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Publication numberUS20030191274 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/974,303
Publication dateOct 9, 2003
Filing dateOct 10, 2001
Priority dateOct 10, 2001
Also published asUS7084230, US20040209971
Publication number09974303, 974303, US 2003/0191274 A1, US 2003/191274 A1, US 20030191274 A1, US 20030191274A1, US 2003191274 A1, US 2003191274A1, US-A1-20030191274, US-A1-2003191274, US2003/0191274A1, US2003/191274A1, US20030191274 A1, US20030191274A1, US2003191274 A1, US2003191274A1
InventorsThomas Kurth, Richard Kurth, Robert Turner, Les Kreifels
Original AssigneeKurth Thomas M., Kurth Richard A., Turner Robert B., Kreifels Les P.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oxylated vegetable-based polyol having increased functionality and urethane material formed using the polyol
US 20030191274 A1
Abstract
The present invention includes a method of producing a polyol having increased functionality by reacting a vegetable oil with an alkene oxide and the polyol produced according to the method.
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Claims(69)
The invention claimed is:
1. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
reacting a vegetable oil with an alkene oxide wherein the alkene oxide comprises about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of the total weight of the vegetable oil and the alkene oxide.
2. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the vegetable oil comprises crude vegetable oil.
3. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the vegetable oil comprises blown vegetable oil.
4. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a vegetable oil chosen from palm oil, safflower oil, canola oil, soy oil, cottonseed oil, and rapeseed oil.
5. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a blown vegetable oil chosen from blown palm oil, blown safflower oil, blown canola oil, blown soy oil, blown cottonseed oil, and blown rapeseed oil.
6. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the alkene oxide comprises propylene oxide.
7. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the alkene oxide comprises ethylene oxide.
8. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the alkene comprises butylene oxide.
9. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 1, wherein the alkene oxide comprises an alkene oxide chosen from propylene oxide, ethylene oxide, and butylene oxide.
10. The polyol produced by reacting a vegetable oil with an alkene oxide.
11. The polyol of claim 10, wherein the vegetable oil is soy oil.
12. The polyol of claim 10, wherein the alkene oxide comprises an alkene oxide chosen from propylene oxide, ethylene oxide, and butylene oxide.
13. The material comprising the reaction product of an isocyanate, an oxylation compound, a modified vegetable oil and a catalyst wherein the modified vegetable oil comprises the reaction product of a first polyol and a vegetable oil and the first polyol comprises the reaction product of a multifunctional alcohol and a second multifunctional compound.
14. The material of claim 13, wherein about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of oxylation compound is used.
15. The material of claim 14, wherein the first polyol is reacted with the oxylation compound prior to reacting the first polyol with the vegetable oil.
16. The material of claim 14, wherein the oxylation compound is reacted with the multifunctional alcohol prior to reacting the multifunctional alcohol and the second multifunctional component.
17. The material of claim 14, wherein the oxylation compound is reacted with the second multifunctional compound prior to reacting the second multifunctional compound with the multifunctional alcohol.
18. The material of claim 14, wherein the vegetable oil is reacted with the oxylation compound prior to reacting the first polyol with the vegetable oil.
19. The material of claim 15, wherein the oxylation compound comprises the oxylation compound chosen from ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, butylene oxide, tetrahydrofuran (TMF), tetrahydrofurfuryl, tetrahydrofurfural, and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol.
20. The material of claim 14, wherein the isocyanate is a diisocyanate compound.
21. The material of claim 14, wherein the isocyanate comprises an isocyanate chosen from 2,4 diisocyanate, 4,4′ diphenylmethane diisocyanate, 2,4 diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and toluene diisocyanate.
22. The material of claim 14, wherein the isocyanate comprises a prepolymer comprising the reaction product of a vegetable oil polyol and an isocyanate.
23. The material of claim 14, wherein the isocyanate comprises an isocyanate and a blowing agent.
24. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
providing a multifunctional alcohol, a vegetable oil, a second multifunctional compound having at least two hydroxyl (OH) groups, and a first oxylation compound;
reacting the multifunctional alcohol with the second multifunctional compound to form a first esterified polyol;
reacting the first esterified polyol with the crude vegetable oil to form a second esterified polyol;
blowing the second esterified polyol; and
reacting the second esterified polyol with the first oxylation compound.
25. The method of claim 24, wherein about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of the first oxylation compound is used.
26. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 24, wherein the second esterified polyol is reacted with an oxylation compound after the second esterified polyol is blown.
27. The method of producing a polyol having increased functionality of claim 24, wherein the first esterified polyol is reacted with a second oxylation compound.
28. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
providing a multifunctional alcohol, a vegetable oil, a second multifunctional compound having at least two hydroxyl (OH) groups and an oxylation compound and;
reacting the multifunctional alcohol with the second multifunctional compound to form an esterified polyol;
reacting the esterified polyol with the vegetable oil to form a second esterified polyol; and
reacting the second esterified polyol with the oxylation compound.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein the second multifunctional compound comprises a saccharide compound.
30. The method of claim 29, wherein the saccharide compound comprises a saccharide compound chosen from monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides, sugar alcohols, and honey.
31. The method claim 28, wherein the vegetable oil comprises blown vegetable oil.
32. The method of claim 28, wherein less than about 70% by weight of oxylation compound is used.
33. The method of claim 28, wherein about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of oxylation compound is used.
34. The method of claim 28, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a vegetable oil chosen from palm oil, safflower oil, canola oil, soy oil, cottonseed oil, and rapeseed oil.
35. The method of claim 28, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a blown vegetable oil chosen from blown palm oil, blown safflower oil, blown canola oil, blown soy oil, blown cottonseed oil, and blown rapeseed oil.
36. The method of claim 29, wherein the saccharide compound comprises a saccharide compound chosen from the group of glucose, sorbitol, and cane sugar.
37. The method of claim 28, wherein the oxylation compound comprises an oxylation compound chosen from propylene oxide, ethylene oxide, butylene oxide, tetrahydrofuran (TMF), tetrahydrofurfuryl, tetrahydrofurfural, furfural derivatives, and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol.
38. The method of claim 37, wherein the oxylation compound comprises propylene oxide.
39. The method of claim 37, wherein the oxylation compound comprises ethylene oxide.
40. The method of claim 37, wherein the oxylation compound comprises butylene oxide.
41. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
reacting a vegetable oil based polyol with an oxylation compound wherein the oxylation compound comprises less than about 70% by weight of the total weight of the vegetable oil and the oxylation compound.
42. The method of claim 43, wherein the oxylation compound comprises a bio-based oxylation compound.
43. The method of claim 42, wherein the oxylation compound comprises an oxylation compound chosen from the group comprising tetrahydrofuran (TMF), tetrahydrofurfuryl, tetrahydrofurfural, furfural derivatives, and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol.
44. The method of claim 41, wherein the alkene oxide comprises an alkene oxide chosen from propylene oxide, ethylene oxide, and butylene oxide.
45. The method of claim 41, wherein the vegetable oil based polyol comprises a vegetable oil based polyol chosen from the group comprising crude vegetable oil, blown vegetable oil, and transesterified vegetable oil.
46. The method of claim 45, wherein the vegetable oil based polyol comprises a vegetable oil based polyol chosen from the group comprising a palm oil based polyol, a safflower based polyol, a canola oil based polyol, a soy oil based polyol, a cottonseed based polyol, and a rapeseed oil based polyol.
47. The method of claim 41, wherein the oxylation compound comprises less than 70% by weight of the resultant mixtures of vegetable oil based polyol and the oxylation compound.
48. The method of claim 47, wherein the oxylation compound comprises about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of the resultant mixture of the vegetable oil based polyol and the oxylation compound.
49. The method of claim 48 further comprising adding heat to the reaction.
50. The method of claim 47 further comprising adding heat to the reaction.
51. The method of claim 41, wherein the oxylation compound comprises an alkene oxide.
52. A polyol comprising the reaction product of a vegetable oil based polyol and an oxylation compound wherein the oxylation compound comprises less than about 70% by weight of the total weight of the vegetable oil and the oxylation compound.
53. The polyol of claim 52, wherein the oxylation compound is a bio-based compound.
54. The polyol of claim 53, wherein the oxylation compound comprises an oxylation compound chosen from the group comprising tetrahydrofuran (TMF), tetrahydrofurfuryl, tetrahydrofurfural, and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol.
55. The polyol of claim 52, wherein the alkene oxide comprises an alkene oxide chosen from propylene oxide, ethylene oxide, and butylene oxide.
56. The polyol of claim 52, wherein the vegetable oil based polyol comprises a vegetable oil based polyol chosen from the group comprising crude vegetable oil, blown vegetable oil, and transesterified vegetable oil.
57. The polyol of claim 56, wherein the vegetable oil based polyol comprises a vegetable oil based polyol chosen from the group comprising a palm oil based polyol, a safflower based polyol, a canola oil based polyol, a soy oil based polyol, a cottonseed based polyol, and a rapeseed oil based polyol.
58. The polyol of claim 52, wherein the oxylation compound comprises about 5% by weight to about 10% by weight of the resultant mixture of the vegetable oil based polyol and the oxylation compound.
59. The polyol of claim 58 wherein heat is added to the reaction of the vegetable oil and the oxylation compound reaction.
60. The polyol of claim 52, wherein the oxylation compound comprises an alkene oxide.
61. A polyol having increased functionality comprising the reaction product of an oxylated component comprising the reaction product of an oxylation compound and an active hydrogen containing compound and a vegetable oil based polyol wherein the active hydrogen containing compound comprises at least two active hydrogens.
62. The polyol of claim 61, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a vegetable oil chosen from a transesterified vegetable oil, a blown vegetable oil, and a crude vegetable oil.
63. The polyol of claim 61, wherein the polyol formed by the reaction of the oxylated component and the vegetable oil based polyol is further reacted with a second oxylation compound.
64. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
reacting an oxylation compound and an active hydrogen containing compound to form an oxylated component; and
reacting the oxylated component with a vegetable oil based polyol.
65. The method of claim 64 further comprising reacting the polyol formed by the reaction of the oxylated component and the vegetable oil with a second oxylation compound.
66. The method of claim 65, wherein the vegetable oil comprises a vegetable oil chosen from a transesterified vegetable oil, a blown vegetable oil, and a crude vegetable oil.
67. A method of producing a polyol having increased functionality comprising:
reacting a first oxylation compound with a first active hydrogen containing compound comprising at least two active hydrogens to form an oxylated component;
reacting the oxylated component with a multifunctional compound comprising at least two active hydrogens to form a precusor polyol; and
reacting the precusor polyol with a vegetable oil based polyol.
68. The method of claim 67 further comprising reacting the reaction product of the precusor polyol and the vegetable oil based polyol with a second oxylation compound.
69. A polyol having increased functionality comprising the reaction product of a precusor polyol and a vegetable oil based polyol wherein the precusor polyol comprises the reaction product of a multifunctional compound comprising at least two active hydrogens and an oxylated component wherein the oxylated component comprises the reaction product of an oxylation compound and a second active hydrogen containing compound comprising at least two active hydrogens.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/944,212, entitled TRANSESTERIFIED POLYOL HAVING SELECTABLE AND INCREASED FUNCTIONALITY AND URETHANE MATERIAL PRODUCTS FORMED USING THE POLYOL, by Thomas M. Kurth et al., filed on Aug. 31, 2001, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference, which claims priority to the following U.S. Provisional Patent Applications: U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/251,068 entitled, “TRANSESTERIFIED POLYOL HAVING SELECTABLE AND INCREASED FUNCTIONALITY AND URETHANE PRODUCTS FORMED USING THE POLYOL”, by Thomas M. Kurth et al., filed Dec. 4, 2000, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference; U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/239,161 entitled, “TRANSESTERIFIED POLYOL HAVING SELECTABLE AND INCREASED FUNCTIONALITY AND URETHANE PRODUCTS FORMED USING THE POLYOL”, by Thomas M. Kurth et al., filed Oct. 10, 2000, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference; and U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/230,463 entitled, “TRANSESTERIFIED POLYOL HAVING SELECTABLE AND INCREASED FUNCTIONALITY AND URETHANE PRODUCTS FORMED USING THE POLYOL”, by Thomas M. Kurth et al., filed Sep. 6, 2000, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Because of their widely ranging mechanical properties and their ability to be relatively easily machined and formed, plastic foams and elastomers have found wide use in a multitude of industrial and consumer applications. In particular, urethane materials, such as foams and elastomers, have been found to be well suited for many applications. Automobiles, for instance, contain a number of components, such as cabin interior parts, that are comprised of urethane foams and elastomers. Urethane foams are also used as carpet backing. Such urethane foams are typically categorized as flexible, semi-rigid, or rigid foams with flexible foams generally being softer, less dense, more pliable, and more subject to structural rebound subsequent to loading than rigid foams.

[0003] The production of urethane foams and elastomers are well known in the art. Urethanes are formed when isocyanate (NCO) groups react with hydroxyl (OH) groups. The most common method of urethane production is via the reaction of a polyol and a diisocyanate, which forms the backbone urethane group. A cross-linking agent and/or chain extender may also be added. Depending on the desired qualities of the final urethane product, the precise formulation may be varied. Variables in the formulation include the type and amounts of each of the reactants and additives.

[0004] In the case of a urethane foam, a blowing agent is added to cause gas or vapor to be evolved during the reaction. The blowing agent is one element that assists in creating the size of the void cells in the final foam, and commonly is a solvent with a relatively low boiling point or water. A low boiling solvent evaporates as heat is produced during the exothermic isocyanate/polyol reaction to form vapor bubbles. If water is used as a blowing agent, a reaction occurs between the water and the isocyanate group to form an amine and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas in the form of bubbles. In either case, as the reaction proceeds and the material solidifies, the vapor or gas bubbles are locked into place to form void cells. Final urethane foam density and rigidity may be controlled by varying the amount or type of blowing agent used.

[0005] A cross-linking agent is often used to promote chemical cross-linking to result in a structured final urethane product. The particular type and amount of cross-linking agent used will determine final urethane properties such as elongation, tensile strength, tightness of cell structure, tear resistance, and hardness. Generally, the degree of cross-linking that occurs correlates to the flexibility of the final foam product. Relatively low molecular weight compounds with greater than single functionality are found to be useful as cross-linking agents.

[0006] Catalysts may also be added to control reaction times and to effect final product qualities. The catalysts generally effect the speed of the reaction. In this respect, the catalyst interplays with the blowing agent to effect the final product density. Preferably, for foam urethane production, the reaction should proceed at a rate such that maximum gas or vapor evolution coincides with the hardening of the reaction mass. The catalyst may also effect the timing or speed of curing so that a urethane foam may be produced in a matter of minutes instead of hours.

[0007] Polyols currently used in the production of urethanes are petrochemicals being generally derived from propylene or ethylene oxides. Polyester polyols and polyether polyols are the most common polyols used in urethane production. For flexible foams, polyester or polyether polyols with molecular weights greater than 2,500, are generally used. For semi-rigid foams, polyester or polyether polyols with molecular weights of 2,000 to 6,000 are generally used, while for rigid foams, shorter chain polyols with molecular weights of 200 to 4,000 are generally used. There is a very wide variety of polyester and polyether polyols available for use, with particular polyols being used to engineer and produce a particular urethane elastomer or foam having desired particular final toughness, durability, density, flexibility, compression set ratios and modulus, and hardness qualities. Generally, higher molecular weight polyols and lower functionality polyols tend to produce more flexible foams than do lower molecular weight polyols and higher functionality polyols. In order to eliminate the need to produce, store, and use different polyols, it would be advantageous to have a single, versatile, renewable component that was capable of being used to create final urethane foams of widely varying qualities.

[0008] Currently, one method employed to increase the reactivity of petroleum based polyols includes propoxylation or ethoxylation. When propoxylation or ethoxylation is done on conventional petroleum based polyols, current industry practice is to employ about 70% propylene oxide by weight of the total weight of the polyol and propylene oxide to complete the reaction. Due to the large amount of alkyloxide typically used, the reaction if the alkyloxide and the petroleum based polyol is extremely exothermic and alkyloxides can be very expensive to use, especially in such high volumes. The exothermic nature of the reaction requires numerous safety precautions be undertaken when the process is conducted on an industrial scale.

[0009] Use of petrochemicals such as, polyester or polyether polyols is disadvantageous for a variety of reasons. As petrochemicals are ultimately derived from petroleum, they are a non-renewable resource. The production of a polyol requires a great deal of energy, as oil must be drilled, extracted from the ground, transported to refineries, refined, and otherwise processed to yield the polyol. These required efforts add to the cost of polyols and to the disadvantageous environmental effects of its production. Also, the price of polyols tends to be somewhat unpredictable. Their price tends to fluctuate based on the fluctuating price of petroleum.

[0010] Also, as the consuming public becomes more aware of environmental issues, there are distinct marketing disadvantages to petrochemical based products. Consumer demand for “greener” “bio-based” products continues to grow. The term “bio-based” or “greener” polyols for the purpose of this application is meant to be broadly interpreted to mean all polyols not derived exclusively from non-renewable resources. Petroleum and bio-based copolymers are also encompassed by the term “bio-based”. As a result, it would be most advantageous to replace polyester or polyether polyols, as used in the production of urethane elastomers and foams, with more versatile, renewable, less costly, and more environmentally friendly components.

[0011] The difficulties in the past that occurred due to the use of vegetable oil as the polyols to produce a urethane product include the inability to regulate the functionality of the polyol resulting in variations in urethane product where the industry demands relatively strict specifications be met and the fact that urethane products, in the past, outperformed vegetable oil based products in quality tests, such as carpet backing pull tests.

[0012] An unresolved need therefore exists for an improved functionality, vegetable oil based polyol of increased and selectable functionality for use in manufacturing a urethane materials such as, elastomers and foams. Also needed is a method of producing such urethane materials using the improved functionality, vegetable oil based polyol based on a reaction between isocyanates alone or as a prepolymer, in combination with the improved functionality polyol or a blend of the improved functionality polyol and other polyols including petrochemical based polyols. The products and methods of the present invention are particularly desirable because they relate to relatively inexpensive, versatile, renewable, environmentally friendly materials such as, vegetable oil, more particularly blown soy oil, transesterified with a saccharide, polysaccharide, or a sugar alcohol to form a polyol of increased and selectable functionality that can be a replacement for soy or petroleum based polyether or polyester polyols typically employed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] This invention generally relates to a new vegetable oil based polyol of increased and selectable functionality and the method of producing the new polyol by oxylation of a vegetable oil based polyol. The invention also generally relates to the use of the oxylated vegetable oil based polyol in all urethane products such as foams, elastomers, or rigid plastics.

[0014] These and other features, advantages and objects of the present invention will be further understood and appreciated by those skilled in the art by reference to the following specification, claims, and appended drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0015] A new vegetable oil based polyol having increased and selectable functionality has been developed. A two-stage transesterification process produces the new vegetable oil based polyol as the reaction product of a multifunctional alcohol and a multifunctional component, subsequently reacted with a vegetable oil. In the first step in the two-stage transesterification process, glycerin, a suitable multifunctional alcohol, or other suitable multifunctional alcohol is heated to about 230° F., and advantageously also stirred; however, a catalyst may be used instead of or in addition to heat. Next, a multifunctional component having at least two hydroxyl groups preferably includes a saccharide compound, typically a monosaccharide, disaccharide, a polysaccharide, sugar alcohol, cane sugar, honey, or mixture thereof is slowly introduced into the glycerin until saturated. Currently, the preferred saccharide components are fructose and cane sugar. Cane sugar provides greater tensile strength and fructose provides greater elongation of the carbon chain of the polyol. Preferably, 2 parts of the saccharide compound is added to 1 part of the multifunctional alcohol, by weight. Glycerin is a carrier for the saccharide compound component, although it does add some functional hydroxyl groups. The saccharide component is slowly added until no additional saccharide component can be added to the glycerin solution.

[0016] It is believed that the multifunctional alcohol and the saccharide component undergo an initial transesterification to form new ester products (precursors). As such, the functionality of the new polyol is selectable. The greater the functionality of the alcohol, the greater the functionality of the final new polyol.

[0017] Next, from about 200 to 300 grams (experimental amount) of vegetable oil, preferably soy oil, and most preferably blown soy oil, is heated to at least about 180° F. However, the temperature may be any temperature from about 180° F. until the oil is damaged. Blown soy oil provides superior results to regular vegetable oil; however, any vegetable oil or blown vegetable oil will work. Other vegetable oils that may be utilized in the present invention include, but should not be limited to, palm oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, canola oil, rapeseed oil, cottonseed oil, linseed, and coconut oil. When these vegetable oils are used, they too are preferably blown. However, the vegetable oils may be crude vegetable oils or crude vegetable oils that have had the soap stock and wax compound in the crude oil removed.

[0018] Once the blown soy oil has been heated, it is slowly reacted with the heated glycerin/saccharide ester, the first transesterification reaction product. The vegetable oil and the first transesterification product undergo a second transesterification reaction that increases the functionality of the resulting polyol. Lowering the amount of the saccharide component added to the vegetable oil lowers the number of functional groups available to be cross-linked with an isocyanate group when the polyol produced using the two-stage transesterification process outlined above is used to create a urethane product. In this manner, functionality of the final polyol produced by the transesterification process of the present invention may be regulated and engineered. Therefore, more rigid urethane products are formed using a polyol produced by the present invention by using increased amounts of a saccharide component. In addition, as discussed above, the higher functionality of the multifunctional alcohol may also increase the functionality of the urethane products formed using the new polyol.

[0019] Also, polyols having increased functionality can not only be made by the transesterification process discussed above alone, but a further increase in functionality of a vegetable oil based polyol may also be achieved by oxylation (propoxylation, butyoxylation, or ethoxylation). The addition of propylene oxide (propoxylation), ethylene oxide (ethoxylation), butylene oxide, (butyloxylation), or any other known alkene oxides to a vegetable oil, a crude vegetable oil, a blown vegetable oil, the reaction product of the saccharide (multifunctional compound) and the multifunctional alcohol, or the final vegetable oil based, transesterified polyol produced according to the transesterification process discussed above will further increase the functionality of the polyol thereby formed.

[0020] Applicants currently believe that bio-based oxylation substances, such as, tetrahydrofuran (TMF), tetrahydrofurfuryl, tetrahydrofurfural, and furfural derivatives as well as tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol may be used instead of or in addition to alkyloxides in the present invention.

[0021] Moreover, Applicants believe that any substance containing an active hydrogen may be oxylated to any desired degree and subsequently transesterified. Once transesterified with the vegetable oil, a compound whose active hydrogens were not fully oxylated may be further oxylated. Some active hydrogens include OH, SH, NH, chorohydrin, or any acid group. Compounds containing these active hydrogens, such as ethylene diamine, may be partially (because it contains more than one active hydrogen) or fully oxylated and then transesterified with the multifunctional alcohol, a crude vegetable oil, a blown vegetable oil, the reaction product of the saccharide (multifunctional compound) and the multifunctional alcohol, or the final vegetable oil based, transesterified polyol produced according to the transesterification process discussed above will further increase the functionality of the polyol thereby formed.

[0022] When propoxylation or like reactions are done to the vegetable oil or the transesterified polyol, an initiator/catalyst is typically employed to start and, throughout the reaction, to maintain the reaction of the propylene oxide and the vegetable oil to the transesterified polyol. The resulting reaction is an exothermic reaction. Initiators/catalysts that may be employed in the propoxylation, ethyoxylation, or butyloxylation reaction include triethylamine, trimethylamine, or other suitable amines as well as potassium hydroxide or other suitable metal catalyst.

[0023] Significantly, while about 70% by weight of alkyloxides is typically used to fully oxylate a petroleum based polyol, when oxylation of crude, blown, or transesterified vegetable based polyols is conducted, only about 5% to about 10% of the oxylation compound is necessary. As a result, Applicants have found that, in experimental amounts, the reaction is not nearly as exothermic as a “typical” oxylation reaction using a petroleum based product. As a result, Applicants believe this will be a significant safety benefit when done at production scale. Applicants have suprisingly found that adding heat to the oxylation reaction employing a vegetable based polyol is preferred. On an industrial scale, this may provide the additional benefit of regulating reaction time. Obviously, since significantly less oxylation raw material is used when oxylation is done to the vegetable based polyol of the present invention, significant cost savings result as well. Additionally and probably most significantly, oxylation of the vegetable based polyols of the present invention, either blown or transesterified, results in a vegetable oil based polyol with improved reactive and chemical properties.

[0024] In practice, the alkyloxide or bio-based oxylation compound and a suitable catalyst/initiator are added to a vegetable oil, preferably a blown or transesterified vegetable oil and mixed. The resultant mixture is then heated until the temperature reaches about 100° C. The temperature is held at about 100° C. for about one to about two hours. The mixture is then cooled to ambient temperature while pulling a vacuum to remove any excess alkyloxide or bio-based oxylation compound.

[0025] Moreover, it has been contemplated that the above described transesterification process may be performed on crude or non-blown vegetable (soy) oil prior to blowing the vegetable (soy) oil to form a pre-transesterified vegetable (soy) oil. The pre-transesterified vegetable (soy) oil may then be blown, as known, to increase its functionality. Thereafter, the transesterification process discussed above may optionally be carried out again on the blown pre-transesterified vegetable (soy) oil.

[0026] A transesterification catalyst such as tetra-2-ethylhexyl titonate, which is marketed by DuPont® as Tyzor® TOT, may be used, instead of or in addition to heat. Also, known acids and other transesterification catalysts known to those of ordinary skill may also be used.

[0027] The preparation of urethanes is well known in the art. They are generally produced by the reaction of petrochemical polyols, either polyester or polyether, with isocyanates. The flexibility or rigidity of the foam is dependent on the molecular weight and functionality of the polyol and isocyanate used.

[0028] Petrochemical polyol based polyurethanes can be prepared when what is known in the art as an A-side reactant is combined with what is known in the art as a B-side reactant. The A-side reactant of the urethane of the invention comprises an isocyanate, typically a diisocyanate such as: 4,4′ diphenylmethane diisocyanate; 2,4 diphenylmethane diisocyanate; and modified diphenylmethane diisocyanate. Typically, a modified diphenylmethane diisocyanate is used. Mondur MR Light®, an aromatic polymeric isocyanate based on diphenylmethane-diisocyanate, and Mondur® MA-2903, a new generation MDI prepolymer, manufactured by Bayer® Corporation, are two specific examples of possible isocyanates that can be used. It should be understood that mixtures of different isocyanates may also be used. The particular isocyanate or isocyanate mixture used is not essential and can be selected for any given purpose or for any reason as desired by one of ordinary skill in the art.

[0029] The A-side of the reaction may also be a prepolymer isocyanate. The prepolymer isocyanate is the reaction product of an isocyanate, preferably a diisocyanate, and most preferably some form of diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and a vegetable oil. The vegetable oil can be any of the vegetables discussed previously or any other oil having a suitable number of reactive hydroxyl (OH) groups. Soy oil is particularly advantageous to use. To create the prepolymer diisocyanate, the vegetable oil, the transesterified vegetable oil or a mixture of vegetable oils and transesterified vegetable oils are mixed and allowed to react until the reaction has ended. There may be some unreacted isocyanate (NCO) groups in the prepolymer. However, the total amount of active A-side material has increased through this process. The prepolymer reaction reduces the cost of the A-side component by decreasing the amount of isocyanate required and utilizes a greater amount of inexpensive, environmentally friendly vegetable (soy) oil. Alternatively, after the A-side prepolymer is formed, additional isocyanates may be added

[0030] The B-side material is generally a solution of a petroleum based polyester or polyether polyol, cross-linking agent, and blowing agent. A catalyst is also generally added to the B-side to control reaction speed and effect final product qualities. As discussed infra, the use of a petrochemical such as, a polyester or polyether polyol is undesirable for a number of reasons.

[0031] It has been discovered that urethane materials of high quality can be prepared by substituting the petroleum based polyol in the B-side preparation with the increased and selectable functionality polyol produced by the transesterification process outlined above. Using Applicants' method permits substantial regulation of the functionality of the resulting polyol thereby making the polyols produced by Applicants' new process more desirable to the industry. Previously, the functionality of vegetable oil based polyols varied dramatically due to, for example, genetic or environmental reasons.

[0032] In addition to the increased and selectable functionality polyol produced by the transesterification process outlined above, the B-side of the urethane reaction may include a cross-linking agent. Surprisingly, a cross-linking agent is not required when using the new transesterified polyol to form a urethane product. Typically, a blowing agent and a catalyst are also used in the B-side of the reaction. These components are also optional, but are typically used to form urethane product, especially foams.

[0033] A currently preferred blown soy oil typically has the following composition; however, the amounts of each component vary over a wide range. These values are not all inclusive. Amounts of each components of the oil vary due to weather conditions, type of seed, soil quality and various other environmental conditions:

100% Pure Soybean Oil Air Oxidized
Moisture 1.15%
Free Fatty Acid 1-6%, typically ≈ 3%
Phosphorous 50-200 ppm
Peroxide Value 50-290 Meq/Kg
Iron ≈6.5 ppm
(naturally occurring amount)
Hydroxyl Number 42-220 mgKOH/g
Acid Value 5-13 mgKOH/g
Sulfur ≈200 ppm
Tin <.5 ppm

[0034] Blown soy oil typically contains a hydroxyl value of about 100-180 and more typically about 160, while unblown soy oil typically has a hydroxyl value of about 30-40. The infrared spectrum scans of two samples of the type of blown soy oil used in the present invention are shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Blown soy oil and transesterified soy oil produced according to the present invention have been found to have a glass transition at about −137° C. to about −120° C. depending on the saccharide component used and whether one is used at all. The glass transition measures the first signs of molecular movement in the polymer at certain temperatures. The glass transition can be measured using a Dynamic Mechanical Thermal (DMT) analysis machine. Rheometric Scientific is one manufacturer of DMT machines useful with the present invention. Applicants specifically utilize a DMTA5 machine from Rheometric Scientific.

[0035] Applicants have also found that soybean oil and most other vegetable oils have C3 and C4 acid groups, which cause bitter smells when the vegetable polyols are reacted with isocyanates. In order to remove these acid groups and the resultant odor from the end use product, Applicants have also developed a way to effectively neutralize these lowering acids with the functionality of the polyol.

[0036] Applicants blow nitrogen (N2) through a solution of about 10% ammonium hydroxide. Nitrogen gas was selected because it does not react with the ammonium hydroxide. Any gas that does not react with the ammonium hydroxide while still mixing the ammonium hydroxide through the vegetable oil would be acceptable. The ammonium hydroxide neutralizes acid groups that naturally occur in the vegetable oil. The pH of transesterified, blown, and crude vegetable oil typically falls within the range of from about 5.9-6.2. Vegetable oil neutralized by the above-identified process has a typical pH range of from about 6.5 to about 7.2, but more typically from about 6.7 to 6.9. The removal of these C3 and C4 acid groups results in a substantial reduction in odor when the neutralized polyols are used to form isocyanates.

[0037] Except for the use of the transesterified polyol replacing the petroleum based polyol, the preferred B-side reactant used to produce urethane foam is generally known in the art. Accordingly, preferred blowing agents, which may be used for the invention, are those that are likewise known in the art and may be chosen from the group comprising 134A HCFC, a hydrochloroflurocarbon refrigerant available from Dow Chemical Co. of Midland, Mich.; methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK); acetone; a hydroflurocarbon; cyclopentane; methylene chloride; any hydrocarbon; and water or mixtures thereof. Presently, a mixture of cyclopentane and water is preferred. Another possible blowing agent is ethyl lactate, which is derived from soybeans and is bio-based. At present, water is the preferred blowing agent when a blowing agent is used. The blowing agents, such as water, react with the isocyanate (NCO) groups, to produce a gaseous product. The concentrations of other reactants may be adjusted to accommodate the specific blowing agent used in the reaction.

[0038] As discussed above, when blown soy oil is used to prepare the transesterified polyol of the B-side, the chain extender (cross-linking agent) may be removed from the B-side of the urethane reactions and similar properties to urethane products produced using soy oil according to the teachings of WO 00/15684 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,180,686, the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated by reference, are achieved.

[0039] If cross-linking agents are used in the urethane products of the present invention, they are also those that are well known in the art. They must be at least di-functional (a diol). The preferred cross-linking agents for the foam of the invention are ethylene glycol; 1,4 butanediol; diethanol amines; ethanol amines; tripropylene glycol, however, other diols and triols or greater functional alcohols may be used. It has been found that a mixture of tripropylene glycol; 1,4 butanediol; and diethanol amines are particularly advantageous in the practice of the present invention. Dipropylene glycol may also be used as a cross-linking agent. Proper mixture of the cross-linking agents can create engineered urethane products of almost any desired structural characteristics.

[0040] In addition to the B-side's vegetable oil, the optional blowing agent(s), and optional cross-linking agents, one or more catalysts may be present. The preferred catalysts for the urethanes of the present invention are those that are generally known in the art and are most preferably tertiary amines chosen from the group comprising DABCO 33-LV® comprised of 33% 1,4 diaza-bicyclco-octane (triethylenediamine) and 67% dipropylene glycol, a gel catalyst available from the Air Products Corporation; DABCO® BL-22 blowing catalyst available from the Air Products Corporation; POLYCAT® 41 trimerization catalyst available from the Air Products Corporation; Dibutyltin dilaurate; Dibutyltin diacetate; stannous octane; Air Products' DBU® (1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0] dibutyltin dilaurate); and Air Products' DBU® (1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0] dibutyltin diacetate). Other amine catalysts, including any metal catalysts, may also be used and are known by those of ordinary skill in the art.

[0041] Also as known in the art, when forming foam urethane products, the B-side reactant may further comprise a silicone surfactant which functions to influence liquid surface tension and thereby influence the size of the bubbles formed and ultimately the size of the hardened void cells in a final urethane foam product. This can effect foam density and foam rebound (index of elasticity of foam). Also, the surfactant may function as a cell-opening agent to cause larger cells to be formed in the foam. This results in uniform foam density, increased rebound, and a softer foam.

[0042] A molecular sieve may further be present to absorb excess water from the reaction mixture. The preferred molecular sieve of the present invention is available under the trade name L-paste™.

[0043] The urethane materials (products) of the present invention are produced by combining the A-side reactant with the B-side reactant in the same manner as is generally known in the art. Advantageously, use of the transesterified polyol to replace the petroleum based polyol does not require significant changes in the method of performing the reaction procedure. Upon combination of the A and B side reactants, an exothermic reaction ensues that may reach completion in anywhere from a few seconds (approximately 2-4) to several hours or days depending on the particular reactants and concentrations used. Typically, the reaction is carried out in a mold or allowed to free rise. The components may be combined in differing amounts to yield differing results, as will be shown in the Examples presented below.

[0044] A petroleum based polyol such as polyether polyol (i.e., Bayer corporation's Multranol® 3901 polyether polyol and Multranol® 9151 polyether polyol), polyester polyol, or polyurea polyol may be substituted for some of the transesterified polyol in the B-side of the reaction, however, this is not necessary. This preferred B-side formulation is then combined with the A-side to produce a urethane material. The preferred A-side, as discussed previously, is comprised of methylenebisdiphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) or a prepolymer comprised of MDI and a vegetable oil, preferably soy oil or a prepolymer of MDI and the transesterified polyol.

[0045] Flexible urethane foams may be produced with differing final qualities by not only regulating the properties of the transesterified polyol, but by using the same transesterified polyol and varying the particular other reactants chosen. For instance, it is expected that the use of relatively high molecular weight and high functionality isocyanates will result in a less flexible foam than will use of a lower molecular weight and lower functionality isocyanate when used with the same transesterified polyol. Likewise, as discussed earlier, the higher the functionality of the polyol produced by the transesterification process, the more rigid the foam produced using it will be. Moreover, it has been contemplated that chain extenders may also be employed in the present invention. For example, butanediol, in addition to acting as a cross-linker, may act as a chain extender.

[0046] Urethane elastomers can be produced in much the same manner as urethane foams. It has been discovered that useful urethane elastomers may be prepared using the transesterified polyol to replace some of or all of the petroleum based polyester or the polyether polyol. The preferred elastomer of the invention is produced using diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and the transesterified polyol. A catalyst may be added to the reaction composition. The resulting elastomer has an approximate density of about 52 lb. to about 75 lb. per cubic foot.

[0047] The following examples are the preparation of transesterified polyol of the present invention, as well as foams and elastomers of the invention formed using the transesterified polyol. The examples will illustrate various embodiments of the invention. The A-side material in the following examples is comprised of modified diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), unless otherwise indicated; however, any isocyanate compound could be used.

[0048] Also, “cure,” if used in the following examples, refers to the final, cured urethane product taken from the mold. The soy oil used in the following examples is blown soy oil. Catalysts used include “DABCO 33-LV®,” comprised of 33% 1,4-diaza-bicyclo-octane and 67% dipropylene glycol available from the Air Products Urethanes Division; “DABCO® BL-22,” a tertiary amine blowing catalyst also available from the Air Products Urethanes Division; “POLYCAT® 41” (n, n′, n″, dimethylamino-propyl-hexahydrotriazine tertiary amine) also available from the Air Products Urethanes Division; dibutyltin dilaurate (T-12); dibutyltin diacetate (T-1); and Air Products DBU® (1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0]). The structures of the Air Products DBU®'s (1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0]) used in the present invention are shown in FIG. 4.

[0049] A blowing catalyst in the following examples effects the timing of the activation of the blowing agent. Some of the examples may include “L-paste™,” which is a trade name for a molecular sieve for absorbing water. Some may also contain “DABCO® DC-5160” or “Air Products DC193®”, both are silicone surfactants available from Air Products Urethane Division.

EXAMPLES

[0050] All percentages referred to in the following examples refer to weight percent, unless otherwise noted.

Example 1

[0051]

Transester-
ification
2.5% Glycerin
5.0% Sorbitol
92.5%  Polyurea polyol and Blown soy oil mixture
Elastomer
Formation
B-side:
 97% Transesterified polyol formed above
Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
  3% Butanediol (cross-linker)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0052] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 55 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 2

[0053]

Transester-
ification
2.5% Glycerin
5.0% Sorbitol
92.5%  Polyurea polyol and Blown soy oil
Elastomer
Formation
B-side:
 97% Transesterified polyol formed above
Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
  3% Dipropylene glycol (chain extender)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0054] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 46 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 3

[0055]

Transester-
ification
2.5% Glycerin
5.0% Sorbitol
92.5%  Blown soy oil
Elastomer
Formation
B-side:
 97% Transesterified polyol formed above
Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
  3% Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0056] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 4

[0057]

Transester-
ification
 5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer
Formation
B-side:
  97% Transesterified polyol formed above
Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
  3% Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0058] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 5

[0059]

Transester-
ification
10.0% Glycerin
20.0% Sorbitol
70.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer
Formation
B-side:
Transesterified polyol formed above
Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
 3.0% Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0060] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 6

[0061]

Transesterification
12.0% Glycerin
24.0% Sorbitol
12.0% Polyurea polyol
52.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side: Transesterified polyol formed above
Heat (190° F.) was used to catalyze the reaction
Butanediol (cross-linker)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

Example 7

[0062]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85% Polyurea polyol and Blown soy oil mixture
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.3 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
10.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0063] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 38 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 8

[0064]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85% Polyurea polyol and Blown soy oil mixture
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
30.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
20.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
3.0 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0065] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 31 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 9

[0066]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0067] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 60 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 10

[0068]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
5.0% Polyurea polyol
80.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
2.4 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0069] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 40 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 11

[0070]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
5.0% Polyurea polyol
80.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
2.4 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0071] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 100 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 12

[0072]

Transesterification
 5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
12.0% Polyurea polyol
73.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
 0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0073] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and cured at a temperature of 162° F.

Example 13

[0074]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0075] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 80 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and cured at a temperature of 166° F.

Example 14

[0076]

Transesterification
5.0% Glycerin
10.0% Sorbitol
85.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed above
0.4 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T-1) - catalyst
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0077] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and cured at a temperature of 153° F.

Example 15

[0078]

Transesterification
1.0% (6.66 g) Glycerin
3.0% (13.4 g) Sorbitol
400.0 g Blown soy oil

[0079] This mixture was heated at 196° F. for 1.5 hours.

Example 16

[0080] 20.0 g of Glycerin heated and stirred at 178° F.

[0081] Introduced 40.0 g sorbitol slowly for about 4 minutes

[0082] Stayed milky until about 15 minute mark

[0083] At temperatures above 120° F., the solution was very fluid and clear. At temperatures under 120° F., the solution was clear; however, it was very viscous.

[0084] Added this mixture to 200.0 g of blown soy oil

[0085] 200.0 g of blown soy oil heated to 178° F.

[0086] Introduced sorbitol, glycerin mixture as follows:

[0087] Added 10.0 g turned very cloudy within 30 seconds. Could not see the bottom of the beaker

[0088] Still very cloudy after 5 minutes and added 10.0 g

[0089] Viscosity increased and had to reduce paddle speed after 10 minutes

[0090] Viscosity reduced somewhat after about 18 minutes

[0091] A further reduction in viscosity after about 21 minutes

[0092] This was mixed in a 500 ML beaker with a magnetic paddle. The scientists were not able to see through the beaker. After about 21 minutes, a vortex appended in the surface indicating a further reduction in viscosity. At this time, the mixture lightened by a visible amount. Maintained heat and removed.

[0093] Reacted the new polyol with Modified Monomeric MDI, NCO-19.

New Polyol 100%
DBU 0.03%
MDI 50 p to 100 p of about Polyol
Reaction: Cream time about 30 seconds

[0094] Tack free in about 45 seconds

[0095] Good physical properties after about 2 minutes

[0096] The reaction looked good, the material showed no signs of blow and seemed to be a good elastomer. It does however exhibit some signs of too much crosslinking and did not have the amount of elongation that would be optimal.

[0097] A comparative reaction run along side with the unmodified blown soy oil was not tack free at 24 hours.

Example 17

[0098]

Transesterification
1.0% Glycerin
3.0% Sorbitol
96.0% Blown soy oil
Elastomer Formation
B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 15
0.5 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0099] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and cured at a temperature of 154° F. for 4 minutes.

Example 18

[0100]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed from 20 g Dipropylene
Glycol, 5 g Glycerin, and 20 g sorbitol blended with 200 g
blown soy oil
   0.3 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0101] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 19

[0102]

Transesterification
750 g Blown soy oil
150 g Glycerin
 75 g Cane sugar

Example 20

[0103]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
10.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.6 g Dibutyltin diacetate
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0104] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 57 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and was set up on 20 seconds.

Example 21

[0105]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
10.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.6 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0106] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 71 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 22

[0107]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
10.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.6 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0108] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 45 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 23

[0109]

B-side: 100.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
 20.0 g Polyether polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
 3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
 3.0 g Butanediol
 0.7 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
228.6 g Calcium Carbonate (filler)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0110] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 25 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 24

[0111]

B-side: 20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
 5.0 g Transesterification from Example 25
 0.6 g Dipropylene Glycol
 0.7 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903).

[0112] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 57 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and was set up on 20 seconds.

Example 25

[0113]

Transesterification
100 g Blown soy oil
 27 g 63% glycerin and 37% cane sugar reaction
product mixture

[0114] The above was heated at a temperature of 230° F. and mixed for 15 minutes.

Example 26

[0115]

Transesterification
100.0 g Blown soy oil
 13.5 g 63% glycerin and 37% cane sugar reaction
product mixture

[0116] The above was heated at a temperature of 220° F.

Example 27

[0117]

Transesterification
400 g Blown soy oil
 12 g 33% Glycerin and 66% Sorbitol

[0118] The glycerin and sorbitol products were preheated to 195 ° F. The total mixture was heated for 15 minutes at 202° F.

Example 28

[0119]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 27
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 0.5 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0120] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 134° F. for 4 minutes.

Example 29

[0121]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 27
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0122] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 67 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 30

[0123]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 27
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Water
0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0124] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 90 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 31

[0125]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 27
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Water
0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
0.2 g Silicon surfactant (Air Products ® DC193)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0126] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 32

[0127]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 27
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Water
0.6 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
0.3 g Tertiary block amine catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0128] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 74 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 33

[0129]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in
Example 27
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Water
0.2 g Silicon surfactant (Air Products ®
DC193)
1.1 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ®
MA-2903)

[0130] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 55 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 34

[0131]

Transesterification:
50.0 g Blown soy oil
 6.0 g 33% Glycerin and 66% Sorbitol reaction
product mixture

Example 35

[0132]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 34
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
0.6 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0133] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 148° F. for 3 minutes.

Example 36

[0134]

Transesterification
20.0 g Glycerin
40.0 g Brown cane sugar

[0135] The above was heated at a temperature of 250° F. and mixed. 30 g of wet mass was recovered in a filter and removed.

Example 37

[0136]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 36
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0137] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 67 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 171° F. for 1 minute.

Example 38

[0138]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 36
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0139] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 67 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 146° F. for 1.5 minutes.

Example 39

[0140]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 36
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
0.5 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0141] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 20 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 141° F. for 2 minutes.

Example 40

[0142]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 36
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 1.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0143] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a 1:1 ratio A-side to B-side at a temperature of 152° F. and for 1 minute.

Example 41

[0144]

Transesterification
350.0 g Blown soy oil
 60.0 g Glycerin
 35.0 g White cane sugar

[0145] The above was heated at a temperature of 240° F.

Example 42

[0146]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 41
(preheated to 101° F.)
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 1.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0147] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 193° F. for 30 seconds.

Example 43

[0148]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 42
(preheated to 101° F.)
 3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0149] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side and reached a temperature of 227° F. for 20 seconds.

Example 44

[0150]

Transesterification:
35.9 g Glycerin
 6.9 g Cane sugar
20.0 g Trimethylolpropane (preheated to 190° F.)

[0151] 30 g of the above mixture was combined with 300 g of blown soy oil.

Example 45

[0152]

Step 1 Heated 60 g trimethylolpropane
(melting point of about 58° C., about 136.4° F.) to liquid
Step 2 Heated 30 g water and added 30 g cane sugar
Step 3 Added 60 g water and cane sugar to 60 g
trimethylolpropane and slowly raised the heat over 3 hours
to 290° F. This drove off the water.

Example 46

[0153]

B-side: 20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 44
 0.5 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0154] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 40 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 47

[0155]

Transesterification:
1000 g Glycerin
 500 g Cane sugar

[0156] The above was mixed at a temperature of 230° F. for 20 minutes.

Example 48

[0157]

Transesterification:
 22.3 g Reaction product formed as in Example 47
100.0 g Blown soy oil

[0158] The above mixture was heated at a temperature of 227° F. for 20 minutes.

Example 49

[0159]

50 g Water
50 g Cane sugar

[0160] The above was mixed and heated at a temperature of 85° F. for 20 minutes.

Example 50

[0161]

Transesterification:
20 g Reaction mixture formed as in Example 53
100 g  Blown soy oil

[0162] The above was heated at a temperature of 185° F. for 20 minutes, then heated to a temperature of 250° F. for 80 minutes.

Example 51

[0163]

B-side:
    20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 50
   0.4 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0164] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 56 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 52

[0165]

B-side:
    20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 50
   0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0166] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 54 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 53

[0167]

Transesterification
3200 g Blown soy oil (5% sugar by volume)
 48 g 67% Glycerin and 37% Cane sugar mixture

Example 54

[0168]

B-side:
60.0 parts by weight  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
40.0 parts by weight  Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
5.0 parts by weight Dipropylene Glycol
2.0 parts by weight Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
2.1 parts by weight Water
109.0 parts by weight  Calcium Carbonate (filler)
A-side: Mondur ® MR light

[0169] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 56 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 55

[0170]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 19
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
1.0 g Water
0.8 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1) - catalyst
54.7 g  Calcium Carbonate (filler)
A-side: Bayer Corporation's Mondur ® MA-2901 (Isocyanate)

[0171] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 40 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 56

[0172]

B-side:
40.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
10.0 g  Polyether polyol
1.5 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Butanediol
1.0 g Water
 55 g Calcium Carbonate (filler)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

Example 57

[0173]

Transesterification
70.0 g Trimethylolpropane
33.0 g Pentaethertrol
60.0 g Sugar

[0174] The above was heated to a temperature of 237° F. and added 15.0 g of this reaction product to 100.0 g of blown soil oil.

Example 58

[0175]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0176] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 41 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 151° F. for 1 minute.

Example 59

[0177]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0178] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 177° F. for 1 minute.

Example 60

[0179]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
3.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0180] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 45 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 165° F. for 10 seconds.

Example 61

[0181]

Transesterification:
200 g Blown soy oil
 20 g Trimethylolpropane

[0182] The above was heated to a temperature of 220° F. for 30 minutes.

Example 62

[0183]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 61
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0184] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 168° F. for 35 seconds.

Example 63

[0185]

Transesterification:
200 g Blown soy oil
 20 g Trimethylolpropane

[0186] The above was heated at a temperature of 325° F. for 1 hour. The trimethylolpropane did not dissolve completely.

Example 64

[0187]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 63
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0188] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 151° F. for 1 minute.

Example 65

[0189]

Transesterification:
100.0 g Blown soy oil
 5.9 g Trimethylolpropane

[0190] The above was heated at a temperature of 235° F.

Example 66

[0191]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 65
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0192] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 162° F. for 1 minute.

Example 67

[0193]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 65
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0194] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 166° F. for 1 minute.

Example 68

[0195]

Transesterification:
2000 g Blown soy oil
 100 g Trimethylolpropane

[0196] The above was heated at a temperature of 200° F. for 2 hours.

Example 69

[0197]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 68
3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0198] The above was heated at a temperature of 166° F. for 1 minute.

Example 70

[0199]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 68
 4.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
 1.3 g Water
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

Example 71

[0200]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 68
 3.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.0 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0201] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 61 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 172° F. for 1 minute.

Example 72

[0202]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 68
 2.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0203] The above was heated at a temperature of 135° F.

Example 73

[0204]

Transesterification:
200.0 g Blown soy oil
 4.0 g Trimethylolpropane

[0205] The above was heated at a temperature of 205° F.

Example 74

[0206]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 73
 2.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0207] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 45 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 126° F.

Example 75

[0208]

Transesterification:
400 g Blown soy oil
 62 g 66.7% Glycerin and 33.3% cane sugar mixture

[0209] The above mixture was heated at an average temperature of 205° F.

Example 76

[0210]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 3901) ® 3901
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0211] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 77

[0212]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer Multranol ® 9151)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0213] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 78

[0214]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 75
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0215] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 79

[0216]

B-side: 20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 75
 0.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0217] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 80

[0218]

B-side:
100.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 75
 2.9 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0219] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 44 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 81

[0220]

Transesterification:
350 g Blown soy oil
 52 g 66.7% Glycerin and 33.3% cane sugar mixture

[0221] The above was heated at a temperature of 194° F. for 4 hours.

Example 82

[0222]

B-side:
40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
 1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
 0.3 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
97.0 g Calcium Carbonate (filler)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0223] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 83

[0224]

B-side:
20.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 53
1.5 g Dipropylene Glycol
1.5 g Butanediol
0.4 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
0.4 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
8.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0225] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 84

[0226]

Transesterification:
400.0 g Blown soy oil
 6.0 g Vinegar (to add acidic proton);
hydrogen chloride may also be added
 60.0 g 66.7% Glycerin and 33.3% Cane sugar mixture

[0227] The above was heated at a temperature of 210° F. for 1 hour.

Example 85

[0228]

B-side:
    40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 84
   0.8 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0229] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 86

[0230]

B-side:
    40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 84
   0.8 g Dibutyltin Diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0231] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 87

[0232]

Transesterification:
First step:
  80.0 g  66.7% Glycerin and 33.3% Cane sugar
  0.8 g Vinegar

[0233] The above was heated at a temperature of 260° F. for 30 minutes.

[0234] Second step:

[0235] 60 g of the above reaction product was reacted with 400 g blown soy oil and mixed for 30 minutes.

Example 88

[0236]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 87
   1.0 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0237] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 89

[0238]

B-side:
20.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 87
 0.5 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
20.0 g Bayer ® Multranol ®
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0239] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 92 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 240° F. for 20 seconds.

Example 90

[0240]

B-side:
    50.0 g Blown soy oil
   1.7 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0241] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 91

[0242]

Transesterification:
50.0 g Blown soy oil
100.0 g  Bayer ® Multranol ® 9185

[0243] The above was heated to a temperature of 100° F. for 5 hours.

Example 92

[0244]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 91
   0.7 g Dibutyltin diacetate (T1)
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0245] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 56 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 93

[0246]

Transesterification
80.0 g Blown soy oil
20.0 g Polyether Polyol Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901

[0247] The above was heated to a temperature of 100° C.

Example 94

[0248]

B-side:
50.0 g  Blown soy oil
0.8 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
5.0 g Butanediol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0249] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 64 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 167° F. for 90 seconds.

Example 95

[0250]

B-side:
50.0 g Blown soy oil
15.0 g Butanediol
 0.8 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0251] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 131 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 224° F. for 20 seconds.

Example 96

[0252]

2000 g   Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 80
6 g Dipropylene glycol
6 g Butanediol
40 g  Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)

Example 97

[0253]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified prepolymer polyol formed as in Example 96
   0.3 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0254] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side for 120 seconds.

Example 98

[0255]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified prepolymer polyol formed as in Example 96
   0.2 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0256] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side for 160 seconds.

Example 99

[0257]

B-side:
    50.0 g Transesterified prepolymer polyol formed as in Example 96
   0.4 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0258] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side for 80 seconds.

Example 100

[0259]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified prepolymer polyol formed as in
Example 96
 0.2 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light mixed with 15% blown
soy oil for 120 seconds.

[0260] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 101

[0261]

Transesterification:
400 g Blown soy oil
 60 g 66.7% Glycerin and 33% Cane sugar mixture

[0262] The above was heated at a temperature of 198° F. for 5 hours.

Example 102

[0263]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 101
 0.8 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0264] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 42 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 149° F. for 260 seconds.

Example 103

[0265]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.9 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
10.0 g Bayer ® Multranol ®
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0266] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 56 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side at a temperature of 189° F. for 190 seconds.

Example 104

[0267]

B-side: 40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 3.0 g Butanediol
 0.9 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
10.0 g Bayer ® Multranol ®
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0268] The above was heated at a temperature of 220° F. for 116 seconds.

Example 105

[0269]

Transesterification
400 g Blown soy oil
 60 g 66.7% Glycerin and 33.3% Cane Sugar

Example 106

[0270]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.8 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0271] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 107

[0272]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 101
 0.9 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0273] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 14 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 108

[0274]

Transesterification:
200.0 g Blown soy oil
 14.3 g Honey

[0275] The above was heated at a temperature of 200° F. for 3 hours.

Example 109

[0276]

B-side: 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.1 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
 1.5 g Dipropylene glycol
 1.5 g Butanediol
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0277] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 110

[0278]

B-side:
40.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
0.2 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
10.0 g  Poly ether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
1.5 g Dipropylene glycol
1.5 g Butanediol
0.2 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0279] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 111

[0280]

B-side:
80.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
20.0 g  Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
3.0 g Butanediol
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0281] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 112

[0282]

B-side:
80.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
20.0 g  Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
3.0 g Dipropylene glycol
3.0 g Butanediol
0.6 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0283] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 113

[0284]

B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.8 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
62.0 g Calcium Carbonate filler
A-side: Mondur ® MR Light

[0285] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 56 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 114

[0286]

B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.2 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
 0.2 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side:
20% Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)
80% Mondur ® MR Light

[0287] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 115

[0288]

Transesterification:
389.0 g Blown soy oil
 13.0 g Dipropylene glycol
 31.6 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
381.5 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)

Example 116

[0289]

B-side:
40.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
10.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 9196)
 0.4 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
A-side:
20.0 g Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)
80.0 g Mondur ® MR Light

[0290] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 82 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 117

[0291]

B-side:
40.0 g  Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 101
0.1 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
1.5 g Dipropylene glycol
10.0 g  Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 3901)
0.4 g Air Products DBU ® = urethane catalyst
(1,8 Diazabicyclo [5.4.0])
A-side: Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)

[0292] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 72 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 118

[0293]

B-side:
 50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
 0.5 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
 2.0 g Butanediol
 20.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 9196)
A-side:
20% Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)
80% Mondur ® MR Light

[0294] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 88 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 119

[0295]

B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified polyol formed as in Example 81
20.0 g Polyether Polyol (Bayer ® Multranol ® 9196)
 0.5 g Dibutyltin Dilaurate (T12)
 2.0 g Dipropylene Glycol
A-side:
  20 g Modified monomeric MDI (Mondur ® MA-2903)
  80 g Mondur ® MR Light

Example 120 Water Blown TDI Seating-Type Foam

[0296]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
50.0 g  Conventional polyol
(3 Functional, 28 OH, 6000 Molecular weight,
1100 viscosity)
0.8 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst
0.8 g Flexible blowing catalyst
(Bis(N,N,dimethylaminoethyl)ether),
1.0 g Flexible foam silicon surfactant
1.0 g Water
A-side: 2,4-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI)

[0297] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 40 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 121 Hydrocarbon Blown TDI Seating-Type Foam

[0298]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
50.0 g  Conventional polyol
(3 Functional, 28 OH, 6000 Molecular weight,
1100 viscosity)
0.8 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
0.8 g Flexible blowing catalyst
(Bis(N,N,dimethylaminoethyl)ether)
1.0 g Flexible foam silicone surfactant
4.0 g Cyclopentane, or other suitable blowing agents
A-side: 2,4-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI)

[0299] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 40 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 122 Water Blown MDI Seating-Type Foam

[0300]

B-side:
100.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
1.0 g Flexible foam surfactant
1.6 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
3.0 g Water
A-side:
100% Isocyanate terminated PPG (polypropylene ether
glycol) Prepolymer (19% NCO, 400 Viscosity, 221
Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0301] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 65 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side. Example 123 (Hydrocarbon blown MDI seating-type foam)

B-side:
100.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
1.0 g Flexible foam surfactant
1.6 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
6.0 g Cyclopentane, or other suitable blowing agent
A-side
100% Isocyanate terminated PPG (polypropylene ether
glycol) Prepolymer (19% NCO, 400 Viscosity, 221
Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0302] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 65 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 124 Water Blown Higher Rebound MDI Searing-Type Foam

[0303]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
50.0 g  Conventional polyol (3-functional, 28 OH,
6000 molecular weight, 1100 viscosity)
1.0 g Flexible foam surfactant
0.3 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
0.4 g Non-acid blocked Alkyltin mercaptide catalyst
3.0 g Water
A-side:
100% Isocyanate terminated PPG
(polypropylene ether glycol) Prepolymer
(19% NCO, 400 Viscosity, 221 Equivalent weight,
2 Functional)

[0304] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 125 Hydrocarbon Blown Higher Rebound MDI Searing-Type Foam

[0305]

B-side:
50.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
50.0 g  Conventional polyol (3 Functional, 28 OH,
6000 Molecular weight, 1100 Viscosity)
1.0 g Flexible foam surfactant
0.3 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
0.4 g Non-acid blocked Alkyltin mercaptide catalyst
6.0 g Cyclopentane, or other suitable blowing agents
A-side:
100% Isocyanate terminated PPG (polypropylene ether
glycol) Prepolymer (19% NCO, 400 Viscosity,
221 Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0306] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 62 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 126 Water Blown Lightweight Rigid Urethane Material

[0307]

B-side:
50.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
 1.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 1.0 g Water
A-side:
100% Polymeric MDI (Methylenebisdipenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0308] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 127 Hydrocarbon Blown Lightweight Rigid Urethane Material

[0309]

B-side:
100.0 g  Transesterified blown soy oil
 1.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 3.0 g Cyclopentane, or other suitable blowing agents
A-side:
100% Polymeric MDI (Methylenebisdipenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0310] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 128 Dense Rigid Urethane Material

[0311]

B-side:
  100.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
   1.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
A-side:
100% Polymeric MDI (Methylenebisdipenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0312] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 129 Very Dense Rigid Urethane Material

[0313]

B-side:
  100.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
   1.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
A-side:
100% Polymeric MDI (Methylenebisdipenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0314] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 110 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 130 Semi-Flexible Carpet Backing Material

[0315]

B-side: 80.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
20.0 g Conventional polyol (2 Functional, 28 OH,
4000 Molecular weight, 820 Viscosity)
 0.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 0.5 g Non-acid blocked Alkyltin mercaptide catalyst
 4.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: 100% Monomeric MDI
(methylenebisdiphenyl diisocyanate) (23% NCO,
500 Viscosity, 183 Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0316] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 45 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 131 Semi-Flexible Carpet Backing Material

[0317]

B-side: 80.0 g Blown soy oil
20.0 g Conventional polyol (2 Functional, 28 OH,
4000 Molecular weight, 820 Viscosity)
 0.2 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 0.5 g Non-acid blocked Alkyltin mercaptide catalyst
 4.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: 50% 4,4-MDI (methylenebisdiphenyl diisocyanate)
Isocyanate
50% 2,4-MDI (methylenebisdiphenyl
diisocyanate)Isocyanate mixture (33.6% NCO, 10
Viscosity, 125 Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0318] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 34 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 132 Flexible Carpet Padding Material

[0319]

B-side: 85.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
 7.5 g Conventional polyol (3 Functional, 28 OH,
4000 Molecular weight, 1100 Viscosity)
 7.5 g Conventional polyol (4 Functional, 395 OH,
568 Molecular weight, 8800 Viscosity)
 0.1 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 0.2 g Non-acid blocked Alkyltin mercaptide catalyst
 2.0 g Dipropylene glycol
A-side: 100% Isocyanate terminated PPG (polypropylene ether
glycol) Prepolymer (19% NCO, 400 Viscosity,
221 Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0320] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 133 Fast-Set Hard Skin Coating Material

[0321]

B-side: 100.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
 1.0 g Flexible foam surfactant
 0.8 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 0.8 g Fast acting Amicure DBU ®
(Bicyclic Amidine) catalyst
A-side: 100% Isocyanate terminated PPG (polypropylene ether
glycol) Prepolymer (19% NCO, 400 Viscosity,
221 Equivalent weight, 2 Functional)

[0322] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 68 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 134 Wood Molding Substitute Material

[0323]

B-side: 100.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
 2.0 g Trimethylolpropane
 1.0 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
A-side: 100% Polymeric MDI (methylenebisdiphenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0324] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 80 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side.

Example 135 Semi-Rigid Floral Foam Type Material

[0325]

B-side: 100.0 g Transesterified blown soy oil
 0.5 g Non-acid blocked Dibutyltin Dilaurate catalyst
 0.5 g Fast acting Amicure DBU
(Bicyclic amidine) catalyst
 5.0 g Water
A-side: 100% Polymeric MDI (methylenebisdiphenyl diisocyanate)
(31.9% NCO, 200 Viscosity,
132 Equivalent weight, 2.8 Functional)

[0326] The B-side was combined with the A-side in a ratio of 70 parts A-side to 100 parts B-side. A colorant (green) may be added if desired.

[0327] The above description is considered that of the preferred embodiments only. Modifications of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art and to those who make or use the invention. Therefore, it is understood that the embodiments shown in the drawings and described above are merely for illustrative purposes and not intended to limit the scope of the invention, which is defined by the following claims as interpreted according to the principles of patent law, including the doctrine of equivalents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7691914Apr 25, 2006Apr 6, 2010Cargill, IncorporatedPolyurethane foams comprising oligomeric polyols
US7786239Jun 24, 2005Aug 31, 2010Pittsburg State UniversityModified vegetable oil-based polyols
US8097739Apr 15, 2008Jan 17, 2012BioBases Technologies, LLCProcess for the manufacture of natural oil hydroxylates
US8133930Apr 23, 2004Mar 13, 2012Dow Global Technologies LlcPolyurethane foams made from hydroxymethyl-containing polyester polyols
US8153746Jun 2, 2010Apr 10, 2012Cargill, IncorporatedModified vegetable oil-based polyols
US8293808Jun 25, 2004Oct 23, 2012Cargill, IncorporatedFlexible polyurethane foams prepared using modified vegetable oil-based polyols
US8324419Jan 21, 2008Dec 4, 2012Basf SeProcess for preparing polyether carbonate polyols
US8652568Sep 7, 2011Feb 18, 2014Dow Global Technologies LlcCoating composition
US8692030 *Apr 20, 2006Apr 8, 2014Pittsburg State UniversityBiobased-petrochemical hybrid polyols
CN101186694BDec 27, 2007Jul 6, 2011北京市丰信德科技发展有限公司Method for preparing polyether polyol from plant oil
DE102008000478A1Mar 3, 2008Sep 11, 2008Basf SeAqueous polyurethane dispersion for use as bonding agents in adhesives, particularly in concealment adhesives, and for coating and impregnating for leather, has polyethercarbonate polyol as structure component
EP2426158A1 *Sep 7, 2011Mar 7, 2012Dow Global Technologies LLCA coating composition
WO2008038678A1Sep 26, 2007Apr 3, 2008Asahi Glass Co LtdMethod for producing soft polyurethane foam
WO2010051448A1 *Oct 30, 2009May 6, 2010Johnson Controls Technology CompanyPalm oil-based polyurethane foam products and method of production
Classifications
U.S. Classification528/74.5, 252/182.24, 536/123.1, 554/30
International ClassificationD06N7/00, C08J9/14, C08G18/40, C08G18/42, C08G18/32, C08G18/76, C08G18/66, C08G18/10, C08G18/36
Cooperative ClassificationC08J9/14, C08J2375/04, C08G18/36, D06N2205/04, C08G2101/0025, D06N2203/068, C08G18/4018, C08G2101/0016, C08G18/6607, C08G2101/0083, C08G18/6696, C08G18/7671, C08G18/3206, C08G18/10, D06N7/0063, C08G18/4288, C08G2101/0008
European ClassificationC08G18/10, C08J9/14, D06N7/00B6, C08G18/32A2, C08G18/40A2, C08G18/76D2B, C08G18/66C2, C08G18/42M, C08G18/36, C08G18/66P6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 10, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: URETHANE SOY SYSTEMS, CO., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KURTH, THOMAS M.;KURTH, RICHARD A.;TURNER, ROBERT B.;ANDOTHERS;REEL/FRAME:012251/0728
Effective date: 20011003