Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20030181584 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/209,285
Publication dateSep 25, 2003
Filing dateJul 31, 2002
Priority dateFeb 7, 2002
Also published asCN1311044C, CN1643015A, CN1643015B, CN1643058A, CN1643058B, CN1643101A, DE60306493D1, DE60306493T2, DE60316262D1, DE60316262T2, DE60330119D1, EP1474459A1, EP1474459B1, EP1474495A1, EP1474495B1, EP1483328A1, EP1483328B1, US7267855, US20030181585, WO2003066697A1, WO2003066731A1, WO2003066769A1
Publication number10209285, 209285, US 2003/0181584 A1, US 2003/181584 A1, US 20030181584 A1, US 20030181584A1, US 2003181584 A1, US 2003181584A1, US-A1-20030181584, US-A1-2003181584, US2003/0181584A1, US2003/181584A1, US20030181584 A1, US20030181584A1, US2003181584 A1, US2003181584A1
InventorsHandlin Dale, Carl Willis, Margaret Clawson, Hendrik Groot, Keith Eiden
Original AssigneeKraton Polymers U.S. Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stress-strain response, friction, elongation, tear strength; cap seals
US 20030181584 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to elastomeric articles prepared from novel anionic block copolymers of mono alkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes, and to blends of such block copolymers with other polymers. The block copolymers are selectively hydrogenated and have mono alkenyl arene end blocks and controlled distribution blocks of mono alkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes. The block copolymer may be blended with at least one other polymer selected from the group consisting of olefin polymers, styrene polymers, amorphous resins, and engineering thermoplastic resins.
Images(17)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(30)
What is claimed is:
1. An elastomeric article comprising at least one hydrogenated block copolymer and, optionally, at least one other polymer selected from the group consisting of olefin polymers, styrene polymers, tackifying resins and engineering thermoplastic resins, wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer has the general configuration:
A-B, A-B-A, or (A-B)nX,
where n is an integer from 2 to about 30, and X is coupling agent residue and wherein:
a. prior to hydrogenation each A block is a mono alkenyl arene homopolymer block and each B block is a controlled distribution copolymer block of at least one conjugated diene and at least one mono alkenyl arene;
b. subsequent to hydrogenation about 0-10% of the arene double bonds have been reduced, and at least about 90% of the conjugated diene double bonds have been reduced;
c. each A block having an average molecular weight between about 3,000 and about 60,000 and each B block having an average molecular weight between about 30,000 and about 300,000;
d. each B block comprises one or more terminal regions adjacent to the A blocks that are rich in conjugated diene units and a region not adjacent to the A blocks that is rich in mono alkenyl arene units;
e. the total amount of mono alkenyl arene in the hydrogenated block copolymer is about 15 percent weight to about 75 percent weight; and
f. the weight ratio of conjugated diene to mono alkenyl arene in the B block is between about 5:1 and about 1:2.
2. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein said mono alkenyl arene is styrene and said conjugated diene is selected from the group consisting of isoprene and butadiene.
3. The elastomeric article according to claim 2 wherein said conjugated diene is butadiene, and wherein about 20 to about 80 mol percent of the condensed butadiene units in block B have 1,2-configuration.
4. The elastomeric article according to claim 3 wherein in block B there are fewer than 20 consecutive units of any one monomer between that of each different monomer.
5. The elastomeric article according to claim 4 wherein the polymer is an ABA polymer and each block B has a center region with a minimum ratio of butadiene units to styrene units.
6. The elastomeric article according to claim 2 wherein the styrene blockiness index of the block B is less than about 10 percent, said styrene blockiness index being defined to be the proportion of styrene units in the block B having two styrene neighbors on the polymer chain.
7. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer is an (A-B)nX block copolymer where each A block has an average molecular weight of about 5,000 to about 20,000, each B block has an average molecular weight of about 30,000 to about 100,000, and the total molecular weight is about 80,000 to about 140,000.
8. The elastomeric article according to claim 7 comprising 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 5 to about 50 parts by weight of a polymer extending oil.
9. The elastomeric article according to claim 7 comprising 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 5 to about 50 parts by weight of an olefin polymer selected from the group consisting of ethylene homopolymers, ethylene/alpha olefin copolymers, propylene homopolymers, propylene/alpha olefin copolymers, high impact polypropylene, and ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymers.
10. The elastomeric article according to claim 9 also comprising about 5 to about 50 parts by weight of a tackifying resin.
11. The elastomeric article according to claim 8 also comprising about 5 to about 40 parts by weight of a styrene polymer selected from the group consisting of crystalline polystyrene, high impact polystyrene, syndiotactic polystyrene and acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene terpolymer.
12. The elastomeric article according to claim 7 comprising 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 5 to about 20 parts by weight of an ethylene/vinyl aromatic interpolymer.
13. The elastomeric article according to claim 12 wherein said ethylene/vinyl aromatic interpolymer is a substantially random ethylene/styrene interpolymer.
14. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer is an (A-B)nX block copolymer where each A block has an average molecular weight of about 10,000 to about 40,000, each B block has an average molecular weight of about 60,000 to about 140,000, and the total molecular weight is about 140,000 to about 220,000.
15. The elastomeric article according to claim 14 comprising 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 10 to about 50 parts by weight of an olefin polymer selected from the group consisting of ethylene homopolymers, ethylene/alpha olefin copolymers, propylene homopolymers, propylene/alpha olefin copolymers, high impact polypropylene, and ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymers.
16. The elastomeric article according to claim 15 also comprising about 20 to about 150 parts by weight of a polymer extending oil.
17. The elastomeric article according to claim 14 comprising 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 10 to about 80 parts by weight of at least one polymer selected from the group consisting of poly(phenylene oxides), syndiotactic polystyrene, cyclic olefin copolymers and acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene terpolymers.
18. A formulated elastomeric composition comprising at least one hydrogenated block copolymer and at least one component selected from the group consisting of fillers, reinforcements, polymer extending oils and polyolefins, wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer has the general configuration
A-B, A-B-A, or (A-B)nX,
where n is an integer from 2 to about 30, and X is coupling agent residue and wherein:
a. prior to hydrogenation each A block is a mono alkenyl arene homopolymer block and each B block is a controlled distribution copolymer block of at least one conjugated diene and at least one mono alkenyl arene;
b. subsequent to hydrogenation about 0-10% of the arene double bonds have been reduced, and at least about 90% of the conjugated diene double bonds have been reduced;
c. each A block having an average molecular weight between about 3,000 and about 60,000 and each B block having an average molecular weight between about 30,000 and about 300,000;
d. each B block comprises one or more terminal regions adjacent to the A blocks that are rich in conjugated diene units and a region not adjacent to the A blocks that is rich in mono alkenyl arene units;
e. the total amount of mono alkenyl arene in the hydrogenated block copolymer is about 15 percent weight to about 75 percent weight; and
f. the weight ratio of conjugated diene to mono alkenyl arene in the B block is between about 5:1 and about 1:2.
19. A cap seal formed from the formulated elastomeric composition of claim 18.
20. The cap seal of claim 19 wherein said formulated elastomeric composition comprises 100 parts by weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 50 to about 125 parts by weight of a process extender oil, to 50 parts by weight of polypropylene and optionally 10 to 60 parts by weight silica.
21. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein the article is in the form of a film, sheet, coating, band, strip, profile, molding, foam, tape, fabric, thread, filament, ribbon, fiber, plurality of fibers or, fibrous web.
22. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein said article is formed in a process selected from the group consisting of injection molding, over molding, dipping, extrusion, roto molding, slush molding, fiber spinning, film making or foaming.
23. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 comprising about 5 to 20 percent weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 80 to about 95 percent weight of an engineering thermoplastic resin.
24. The elastomeric article according to claim 23 wherein said engineering thermoplastic resin is selected from the group consisting of thermoplastic polyester, thermoplastic polyurethane, poly(arylether), poly(aryl sulfone), polycarbonate, acrylic resins, acetal resin, polyamide, halogenated thermoplastic and nitrile barrier resin.
25. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer is a functionalized block copolymer.
26. The elastomeric article according to claim 25 wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer has been grafted with an acid compound or its derivative.
27. The elastomeric article according to claim 26 wherein said acid compound or its derivative is selected from the group consisting of maleic anhydride, maleic acid, fumaric acid, and its derivatives.
28. The elastomeric article according to claim 26 wherein said acid compound or its derivative is maleic anhydride or maleic acid.
29. The elastomeric article according to claim 28 containing 75 to 95 weight percent of an engineering thermoplastic selected from the group consisting of polyamides and polyurethanes and 5 to 25 weight percent of the functionalized block polymer.
30. The elastomeric article according to claim 1 comprising about 5 to 40 percent weight of said hydrogenated block copolymer and about 60 to about 95 percent weight of a polystyrene homopolymer or copolymer.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] The present application claims priority from copending, commonly assigned U.S. patent application Serial No. 60/355,210, filed Feb. 7, 2002, entitled Novel Block Copolymers and Method for Making Same.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates to elastomeric articles prepared from novel anionic block copolymers of mono alkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes, and to blends of such block copolymers with other polymers. The invention also relates to formed articles and methods for forming articles from such novel block copolymers.

[0004] 2. Background of the Art

[0005] The preparation of block copolymers of monoalkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes is well known. One of the first patents on linear ABA block copolymers made with styrene and butadiene is U.S. Pat. No. 3,149,182. These polymers in turn could be hydrogenated to form more stable block copolymers, such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,595,942 and Re. No. 27,145. Since then, a large number of new styrene diene polymers have been developed. Now a novel anionic block copolymer based on monoalkenyl arene end blocks and controlled distribution mid blocks of mono alkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes has been discovered and is described in copending, commonly assigned U.S. patent application Serial No. 60/355,210, entitled “NOVEL BLOCK COPOLYMERS AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME”. Methods for making such polymers are described in detail in the above-mentioned patent application. What has now been found is that blends or compounds of these novel block copolymers with processing oils and other polymers have surprising property advantages, and show promising utility in a variety of end-use applications, including injection molding, extruded goods and polymer modification.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] In one aspect of the present invention we have discovered that a novel composition comprising at least one hydrogenated block copolymer having a controlled distribution block of a monoalkenyl arene and conjugated diene, and optionally including another polymer, has superior properties for many applications. We have also discovered that these compositions can be used in various forming processes, and that they also have a number of advantages in processing.

[0007] Accordingly, the broad aspect of the present invention is an elastomeric article comprising at least one hydrogenated block copolymer and, optionally, at least one other polymer selected from the group consisting of olefin polymers, styrene polymers, tackifying resins and engineering thermoplastic resins, wherein said hydrogenated block copolymer has the general configuration: A-B, A-B-A, or (A-B)nX; where n is an integer from 2 to about 30, and X is coupling agent residue and wherein (a.) prior to hydrogenation each A block is a mono alkenyl arene homopolymer block and each B block is a controlled distribution copolymer block of at least one conjugated diene and at least one mono alkenyl arene; (b.) subsequent to hydrogenation about 0-10% of the arene double bonds have been reduced, and at least about 90% of the conjugated diene double bonds have been reduced; (c.) each A block having an average molecular weight between about 3,000 and about 60,000 and each B block having an average molecular weight between about 30,000 and about 300,000; (d.) each B block comprises one or more terminal regions adjacent to the A blocks that are rich in conjugated diene units and a region not adjacent to the A blocks that is rich in mono alkenyl arene units; (e.) the total amount of mono alkenyl arene in the hydrogenated block copolymer is about 20 percent weight to about 80 percent weight; and (f.) the weight ratio of conjugated diene to mono alkenyl arene in the B block is between about 5:1 and about 1:2.

[0008] In another aspect of the present invention we have shown that the elastomeric article can be formed in a wide variety of processes, including injection molding, compression molding, over molding, dipping, extrusion, roto molding, slush molding, fiber spinning, blow molding, polymer modification, cast film making, blown film making and foaming.

[0009] In still another aspect of the present invention, the hydrogenated controlled distribution polymer of the present invention may be functionalized in a variety of ways, including reaction with maleic acid or anhydride. Such functionalized polymers have additional polarity that makes them particularly useful where adhesion to other polar polymers is important, such as in over molding applications.

[0010] The elastomeric articles of the present invention have a number of surprising properties. These properties include, for example, the unusual stress-strain response, which shows that a composition of the present invention exhibits a stiffer rubbery response to strain, therefore requiring more stress to extend the same length. This is an extremely useful property that allows the use of less material to achieve the same force in a given product. Elastic properties are also modified, exhibiting increasing modulus with increasing elongation, and there is a reduced occurrence of the rubbery plateau region where large increases in elongation are required to procure an increase in stress. Another surprising property is reduced coefficient of friction while retaining elastomeric properties. This is important for applications where a soft material is desired without a high friction surface. Still another surprising property is increased tear strength.

[0011] The controlled distribution copolymers of the present invention offer additional advantages in their ability to be easily processed using equipment generally designed for processing thermoplastic polystyrene, which is one of the most widely known and used alkenyl arene polymers. Melt processing can be accomplished via extrusion or injection molding using either single screw or twin screw techniques that are common to the thermoplastics industry. Solution or spin casting techniques can also be used as appropriate. A particularly interesting application is in over molding where a composition containing the controlled distribution block copolymer and optionally other thermoplastic polymers and process aides are injection molded onto a substrate of a more rigid polymer to impart a softer feel or different frictional characteristics. The polymers of the present invention provide improved adhesion to polar polymers. Adhesion to very polar materials such as polyamides or polyurethanes may be further improved by functionalizing the polymer of the present invention, for example with maleic anhydride.

[0012] In yet another aspect of the present invention, the elastomeric article can be processed into the form of a film, sheet, multi layer laminate, coating, band, strip, profile, molding, foam, tape, fabric, thread, filament, ribbon, fiber, plurality of fibers, or fibrous web. Another particularly interesting application is thermoplastic films which retain the processability of styrenic block copolymers but exhibit a higher “elastic power” similar to spandex polyurethanes. As compounded with polyethylene or with a combination of tackifying resin and polyethylene, the controlled distribution copolymers of the present invention can meet these performance expectations. The resultant films show significant improvements in puncture resistance and strength, and reduced viscosity, when compared with common styrene/ethylene-butylene block copolymers. The same controlled distribution styrene/butadiene (25/75 wt/wt) copolymer can also be formulated in a film compound with oil and polystyrene, wherein it exhibits higher strength and improved energy recovery and transparency in comparison with a control formulation based on a styrene/ethylene-butylene/styrene block copolymer. Molding applications formulated using oil and polypropylene have a reduced viscosity and coefficient of friction, and may be used in applications such as cap seals. It should also be possible to produce such cap seals without using undesirable slip agents.

[0013] Finally, the copolymers of the present invention can be compounded with other components not adversely affecting the copolymer properties. Exemplary materials that could be used as additional components would include, without limitation, pigments, antioxidants, stabilizers, surfactants, waxes, and flow promoters. The polymers of the present invention are useful in a wide variety of applications including, for example, molded and extruded goods such as toys, grips, handles, shoe soles, tubing, sporting goods, sealants, gaskets, and oil gels. The compositions also find use as rubber toughening agents for polyolefins, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polyamide, polyurethane, polyester, polycarbonate and epoxy resins. The polymers of the present invention are also useful in alloys and blends, and as compatibilizers for a variety of polymers and other materials. Improved elasticity when compared with conventional styrenic block copolymers makes these copolymers particularly useful for adhesives, including both pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0014] The key component of the present invention is the novel block copolymer containing monoalkenyl arene end blocks and a unique midblock of a monoalkenyl arene and a conjugated diene. Surprisingly, the combination of (1) a unique order for the monomer addition and (2) the use of diethyl ether or other ethers as a component of the solvent (which will be referred to as “randomizing agents”, in keeping with the common usage of the term) results in a certain marked uniformity of the distribution of the two monomers (herein termed a “controlled distribution” polymerization, i.e., a polymerization resulting in a “controlled distribution” structure), and also results in the presence of certain mono alkenyl arene rich regions and certain conjugated diene rich regions in the polymer block. For purposes hereof, “controlled distribution” is defined as referring to a molecular structure lacking well-defined blocks of either monomer, with “runs” of any given single monomer attaining a preferred maximum number average of about 20 units, as shown by either the presence of only a single Tg, intermediate between the Tg's of either monomer alone, when analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (“DSC”) (thermal) methods or via mechanical methods, or as shown via proton nuclear magnetic resonance (“H-NMR”) methods. This controlled distribution structure is very important in maintaining the rubbery properties of the polymer with a single, narrow Tg, because the controlled distribution structure ensures that there is virtually no phase separation of the two monomers, i.e., in contrast with block copolymers in which the monomers actually remain as separate “microphases”, with distinct Tg's, but are actually chemically bonded together which produces much more plastic physical properties. The presence of the arene monomer in the rubber segment allows preferential interactions that improve tensile and tear strength as well as adhesion to styrene containing polymers. The controlled distribution structure assures that only one Tg is present and that, therefore, the thermal performance of the resulting copolymer is predictable and, in fact, predeterminable. Furthermore, when a copolymer having such a controlled distribution structure is then used as one block in a di-block, tri-block or multi-block copolymer, it provides the properties of a rubbery block with the adhesion characteristics of a more polar block. Modification of certain other properties is also achievable.

[0015] It is also an important aspect of the present invention that the subject copolymer block also has three distinct regions—conjugated diene rich regions on the end of the block and adjacent to the A blocks and a mono alkenyl arene rich region not adjacent to the A block and near the middle or center of the block. What is desired is a mono alkenyl arene/conjugated diene controlled distribution copolymer block, wherein the proportion of mono alkenyl arene units increases gradually to a maximum near the middle or center of the block and then decreases gradually until the polymer block is fully polymerized. For sequentially prepared block copolymers A-B-A, the B block will have terminal regions rich in conjugated diene units, and a center region that is rich in mono alkenyl arene units. When the block copolymer is prepared via a coupling route, it will have a structure (A-B)nX. In that case each B block will have at least one region adjacent to the A block that is rich in conjugated diene units. The other end not adjacent to the A block may or may not be rich in conjugated diene units. The remainder of the block will be therefore rich in mono alkenyl arene units.

[0016] Another important aspect of the present invention is to control the microstructure or vinyl content of the conjugated diene in the controlled distribution copolymer block. The term “vinyl content” refers to the fact that a conjugated diene is polymerized via 1,2-addition (in the case of butadiene—it would be 3,4-addition in the case of isoprene). Although a pure “vinyl” group is formed only in the case of 1,2-addition polymerization of 1,3-butadiene, the effects of 3,4-addition polymerization of isoprene (and similar addition for other conjugated dienes) on the final properties of the block copolymer will be similar. The term “vinyl” refers to the presence of a pendant vinyl group on the polymer chain. When referring to the use of butadiene as the conjugated diene, it is preferred that about 20 to about 80 mol percent of the condensed butadiene units in the copolymer block have 1,2 vinyl configuration. Preferably about 30 to about 70 mol percent of the condensed butadiene units should have 1,2 configuration. This is effectively controlled by varying the relative amount of the randomization agent. As will be appreciated, the randomization agent serves two purposes—it creates the controlled distribution of the mono alkenyl arene and conjugated diene, and also controls the microstructure of the conjugated diene. Suitable ratios of randomization agent to lithium are disclosed and taught in U.S. Pat. Re No. 27,145.

[0017] Regarding the monomers used in preparing the novel controlled distribution copolymers of the present invention, the alkenyl arene can be selected from styrene, alpha-methylstyrene, para-methylstyrene, vinylnaphthalene, and para-butyl styrene, including mixtures thereof. Of these, styrene is most preferred and is commercially available, and relatively inexpensive, from a variety of manufacturers. The conjugated dienes for use herein are 1,3-butadiene and substituted butadienes such as isoprene, piperylene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, and 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene, or mixtures thereof. Of these, 1,3-butadiene is most preferred.

[0018] As discussed above, the controlled distribution polymer block has diene rich region(s) adjacent to the A block and an arene rich region not adjacent to the A block, and typically near the center of the block. Typically the region adjacent to the A block comprises the first 15 to 25% of the block and comprises the diene rich region(s), with the remainder considered to be arene rich. The term “diene rich” means that the region has a measurably higher ratio of diene to arene than the arene rich region. Another way to express this is the proportion of mono alkenyl arene units increases gradually along the polymer chain to a maximum near the middle or center of the block (if we are describing an ABA structure) and then decreases gradually until the polymer block is fully polymerized. For the controlled distribution block the weight ratio of conjugated diene to mono alkenyl arene is between about 5:1 and about 1:2, preferably between about 3:1 and about 1:1.

[0019] A particular feature of the present invention is that the resultant copolymer is relatively uniform in its distribution of the two monomers within a polymer chain, thus offering the improvements in Tg and property modification suggested by the identity of the starting monomers. A proton (hydrogen) nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) procedure may preferably be used to assay for this advantageous controlled distribution, using techniques known to those skilled in the art. Alternatively, a DSC method may be used as an assay, determining the controlled structure of the polymerization by confirming the presence of a desired single Tg as is characteristic of a controlled distribution copolymer.

[0020] The potential for blockiness can also be inferred from measurement of the UV-visible absorbance in a wavelength range suitable for the detection of polystyrillithium end groups during the polymerization of the B block. A sharp and substantial increase in this value is indicative of a substantial increase in polystyrillithium chain ends. In this process, this will only occur if the conjugated diene concentration drops below the critical level to maintain controlled distribution polymerization. Any styrene monomer that is present at this point will add in a blocky fashion. The term “styrene blockiness” is defined to be the proportion of S units in the polymer having two S nearest neighbors on the polymer chain. Expressed thus, Polymer-Bd-S-(S)n-S-Bd-Polymer, where n greater than zero is defined to be blocky styrene. For example, if n equals 8 in the example above, then the blockiness index would be 80%.

[0021] As used herein, “thermoplastic block copolymer” is defined as a block copolymer having at least a first block of a mono alkenyl arene, such as styrene and a second block of a controlled distribution copolymer of diene and mono alkenyl arene. The method to prepare this thermoplastic block copolymer is via any of the methods generally known for block polymerizations. The present invention includes as an embodiment a thermoplastic copolymer composition, which may be either a di-block, tri-block copolymer or multi-block composition. In the case of the di-block copolymer composition, one block is the alkenyl arene-based homopolymer block and polymerized therewith is a second block of a controlled distribution copolymer of diene and alkenyl arene. In the case of the tri-block composition, it comprises, as end-blocks the glassy alkenyl arene-based homopolymer and as a mid-block the controlled distribution copolymer of diene and alkenyl arene. Where a tri-block copolymer composition is prepared, the controlled distribution diene/alkenyl arene copolymer can be herein designated as “B” and the alkenyl arene-based homopolymer designated as “A”.

[0022] The A-B-A, tri-block compositions can be made by either sequential polymerization or coupling. In the sequential solution polymerization technique, the mono alkenyl arene is first introduced to produce the relatively hard aromatic block, followed by introduction of the controlled distribution diene/alkenyl arene mixture to form the mid block, and then followed by introduction of the mono alkenyl arene to form the terminal block. In addition to the linear, A-B-A configuration, the blocks can be structured to form a radial (branched) polymer, (A-B)nX, or both types of structures can be combined in a mixture. Some A-B diblock polymer can be present but preferably at least about 70 weight percent of the block copolymer is A-B-A or radial (or otherwise branched so as to have 2 or more terminal resinous blocks per molecule) so as to impart strength.

[0023] It is also important to control the molecular weight of the various blocks. For an AB diblock, desired block weights are 3,000 to about 60,000 for the mono alkenyl arene A block, and 30,000 to about 300,000 for the controlled distribution conjugated diene/mono alkenyl arene B block. Preferred ranges are 5000 to 45,000 for the A block and 50,000 to about 250,000 for the B block. For the triblock, which may be a sequential ABA or coupled (AB)2X block copolymer, the A blocks should be 3,000 to about 60,000, preferably 5000 to about 45,000, while the B block for the sequential block should be about 30,000 to about 300,000, and the B blocks (two) for the coupled polymer half that amount. The total average molecular weight for the triblock copolymer should be from about 40,000 to about 400,000, and for the radial copolymer from about 60,000 to about 600,000. These molecular weights are most accurately determined by light scattering measurements.

[0024] An important feature of the thermoplastic elastomeric di-block and tri-block polymers of the present invention, including one or more controlled distribution diene/alkenyl arene copolymer blocks and one or more mono alkenyl arene blocks, is that they have at least two Tg's, the lower being the combined Tg of the controlled distribution copolymer block which is an intermediate of its constituent monomers' Tg's. Such Tg is preferably at least about −60 degrees C., more preferably from about −40 degrees C. to about zero degrees C., and most preferably from about −40 degrees C. to about −10 degrees C. The second Tg, that of the mono alkenyl arene “glassy” block, is preferably more than about 80 degrees C. , more preferably from about 80 degrees C. to about 105 degrees C. The presence of the two Tg's, illustrative of the microphase separation of the blocks, contributes to the notable elasticity and strength of the material in a wide variety of applications, and its ease of processing and desirable melt-flow characteristics.

[0025] The block copolymer is selectively hydrogenated. Hydrogenation can be carried out via any of the several hydrogenation or selective hydrogenation processes known in the prior art. For example, such hydrogenation has been accomplished using methods such as those taught in, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,494,942; 3,634,594; 3,670,054; 3,700,633; and Re. No. 27,145. Hydrogenation can be carried out under such conditions that at least about 90 percent of the conjugated diene double bonds have been reduced, and between zero and 10 percent of the arene double bonds have been reduced. Preferred ranges are at least about 95 percent of the conjugated diene double bonds reduced, and more preferably about 98 percent of the conjugated diene double bonds are reduced. Alternatively, it is possible to hydrogenate the polymer such that aromatic unsaturation is also reduced beyond the 10 percent level mentioned above. In that case, the double bonds of both the conjugated diene and arene may be reduced by 90 percent or more.

[0026] In an alternative, the block copolymer of the present invention may be functionalized in a number of ways. One way is by treatment with an unsaturated monomer having one or more functional groups or their derivatives, such as carboxylic acid groups and their salts, anhydrides, esters, imide groups, amide groups, and acid chlorides. The preferred monomers to be grafted onto the block copolymers are maleic anhydride, maleic acid, fumaric acid, and their derivatives. A further description of functionalizing such block copolymers can be found in Gergen et al, U.S. Pat. No. 4,578,429 and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,506,299. In another manner the selectively hydrogenated block copolymer of the present invention may be functionalized by grafting silicon or boron containing compounds to the polymer as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 4,882,384. In still another manner, the block copolymer of the present invention may be contacted with an alkoxy-silane compound to form silane-modified block copolymer. In yet another manner, the block copolymer of the present invention may be functionalized by grafting at least one ethylene oxide molecule to the polymer as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 4,898,914, or by reacting the polymer with carbon dioxide as taught in U.S. pat. No. 4,970,265. Still further, the block copolymers of the present invention may be metallated as taught in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,206,300 and 5,276,101, wherein the polymer is contacted with an alkali metal alkyl, such as a lithium alkyl. And still further, the block copolymers of the present invention may be functionalized by grafting sulfonic groups to the polymer as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 5,516,831.

[0027] One of the surprising compositions of the present invention is the combination of the hydrogenated block copolymer and a polymer extending oil. While in the absence of oil, these polymers exhibit a stiffer elastomeric behavior than a traditional triblock polymer, in the presence of oil, they exhibit a softer elastomeric behavior. Especially preferred are the types of oil that are compatible with the elastomeric segment of the block copolymer. While oils of higher aromatics content are satisfactory, those petroleum-based white oils having low volatility and less than 50% aromatic content are preferred. The oils should additionally have low volatility, preferable having an initial boiling point above about 500° F. The amount of oil employed varies from about 0 to about 300 parts by weight per hundred parts by weight rubber, or block copolymer, preferably about 20 to about 150 parts by weight.

[0028] The block copolymers of the present invention may be blended with a large variety of other polymers, including olefin polymers, styrene polymers, tackifying resins, and engineering thermoplastic resins.

[0029] Olefin polymers include, for example, ethylene homopolymers, ethylene/alpha-olefin copolymers, propylene homopolymers, propylene/alpha-olefin copolymers, high impact polypropylene, butylene homopolymers, butylene/alpha olefin copolymers, and other alpha olefin copolymers or interpolymers. Representative polyolefins include, for example, but are not limited to, substantially linear ethylene polymers, homogeneously branched linear ethylene polymers, heterogeneously branched linear ethylene polymers, including linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE), ultra or very low density polyethylene (ULDPE or VLDPE), medium density polyethylene (MDPE), high density polyethylene (HDPE) and high pressure low density polyethylene (LDPE). Other polymers included hereunder are ethylene/acrylic acid (EEA) copolymers, ethylene/methacrylic acid (EMAA) ionomers, ethylene/vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymers, ethylene/vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymers, ethylene/cyclic olefin copolymers, polypropylene homopolymers and copolymers, propylene/styrene copolymers, ethylene/propylene copolymers, polybutylene, ethylene carbon monoxide interpolymers (for example, ethylene/carbon monoxide (ECO) copolymer, ethylene/acrylic acid/carbon monoxide terpolymer and the like. Still other polymers included hereunder are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and blends of PVC with other materials.

[0030] Styrene polymers include, for example, crystal polystyrene, high impact polystyrene, medium impact polystyrene, styrene/acrylonitrile copolymers, styrene/acrylonitrile/butadiene (ABS) polymers, syndiotactic polystyrene and styrene/olefin interpolymers. Representative styrene/olefin interpolymers are substantially random ethylene/styrene interpolymers, preferably containing at least 20, more preferably equal to or greater than 25 weight percent interpolymerized styrene monomer.

[0031] For the purposes of the specification and claims, the term “engineering thermoplastic resin” encompasses the various polymers found in the classes listed in Table A below, and further defined in U.S. Pat. No. 4,107,131, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

TABLE A
1. Thermoplastic Polyester
2. Thermoplastic Polyurethane
3. Poly(aryl ether) and Poly(aryl sulfone)
4. Polycarbonate
5. Acetal resin
6. Polyamide
7. Halogenated thermoplastic
8. Nitrile barrier resin
9. Poly(methyl methacrylate)

[0032] Tackifying resins include polystyrene block compatible resins and midblock compatible resins. The polystyrene block compatible resin may be selected from the group of coumarone-indene resin, polyindene resin, poly(methyl indene) resin, polystyrene resin, vinyltoluene-alphamethylstyrene resin, alphamethylstyrene resin and polyphenylene ether, in particular poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether). Such resins are e.g. sold under the trademarks “HERCURES”, “ENDEX”, “KRISTALEX”, “NEVCHEM” and “PICCOTEX”. Resins compatible with the hydrogenated (mid) block may be selected from the group consisting of compatible Cs hydrocarbon resins, hydrogenated C5 hydrocarbon resins, styrenated C5 resins, C5/C9 resins, styrenated terpene resins, fully hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated Cg hydrocarbon resins, rosins esters, rosins derivatives and mixtures thereof. These resins are e.g. sold under the trademarks “REGALITE”, “REGALREZ”, “ESCOREZ” and “ARKON”. The resin employed will typically have a viscosity at 350° F., of no more than 300 centipoise.

[0033] The polymer blends of the present invention may be compounded further with other polymers, oils, fillers, reinforcements, antioxidants, stabilizers, fire retardants, antiblocking agents, lubricants and other rubber and plastic compounding ingredients without departing from the scope of this invention.

[0034] Examples of various fillers that can be employed are found in the 1971-1972 Modern Plastics Encyclopedia, pages 240-247. A reinforcement may be defined simply as the material that is added to a resinous matrix to improve the strength of the polymer. Most of these reinforcing materials are inorganic or organic products of high molecular weight. Various examples include glass fibers, asbestos, boron fibers, carbon and graphite fibers, whiskers, quartz and silica fibers, ceramic fibers, metal fibers, natural organic fibers, and synthetic organic fibers. Especially preferred are reinforced polymer blends of the instant invention containing about 2 to about 80 percent by weight glass fibers, based on the total weight of the resulting reinforced blend. Coupling agents, such as various silanes, may be employed in the preparation of the reinforced blends.

[0035] Regarding the relative amounts of the various ingredients, this will depend in part upon the particular end use and on the particular block copolymer that is selected for the particular end use. Table B below shows some notional compositions expressed in percent weight, which are included in the present invention:

TABLE B
Applications, Compositions and Ranges
Application Ingredients Composition % w.
Films, Molding, Alloys Polymer  1-99%
Ethylene copolymers:  99-1%
EVA, Ethylene/styrene
Personal Hygiene Films Polymer  0-75%
and Fibers PE  0-30%
PP  0-30%
Tackifying Resin  5-30%
End Block Resin  5-20%
Personal Hygiene Films Polymer  50-90%
and Fibers PE  5-30%
Tackifying Resin  0-40%
Personal Hygiene Films Polymer  45-85%
and Fibers PS  10-25%
Oil  5-30%
Injection Molded articles Polymer  25-85%
Polyolefin  5-50%
Oil  10-50%
Injection molded/extrusion Polymer  55-90%
PPO  10-50%
PS  10-50%
Engineering Plastic  10-50%
Oil  0-50%
Cap Seals Polymer  25-60%
Oil  25-50%
PP  10-30%
Filler  0-25%
Lubricant 0 to 3%
Engineering Thermoplastic Polymer or Maleated  5-30%
toughening Polymer Engineering  70-95%
thermoplastic,
e.g. Nylon 6,6, TPU
Asphalt Modification Polymer  2-15%
Asphalt  85-98%
Dipped Goods Polymer 60-100%
Plasticizer, oil  0-40%
Polymer Modification Polymer  5-30%
ABS, PS, HIPS  70-95%

[0036] The polymer of the present invention may be used in a large number of applications, either as a neat polymer or in a compound. The following various end uses and/or processes are meant to be illustrative, and not limiting to the present invention:

[0037] Polymer modification applications

[0038] Injection molding of toys, medical devices

[0039] Extruding films, tubing, profiles

[0040] Over molding applications for personal care, grips, soft touch applications, for automotive parts, such as airbags, steering wheels, etc

[0041] Dipped goods, such as gloves

[0042] Thermoset applications, such as in sheet molding compounds or bulk molding compounds for trays

[0043] Roto molding for toys and other articles

[0044] Slush molding of automotive skins

[0045] Thermal spraying for coatings

[0046] Blown film for medical devices

[0047] Blow molding for automotive/industrial parts

[0048] Asphalt modification

[0049] Films and fibers for personal hygiene applications

EXAMPLES

[0050] The following examples are provided to illustrate the present invention. The examples are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention and they should not be so interpreted. Amounts are in weight parts or weight percentages unless otherwise indicated.

Example 1

[0051] Various controlled distribution block copolymers of the present invention were prepared according to the process disclosed in copending patent application Serial No. 60/355,210 referenced above. All polymers were selectively hydrogenated linear ABA block copolymers where the A blocks were polystyrene blocks and the B block prior to hydrogenation was a styrene butadiene controlled distribution block having terminal regions that are rich in butadiene units and a center region that was rich in styrene units. The various polymers are shown in Table 1 below. These polymers were then used in the various applications described in the other Examples. Step I MW is the molecular weight of the first A block, Step II MW is the molecular weight of the AB blocks and Step III MW is the molecular weight of the ABA blocks. The polymers were hydrogenated such that greater than about 95% of the diene double bonds have been reduced.

TABLE 1
Controlled Distribution Polymers
% Sty- 1,2-
Polymer Step I Step II Step III rene in Styrene BD PSC
Number MW(k) MW(k) MW(k) Step II Blockiness (%) (%)
1 10.5 106.3 118.6 12.6 65.6 34.5 29.75
2 10.5 98.6 110.8 12.5 65 38 29.53
3 9.2 90.6 99.9 24.9 50 35.8 40.12
4 9.7 92.3 102.8 37.6 43 35.3 48.3
5 13.9 140.8 158.2 37.6 43 35 50.15
6 10.6 101.4 112.6 25.1 49 36.2 40
7 10.3 99.3 111.9 25.2 51 37.1 40.31
8 8.2 91.2 98.9 25.1 43.9 37 37
9 32 162 194.8 37.8 58 34.3 58.1
10 29.4 159.4 189.2 50 49 33.6 65.8
11 24 120.9 145.8 40 59 33.6 58.9
12 30.3 164.3 196.8 24 65 35.4 48.2
13 29.9 163.3 195.9 38 57 34.5 58.2
14 8.4 88.5 95.8 25 46 36.1 38.3
15 9 86.8 95.5 25 48 35.9 39.3

Example 2

[0052] In this example three different block copolymers were compounded with varying amounts of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) and the compounds were extruded into films. One of the block copolymers was a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (KRATON G 1652) and the other two block copolymers were controlled distribution block copolymers #14 and #15. The relative amounts and test results are shown in Table 2 below. As shown in Table 2, adding 20% KRATON polymer to EVA increases impact resistance, decreases hysteresis set and increases recoverable energy in films. The improved impact resistance is important to reduce failure of a film from an external force, such as dropping. The increased recoverable energy and decreased hysteresis set is desirable for improved elasticity of a film. The advantage of polymers 14 and 15 over G11652 shows in the increased isotropic behavior seen in the Elmendorf Tear data. Isotropic tear is advantageous in film applications where straight tear along a seam is necessary, such as food wrap or wrapping for sterile surgical kits.

TABLE 2
Compound Unit Direction EVA 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5
Block Copolymer Type # 14 # 15 G-1652 # 15 G-1652
Block Copolymer Amount %/wt  0% 20% 20% 20% 80% 80%
EVA Copolymer Amount %/wt 100% 80% 80% 80% 20% 20%
Property
Tensile Properties
Tensile psi MD 4727 3855 3846 4072 3344 6392
TD 4979 3752 3933 4023 3102 6889
Ultimate elongation % MD 655 601 603 630 698 839
TD 885 782 781 758 812 765
100% modulus psi MD 737 570 663 574 404 385
TD 532 416 484 509 299 535
300% modulus psi MD 1423 1055 1202 1044 683 638
TD 797 622 724 763 439 1003
Elmendorf Tear g/mil MD 81.9 24.9 26.9 31.7 16.1 80.6
TD 128.3 22.2 25.8 51.4 47.2 130.8
Impact resistance in-lbf/mls 4.7 no failure no failure no failure no failure No failure
Cyclic hysteresis to
100% extension
Stress at 100% psi MD 475 466 492 511 338 444
extension
TD 358 387 379 399 254 277
Recoverable energy % MD 33.4 41.6 42.8 43.3 64.1 48.1
after 1 cycle
TD 32.6 44.3 42.3 41.6 68.3 63
Hysteresis set @ 1 % MD 29.3 18.5 17 15 11 11
cycle
TD 36.1 16.4 18.5 19.1 11.7 9.9
Cyclic hysteresis to
300% extension
Stress at 300% psi MD 958 941 818 987 504 667
extension
TD 539 554 458 568 384 462
Recoverable energy % MD 13.5 19.3 18.3 18.6 50.7 40.1
after 1 cycle
TD 16 23.5 21.8 22.3 57.8 51.5
Hysteresis set @ 1 % MD 190 133 141 141 37 32.7
cycle
TD 186 125 139 134 34.6 27.4

Example 3

[0053] In this example three different block copolymers were compounded with varying amounts of a propylene homopolymer (Valtec HH442H PP), a low-density polyethylene (Petrothene NA601-04) and two different resins (Regalite R-1125 and Kristalex F-100). Regalite R-1125 is a midblock-compatible resin, and Kristalex F-100 is a styrene containing end block resin. The block copolymers were controlled distribution block copolymers #14 and #15, and a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (KRATON G 1657).

[0054] The compounds were formed into fibers and tested. Table 3 below shows the compounds used and the test results. As shown in Table 3 Polymers 14 and 15 exhibit lower permanent set and retain their properties better under stress, as shown by the stress-decay values, than normal SEBS triblock copolymers. This is true for simple blends with LDPE and PP (examples 3-1 to 3-6) and in more complex formulations with resins (examples 3-7 and 3-8).

TABLE 3A
Compound Number
Formulation, % weight 3-1 3-2 3-3 3-4 3-5 3-6
Kraton G-1657 75 75
Polymer #14 75 75
Polymer #15 75 75
Valtec HH442H PP 25 25 25
Petrothene NA601-04 LDPE 25 25 25
MFR (230° C./2.16 kg) 29 10.2 9.5 22 7.6 7.3
Fiber Data
 50% modulus, MPa 1.5 1.70 1.77 3.5 2.32 4.10
100% modulus, MPa 1.8 2.08 2.14 3.8 3.19 5.10
 50% modulus at 1.33 1.43 1.49 2 2.16 3.66
40° C., MPa
 50% modulus at 40° C. after 0.72 0.83 0.92 0.51 1.10 1.69
2 hrs Mpa
Stress-decay, (%) 46 42 38 75 49 54
Permanent set (%) 12 10 11 16 11.5 21

[0055]

TABLE 3B
Compound Number
Formulation, % weight 3-7 3-8
Kraton G-1657
Polymer #14 65
Polymer #15 65
Valtec HH442H PP 15 15
Petrothene NA601-04 LDPE
Regalite R-1125 resin 10 10
Kristalex F-100 resin 10 10
MFR (230° C./2.16 kg) 12.4 11.5
Fiber Data
 50% modulus, Mpa 1.39 1.68
100% modulus, Mpa 1.85 2.23
 50% modulus at 40° C., MPa 1.30 1.43
 50% modulus at 40° C. after 2 hours, 0.79 0.89
Mpa
Stress-decay (%) 39 38
Permanent set (%) 7.5 8.5

Example 4

[0056] In this example three different block copolymers were compounded with mineral oil (Drakeol 34 mineral oil) and crystal polystyrene (EA3000). The block copolymers were controlled distribution block copolymers #3 and #4, and a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (GRP 6926). All three of the block copolymers had approximately the same molecular weights for the end blocks and mid block. The various components were compounded and then formed into films, and tested. The amounts are expressed in percent weight. The various formulations and test results are shown below in Table 4. As shown in Table 4 the modulus and hysteresis values for the comparison example 4-1 vary by almost a factor of two between the machine direction, MD, and transverse direction, TD. This indicates a high degree of orientation during film casting resulting in film with highly anistropic properties and dimensional instability. By comparison examples 4-2 and 4-3 show a much smaller difference in Modulus, recoverable energy and permanent set at all elongations between the MD and TD directions. The values of recoverable energy and permanent set in the MD for examples 4-2 and 4-3 are surprisingly low, indicating a much more elastic film than a traditional SEBS triblock copolymer.

TABLE 4A
Compound Number
4-1 4-2 4-3
Formulation % % %
GRP 6926 SEBS 58.4
Polymer #3 58.83
Polymer #4 58.83
G1650
Drakeol 34 mineral oil 23.66 23.81 23.81
EA3000 Polystyrene 17.94 17.35 17.35
Tensile
Max. Stress, psi TD 3716 3503 3580
Max. Stress, psi MD 3151 3831 3196
Ultimate Elongation, % TD 931 790 708
Ultimate Elongation, % MD 829 756 656
 50% Modulus, psi TD 118 103 96
 50% Modulus, psi MD 271 119 104
100% Modulus, psi TD 148 138 129
100% Modulus, psi MD 341 165 148
200% Modulus, psi TD 210 210 200
200% Modulus, psi MD 480 271 257
300% Modulus, psi TD 291 327 324
300% Modulus, psi MD 630 447 458
500% Modulus, psi TD 593 913 1030
500% Modulus, psi MD 1080 1270 1393
100% TD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 100% extension, psi 136.4 212.5 144.8
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 79.4 89.1 88.6
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 4.9 4.7 4.9
100% MD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 100% extension, psi 379.5 144.7 175.5
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 46.3 86.4 85.5
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 8.7 4.9 4.8

[0057]

TABLE 4B
Compound Number
4-1 4-2 4-3
% % %
200% TD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 200% extension, psi 231.7 225.2 166.9
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 73.3 88.9 87.3
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 8.6 7.4 8.9
200% MD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 200% extension, psi 610.8 301.5 223.7
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 40.3 82.8 81 .3
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 16.4 7.5 8.7
300% TD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 200% extension, psi 278.6 298.3 347.2
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 68.2 87.3 85
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 13.2 9.1 11.1
300% MD Hysteresis (75 F)
(10 in/min)
Stress @ 200% extension, psi 609.6 436.7 541.7
Recoverable energy @ cycle 1, % 36.5 78 75.2
Hysteresis set @ cycle 1, % 25.4 9.6 11.3
Stress Relaxation @ 150%, TD
(20 in/min) @ 100 F for 60 min
Max Stress, psi 196.4 152.8 140.62
Stress @ 1 hr, psi 152.7 128 115.2
% Relaxation, % 22 16.2 18.1
Stress Relaxation @ 150%, MD
(20 in/min) @ 100 F for 60 min.
Max Stress, psi 395 175 183
Stress @ 1 hr, psi 269 142 122
% Relaxation, % 32 18.9 33.44

Example 5

[0058] In this example two different controlled distribution block copolymers (#13 and #3) were compounded with two different ethylene styrene interpolymers, which interpolymers were made with a metallocene catalyst and had a random structure. These interpolymers were Dow 2900TE having a styrene content of 34.2% w and Dow 2901 TE, having a styrene content of 72.7% w. The various components were mixed in a Brabender mixer and then formed into compression-molded films. The various formulations and results are shown below in Table 5. As shown in Table 5 the addition of 2900TE to Polymer #3 increases strength across the complete composition range from 90/10 to 10/90 while retaining high elongation. Surprisingly, Examples 5-2 through 5-4 are transparent with excellent hysteresis recovery and low permanent set. The higher styrene content of 2901 TE produces opaque compounds (examples 5-8 through 5-13) that still retain high strength and elongation across the range. The addition of polymer #13 to 2900TE, examples 5-15 to 5-17, decreases permanent set and improves hysteresis recovery and elongation without loss of tensile strength. Examples 5-2 through 5-6 have the unexpected benefit of having higher tensile strength than the two polymers of which they are composed.

TABLE 5A
Molded Films
FORMULATION(% weight): 5-1 5-2 5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6 5-7
Polymer #13
Polymer #3 100 90 80 50 30 20 10
2900 TE 10 20 50 70 80 90
2901 TE
AO 330 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Properties:
Stress-Strain
Max. Stress, psi 4106.0 6118 6088 8014 6494 6647 5901
Ultimate Elongation, % 789 840 829 794 739 741 695
 50% Modulus, psi 236 285 395 314 454 485 466
100% Modulus, psi 308 346 464 408 566 604 599
200% Modulus, psi 459 480 624 599 785 849 862
300% Modulus, psi 680 672 848 891 1159 1254 1302
500% Modulus, psi 1402 1501 1898 2192 2816 2793 3071
100% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 372.9 271.3 346.2 363.9 452 491.9 515.7
Perm. Set, % 7.5 7.4 8.6 9.7 10.3 10.3 10.4
1st Cycle Recovery, % 67.7 74 67.7 66.4 63.1 62.5 60.7
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 297 228 284 286 356 387 408
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 197 168 187 177 204 218 221
Stress @ 50% Ext.2nd load, psi 214 186 215 222 265 287 298
Stress @ 50% Ext.2nd Unload, psi 190 163 180 170 195 208 210
2nd Cycle Recovery, % 90.5 89.7 87.2 82.3 80.4 79.8 78.6
300% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 500.4 533.6 537.6 711.8 864.3 914.4 968.2
Perm. Set, % 15.4 20.1 26.6 53.8 79.1 89.4 102
1st Cycle Recovery, % 69.4 65.1 58.8 43.7 34.8 32.7 29.9
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 215.4 234.3 240.4 290.7 379.7 404.6 429.8
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 97.4 81.7 60.2 n/a n/a n/a n/a
100% Cyc-1 Load Stress, psi 267.7 282.7 289.5 366.1 473.9 506.3 533.4
100% Stress Cyc-1 Unload, psi 161.6 152.6 129.9 78.8 39.8 22.2 n/a

[0059]

TABLE 5B
Molded Films
FORMULATION(% weight): 5-8 5-9 5-10 5-11 5-12 5-13
Polymer #13
Polymer #3 90 80 50 30 20 10
2900 TE
2901 TE 10 20 50 70 80 90
AO 330 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Properties:
Stress-Strain
Max. Stress, psi 4721 5450 4089 4121 4581 4820
Ultimate Elongation, % 749 689 443 398 396 376
 50% Modulus, psi 328 282 252 329 364 371
100% Modulus, psi 392 350 357 458 531 592
200% Modulus, psi 550 534 719 968 1218 1534
300% Modulus, psi 790 862 1748 2569 3056 3349
500% Modulus, psi 1842 2584 n/a N/A N/A N/A
100% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 317.3 292.6 355.5 359 426.6 555.6
Perm. Set, % 11.4 15.2 24.7 31.8 33.3 40
1st Cycle Recovery, % 66.6 62.1 50.4 42.7 37.9 30
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 256 240 254 243 289 371
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 168 144 115 83 81 60
Stress @50% Ext.2nd load, psi 196 186 223 222 247 281
Stress @50% Ext.2nd Unload, psi 160 135 100 59 54 31
2nd Cycle Recovery, % 85.5 79 57.8 46.1 43.1 38.5
300% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 648.4 788.3 2073.7 2315.6 2849.1 2735.3
Perm. Set, % 26.4 32.9 53 69.2 78.2 95.2
1st Cycle Recovery, % 60.1 55.7 35.5 30.4 26.8 22.7
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 260.5 274 269.8 281.7 337.7 360.2
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 71.1 53.4 n/a n/a n/a n/a
100% Cyc-1 Load Stress, psi 321.6 330.7 366.7 398 487.2 528.5
100% Stress Cyc-1 Unload, psi 154.9 144 112.7 73.8 59.9 14.2

[0060]

TABLE 5C
Molded Films
FORMULATION(% weight): 5-14 5-15 5-16 5-17 5-18 5-19
Polymer #13 100 30 20 10
Polymer #3
2900 TE 70 80 90 100
2901 TE 100
AO 330 0.2 0.2 0.2
Properties:
Stress-Strain
Max. Stress, psi 5260.5 6232 6379 5487 5916 4209
Ultimate Elongation, % 714.5 722.5 703 675 662 302
 50% Modulus, psi 497.5 495.5 522 534 438 372
100% Modulus, psi 543 607.5 649 659.5 582 626
200% Modulus, psi 772.5 851.5 916 927.5 876 1851
300% Modulus, psi 1170 1254 1379 1364 1344 n/a
500% Modulus, psi 2611 2727 3010 2872 2932 n/a
100% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 490.4 468.2 489 532.3 543.6 613.8
Perm. Set, % 20.4 15 14.1 14.5 13 40.9
1st Cycle Recovery, % 39.4 54.6 55.2 53.6 55.3 30.5
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 456 373 389 423 424 366
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 162 178 187 195 201 54
Stress @ 50% Ext.2nd load, psi 263 265 280 298 295 278
Stress @ 50% Ext.2nd Unload, psi 152 167 178 186 191 29
2nd Cycle Recovery, % 67 73.7 73.8 73 75.1 39.3
300% Hysteresis:
Max. stress, psi 921 933.1 943.8 1046.2 1013.2 *samples broke,
exceeded limits
Perm. Set, % 42.3 93.5 102.2 108.3 113.6
1st Cycle Recovery, % 38.9 30 29.5 28.3 28.3
Load Stress 50% ext., psi 452.1 408 413.5 460.7 409.7
Unload Stress 50% ext., psi 25.2 n/a n/a n/a n/a
100% Cyc-1 Load Stress, psi 487 500.1 511.1 569.1 526.3
100% Stress Cyc-1 Unload, psi 119.5 13.9 6.5 n/a n/a

Example 6

[0061] In this example one controlled distribution block copolymer (#9) was compared against a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (KRATON G 1651) in various compounds with extending oil and polypropylene homopolymer. The various formulations and results are shown below in Table 6. As shown in Table 6, compositions made with polymer #9 have much improved melt flows compared with compositions made with G-1651. Surprisingly, the tensile strengths of compositions made with polymer #9 are almost the same in the machine and transverse directions in the mold when compared to G-1651 compositions. This means that parts formed by injection molding or extrusion will fill the mold better, have much less tendency to warp when exposed to heat, and will have more uniform properties when Polymer #9 is substituted for G-1651. This stability means they will have opportunities for use in medical applications.

TABLE 6
Compound #
6-1 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-6
Polymer Type
Formulation #9 G-1651 #9 G-1651 #9 G-1651
Polymer phr 100 100 100 100 100 100
PP Pm6100 phr 25 25 50 50 75 75
Oil phr 90 90 140 140 90 90
Properties
MFR 200° C./5 kg g/10 min 5.6 0.1 120 26 30 7
Hardness Shore A 30 sec 43 55 53 61 82 85
Resilience % 52 55 47 46 46 43
Din Abrasion mm3 285 110 244 95 146 65
Tensile properties
Mod 300% MD MPa 2.5 4 2.5 4 5.9 7
Mod 300% PMD MPa 2.2 3 2.4 3 5.2 5
Tensile Strength MD MPa 6.6 4 3 5 8.5 10
Tensile Strength PMD MPa 8.1 13 2.9 12 9.6 21
Elongation at Break MD % 700 330 450 510 520 500
Elongation at Break PMD % 805 780 470 790 615 805
Trouser tear MD kN/m 9.6 7 6.9 9 17.5 18
Trouser tear PMD kN/m 8.9 8 7.8 10 23 21

Example 7

[0062] In this example two different controlled distribution block copolymers (#11 and #9) were compared against two different selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymers (KRATON G 1651 and 1654) in oiled compounds. The extending oil used was Primol 352. To the oil and polymer were added various other components including polypropylene, poly(phenylene oxide) (Blendex HPP857), polystyrene, syndiotactic polystyrene (MA405), cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 6017) and ABS (Terluran 967 K). The various formulations and results are shown below in Table 7. As shown in Table 7 compositions based on polymers #9 and 11 are more isotropic than the comparison polymer while maintaining a good balance of properties. They can also be blended with a variety of engineering thermoplastics to yield a good balance of isotropic properties.

TABLE 7A
Compound
7-1 7-2 7-3 7-4 7-5 7-6 7-7 7-8 7-9
Polymer #11 100 100 100 100 100 100
Polymer #9 100
G1651 100
G1654 100
Primol 352 80 80 80 80 80 110 110 110 110
PP (MFR = 5.5) 45 45 45 45
PPO (Blendex HPP857) 40
PS 144C 40
Syndiotactic PS (MA 405) 40
COC (Topas 6017) 40
ABS (Terluran 967 K) 40
Presence of IPN no no no yes no yes yes yes yes
Hardness, Shore A 74 50 40 52 50 59 61 64 63
30 sec
Compression set, %
 70° C./24 hrs 65 73 84 82 83 54/56 56/65 42 48/50
100° C./24 hrs 97 100 100 100 100 84 97 62 81

[0063]

TABLE 7B
Compound
7-1 7-2 7-3 7-4 7-5 7-6 7-7 7-8 7-9
Stress strain properties MD
300% Modulus, MPa 4.9 5.3 4.7 3 4.8 3.3 3.8 3.9 4.2
Ts at break MPa 5.2 6.5 7.8 7.4 5.5 4.8 5.5 5.7 5.3
Elongation at break 350 400 470 650 550 560 580 570 460
Delamination no no no no yes no no no no
PMD
300% Modulus, MPa 5.3 2.9 3.1 2.2 3.2 2.7 2.9 2.7 3
Ts at break MPa 6.5 14.2 11 9.3 6.7 4.5 4.8 13.3 13
Elongation at break 445 740 670 750 750 650 640 900 900
Delamination no no no no yes no no no no
Anisotropy 1.2 2.2 1.4 1.3 1.2 0.94 0.9 2.3 2.5
(TSpmd/TSmd)
Angle Tear Strength, kN/m
Md nm 27 24 26 28 22 25 30 30
Delamination no minor no yes no no no no
Pmd nm 37 32 26 32 22 25 35 35
Delamination no minor no yes no no no no

Example 8

[0064] In this example three different controlled distribution block copolymers (#3, #4 and #5) were compared against a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (KRATON G 1651) in formulations comprising polymer, polypropylene (PP 5A15H), extending oil (Drakeol 34) and silica. These formulations are intended for use as cap seals for screwed containers. The compounds mentioned in Table 8 were prepared by preblending the raw materials then mixing under heat and shear until a uniform blend was achieved. Blending viscosity for compounds with polymers 3, 4 and 5 was lower than for G1651 compound. Each compound was then molded under heat and pressure to make a plaque of uniform thickness. Samples from these plaques were tested on a mechanical properties instrument, the results being found in Table 8.

[0065] Polymers 3, 4 and 5 show isotropic behavior for mechanical properties, but G 1651 does not. Polymer 5 molecular weight is less than G 1651 by 50,000, yet exhibits the same tensile and elongation properties. Modulus for polymers 3,4 and 5 are slightly higher than that of G 1651, indicating that the compound is slightly stiffer. Coefficient of friction shows that increasing the amount of styrene in the midblock lowers the surface friction of the molded part.

[0066] The advantages of compounds made with polymers 3, 4 and 5 include:

[0067] 1. Lower blending viscosity results in easier mold processing

[0068] 2. Isotropic behavior allows dimensional stability in molded parts

[0069] 3. Increase in tensile, elongation and modulus allows for use of less polymer in compounds

[0070] 4. Decrease in coefficient of friction allows for use in applications where low friction surfaces are desirable, such as bottle cap seals.

TABLE 8
Compound #
8-1 8-2 8-3 8-4
Polymer Type
Formulation (parts by weight) Unit Direction G-1651 #3 #4 #5
Polymer 100 100 100 100
Drakeol 34 100 100 100 100
PP5A15H 34 34 34 34
Silica 41 41 41 41
Property
Tensile Properties
Tensile psi MD 810 629 673 1378
TD 1343 619 636 1440
Ultimate elongation % MD 616 646 686 858
TD 872 740 599 883
100% modulus psi MD 207 297 232 228
TD 195 230 266 228
300% modulus psi MD 404 453 363 452
TD 384 381 421 456
COF Static 2.05 1.59 1.05 0.823
Dynamic 2.03 1.15 1.15 0.698

Example 9

[0071] In this example two different controlled distribution block copolymers (#15 and #16) were compared with KRATON FG-1901 in blends with Nylon 6,6 (Zytel 101) at 15 and 20% by weight in a twin screw extruder. Polymer #16 was prepared by maleating Polymer #15 to a level of 1.7% weight bound maleic anhydride in a Bergstroff twin screw extruder. KRATON FG 1901 is an S-EB-S block copolymer that was maleated to a similar level of 1.7% weight. The blends were injection molded and the impact strength was measured using an Izod impact tester. Samples were taken both from the blind end of the mold and the gate end of the mold to minimize molding effects.

[0072] As shown in Table 9, the addition of maleic anhydride dramatically improves the ability of Polymer #15 to toughen Nylon 6,6. The greater toughness presented by the maleated Polymer #15 might allow less modifier to be used to achieve the same toughness compared to available materials.

TABLE 9
Formulation (% weight) 9-1 9-2 9-3 9-4 9-5
Polymer # 15 20
Polymer # 16 15 20
KRATON FG 1901 15 20
Nylon 6,6 80 85 80 85 80
Notched Izod Impact Test _(foot pounds per inch)
Gate end 2.05 20.7 25.1 13.2 21.2
Blind end 2.08 23.6 25.9 13.5 23.1

Example 10

[0073] In this example we compared a controlled distribution copolymers (#14) with KRATON G 1650 in an experiment to prepare dipped articles. The method employed was as follows: first the polymer was dissolved in toluene. If needed, plasticizer was added to control viscosity. The solution was filtered through 100 mesh metal filter. Then a glass tube (diameter 25 mm, L=25 cm) was immersed in the solution. The glass tube was removed from the solution at an appropriate speed to obtain a homogeneous film on the tube. The solvent was allowed to evaporate. The typical evaporation time for toluene at 45-50° C. is 5 minutes. Next the glass tube was cooled to room temperature. The dipping sequence was repeated as needed. After the last dip, the solvent was allowed to evaporate completely (1-2 hours at 45-50° C.). The tube was cooled down and the film removed carefully from the glass tube. Tensile Testing was conducted according to ISO 4074-9 after cutting circular test-samples from the samples.

[0074] As shown in Table 10, Polymer #14 exhibits an advantaged combination of tensile strength and set at break.

TABLE 10
Sample ID
10-1 10-2 10-3 10-4 10-5
Polymer
14 14 G1650 G1650 G1650
Concentration % w 13 10 15 15 15
Brookfield viscosity 250 150 375 370 365
Oil content phr 0 25 0 25 50
PS MW k 10 10 10 10 10
PSC eff. % w 20 16 30 24 20
Number of dips 2-3 3 2 2 2
Thickness micro-m 50 50 100 75 80
Stress 100% MPa 1.8 1.0 1.6 1.5 1.3
Stress 300% MPa 3.8 1.9 3.1 2.6 2.2
Elongation % 500 550 450 650 810
Force N 30 25 35 60 65
Tensile strength MPa 24 18 12 30 27
Set after break % 3 5 6 8 15

Example 11

[0075] In this example we compared two different controlled distribution block copolymers (#2 and #3) with KRATON G-1730, a selectively hydrogenated S-I-S-I tetra block copolymer in various compounds useful in personal hygiene articles. Some compounds only contained the controlled distribution polymer or G-1730 plus polyethylene (PE NA601), while other compounds also contained a resin (Regalrez 1126).

[0076] The first set of compounds (numbers 1 to 6) were prepared in the brabender mixing head on small scale. Following that larger amounts of the control formulation containing G-1730 and one other controlled distribution copolymer compound (compound #7 and 8) were compounded on a twin screw extruder. The pellets were then transformed into film on a cast film line. The properties of those films were measured in the machine (MD) and transverse (TD) directions. The examples shown in Table 11 reveal that the polymers of the present invention give much higher modulus values while retaining the other good properties of the control compound. Those higher modulus values are a result of the stiffer stretch of the inventive polymers and allow elastic laminate constructions having higher force or allow the same laminate to be made more efficiently with less elastomer. The films made form the present invention surprisingly have much greater tear strength than the control films.

TABLE 11A
Compounds:
1 2 3 4 5 6
Polymer
G-1730 #2 #3 G-1730 #2 #3
Polymer   68%   68%   68% 84.80% 84.80% 84.80%
Regalrez 1126   20%   20%   20%
PE NA601 11.80% 11.80% 11.80%   15%   15%   15%
AO 330  0.20%  0.20%  0.20%  0.20%  0.20%  0.20%
Properties (from plaques):
Stress-Strain
Max. Stress at 2090 3169 3255 1620 2859 2683
Break, psi
Strain at 1083 1057 895 927 1050 690
Break, %
100% 141 159 165 231 300 314
Modulus, psi
200% 189 201 236 295 361 428
Modulus, psi
300% 250 256 321 382 440 580
Modulus, psi
500% 427 443 605 651 663 1165
Modulus, psi
100%
Hysteresis
Perm. Set, % 8.2 8.9 7.4 10.9 13.9 13.7
1st Cycle 79.4 76.9 83.3 68.8 60.5 61.9
Recovery, %

[0077]

TABLE 11B
Compounds
7 8
Polymer
#3 G-1730
Polymer   68%   68%
Regalrez 1126   20%   20%
PE NA601 11.80% 11.80%
AO 330  0.20% 0.20
Properties (from films):
MD TD MD TD
Stress-Strain
Max. Stress at Break, 3635 3124 3213 1924
psi
Strain at Break, % 769 773 888 787
100% Modulus, psi 168 137 122 106
200% Modulus, psi 212 175 158 139
300% Modulus, psi 273 243 211 189
500% Modulus, psi 357 336 281 255
689 661 535 498
100% Hysteresis
Perm. Set, % 8.7 6.6 6.5 7.2
1st Cycle Recovery, % 69.4 78.7 78.8 78.8
98 103 84 58
300% Hysteresis:
Perm. Set, % 31.1 16.9
1st Cycle Recovery, % 56.8 71.3
100% Stress Cyc-1 85.2 80.5
Unload, psi
Stress Relaxation @
150% Strain
Max. Stress, psi 196 153
Stress @ End of Test, 162 116
psi
% Relax @ 30′, % 18 25
Elmendorff tear:
Tear strength(g/mils) 105.7 112.4 85 77

Example #12

[0078] This example is similar to Example #6, in that one controlled distribution block copolymer (#9) was compared against a selectively hydrogenated SBS block copolymer (KRATON G 1654) in a compound with extending oil and polypropylene homopolymer. The results are shown in Table 12. As shown in Table 12, the composition with Polymer #9 has much improved melt flows compared to compositions made with G-1654. Surprisingly, the compression set of the two compounds are nearly the same. This means that the compound made with Polymer #9 can be much more easily molded than the compound containing G-1654 while retaining approximately the same properties.

TABLE 12
Formulation (parts by weight)
 100 pbw Block Copolymer
 110 pbw Plasticiser (Primol 352)
  45 pbw Polypropylene
(MFR = 5.5)
 0.2 pbw Irganox 1010
 0.8 pbw Irganox PS 800
Extrusion conditions (W&Pfl ZSK 25) Werner Pfleiderer ZSK 25
Spiral flows conditions: Temperature of melt = 190° C./mould = 30° C.,
Injection time: 3 sec
Polymer G1654 #9
Spiral Flow, degrees
500 bars 450 670
750 bars 670 890
900 bars 790 980
MFR, (g/10 min)
230° C./2.16 kg 1 25
200° C./5 kg 4 60
IPN test in toluene
PP content (% w) 25 20
Compression set %
 23 C/72 hrs
 70 C/24 hrs 54 48
100 C/24 hrs 81 84
Hardness, Shore A 63 59
DIN Abrasion, mm3 90 325
Oil bleed-out No No
Transparency 3 1

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6846571 *Oct 3, 2002Jan 25, 2005Raj K. AgrawalMultilayer laminate; wear resistance, low gloss
US6987142 *Feb 6, 2003Jan 17, 2006Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcAdhesives and sealants from controlled distribution block copolymers
US7067589Feb 10, 2005Jun 27, 2006Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcBlock copolymers and method for making same
US7138456Feb 10, 2005Nov 21, 2006Bening Robert CBlock copolymers and method for making same
US7141621 *Feb 6, 2003Nov 28, 2006Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcGels from controlled distribution block copolymers
US7169848 *Feb 6, 2003Jan 30, 2007Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcLiving copolymer containing a controlled distribution copolymer block of a conjugated diene and a monoalkenyl arene and has terminal regions that are rich in conjugated diene units and center region is rich in monoalkenyl arene
US7169850Feb 10, 2005Jan 30, 2007Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcConjugated diene-arene copolymer for block polymers with organolithium initiators
US7220917Oct 24, 2005May 22, 2007General Electric CompanyElectrical wire and method of making an electrical wire
US7223816Feb 7, 2003May 29, 2007Handlin Jr Dale LSolvent-free, hot melt adhesive composition comprising a controlled distribution block copolymer
US7226484 *Aug 4, 2004Jun 5, 2007Applied Elastomerics, Inc.Tear resistant gels and articles for every uses
US7244785Feb 10, 2005Jul 17, 2007Bening Robert CBlock copolymers and method for making same
US7267855Feb 6, 2003Sep 11, 2007Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcArticles prepared from hydrogenated controlled distribution block copolymers
US7282536Feb 10, 2005Oct 16, 2007Kraton Polymers LlcSulfonation of hydrogenated conjugated diene-arene block polymers via acetyl sulfate, then salt formation with a metal such as zinc acetate; lower melt and solution viscosity
US7332542Feb 10, 2005Feb 19, 2008Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcConjugated diene-arene copolymer for block polymers with organolithium initiators; lower melt and solution viscosity; increase the stretching stiffness of a styrene/diene block copolymer without increasing the plasticity
US7417083Mar 28, 2005Aug 26, 2008Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Flame retardant composition
US7453044May 21, 2007Nov 18, 2008Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Conductor and a covering of a thermoplastic composition; a polyarylene ether, a polyolefin, a polymeric compatibilizer and a flame retardant; melt mixed, melt filtered
US7582692Nov 30, 2005Sep 1, 2009Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Flame retardant thermoplastic composition and articles comprising the same
US7582702Mar 24, 2006Sep 1, 2009Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcButadiene-isoprene-styrene copolymers; molecular weight control
US7585916Mar 14, 2007Sep 8, 2009Kraton Polymers Us LlcBlock copolymer compositions
US7592390Mar 24, 2006Sep 22, 2009Kraton Polymers U.S. Llcanionic hydrogenated block copolymers of mono alkenyl arenes and conjugated dienes, and tailored softening modifiers having a particular polydispersity index that results in a surprising improvement in properties ( living polymer)
US7625967Mar 7, 2006Dec 1, 2009Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcOil gels of controlled distribution block copolymers and ester oils
US7629278May 11, 2006Dec 8, 2009Pliant CorporationLow cost multilayer elastomeric films having a low permanent set
US7718721Nov 13, 2006May 18, 2010Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.A polyamine included in a thermoplastic blend of a melt kneaded product of a polyphenyl ether, a polyolefin, an acid-modified hyrdrogenated block polymer of an alkenylaromatic compound and a conjugated diene; tensile strength; chemical resistance; halogen-free tubes for auto wiring-harnesses sheath
US7741564Nov 29, 2005Jun 22, 2010Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.the coverings comprising a thermoplastic composition; a polyarylene ether, a polyolefin, a polymeric compatibilizer and a flame retardant; melt mixed, melt filtered; use in an automotive environment and is free of halogenated resins
US7772322 *Feb 17, 2005Aug 10, 2010Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Poly(arylene ether) composition and articles
US7799854May 25, 2007Sep 21, 2010Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Polyarylene ether, impact modifier, phosphate salt; for production of covered conductors; retardant composition has little or no negative impact on the physical properties of the thermoplastic composition
US7847022 *Feb 6, 2003Dec 7, 2010Kraton Polymers U.S. LlcArticles prepared from controlled distribution block copolymers
US7858693Mar 24, 2006Dec 28, 2010Kratonpolymers U.S. LlcUnhydrogenated block copolymer compositions
US7893156 *Apr 23, 2003Feb 22, 2011Asahi Kasei Chemicals CorporationBlock copolymer and composition thereof
US7922854Dec 8, 2009Apr 12, 2011Pliant, LlcLow cost multilayer elastomeric films having a low permanent set
US7923391 *Oct 16, 2007Apr 12, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Nonwoven web material containing crosslinked elastic component formed from a pentablock copolymer
US7923392 *Oct 16, 2007Apr 12, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Crosslinked elastic material formed from a branched block copolymer
US8147958Jul 2, 2010Apr 3, 2012Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Poly(arylene ether) composition and articles
US8304478Jul 30, 2010Nov 6, 2012Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Polyamide/poly(arylene ether) composition, article, and method
US8349963Oct 16, 2007Jan 8, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Crosslinked elastic material formed from a linear block copolymer
US8399368 *Oct 16, 2007Mar 19, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Nonwoven web material containing a crosslinked elastic component formed from a linear block copolymer
US8541504Feb 19, 2008Sep 24, 2013Asahi Kasei Chemicals CorporationImpact absorber composition
US8772396Dec 7, 2010Jul 8, 2014Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Poly(arylene ether)—polyolefin composition and its use in wire and cable insulation and sheathing
DE102007027156A1Jun 13, 2007Dec 24, 2008Kraiburg Tpe Gmbh & Co. KgTransparente, thermoplastisch verarbeitbare, elastomere Polymerzusammensetzung mit UV-Stabilität und guten Haftungseigenschaften
EP2365032A1Dec 21, 2006Sep 14, 2011SABIC Innovative Plastics IP B.V.Flame retardant flexible thermoplastic composition, method of making, and articles thereof
WO2006007154A2 *May 19, 2005Jan 19, 2006Dow Global Technologies IncElastomeric monoalkenyl arene-conjugated diene block copolymers
WO2006088707A1 *Feb 9, 2006Aug 24, 2006Gen ElectricPoly(arylene ether) composition and articles
WO2008102761A1Feb 19, 2008Aug 28, 2008Asahi Kasei Chemicals CorpImpact absorber composition
WO2008146210A1May 21, 2008Dec 4, 2008Sabic Innovative Plastics IpFlame retardant thermoplastic composition and articles comprising the same
WO2008151993A1 *Jun 6, 2008Dec 18, 2008Kraiburg Tpe Gmbh & Co KgTransparent, thermoplastic, processable elastomeric polymer composition with uv stability and good adhesion properties
WO2010033889A2Sep 21, 2009Mar 25, 2010Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Poly(arylene ether) composition and a covered conductor with flexible covering wall and large size conductor
WO2011009013A2Jul 16, 2010Jan 20, 2011Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V.Poly(arylene ether) composition and a covered conductor with thin wall and small size conductor
WO2012055919A1Oct 26, 2011May 3, 2012Basf SeElastomeric block copolymers with a star-shaped molecular architecture, said star-shaped molecular architecture having at least two different star arms
Classifications
U.S. Classification525/88
International ClassificationC09D153/02, C08L95/00, C09J153/02, C08L23/10, C08L101/00, C08F287/00, C08L77/00, C08F297/04, C08L53/02, C08L25/06, C08L91/00, C08L23/12
Cooperative ClassificationC09D153/02, C09D153/025, C08F287/00, C08L25/06, C08F297/04, C08L23/10, C08L95/00, C08L77/00, C08L91/00, C09J153/02, C08L23/12, C08L53/02, C08L101/00, C09J153/025, C08L53/025
European ClassificationC08L77/00, C08L95/00, C08L53/02, C08L101/00, C08L53/02B, C08L23/10, C09J153/02B, C09J153/02, C09D153/02, C09D153/02B, C08F297/04, C08F287/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 2, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: UBS AG, STAMFORD BRANCH, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KRATON POLYMERS U.S. LLC;REEL/FRAME:014242/0281
Effective date: 20031223