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Publication numberUS20030183550 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/400,001
Publication dateOct 2, 2003
Filing dateMar 26, 2003
Priority dateMar 26, 2002
Also published asWO2003082701A1
Publication number10400001, 400001, US 2003/0183550 A1, US 2003/183550 A1, US 20030183550 A1, US 20030183550A1, US 2003183550 A1, US 2003183550A1, US-A1-20030183550, US-A1-2003183550, US2003/0183550A1, US2003/183550A1, US20030183550 A1, US20030183550A1, US2003183550 A1, US2003183550A1
InventorsSamuel DiLiberto
Original AssigneeDiliberto Samuel L.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disaster pack and method for making same
US 20030183550 A1
Abstract
A disaster pack comprising a pillow, a blanket, and a mattress pad compressed and disposed within a first sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of the cavity is disclosed. A packaged product comprising a compressible dry good compressed and disposed within a sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of the cavity, wherein the compressed volume of the compressible dry good disposed within the sealed bag is less than about twenty percent of the free state volume of the compressible dry good is also disclosed. A method for making the packaged product comprises the steps of placing the compressible dry good within a bag; placing the compressible dry good disposed within the bag on a platen; compressing the compressible dry good within the bag; sealing the open end of the bag to form a sealed bag; and removing the dry good within the sealed bag from the platen.
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Claims(47)
I claim:
1. A disaster pack comprising a pillow and a blanket compressed and disposed within a first sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of said cavity.
2. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow and said blanket disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about twenty percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow and said blanket.
3. The disaster pack as recited in claim 2, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow and said blanket disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about twelve percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow and said blanket.
4. The disaster pack as recited in claim 3, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow and said blanket disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about eight percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow and said blanket.
5. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1, wherein said seal is a heat seal.
6. The disaster pack as recited in claim 5, wherein said first sealed bag further comprises a notch adjacent to said heat seal.
7. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1, wherein said seal is a compression seal.
8. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1, wherein said first sealed bag is comprised of nylon and low density polyethylene.
9. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1 further comprising a mattress pad disposed within a second sealed bag, wherein said first sealed bag and said second sealed bag are disposed within a packaging bag.
10. The disaster pack as recited in claim 9, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad is less than about twenty percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.
11. The disaster pack as recited in claim 1, further comprising a label applied to an outer surface of said sealed bag.
12. A disaster pack comprising a pillow, a blanket, and a mattress pad compressed and disposed within a first sealed bag comprised of a first cavity, and a first seal at one end of said first cavity, wherein:
a) said pillow and said blanket are disposed within a second sealed bag comprised of a second cavity, and a second seal at one end of said second cavity;
b) said mattress pad is disposed within a third sealed bag comprised of a third cavity, and a third seal at one end of said third cavity; and
c) said second sealed bag and said third sealed bag are disposed within said first sealed bag.
13. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about twenty percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.
14. The disaster pack as recited in claim 13, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about twelve percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.
15. The disaster pack as recited in claim 14, wherein the compressed volume of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad disposed within said first sealed bag is less than about eight percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.
16. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein at least one of said first seal, said second seal, and said third seal are heat seals.
17. The disaster pack as recited in claim 16, wherein said first sealed bag further comprises a notch adjacent to said first heat seal.
18. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein at least one of said first seal, said second seal, and said third seal is a compression seal.
19. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein said first sealed bag, said second sealed bag, and said third sealed bag are comprised of nylon and low density polyethylene.
20. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein said mattress pad is comprised of at least about sixty weight percent polymer foam.
21. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein said pillow is comprised of at least about 50 weight percent polyester fibers.
22. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, wherein said blanket comprises a fabric of fibers selected from the group consisting of wool, silk, linen, polyester, nylon, acetate, poly(ethylene terephthalate), polytetrafluoroethylene, and mixtures thereof.
23. The disaster pack as recited in claim 12, further comprising a label applied to an outer surface of said sealed bag.
24. A packaged product comprising a first compressible dry good compressed and disposed within a sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of said cavity, wherein the compressed volume of said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealed bag is less than about eighty percent of the free state volume of said compressible dry good.
25. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein the compressed volume of said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealed bag is less than about forty percent of the free state volume of said compressible dry good.
26. The package as recited in claim 25, wherein the compressed volume of said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealed bag is less than about twenty percent of the free state volume of said compressible dry good.
27. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said first compressible dry good is a pillow.
28. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said first compressible dry good is a blanket.
29. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said first compressible dry good is a foam pad.
30. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said first compressible dry good is a chair.
31. The package as recited in claim 24 further comprising a second compressible dry good disposed within said sealed bag, wherein said first compressible dry good is a pillow, and said second compressible dry good is a blanket.
32. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said seal is a heat seal.
33. The package as recited in claim 32, wherein said sealed bag further comprises a notch adjacent to said heat seal.
34. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said seal is a compression seal.
35. The package as recited in claim 24, wherein said sealed bag is comprised of nylon and low density polyethylene.
36. The package as recited in claim 24, further comprising a label applied to an outer surface of said sealed bag.
37. A method of preparing a packaged product comprising a first compressible dry good compressed and disposed within a sealable bag comprising a cavity and an open end, comprising the steps of:
a) placing said first compressible dry good within said sealable bag;
b) placing said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealable bag on a platen;
c) compressing said first compressible dry good within said sealable bag;
d) sealing said open end of said sealable bag to form a sealed bag; and
e) removing said first compressible dry good within said sealed bag from said platen.
38. The method of claim 37, further comprising the step of first placing said first compressible dry good within a packaging bag and evacuating air from said packaging bag and said object before said placing said first compressible dry good within said sealable bag.
39. The method of claim 37, wherein after said step of compressing said compressible dry good within said bag, the compressed volume of said dry good is less than about eighty percent of the free volume of said dry good.
40. The method of claim 37, wherein after said step of compressing said compressible dry good within said bag, the compressed volume of said dry good is less than about forty percent of the free volume of said dry good.
41. The method of claim 37, wherein said step of sealing said open end of said sealable bag to form a sealed bag is performed by a hot press.
42. The method of claim 37, further comprising the step of applying a label to a surface of said sealed bag.
43. A method of preparing a disaster pack comprising a pillow, a blanket, and a mattress pad compressed and disposed within a package comprising the steps of:
a) placing said pillow and said blanket within a first sealable bag comprising a first cavity and a first open end;
b) placing said pillow and said blanket disposed within said first sealable bag on a platen;
c) compressing said pillow and said blanket within said first sealable bag;
d) sealing said first open end of said first sealable bag to form a first sealed bag;
e) removing said pillow and said blanket within said first sealed bag from said platen;
f) placing said mattress pad within a second sealable bag comprising a second cavity and a second open end;
g) placing said mattress pad disposed within said second sealable bag on said platen;
h) compressing said mattress pad within said second sealable bag;
i) sealing said second open end of said second sealable bag to form a second sealed bag;
j) removing said mattress pad within said second sealed bag from said platen; and
k) placing said first sealed bag and said second sealed bag within a first packaging bag comprising a third cavity and a third open end.
44. The method of claim 43, further comprising the step of placing said mattress pad within a second packaging bag and evacuating air from said second packaging bag and said mattress pad before said placing said mattress pad within said second packaging bag within said second sealable bag.
45. The method of claim 43, wherein after said step of placing said first sealed bag and said second sealed bag within a first packaging bag, the compressed volume of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad disposed within said first packaging bag is less than about twenty percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.
46. The method of claim 43, wherein said steps of sealing said first open end of said first bag to form a first sealed bag, and sealing said second open end of said second bag to form a second sealed bag, are performed by at least one hot press.
47. The method of claim 43, further comprising the step of applying a label to a surface of at least one of said first sealable bag, said second sealable bag, and said first packaging bag.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of the filing date of U.S. provisional patent application Serial No. 60/367,558 filed Mar. 26, 2002.

[0002] This invention relates in one embodiment to a package containing bedding for use by a human, and more particularly to a highly compact package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket, which have been highly compressed and enclosed in a compact package. The package of the present invention may be stored and transported in minimal space, distributed under emergency circumstances, and subsequently opened so that the bedding from such package may be used by a human.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Compact packaging for any compressible dry goods made of foam, pliable fiber filling, piled fabric, and any other flexible material having a large void volume of air contained therein.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] There are numerous circumstances in which there is a need for a highly compact package containing dry goods that are made of foam, pliable fiber filling, piled fabric, and any other flexible material having a large void volume of air contained therein. One such circumstance is on the occasion of a natural or man-made disaster, in which a significant number of people are suddenly displaced from their normal residences, and must be temporarily sheltered or at least kept warm until the situation improves. In such a circumstance, it is almost always necessary to provide temporary bedding for such people.

[0005] Minimal bedding for an individual typically comprises a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket. One property in common for each of these objects is that in their free state (i.e. while in use), each contains a large void volume of air therein, such a property being necessary to provide the required bedding functions of padding, support, and thermal insulation. Such a required property of bedding is exactly the opposite of desirable properties for the storage, transportation, and distribution of such goods in an emergency or other circumstance. The large volume of air contained in such objects renders them unsuitable for timely and cost effective storage, transportation, and distribution in an emergency or other circumstance.

[0006] There are many other heretofore unmet needs and additional uses for the disaster pack, and the packaging methods of the present invention. For example, there is a need for a small number of such packages to be carried on board emergency vehicles such as police, fire and ambulance vehicles for use by a few individuals in rescue situations. The storage of approximately between one and five foam mattress, pillow, and blanket sets in their free state would clearly be an unacceptable practice, as such bedding packages would require excessive space within any of such vehicles.

[0007] In addition, such packages of bedding being relatively low in cost, is also an attractive feature, because such packages could be treated as one-use disposable bedding. In present times, with there being such broad concern and even statutory and regulatory requirements for the avoidance of transmission of blood-borne pathogens and other contaminants, the disaster pack and packaging methods of the present invention are clearly advantageous.

[0008] Individual travelers or families in some circumstances may also have need for a disaster pack of the present invention comprising a pillow and a blanket. Such circumstances would be when an individual or family is traveling in a remote area having a cold climate. In the event of a breakdown of the travelers' vehicle, a small number of such disaster packs carried onboard the vehicle could save the lives of the travelers, keeping them warm until help arrives. Such disaster packs, being highly compact, could easily be carried within a storage area of the vehicle, and such disaster packs could further comprise articles of clothing such as hats, mittens, gloves, cloth booties, and the like.

[0009] In like manner, a pillow packaged according to the present invention, in a highly compact package, could be used by a traveler staying in a hotel. Such a package could easily be carried in a suitcase, and opened at the hotel room to provide the traveler with a sanitary pillow, free of pathogens, allergens, and other contaminants. It is well known that hotel pillows that undergo repeated use by hotel customers, become infested with dust mites, dust mite feces, and numerous other known and unknown pathogens and allergens.

[0010] There is also a use for the packaging methods of the present invention in more cost effective storage, transportation, and display of dry goods for retail sale, or the transportation of dry goods to the end consumer. Bedding, foam furniture, and all manner of dry goods that are made of foam, pliable fiber filling, piled fabric, and any other flexible material having a large void volume of air contained therein, and a significant shape memory, are products for which the packaging process of the present invention may be used advantageously. Such products can be packaged at the manufacturer's factory after fabrication, and subsequently shipped to a warehouse or directly to the retail store using only a fraction of the space for such transportation and storage that would otherwise be required if such goods were shipped in their free state according to the present practice.

[0011] In addition, such goods packaged by the process of the present invention may be offered for sale in point-of-purchase displays in such compact packaging, with a single unpackaged product in its state of use on display. Consumers could buy the product in its compact packaging, transport it home, and then open such package and use the product. Thus the use of the packaging process of the present invention, by reducing the space required for storage, transportation, and display of the product offers the opportunity for major cost savings for the retail store and the consumer. In like manner, for those manufacturers that sell directly to the end customer via mail order, the packaging process of the present invention offers the opportunity to ship products that otherwise require high-volume and unwieldy shipping boxes in very compact flexible packaging such as fiber-reinforced envelopes, or in the packaging itself, with appropriate shipping labels.

[0012] Although it is known that a packaging process exists for the storage of clothing in an evacuated bag (marketed and sold as the “Space Bag”), such packaging entails the use of a more costly, non-disposable, non-heat sealable bag, and such packaging requires the use of a vacuum cleaner to reduce the volume of air within the clothing and the bag. Thus such a process is not considered sufficiently cost-effective and efficient for the mass production of packaged dry goods in a reduced volume.

[0013] To the best of the applicant's knowledge, no such packaging is currently available, that can contain bedding or other compressible dry goods in the minimum possible volume, in a sterile or at least fully sealed and non-allergenic inexpensive disposable/recyclable package, and in a regular geometric shape that is optimal for storage and transportation in a minimum of space.

[0014] It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a highly compact bedding package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket, which have been highly compressed and enclosed therein, and which may subsequently stored and transported in minimal space, and distributed under emergency circumstances to large numbers of people.

[0015] It is an object of this invention to provide a highly compact bedding package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket, which is sufficiently compact to be carried on board emergency vehicles such as police, fire and ambulance vehicles for use in rescue situations.

[0016] It is an object of this invention to provide a highly compact, inexpensive bedding package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket, which is sanitary and disposable after a single use.

[0017] It is an object of this invention to provide a highly compact bedding package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, a blanket and/or articles of clothing, which is sufficiently compact to be carried in one's personal vehicle, to be opened and used in an emergency.

[0018] It is an object of this invention to provide a pillow enclosed in a highly compact package, which could easily be carried in a suitcase by a traveler, and subsequently opened at the hotel room to provide the traveler with a sanitary pillow, free of allergens.

[0019] It is an object of this invention to provide a method for making a highly compact bedding package containing a pillow and a blanket.

[0020] It is an object of this invention to provide a method for making a highly compact bedding package containing a foam mattress, a pillow, and a blanket.

[0021] It is an object of this invention to provide a method for making a highly compact dry goods package that enables the more cost effective storage, transportation, and display of dry goods for retail sale.

[0022] It is an object of this invention to provide a method for making a highly compact dry goods package that enables the more cost effective transportation of the dry goods directly to the end consumer.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0023] In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a disaster pack comprising a pillow, and a blanket compressed and disposed within a first sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of said cavity. In one preferred embodiment, the compressed volume of said pillow and said blanket disposed within said sealed bag is less than about twenty percent of the sum of the free state volumes of said pillow, said blanket, and said mattress pad.

[0024] In accordance with the present invention, there is further provided a disaster pack comprising a pillow, a blanket, and a mattress pad compressed and disposed within a first sealed bag comprised of a first cavity, and a first seal at one end of said first cavity, wherein said pillow and said blanket are disposed within a second sealed bag comprised of a second cavity, and a second seal at one end of said second cavity; said mattress pad is disposed within a third sealed bag comprised of a third cavity, and a third seal at one end of said third cavity; and said second sealed bag and said third sealed bag are disposed within said first sealed bag.

[0025] In accordance with the present invention, there is further provided a packaged product comprising a first compressible dry good compressed and disposed within a sealed bag comprised of a cavity, and a seal at one end of said cavity, wherein the compressed volume of said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealed bag is less than about eighty percent of the free state volume of said first compressible dry good.

[0026] In accordance with the present invention, there is further provided a method of preparing a packaged product comprising a first compressible dry good compressed and disposed within a sealable bag comprising a cavity and an open end, comprising the steps of placing said first compressible dry good within said sealable bag; placing said first compressible dry good disposed within said sealable bag on a platen; compressing said first compressible dry good within said sealable bag; sealing said open end of said sealable bag to form a sealed bag; and removing said first compressible dry good within said sealed bag from said platen.

[0027] One aspect of the invention deals with a basic problem in the packaging, storage, and transportation of dry goods that are made of foam, pliable fiber filling, piled fabric, and any other flexible material having a large void volume of air contained therein. A property of such a dry good product is that in its free state (i.e. while in use), such product contains a large void volume of air therein. This property is usually required in order to provide the functional performance of the product when used for its intended purpose. Such a required property is exactly the opposite of desirable properties for the storage, transportation, and distribution of such goods in an emergency or other circumstance.

[0028] This aspect of the invention is further based on the discovery of a technique that alleviates this problem. The technique involves the placement of the dry good product in its free state within a package, collapsing the product, further compressing the product into a compacted state, and sealing the compacted product within the package.

[0029] The technique can be implemented with a machine that provides a vacuum source to evacuate the package and the product, a mechanical press to assist in compaction of the product, and sealing means to seal the product in its compacted state, thereby retaining the product in its compacted state until such package is opened.

[0030] The technique described above is advantageous because it is simple and inexpensive compared to other packaging approaches, and it enables the packaging of dry goods in an extremely compact volume. As a result of the invention, such dry goods may be stored in minimal space in a warehouse or retail store, and/or may be transported in minimal volume until such goods arrive at a retail store, or at the intended location of end use by the consumer.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0031] The invention will be described by reference to the following drawings, in which like numerals refer to like elements, and in which:

[0032]FIG. 1 is schematic representation of a process in which one embodiment of the package of the present invention is opened;

[0033]FIG. 1A is a detailed view of a corner of the package of FIG. 1 comprising a notch to facilitate opening of such package;

[0034]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of unpacked and fully deployed bedding contained in one embodiment of the package of the present invention;

[0035]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional schematic view of the beginning of a process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged.

[0036]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged, at a point after the pillow is compressed, but before the packaging bag is sealed;

[0037]FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged, at a point when the packaging bag is sealed;

[0038]FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional schematic view at the conclusion of a process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged;

[0039]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an uncompressed pillow and a compressed pillow packaged and sealed by the process of the present invention;

[0040]FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an uncompressed foam mattress pad and a compressed foam mattress pad packaged and sealed by the process of the present invention;

[0041]FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an uncompressed blanket and a compressed blanket packaged and sealed by the process of the present invention;

[0042]FIG. 10 is a perspective view of one preferred embodiment of a package of the present invention, with its contents depicted therein in phantom;

[0043]FIG. 11 is a top view of the package of FIG. 10 to which a label has been affixed;

[0044]FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional schematic view of the beginning of a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged using vacuum assistance means;

[0045]FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged, at a point after a first packaging bag and foam mattress pad contained therein are evacuated, but before the first packaging bag and foam mattress pad are placed within a second packaging bag;

[0046]FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad contained in a first and a second packaging bag is packaged, at a point after a first packaging bag and foam mattress pad contained therein have been placed in a second packaging bag, but before the foam mattress pad contained in the first and the second packaging bag is compressed;

[0047]FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged, at a point after the foam mattress pad is compressed, but before the second packaging bag is sealed;

[0048]FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged, at a point when the second packaging bag is sealed;

[0049]FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional schematic view at the conclusion of a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged;

[0050]FIG. 18 is a flow chart depicting the steps of one preferred process for preparing a package containing a single object in accordance with the present invention;

[0051]FIG. 19 is a flow chart depicting the steps of one preferred process for preparing a package containing multiple objects in accordance with the present invention;

[0052]FIG. 20A is a side view of one packaging apparatus for the making of the compressible dry goods packaged in accordance with the present invention;

[0053]FIG. 20B is a top view of the packaging apparatus of FIG. 20A; and

[0054]FIG. 21 is a side view of an alternate packaging apparatus for the making of the compressible dry goods packaged in accordance with the present invention.

[0055] The present invention will be described in connection with a preferred embodiment, however, it will be understood that there is no intent to limit the invention to the embodiment described. On the contrary, the intent is to cover all alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0056] For a general understanding of the present invention, reference is made to the drawings. In the drawings, like reference numerals have been used throughout to designate identical elements. In describing the present invention, a variety of terms are used in the description. As used herein, free state is meant to indicate the fully expanded state or shape of a dry good at atmospheric pressure, wherein such dry good is not subjected to any external forces that deform it or reduce its volume. Free state volume is meant to indicate the volume of a dry good in its fully expanded state at atmospheric pressure. Compressed volume or packaged volume is meant to indicate the volume occupied by a dry good in a compressed state and contained by a package of the present invention. Shape memory is meant to indicate the extent to which an object is restored, either elastically, or with assistance, to its original free state volume after being unpackaged and released from a compressed state.

[0057]FIG. 1 is schematic representation of a process in which one embodiment of the package of the present invention is opened. Reference to FIG. 1 is illustrative of aspects of how the package of the present invention is constructed, and how the package and the contents therein are used by the end consumer. It is to be understood that for the sake of illustration, the dry goods content of the package 102 of FIG. 1 is shown as a bedding kit, but that many other dry goods or combinations of dry goods may be contained in the package of the present invention.

[0058] Referring to FIG. 1 and in one embodiment, package 102 comprises a sealed plastic bag. In the preferred package 102 is an unsealed bag made of fabric material such as, e.g., non-woven fabric. Referring again to FIG. 1, and in the embodiment wherein package 102 is a sealed bag, in step 101 of process 100, strip 105 is torn from the end of package 102, thereby opening package 102. In such embodiment, package 102 comprises a notch 105 (see also FIG. 1A) adjacent to bag seal 134, which acts as a stress concentrator that facilitates the tearing of package 102. Thus package 102 is opened without cutting tools that might damage the goods contained therein. In an alternate embodiment (not shown) package 102 comprises a score mark disposed across the end thereof in lieu of or in addition to notch 105, which further provides stress concentration that facilitates the tearing of package 102. Such stress concentration means to assist in package opening are well known.

[0059] Referring again to FIG. 1, in step 103 of the embodiment of package 102 comprising a bedding kit 107, three sealed bags 110, 114, and 118 are preferably removed from the bag 102. These sealed bags 110, 114, and 118 contain, respectively, pillow 108, blanket 112, and foam mattress 116.

[0060] In one embodiment of bedding kit 107, pillow 108 is compressed and contained in sealed bag 110 at a volume of less than about twenty percent of its volume in its free state, and preferably at a volume of less than about five percent of its volume in its free state, and more preferably at a volume of less than about three percent of its volume in its free state. The operative requirements for each of pillow 108, blanket 112, and foam mattress 116 are that each is compressible to a significantly lesser volume than its respective free state, and that each has a high “shape memory”, i.e. each item is sufficiently elastic, or can be “fluffed”, such that after unpackaging, each object is restored to approximately the same free volume that it occupied before packaging.

[0061] In one preferred embodiment of bedding kit 107, pillow 108 is a Fiberfill pillow comprised of at least about 50 weight percent polyester fibers with a compressed length of 20 inches, a compressed width of 14.5 inches, and compressed thickness of 0.25 inches; and an uncompressed length of 26 inches, and uncompressed width of 20 inches, and an uncompressed thickness of 7 inches. Pillow 108 is thus compressed from a free state volume of about 3640 cubic inches to a compressed volume of about 72.5 cubic inches, and is thus contained in sealed bag 110 at a volume of about two percent of its free state volume.

[0062] In one embodiment of bedding kit 107, blanket 112 is compressed and contained in sealed bag 114 at a volume of less than about forty percent of its volume in its free state, and preferably at a volume of less than about twenty five percent of its volume in its free state, and more preferably at a volume of less than about fifteen percent of its volume in its free state.

[0063] Many known fabrics and sheet goods having low bulk thermal conductivity are suitable for use as blanket 112. In one embodiment, blanket 112 is a Microfleece blanket. In another embodiment, blanket 112 is a fabric formed from woven fibers selected from the group consisting of wool, silk, linen, polyester, nylon, acetate, poly(ethylene terephthalate), and mixtures thereof.

[0064] In one preferred embodiment of bedding kit 107, blanket 112 preferably is formed by a needle-punching process, and consists essentially of poly(ethylene terephthalate), fibers, such blanket having a compressed length of 17 inches, a compressed width of 13 inches and a compressed thickness of 0.5 inch; and an uncompressed length of 72 inches, an uncompressed width of 48 inches, and an uncompressed thickness of 0.25 inches. Blanket 112 is thus compressed from a free state volume of about 864 cubic inches to a compressed volume of about 110.5 cubic inches, and is thus contained in sealed bag 114 at a volume of about thirteen percent of its free state volume.

[0065] In a further embodiment, blanket 112 includes fabric comprising a micro-porous membrane manufactured of fibers formed of expanded PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) such as Gore-Tex® fabric manufactured by W. L. Gore and Associates.

[0066] In a further preferred embodiment, pillow 108 and blanket 112 are packaged together in a single bag, provided an alternative embodiment of the disaster pack of the present invention. In such an embodiment, pillow 108 and blanket 112 are compressed and contained in sealed bag at a volume of less than about twenty percent of the sum of their respective volumes in the free state, and preferably at a volume of less than about ten percent of the sum of their respective volumes in the free state, and more preferably at a volume of less than about five percent of the sum of their respective volumes in the free state.

[0067] In one embodiment of bedding kit 107, foam pad/mattress 116 is compressed and contained in sealed bag 118 at a volume of less than about twenty percent of its volume in its free state, and preferably at a volume of less than about fifteen percent of its volume in its free state, and more preferably at a volume of less than about ten percent of its volume in its free state.

[0068] In one preferred embodiment of bedding kit 107, foam pad/mattress 116 is preferably a polymer foam pad comprising at least about 60 weight percent polyurethane ether foam with a compressed length of 18.5 inches, a compressed width of 11 inches, and a compressed thickness of 1 inch; and an uncompressed length of 72 inches, an uncompressed width of 24 inches, and an uncompressed thickness of 1.5 inches. Foam pad/mattress 116 is thus compressed from a free state volume of about 2592 cubic inches to a compressed volume of about 203.5 cubic inches, and is thus contained in sealed bag 118 at a volume of about eight percent of its free state volume.

[0069] Each of the pillow 108, the blanket 112, and the foam pad 116 preferably weights about 1.1 pounds. The total weight of disaster pack 102 containing bedding kit 107, including the respective individual enclosures for pillow 108, blanket 112, and foam pad 116, is about 3.5 pounds. In general, it is preferable that the disaster pack 102 of the present invention weighs less than about eight pounds, and more preferably less than about five pounds.

[0070] In one embodiment of disaster pack 102, the pillow 108, blanket 112, and foam pad/mattress 116 are compressed and contained therein at a volume of less than about twenty percent of the sum of their respective free state volumes, and preferably at a volume of less than about twelve percent of the sum of their respective free state volumes, and more preferably at a volume of less than about eight percent of the sum of their respective free state volumes. In one preferred embodiment of disaster pack 102 comprising a Fiberfill pillow, a woven blanket, and a polyurethane ether foam pad as previously described, such components are compressed from a free state volume of about 7096 cubic inches to a compressed volume of about 386.5 cubic inches, and thus disaster pack 102 is contained at a volume of about 5.5 percent of its free state volume.

[0071] In one preferred embodiment, each of the pillow 108, the blanket 112, and the foam pad 116 are individually packaged in a sealed plastic bag comprising a stress-concentrating notch or score mark, similar to the package enclosure 102 containing the entire bedding kit 107. Thus the process to open each of the enclosures for pillow 108, the blanket 112, and the foam pad 116 is substantially the same as shown in step 101 for the opening of package 102.

[0072] It will be apparent that although the foregoing description has generally pertained to dry goods that are highly compressible, i.e. dry goods having a packaged volume of less than forty pecent of their free state volumes, the packaged objects, method, and apparatus of the present invention are limited to such a relative volume reduction in order to be useful. For example, there are many dry goods made of less compressible materials, e.g. closed cell foam. Such a closed cell foam object is compressible to a smaller packaged volume, on the order of up to 80 percent if its free state volume, wherein the method of the present invention compresses the air trapped in the closed cells into a smaller volume at a higher pressure, rather than displacing such air. Also of significant importance is the result that somewhat irregularly shaped objects, such as e.g., foam chairs, foam pet beds, stuffed toys, and the like, are rendered into a more regularly shaped rectilinear or cubic object that is more easily handled, stacked, and transported. Thus, such dry goods packaged in accordance with present invention are thus rendered less expensive to handle, store, transport, and offer for retail sale. Accordingly, such moderately compressed packaged dry goods are to be considered within the scope of the present invention.

[0073]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the unpacked and fully deployed bedding kit contained in the embodiment of package 102 of FIG. 1, prepared by the package opening process 100 of FIG. 1. As is illustrated in FIG. 2, the package 102 containing bedding kit 107 (see FIG. 1) produces a functional bedding assembly 109 comprised of the foam mattress 116, the blanket 112, and the pillow 108.

[0074] FIGS. 3-6 are cross-sectional schematic views of steps of a process of the present invention in which pillows, blankets, foam mattress pads, or other compressible dry goods are packaged.

[0075]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional schematic view of the beginning of a process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged. Referring to FIG. 3, the uncompressed pillow 108 is first disposed within a heat-sealable plastic bag 130. The heat sealable plastic bag 130 preferably is substantially impermeable to gas; bag 130 may be any heat-sealable bag adapted to storing items from which air has been evacuated.

[0076] In one embodiment, bag 130 is a heat-sealable bag comprised of nylon and low density polyethylene. In one embodiment, the heat-sealable bag is sold as “NOWVAC-HB” by NOW Plastics of One Monarch Place, Springfield, Mass. This bag is identified as being a “ . . . clear, high barrier flexible and formable coextruded multiple layer vacuum bag comprised of Polyamide (Nylon), EVOH (Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol) and Low Density Polyethylene or EVA (Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate).”

[0077] In another embodiment, bag 130 consists essentially of poly (ethylene terephthalate), (PET), also known commercially as Mylar®. Such PET bag may be either heat sealed, or such bag may be compression sealed, wherein a pressure sensitive adhesive is disposed on the inside surface of end 119 of bag 130 prior to the application of pressure by press 121. In such application, press 121 may be a cold press.

[0078] In another embodiment, a hot melt adhesive is disposed on the inside surface of end 119 of bag 130 prior to the application of pressure by press 121. For example, such adhesive may be formed as an adhesive tape, or an adhesive gauze-like web, and selected from the group consisting of polyurethanes, polyolefins, polyamides, and polyesters. Such adhesives are sold commercially by the Industrial Adhesives Division of the Bostik Findley Corporation of Middleton, Mass. 01949, and are marketed in sales brochure AI 27 8/99 5M, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. Numerous other adhesives will be apparent to those skilled in the art. For example, one may use other hot melt adhesives, reactive hot melt adhesives, liquid adhesives, and the like, with the appropriate use of a cold press if the sealing bond is formed at ambient temperature, or a hot press if the bond is formed at elevated temperature.

[0079] Referring again to FIG. 3, pillow 108 disposed within cavity 133 of heat-sealable bag 130 is disposed on platen 111 and compressed by press 113. The press 113, in one embodiment, is a 20 ton press, manufactured by the USM Corporation, which moves in the direction of arrow 115. As press 113 compresses pillow 108, the air (not shown) within such pillow 108 is displaced in the direction of arrow 117 out of the opening in the end 119 of bag 130, such that cavity 133 of bag 130 is significantly reduced in volume. At least about 80 volume percent of the air within pillow 108 is displaced in the pressing operation. In one embodiment, at least about 95 volume percent of the air is displaced in the pressing operation, and more preferably, at least about 97 volume percent of the air is displaced in the pressing operation.

[0080] In operations for the packaging of less compressible goods, such as goods made of closed cell foam, press 113 compresses the air trapped therein, thereby reducing the volume of such objects. Such a volume reduction is at least about 20 volume percent, preferably at least about 30 volume percent, and more preferably at least about 40 volume percent.

[0081]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional schematic view during the process of the present invention in which a pillow is packaged, at a point after the pillow is compressed by a press, but before the packaging bag is sealed. FIG. 4 illustrates the situation where substantially all of the air has been pressed and displaced out of pillow 108. When substantially all of such air has been pressed out of pillow 108, the end 119 of bag 130 is heated sealed as indicated in FIG. 5 by heated press 121, which preferably is at a temperature of from about 425 to about 475 degrees Fahrenheit. In one embodiment, the end 119 of bag 130 is pressed under these conditions for about 20 seconds. Depending upon conditions such as the temperature of press 113, the temperature of the platen beneath press 113, and the melting temperature of bag 130, a proper seal may be achieved in a little as about 5 seconds.

[0082] Thereafter, as is illustrated in FIG. 6, cold press 113 and hot press 121 are retracted, with end 119 of bag 130 having been fused into-seal 134. Compressed pillow 108′ within sealed bag 130 then comprises compressed pillow assembly 110 (as in FIG. 1). Compressed pillow assembly 110 is ready to be packaged in bag 102 (see FIG. 1). In one embodiment, bag 130 is supplied from the bag manufacturer with a notch 105 (see FIG. 1A) that after sealing is positioned adjacent to seal 134. In another embodiment (not shown) hot press 121 is provided with a die that forms a notch at the edge of seal 134.

[0083] FIGS. 12-17 are cross-sectional schematic views of steps of a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad, or other similar compressible dry goods are packaged, with the use of vacuum assistance means.

[0084]FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional schematic view of the beginning of a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged using vacuum assistance means. Referring to FIG. 12, the uncompressed foam mattress pad 116 is first rolled up and/or folded over upon itself and disposed within a first packaging bag 129. Foam mattress pad 116 disposed within first packaging bag 129 is disposed on platen 111, and vacuum assistance means 140 is connected to first packaging bag 130. It is not required that first packaging bag is a heat sealable bag. In one embodiment, first packaging bag is a polyethylene bag.

[0085] In one preferred embodiment, vacuum assistance means 140 comprises a vacuum hose 143 that is operatively connected to a vacuum pump (not shown). In another embodiment, vacuum assistance means comprises a vacuum hose 143 that is operatively connected to a vacuum cleaner (not shown) comprising an electric motor, a blower, a vacuum tank, and a filter. In one preferred embodiment, vacuum hose 143 is made of lightweight plastic and comprises a flexible corrugated section 142 joined to a tubular cuff 144. In a further embodiment (not shown) cuff 144 extends further into bag 129, and is formed into an elongated flat section with perforations disposed therethrough. Such a structure facilitates the rapid and uniform evacuation of bag 129. Vacuum hose 143 is preferably between about one half inch and about three inches in diameter, and more preferably between about one inch and about two inches in diameter.

[0086] It is also preferred that vacuum assistance means 140 have sufficient capacity to draw at least about 20 inches water column of vacuum, and more preferably at least about 50 inches water column of vacuum. In one embodiment, vacuum assistance means 140 comprises a Shop Vac Model 2010 vacuum cleaner rated at 1.0 HP sold by the Sears and Roebuck Corporation.

[0087] Referring again to FIG. 12, vacuum assistance means 140 is connected to first packaging bag 129, preferably by inserting vacuum hose 143 into end 127 of bag 129 as indicated by arrow 152. End 127 of bag 130 is then gathered around hose 143 by the operator's hands (not shown), by automated robotic hands (not shown) or by other suitable means, thereby forming a temporary seal between bag 129 and hose 143. Vacuum assistance means 140 is then actuated by suitable means, e.g. a foot switch (not shown) operatively coupled to an electric motor, a valve (not shown) disposed in vacuum hose 143 proximate to the packaging operation, or by a second operator (not shown). Upon actuation of vacuum assistance means 140, air is evacuated from bag 129 and from foam mattress pad 116, flowing as indicated by arrow 154 out through hose 143.

[0088]FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional schematic view during a preferred process of the present invention in which a foam mattress pad is packaged, at a point after a first packaging bag and foam mattress pad contained therein are evacuated, but before the first packaging bag and foam mattress pad are placed within a second packaging bag. Referring to FIG. 13, most of the air contained in foam mattress pad 116 and first packaging bag 129 has been evacuated through hose 143, as indicated by arrow 154. Bag 129 has collapsed such that cavity 135 thereof is substantially contiguous with evacuated foam mattress pad 116, and has collapsed to a narrow neck 132 between foam mattress pad 116 and hose cuff 144.

[0089] At some point in time, vacuum assistance means 140 has evacuated air from bag 129 and foam mattress pad 116 to the limit of its capacity. The capacity of vacuum assistance means 140 is selected such that vacuum assistance means 140 is capable of evacuating the limit of its capacity of the air within bag 130 and foam mattress pad 116 within about twenty seconds, and more preferably within about ten seconds. In a more preferred embodiment, vacuum assistance means 140 is capable of achieving the desired evacuation of air within about five seconds.

[0090] At such time as when vacuum assistance means 140 has evacuated bag 129 and foam mattress pad 116 to near the limit of the capacity of vacuum assistance means 140, the next step of placing evacuated bag 129 and foam mattress pad 116 in heat sealable bag 130 proceeds. Referring again to FIG. 13, heat sealable bag 130 is drawn over evacuated bag 129 and foam mattress pad 116 as indicated by arrow 164, and vacuum hose 143 is withdrawn from end 127 of bag 129 as indicated by arrow 160. FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional schematic view depicting foam mattress pad 116 contained in first packaging bag 129 and heat-sealable packaging bag 130, at a point after first packaging bag 129 and foam mattress pad 116 contained therein have been placed in heat sealable bag 130, but before foam mattress pad 116 contained in bags 129 and 130 is compressed.

[0091] Compressing of foam mattress pad 116 then proceeds, resulting in the state depicted in FIG. 15. FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional schematic view in which a foam mattress pad 116 is compressed, but before the heat sealable bag 130 is sealed. Refering to FIG. 15, press 115 has been lowered upon foam mattress pad 116, further displacing a portion of the remaining air contained therein out through end 119. The pressing operation depicted in FIG. 15 is substantially identical to that shown in FIG. 4 and previously described in this specification.

[0092]FIGS. 15 and 16 are cross-sectional schematic views during the preferred process of the present invention, at a point when the packaging bag is sealed, and at the conclusion of such process, respectively. The steps depicted in FIGS. 15 and 16 are substantially identical to those shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 and previously described in this specification.

[0093] It is to be understood that the use of vacuum assistance means 140 is optional, and not required in all embodiments of the present invention. One reason for the use of vacuum assistance means and first packaging bag 129 is that the clearance between the platen 111 and cold press 113 in the retracted position is insufficient to enable the placement of foam mattress pad 116 in a bag upon platen 1111 without first partially compressing pad 116. In an alternate embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention, cold press 113 is retracted further vertically to provide sufficient clearance. In another embodiment, cold press 113 is swiveled horizontally to provide sufficient clearance.

[0094] Another reason for the use of vacuum assistance means and first packaging bag 129 is that it is preferable to use a small heat sealable bag such that less gathering and slack are present after sealing of such bag. Thus the foam mattress pad 116 is first partially compressed such that it can be fitted into such smaller heat sealable bag. In an alternate embodiment, heat sealable bag may be a heat shrinkable bag, such that excess gathering and slack are reduced as part of the packaging process.

[0095]FIGS. 7, 8, and 9 are perspective views of an uncompressed pillow and a compressed pillow, an uncompressed foam mattress pad and a compressed foam mattress pad, and an uncompressed blanket and a compressed blanket, respectively, packaged and sealed by the process of the present invention. FIGS. 7, 8, and 9 illustrate the uncompressed pillow 108, and the compressed pillow assembly 110, the uncompressed foam pad 116, and the compressed foam pad assembly 118, the uncompressed blanket 112, and the compressed blanket assembly 114. As will be apparent, each of the compressed articles 110, 118, and 114 may be produced by the processes depicted in FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6; or by the processes depicted in FIGS. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17. However, it is preferable that compressed articles 110 and 114 are produced by the process depicted in FIGS. 2-6 without vacuum assistance, and article 118 is produced by the process depicted in FIGS. 12-17. It will be further apparent that each of the compressed articles 110, 118, and 114 is compressed and packaged into a significantly smaller volume than the corresponding articles contained therein in their respective free states.

[0096] In one preferred embodiment, pillow 108 of FIG. 7 and blanket 114 of FIG. 9 are disposed together in a single heat sealable bag 130 (see FIG. 3), and the subsequent process steps depicted in FIGS. 4-6 are then performed to produce a packaged blanket and pillow packaged as a single unit. Such a smaller and simpler disaster pack has utility, e.g. when carried in one's personal automobile in cold climates.

[0097]FIG. 10 is a perspective view of one preferred embodiment of a package of the present invention, with contents depicted therein in phantom. In an embodiment wherein package 102 contains a bedding kit 107 comprising compressed pillow assembly 110, compressed foam pad 116, and compressed foam pad assembly 118 (see FIGS. 1, and 7-9), such bedding kit 107 is sealed within package 102. The respective compact rectangular shapes of each of such packaged components as shown in FIGS. 7-9 results in an overall compact rectangular shape of package 102 having a semi-rigid structure.

[0098] Such compact shape and semi-rigid structure of the bedding kit, and of other dry goods packaged according to the present invention, are very advantageous to the operations that occur in the movement of such goods from the factory floor, to warehousing, to retail sales location, to a storage location of the end customer. Such operations include, but are not limited to, labeling of such goods for inventory tracking and/or retail sale, placement of goods on shipping skids or wire mesh cargo containers on the factory floor, trucking of such goods to warehouses or retail sales locations, shipping of such goods by direct mail or commercial courier in very simple lightweight packaging such as a mailing envelope, placement of such goods on overhead storage racks at the retail store, offering of such goods on retail store shelves while showing only a single unit of such goods in free state in a point-of-purchase display. All of these operations are economically and functionally advantageous compared to the equivalent operations on uncompressed dry goods.

[0099] In one further embodiment, best illustrated by reference to FIG. 8, a dry good comprising a small foam chair is packaged. Foam chair has a rectilinear shape similar to foam pad 116, but with a lower aspect ratio, i.e. foam chair 116 is more closely approximated by a cube having a cavity hewn therefrom for the seating of a human therein. In further embodiments best illustrated by reference to FIG. 8, dry good 116 is a foam pet bed, a stuffed toy, or a foam play ball.

[0100]FIG. 11 is a top view of the package of FIG. 10 to which a label has been affixed or printed. It will be apparent that the compact shape and semi-rigid structure of package 102 is advantageous for labeling such package. In one embodiment, label 123 is a preprinted label comprising an adhesive backing, such label being removed from a release paper and applied to package 102. In another embodiment, label 123 is directly printed upon package 102 by printing means such as, e.g., ink jet printing, screen printing, a hot stamp, and the like. Such labels may include, but are not limited to, inventory management/tracking barcodes, UPC barcodes, lot numbers, dates, trademarks, patent numbers, logos, sales collateral, manufacturer's contact information, pricing, instructions for use, recycling instructions, safety warnings, materials contents, material safety data sheets, country of origin, illustrations, photographs, and other manufacturing, tracking, marketing, sales and use, and/or disposal information.

[0101]FIG. 18 is a flow chart depicting the steps of one preferred process for preparing a package containing a single object in accordance with the present invention. Referring to FIG. 18, packaging process 200 comprises a first step 210, placing the object in a heat sealable bag, and placing the bagged object upon a platen. The details of step 210 are depicted in FIG. 3.

[0102] Subsequent to step 210, in step 220, the object and bag are compressed and a portion of the remaining air contained therein is displaced from the bag, as depicted in FIGS. 4 and described elsewhere in this specification. Step 230, sealing of the object in the compressed bag, follows, as depicted in FIG. 5 and described elsewhere in this specification. The completely sealed package assembly is then removed from the platen in step 240, and delivered to labeling and/or shipping processes, or other packaging processes.

[0103] Referring again to FIG. 18, in the case where a large foam object such as a mattress pad is being packaged, packaging process 200 optionally further comprises step 405, placing such foam object in a first bag, and evacuating the first bag and foam object, as depicted in FIGS. 12 and 13 and described elsewhere in this specification. Subsequently, such foam object is packaged in steps 210-240, as depicted in FIGS. 14-17 and described elsewhere in this specification.

[0104] In one embodiment, the completely sealed package assembly is combined and further packaged with other package assemblies, in order to prepare a package containing multiple objects. FIG. 19 is a flow chart depicting the steps of one preferred process for preparing a package containing multiple objects in accordance with the present invention. Referring to FIG. 19, overall packaging process 500, in the most simple embodiment, comprises step 510, placing the multiple objects, or multiple packages containing objects in a packaging bag. In one preferred embodiment, the packaging bag is a cloth bag, as previously described in this specification.

[0105] In an alternate embodiment, wherein the bag of step 510 is a sealable bag, process 500 further comprises placing such bag on a platen, followed by an optional step 520, compressing or evacuating such bag containing multiple objects, or multiple packages containing objects, thereby displacing air contained in such multiple objects and/or multiple packages; 530, sealing the bag containing the multiple objects, or multiple packages containing objects; and 540, removing the multiple-object containing package from the platen. Such multiple-object containing package may then be delivered to labeling and/or shipping processes, to a warehouse, a retail sales location, and/or to the end user of the product(s) contained therein.

[0106] In one preferred embodiment, packaging process 500 further comprises the steps of preparing individual packaged objects as previously described and shown in this specification and FIGS. 1-18. Referring again to FIG. 19, process 500 further comprises the steps of sub-process 200, in which a first object is packaged in accordance with FIG. 18 as previously described in this specification; and the steps of sub-process 300, in which a second object is packaged in accordance with FIG. 18 as previously described in this specification. In a further embodiment, process 500 further comprises the steps of sub-process 400, in which a third foam object is packaged in accordance with FIG. 18 as previously described in this specification.

[0107] It will be apparent that process 500 may further comprise additional sub-processes for the packaging of individual dry goods, or process 500 may include the packaging of other substantially flat-shaped or small incompressible objects in addition to the individually packaged compressible dry goods, such as in the case of a disaster pack, e.g. a candle, a lighter, a match book, a small flashlight, preserved flat foodstuffs, and the like. It will be further apparent that individual labels may be applied or printed on such individual packages prior to their being packaged in a single bag, as indicated by optional step 505 of FIG. 18.

[0108] In one embodiment, process 500 is used to produce the disaster pack 102 (see FIG. 1) of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 1 and FIG. 19, in sub-process 200, the packaged pillow 110 is produced; in sub-process 300, the packaged blanket 114 is produced; and in sub-process 400, the packaged foam pad 118 is produced. Such individual packages may then be labeled in accordance with step 505. Subsequently, pillow 110, blanket 114, and foam pad 118 are combined in a heat-sealable bag and packaged as depicted in steps 510-550 as previously described in this specification. In an alternate embodiment, pillow 108 and blanket 114 are combined in a single heat sealable bag and a pillow/blanket packaged assembly (not shown) is produced in sub-process 200, while in sub-process 400, the packaged foam pad 118 is produced. Subsequently, pillow/blanket assembly and foam pad 118 are combined in a heat-sealable bag and packaged as depicted in steps 510-550 as previously described in this specification. Disaster pack 102 may then be delivered to labeling and/or shipping processes, to a warehouse, a retail sales location, and/or to the end user thereof.

[0109] It will be apparent that in making disaster pack 102, the packaged pillow 110, packaged blanket 114, (or a combined packaged pillow/blanket assembly), packaged mattress pad 118, and the combined package 102 may be made serially using a single apparatus comprising a platen, vacuum assistance means, a cold press, and a hot press. Alternatively, a plurality of packaging apparatus may be provided, with each individual apparatus packaging one of the pillow 108, the blanket 112, the mattress pad 116, or the combined package 102 simultaneously, so that higher manufacturing throughput is attained.

[0110] It will be further apparent that disaster pack 102 may comprises multiple sets of pillow 110, and blanket 114, and may further comprise foam pad 118, so that disaster pack 102 may be made suitable for two people, or suitable for a family of three or more people. It will be further apparent that although in the preferred embodiment, the pillow 110, blanket 114, and foam pad 118 are first packaged and sealed in individual bags, and then packaged and sealed in a single bag, Alternatively pillow 110, blanket 114, and foam pad 118 may all be disposed in a single bag, further compressed, and sealed therein in accordance with the process of the present invention. Alternatively, pillow 110 and blanket 114 may be sealed as an assembly in a first sealable bag, and foam pad 118 may be sealed in a second sealable bag, and such first and second sealed bags may be further sealed in a third sealable bag.

[0111] Apparatus for performing the methods of the present invention are provided for the making of the packaged compressible dry goods of the present invention. FIG. 20A is a side elevation view of one packaging apparatus for the making of the compressible dry goods packaged in accordance with the present invention; and FIG. 20B is a top view of the packaging apparatus of FIG. 20A. Referring to FIGS. 20A and 20B, apparatus 600 comprises a first conveyor 602, a second conveyor 604, platen 611, and combination press 610. In operation, first conveyor 602 conveys a bagged dry good, e.g. pillow 108 in bag 130 onto platen 611. Combination press 610 then deploys cold press portion 613 to compress pillow 108 in bag 130, thereby displacing the air therein. Combination press 610 then deploys hot or cold sealing press portion 621 to seal compressed pillow 108 in bag 130, thereby forming a sealed package 110 comprising seal 134. Sealed package 110 is then conveyed by conveyor 604 to a downstream operation such as e.g. labeling, or to shipping/storage container 620.

[0112] In a further embodiment, vacuum assistance means 140 of FIG. 12 is provided proximate to platen 611 and combination press 610. Such vacuum assistance means is used as previously described in this specification.

[0113] In a further embodiment, apparatus 600 further comprises an articulating arm (not shown) that precisely locates bag 130 on platen 611 prior to the sealing thereof, and/or displaces sealed bag 110 onto conveyor 604, wherein sealed bag 110 is conveyed to a downstream operation such as e.g. labeling, or to shipping/storage container 620.

[0114] In an alternate embodiment, apparatus 600 comprises conveyor 602 (and not conveyor 604), with platen 611 disposed within conveyor 602, between the upper and lower belts thereof. In operation of such embodiment, conveyor 602 ceases conveyance of dry good 108 in bag 130 briefly, while sealing press 621 is deployed to form seal 134 (see FIG. 6) in package 110. Subsequently, conveyor 602 is restarted, conveying sealed package 110 to a downstream operation such as e.g. labeling, or to shipping/storage container 620.

[0115]FIG. 21 is a side view of an alternate packaging apparatus for the making of the compressible dry goods packaged in accordance with the present invention. Referring to FIG. 21, apparatus 700 comprises compressing conveyor assembly 705, ejection conveyor assembly 715, platen 711, and sealing press 721. In operation, compressing conveyor 705, comprised of conveyor belts 704 and 706, conveys and compresses a bagged dry good, e.g. mattress pad 116 in bag 130, between cold or hot sealing press 721 and platen 711, such that end 119 of bag 130 is disposed between sealing press 721 and platen 711. Sealing press 721 is then deployed to form seal 134 in sealed bag 118. Ejecting conveyor 715, comprised of conveyor belts 714 and 716, then conveys sealed package 118 to a downstream operation such as e.g. labeling, or to shipping/storage container 720.

[0116] It will be apparent that in one embodiment, end 119 of bag 130 is disposed in the upstream direction as shown in FIG. 21, and in another embodiment (not shown) end 119 of bag 130 is disposed in the downstream direction. Either operation is suitable, with the operative requirement being that conveyors 705 and 715 temporarily stop the motion of bag 130 such that the end 119 of bag 130 is disposed beneath sealing press 721 on platen 711, so that sealing press 721 can be deployed to form seal 134 in package 118. In the preferred embodiment, sealing press 721 is a hot press, and platen 711 is a hot platen. In a further embodiment, vacuum assistance means 140 of FIG. 12 is provided proximate to the entrance of compressing conveyor 705. Such vacuum assistance means is used to first place a dry good in a packaging bag as previously described in this specification.

[0117] Referring again to FIG. 21, in a further embodiment (not shown), apparatus 700 comprises at least one supply roll of heat sealable film at the entrance to conveyor assembly 705, wherein a dry good is disposed within and partially wrapped by such film, and further drawn into and compressed by conveyor assembly 705. In one embodiment, a partial bag wrap around such dry good is formed, similar to bag 130. Apparatus 700 further comprises a cutter to cut the required length of such film from the supply roll, additional heat presses (not shown) disposed on each side of conveyors 705 and/or 715, which seal the side edges of such film, thereby forming a bag around dry good 108. Such bag is then sealed by press 721 as previously described.

[0118] In a further embodiment, apparatus 700 comprises a second heat sealble film supply roll at the entrance to conveyor assembly 705, such that dry good 108 is disposed between two sheets of sealing film from the first and second supply rolls. In such embodiment, sealing press 721 seals the leading edge of the film pieces together, side heat presses (not shown) seal the side edges as described previously, and sealing press 721 seals the trailing edge of the film, thereby sealing compressed dry good 108 in a bag formed in situ by apparatus 700. In a further embodiment (not shown), die cutters are provided that cut the sheet film, and/or that cut and square up the excess material from the heat sealed edges thereof.

[0119] It will be apparent that a plurality of apparatus 600 and/or apparatus 700 may be provided and controlled in serial operation, or in parallel operation, or in combinations thereof to form manufacturing cells for the making of packages of dry goods comprising multiple articles such as the disaster pack of the present invention. Such apparatuses may be physically arranged in parallel directions, in directions perpendicular to each other, or in a radial configuration depending upon the particular package being prepared.

[0120] It is, therefore, apparent that there has been provided, in accordance with the present invention, a disaster pack comprising a pillow, a blanket, and a foam pad contained in a highly compressed state within a sealed package, and a process for making such disaster pack. While this invention has been described in conjunction with preferred embodiments thereof, it is evident that many alternatives, modifications, and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, it is intended to embrace all such alternatives, modifications and variations that fall within the spirit and broad scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/524.8, 53/434, 53/445, 206/803, 206/223, 53/436
International ClassificationB65B63/02, B65D75/38, B65D85/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65B63/02, B65D75/38, B65D85/16, B65B63/026
European ClassificationB65B63/02D, B65D75/38, B65D85/16, B65B63/02