Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20030195636 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/121,196
Publication dateOct 16, 2003
Filing dateApr 12, 2002
Priority dateApr 12, 2002
Also published asUS7637958, US20050131550
Publication number10121196, 121196, US 2003/0195636 A1, US 2003/195636 A1, US 20030195636 A1, US 20030195636A1, US 2003195636 A1, US 2003195636A1, US-A1-20030195636, US-A1-2003195636, US2003/0195636A1, US2003/195636A1, US20030195636 A1, US20030195636A1, US2003195636 A1, US2003195636A1
InventorsBrian Coop
Original AssigneeCoop Brian T.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prosthetic locking device
US 20030195636 A1
Abstract
A device is provided to lock the residual limb of an amputee into a prosthesis. The device is comprised of rolling elements within a tapered housing which accepts a smooth plunger, such as a wire, cable, or rod connected to a suspension sleeve, with minimal resistance while opposing removal of the plunger from the locking device until the rolling elements have been retracted with a release mechanism. The nature of this device allows it to compensate for irregularities or wear in the plunger while continuing to securely lock the prosthesis to the sleeve. This locking device will function properly with a certain amount of misalignment between the lock and the plunger.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A prosthetic locking device in a prosthetic socket for receiving a substantially smooth plunger attached to a prosthetic sleeve comprising:
(a) a lock housing having a proximal opening for introduction of a plunger, and having a tapered interior expanding distally from the opening;
(b) a rolling element housed within the tapered interior;
(c) a lift to bias the rolling element toward the proximal opening;
(e) a release mechanism which moves the rolling element distally from the proximal opening when activated.
2. The prosthetic locking device of claim 1 having a plurality of rolling elements housed within the tapered interior.
3. The prosthetic locking device of claim 2, where the rolling elements are of a form selected from the group consisting of spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal and columnar.
4. The prosthetic locking device of claim 1, where the rolling element is made from material selected from the group consisting of austenitic stainless steel, titanium, and brass.
5. The prosthetic locking device of claim 1, where the release mechanism is selected from the group consisting of a linearly actuated cam, radially actuated cam, pin-hinged linkage, gear-to-gear system, and gear-to-rack system.
6. The prosthetic locking device of claim 1, further comprising an actuation button connected to said release mechanism and extending from the lock housing.
7. The prosthetic locking device of claim 6, wherein the actuation button comprises a draw member connected to the release mechanism that can be pulled to actuate the release mechanism.
8. A prosthetic locking device in a prosthetic socket for receiving a plunger mounted on a prosthetic sleeve comprising:
(a) a lock housing having an exterior, a tapered interior, with a top interior portion, and an opening passing through the top interior portion to the exterior;
(b) a substantially smooth rolling element housed within said tapered interior;
(c) a spring biasing said rolling element towards the top portion of the tapered interior;
(d) a release mechanism which moves the rolling element away from the top portion of the tapered interior when activated.
9. The prosthetic locking device of claim 8 having a plurality of rolling elements housed within the tapered interior.
10. The prosthetic locking device of claim 9, where the rolling elements are of a form selected from the group consisting of spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal and columnar.
11. The prosthetic locking device of claim 8, where the rolling element is made of materials selected from the group consisting of austenitic stainless steel, titanium, and brass.
12. The prosthetic locking device of claim 8, where the release mechanism is selected from the group consisting of a linearly actuated cam, radially actuated cam, pin-hinged linkage, gear-to-gear system, and gear-to-rack system.
13. The prosthetic locking device of claim 8, further comprising an actuation button connected to said release mechanism and accessible from the lock housing.
14. A method of attaching a prosthetic sleeve having a plunger to a prosthetic socket fitted with the prosthetic locking device of claim 1 comprising the steps of:
(a) guiding the plunger into the proximal opening of the lock housing;
(b) pushing the plunger into the tapered interior and contacting the rolling element therein;
(c) applying sufficient force on the plunger to urge the rolling element distally from the opening and the tapered interior wall such that the rolling element is moved distally from the opening sufficiently that the width of the tapered interior increases sufficiently to permit the plunger to pass by the rolling element;
(d) continuing to urge the plunger through the prosthetic locking device to the desired depth;
(e) biasing the rolling element toward the proximal opening thereby biasing the rolling element against both the tapered interior and the plunger.
15. The method of claim 15, wherein the rolling elements are of a form selected from the group consisting of spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal and columnar.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein the plunger is in a form selected from the group consisting of solid wire, rod, tube, and stranded flexible wire.
17. A method of detaching a prosthetic sleeve having a longitudinally smooth plunger passing through the opening to the top interior portion of the lock housing and engaged in the locking device of claim 8, comprising the steps of:
(a) activating the release mechanism to move the rolling element retainer away from the top opening;
(b) continuing the distal movement of the rolling element retainer until the width of the tapered interior is sufficient that the rolling element does not simultaneously contact both the tapered interior and the longitudinally smooth plunger;
(c) withdrawing the plunger out through the top opening.
18. The method of claim 18, wherein the release mechanism is actuated by pulling a draw member connected to the release mechanism.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the plunger is in a form selected from the group consisting of solid wire, rod, and stranded flexible wire.
20. A prosthetic locking device in a prosthetic socket for receiving a substantially smooth plunger attached to a prosthetic sleeve comprising:
(a) a lock housing having a top proximal opening for introduction of a substantially smooth plunger, and having an interior with a top portion, a conically tapered intermediate portion expanding distally away from the top portion, and a bottom portion
(b) a rolling element retainer having a base with a central opening, positioned within the interior of the clutch lock housing and also having a cam element;
(c) at least three spherical rolling elements positioned upon the base of the rolling element retainer outward of the central opening;
(d) a compressible spring biasing the rolling element retainer toward the proximal opening;
(e) a release mechanism which engages the cam element and moves the rolling element retainer distally from the proximal opening when activated.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention is an improved locking device for attaching a prosthesis to a suspension sleeve on a residual limb.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Various methods of attaching a prosthesis to an amputee's residual limb have been utilized over the years. Despite advances in materials and design many of the older methods are still being used. The earliest methods were strap and belt type suspension systems. In this design, the amputee inserted the residual limb into the prosthesis and tightened a belt, typically made from leather, to hold the prosthesis to the limb. This design was fraught with practical difficulties, but for many years was the only design available. A second-generation design improvement uses flexible inner integral suction suspension sockets. These designs are especially useful for above-knee prostheses. The amputee simply pulls the prosthesis over the residual limb, while the flexible interior of the socket adheres to the limb creating a vacuum that suctions the prosthetic in place. A valve is installed within the socket to break the suction.
  • [0003]
    More recent designs have employed mechanical connectors, combined with a removable roll-on suction suspension sleeve. These mechanical connectors consist of: 1) lanyard systems utilizing a braided or twisted polymeric cord attached to the end of the suction suspension sleeve which passes through the socket where it can be secured external to the prosthesis; 2) shuttle lock systems, having a ring attached to the suspension sleeve to receive a pin inserted through the socket; 3) a ratchet type shuttle lock system, using a barbed plunger extending from the end of the suction suspension sleeve and engaging a ratchet mechanism on the prosthesis; and 4) gear driven clutch lock systems using a plunger with teeth to engage a gear mounted to a shaft turning on a one-way bearing where the plunger once engaged with the gear is restricted from upward vertical movement.
  • [0004]
    Most recently, smooth pin lock systems have been devised in an attempt to overcome the drawbacks of the earlier mechanical lock systems such as Gramnas U.S. Pat. No. 5,298,290 ('290). Gramnas uses a washer to lock the plunger. The washer is housed such that when the plunger pierces the interior of the washer the washer becomes biased against the plunger by springs, which flank the washer. The springs are actuated by a single bearing. The bearing serves to compress one spring while leaving the other to bias the washer against the interior of the housing. Thus the washer becomes angled and the plunger is prevented from exiting the lock. Because the Gramnas design does not rely on gears or ratchets to secure the sleeve to the socket less play is introduced into the lock. Despite the improvements that the smooth pin lock system offers, it has not been a complete solution and has introduced its own disadvantages.
  • [0005]
    All of the automatic locking mechanical connectors (ratcheting shuttle, gear driven clutch, and smooth pin) have the drawback of requiring the plunger and the lock to be aligned on the same axis. The nature of the design of the ratcheting shuttle and gear driven clutch type locks permits a certain amount of play or backlash that allows the residual limb to piston within the socket. The lanyard and shuttle lock systems do not automatically lock and cannot accommodate volume changes in the residual limb without manual adjustments. Volume changes occur as the amputee bears weight on the residual limb causing swelling or shrinkage in the fleshy portion of the residual limb. Limb shrinkage loosens the fit in the socket and causes the residual limb to slip deeper into the prosthesis. The practical result is that additional play is introduced requiring the amputee to make frequent adjustments to maintain a snug fitting. The ratcheting shuttle lock also suffers from this drawback because the discrete locking steps are spaced too widely to make fine adjustments.
  • [0006]
    Smooth pin systems must conform to tight tolerances in order to work properly. As components wear, the retention of the prosthesis becomes less secure. This is particularly true in smooth pin systems such as the Gramnas invention, where the smooth pin is restricted from moving out of the lock by a washer that contacts the plunger with a narrow and limited surface area. Over time, the limited surface area of the washer becomes worn, introducing unwanted play or backlash into the locking mechanism. An additional drawback to the washer design is that it is incapable of accepting flexible plungers because the angle generated by the washer is insufficient to prevent a flexible plunger from snaking out of the lock housing. The design therefore requires the plunger and the lock to be aligned on the same axis. When the lock is manufactured with less than perfect alignment in the socket the washer is subject to extraordinary wear causing the locking mechanism to fail prematurely.
  • [0007]
    A further drawback common to all the mechanical connectors is that they are necessarily manufactured with materials that can withstand the rigors of the locking mechanism. Commonly, the moving and contacting parts are fabricated from high carbon bearing grade steel and hardening the various parts, such as by heat treatment. Such steel bearing grade parts, however, are highly subject to corrosion, particularly when the prosthesis is used in environments offering exposure to liquids or other contaminants. Internal corrosion of the locking device can lead to seizure and failure of the moveable components.
  • [0008]
    Efforts to overcome the corrosion problem by forming the moving components of a corrosion resistant metal alloy, such as austenitic stainless steel (type 300 series) typically are not practical since such corrosion resistant steel cannot be hardened to the extent necessary for satisfactory life of the moving components. Alternately, forming the moving components of martensitic stainless steels, such as 440C, may provide a bearing grade steel which is hardenable. However, the corrosion resistance is less than that of the 300 series stainless steels. The result is that neither grade of stainless is suitable for the current lock designs. Therefore, amputees that live active lifestyles, who are prone to get their prosthesis wet are forced to live with locking mechanisms that corrode or fail to operate with peak efficiency.
  • [0009]
    The present invention addresses these potentially troublesome issues while combining the ease of use of an automatic lock with the stepless adjustability of the clutch and smooth pin lock.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0010]
    This invention is designed to securely lock a sleeve fitted to the amputee's residual limb to a corresponding prosthesis without discrete steps and with little to no backlash during engagement. The invention utilizes a plunger on the sleeve, which is engaged in the prosthesis then detaches when a release mechanism is operated. Rolling elements in the prosthesis portion lock onto the plunger without the need to hold it in perfect alignment, allowing a certain amount of angular misalignment when mounting the lock in the prosthesis. Because the lock is permanently molded or laminated into the socket of the prosthesis during fabrication, a design that can function with imperfect alignment offers advantages to the manufacturer or technician by reducing the likelihood that the prosthesis would need to be re-fabricated. Such a design, also offers advantages to the amputee by reducing the difficulty of adapting to a poorly aligned socket.
  • [0011]
    This device is also designed to compensate for dimensional variances in the plunger that may occur between plungers of different construction, for example, solid wire or flexible stranded cable, as well as variances that may occur throughout the life of the plunger due to wear.
  • [0012]
    Another significant advantage of the invention, not addressed by the prior art, is that the moving components, which include the plunger and rolling elements, can be made of softer materials, which are more resistant to oxidation in wet or humid environments. Examples of suitable materials include but are not limited to austenitic stainless steel, titanium, and brass. This feature will allow the amputee to use the locking device in aquatic sports with less concern of the lock rusting or corroding.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 1 is a partial sectional view of a prosthetic socket containing a prosthetic lock according to the invention.
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 2a is a cross-sectional front plan view of a prosthetic lock according to the invention with a plunger in an unlocked position just before making initial contact with a rolling element.
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 2b is a complementary side plan view of the locking device as illustrated in FIG. 2a showing the cam follower at the top of the cam track.
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 3a is a cross-sectional front plan view of a prosthetic lock according to the invention with a plunger contacting a rolling element with sufficient force to compress the lock spring.
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 3b is a complementary side plan view of the locking device as illustrated in FIG. 3a showing the cam followers descending the cam track in response to the initial compression of the lock spring.
  • [0018]
    [0018]FIG. 4a is a cross-sectional front plan view of a prosthetic lock according to the invention with the plunger in a locked position.
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 4b is a complementary side plan view of the locking device as illustrated in FIG. 4a showing the cam follower descending the cam track in response to the plunger compressing the lock spring to a locking depth.
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 5a is a cross-sectional front plan view of the prosthetic lock according to the invention with the plunger released from the locked position by the release mechanism.
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 5b is a complementary side plan view of the locking device as illustrated in FIG. 5a showing the cam follower fully descended along the cam track to an unlocking position.
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 6 is a partial section front plan view of a prosthetic lock according to the invention with a flexible plunger with an off-axis translation
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 7 is a partial section view of a prosthetic release mechanism according to the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0024]
    Referring now to the drawings and in particular to FIG. 1, a cross-sectional view of a prosthetic socket 15 with a smooth plunger 30 engaged in a locking device 10 is shown. The plunger 30 is attached to the distal end of a sleeve 6 adapted to fit over the residual limb of an amputee. Typical sleeve materials are urethanes, thermoplastic elastomers, or silicone based polymers. The socket 15 and locking device 10 are secured to the proximal end of a prosthesis, typically a prosthetic limb. The plunger 30 is shown fully engaged within the locking device 10. The distal end 31 of the plunger has passed through the locking device 10 and occupies the prosthetic socket plunger cavity 16. The plunger 30 may be tubular or rigid as depicted in FIG. 2a, or flexible such as the braided or twisted cable depicted in FIG. 6.
  • [0025]
    In a preferred embodiment the plunger 30 should be substantially smooth along its length, however, as in the case of braided cable, ridges in and around the circumference of the plunger 30 are not objectionable. In addition, the plunger 30 should not be limited to a cylindrical form and may also be a multifaceted prismatic member (triangular, rectangular, hexagonal, etc.). Typically, the locking device 10 contains a release mechanism 19 that detaches the plunger 30 by depressing a release button 22, shown in FIG. 1. Also shown is button shield 23 to prevent accidental release of the locking device 10. The release mechanism 19 is not essential to the success of the invention and may be any one of a variety of means to disengage the plunger 30 from the locking device 10. For instance, cam mechanisms that are linearly or radially actuated, a pin hinged linkage, or gear-to-gear or gear-to-rack mechanisms that may be actuated by a pushing member or a drawing member may be used. An exemplerary release mechanism is disclosed in more detail in FIG. 7.
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIGS. 2a-b, 3 a-b, 4 a-b, and 5 a-b depict the plunger 30, at various stages of engagement with the locking device 10. For convenience of illustration plunger 30 is shown in isolation from sleeve 6 (shown in FIG. 1) in which it is secured during use.
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 2a shows the locking device 10 in an unlocked position with no plunger 30 engaged in the lock. The plunger 30 is shown entering the proximal end of the lock housing 20 just before making initial contact with rolling elements 35. Once separated by the plunger 30, the rolling elements 35 remain in contact with the tapered interior 32 of the clutch lock body 29 due to force applied by a lift such as, lock spring 37, which biases the rolling element retainer 36 to the top most portion 33 of the tapered interior 32. The shape of the rolling elements 35 may be cylindrical, spherical, elliptical or any other shape that allows rolling elements 35 to contact the tapered lock-housing interior 32 when force is applied by the plunger 30. The number of rolling elements 35 may also be variable. The embodiment shown in FIG. 2a has three rolling elements 35 within the rolling element retainer 36, but it is possible to have a larger plurality or only one rolling element 35 in a properly configured retainer 36. For instance, single rolling element 35 requires that at least one interior surface not be tapered. With a single cylindrical rolling element 35, only one wall of the retainer 36 would need to be tapered.
  • [0028]
    As illustrated in FIG. 2a the rolling elements 35 have not yet begun begun to be forced outward. Before the plunger comes into contact with the rolling elements 35 the lock spring 37 has not yet been compressed. Cam followers 27 are shown attached by the cam spacers 28 to the rolling element retainer 36. The cam follower 27 are shown between upper cam track wall 34 a and lower cam track wall 34 b.
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 2b shows the exterior of the locking device 10 and the position of cam follower 27 when plunger 30 is in the uncompressed position depicted in FIG. 2a. The cam follower 27 is at the top of radial cam track 18.
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 3a shows the plunger 30 beginning to penetrate the interior of the clutch lock body 29. The downward force placed on the rolling elements 35 begins to compress the lock spring 37. The rolling elements 35 begin to spin or roll along the walls of tapered interior 32 as the plunger 30 is inserted deeper into the clutch lock body 29. The rolling element retainer 36 and rolling elements 35 descend within the tapered interior 32 of the clutch lock body 29. As illustrated, a small clearance space has developed between the retainer 36 and the top most portion 33 of the tapered interior 32.
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 3b shows the exterior of the locking device 10 and the position of cam follower 27 when the plunger 30 is in the position depicted in FIG. 3a. The cam follower 27 has descended down the cam track 18 a distance, which corresponds to the partial compression of the lock spring 37.
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 4a shows the plunger 30 after fully penetrating the clutch lock body 29. In addition the plunger distal end 31 has passed through the lock spring 37 and out of the locking device 10. Once the distal end 31 has passed the rolling elements 35, and the full diameter of plunger 30 is disposed between those elements 35, the plunger 30 resists removal. Notably, in this locked position the plunger 30 may still pass freely downward through the rolling elements 35 of the locking device 10 until the plunger face 17 strikes the plunger guide 21.
  • [0033]
    In the locked position shown in FIG. 4a the plunger 30 has moved the rolling elements 35 down the tapered interior 32 to a position where the width of the interior 32 is just adequate to accommodate the plunger 30 and the rolling elements 35. This position generally results after the full diameter of plunger 30 has passed the equator of the rolling elements 35. At this point the plunger 30 cannot be retrieved from the locking device 10 without activating the release mechanism.
  • [0034]
    After the plunger 30 has passed the equator of the rolling elements 35 it cannot be removed from the locking device 10 because the rolling elements 35 are biased upwards by lock spring 37 and inwards against plunger 30 by the tapered interior 32. Pulling the plunger 30 upward in the direction that would remove it from the lock 10 causes the plunger 30 to frictionally interface with rolling elements 35, which are thereby encouraged to roll up the tapered interior 32 of the clutch lock body 29. This action causes the rolling elements 35 to be even more tightly compressed against the plunger 30. Because rolling elements 35, plunger 30 and the tapered interior 32 are not made of compressible material, the plunger 30 and rolling elements 35 in rolling element retainer 36 effectively form a wedge, which cannot be moved upwards within the lock 10. While the rolling elements 35, plunger 30 and tapered interior 32 are not made of compressible material, they are preferably made of softer more corrosion resistant materials than prior art prosthetic locking devices. Examples include corrosion resistant grades of stainless steel, titanium, and other corrosion resistant alloys. This is possible because the invention, unlike prior locks, displaces wear over a larger surface area and requires less force to initially secure and hold the prosthesis in place. Because the rolling elements 35 roll and spin during the locking process no single portion of the rolling elements 35 consistently contacts the plunger 30. The plunger 30 also being cylindrical offers more surface area to contact the rolling elements. The use of a plurality of spherical rolling elements acts to both distribute the contacting portions of rolling elements 35 over the entire surface of those elements, and to maximize the number of contacts between plunger 30 and rolling elements 35.
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 4b shows the exterior of the locking device 10 and the position of cam follower 27 when plunger 30 and retainer 36 are positioned as depicted in FIG. 4a. The cam follower 27 has descended down the cam track 18 a distance, which corresponds to the partial compression of the lock spring 37. The lock spring 37 does not need to compress further to accommodate any length of plunger 30, because the width of the tapered interior 32 is adequate at this point to accommodate the plunger 30 and the rolling elements 35. Thus even as the plunger 30 is inserted further until the plunger face 17 interfaces with guide 21, there is no additional downward pressure to further compress the lock spring 37.
  • [0036]
    [0036]FIG. 5a shows the plunger 30 in an unlocked position as the release mechanism has compressed the lock spring 37 to the extent that the rolling elements 35 are no longer in intimate contact with both the plunger 30 and the tapered interior 32. So long as the release mechanism holds the lock spring 37 in this compressed position the plunger 30 can be pulled back through the top 11 of the locking device 10, because the rolling elements 35 will not simultaneously engage both plunger 30 and tapered interior 32 and roll upward as the plunger 30 is removed.
  • [0037]
    [0037]FIG. 5b shows the exterior of the locking device 10 and the position of cam follower 27 when the retainer 36 is in the position depicted in FIG. 5a. The cam follower 27 has descended to the bottom of the cam track 18, a distance, which corresponds to the nearly total compression of the lock spring 37. The cam follower 27 is typically placed in this position by a radially actuated release mechanism. A linearly actuated release mechanism is disclosed in greater detail below in connection with FIG. 7.
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 6 illustrates a unique feature of the present invention, which allows flexible plungers 30 to enter the locking device 10 at irregular angles while maintaining reliable locking function. This is particularly beneficial when the locking mechanism has been cast into the prosthetic socket or limb at an imperfect angle. As shown in FIG. 6 the plunger 30 has entered the locking device 10 at a slight angle from the right side of the plunger guide 21. The rolling elements 35 accommodate the angled entry directing the plunger 30 through the rolling element retainer 36 and the locking device 10 while establishing a reliable lock. As previously described once the full diameter of plunger 30 has passed the equator of the rolling elements 35 it cannot be removed through the locking device top 11. Other locking devices that allow angular plunger 30 entry usually impart some amount of play in the locking hold. The present invention provides a consistent lock while minimizing any play or looseness due to an angled entry.
  • [0039]
    [0039]FIG. 7 illustrates one embodiment of the release mechanism 19 that can be used with the invention. The plunger 30 is shown fully engaged within the locking device 10. The plunger 30 is released by pressing the release button 22 that communicates via release pin 25 to release cam 26. The release cam 26 has a downwardly slanted face 26 a, which pushes the cam follower 27 downward in the linear cam track 18 in the clutch lock body 29. Cam follower 27 is connected to the rolling element retainer 36. As the downward slanted face 26 a passes over cam followers 27, both cam followers 27 and attached rolling element 36 move downward compressing the lock spring 37 to the extent shown in FIG. 5. The rolling element retainer 36 also moves the rolling elements 35 downward within the tapered interior 32 to a wider portion. The width of the tapered interior 32 at this point is such that rolling elements 35 do not simultaneously contact both the plunger 30 and the tapered interior 32 of the clutch lock body 29, thereby effecting the release of the plunger 30 from the locking device 10. Release button 22 is normally held in the locked position by the release spring 24 and may be protected from accidental actuation by a button shield 23 as shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0040]
    While a preferred embodiment has been shown and described, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the disclosure, but rather it is intended to cover all modifications and alternate methods falling within the spirit and the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023215 *Feb 17, 1976May 17, 1977Moore Robert RLocking prosthetic knee
US5116382 *Jun 4, 1990May 26, 1992Victory Prosthetic Systems, Inc.Prosthesis capture device
US5298290 *Sep 18, 1992Mar 29, 1994Balzers AktiengesellschaftProtective coating on substrates
US5547308 *Apr 27, 1993Aug 20, 1996Dzus Fastener Europe LimitedFastening device
US6093210 *Feb 23, 1999Jul 25, 2000Gramnas; FinnFastening device for prosthesis
US6106559 *Mar 25, 1999Aug 22, 2000Meyer; Dennis E.Socket coupler for a prosthetic limb
US6235062 *Apr 12, 2000May 22, 2001Finn GramnasFastening device for prosthesis
US6402789 *Nov 27, 1998Jun 11, 2002Gramnaes FinnLocking device intended as a fastening means for a prosthesis
US6440173 *Aug 21, 2000Aug 27, 2002Dennis E. MeyerSocket coupler for a prosthetic limb
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6893468 *Jun 12, 2002May 17, 2005Arnold A. LundAbove and below knee prosthesis—leg coupler
US6981992 *Apr 9, 2003Jan 3, 2006American Prosthetic Components, Inc.Three prong adapter
US7081138 *Aug 21, 2002Jul 25, 2006Centri AbLock mechanism on a prosthetic device
US7141073Mar 9, 2004Nov 28, 2006Biomet, Inc.Compliant fixation of external prosthesis
US7476254Jan 5, 2006Jan 13, 2009Biomet Manufacturing CorporationCompliant fixation for pelvis
US7520194 *Sep 18, 2006Apr 21, 2009Thyssenkrupp Presta AgDevice for securing two relatively movable parts
US7670383May 4, 2004Mar 2, 2010Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Pubic catch
US7722678Feb 9, 2006May 25, 2010Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Intramedullary compliant fixation
US8048166Mar 20, 2006Nov 1, 2011Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Method and apparatus for constructing a modular acetabulum
US8097042 *Jan 5, 2007Jan 17, 2012Prosthetic Design, Inc.Double-wall prosthetic limb assembly
US8512416Jan 28, 2011Aug 20, 2013Biomet Manufacturing, LlcTransdermal intraosseous device
US8623092 *Oct 12, 2010Jan 7, 2014Simplicity Orthopedics, Inc.Method and apparatus for restoring a joint, including the provision and use of a longitudinally-adjustable and rotationally-adjustable joint prosthesis
US8915970Feb 8, 2013Dec 23, 2014Biomet Manufacturing, LlcTransdermal prosthesis
US8968415Feb 7, 2013Mar 3, 2015Biomet Manufacturing, LlcImplant fixation device
US9254194Aug 19, 2013Feb 9, 2016Biomet Manufacturing, LlcTransdermal intraosseous device
US9283093 *Mar 12, 2013Mar 15, 2016Randall D. AlleyAdaptable socket system, method, and kit
US9474618 *Jan 7, 2014Oct 25, 2016Simplicity Orthopedics, Inc.Method and apparatus for restoring a joint, including the provision and use of a longitudinally-adjustable and rotationally-adjustable joint prosthesis
US9597203 *Mar 25, 2015Mar 21, 2017Tornier, Inc.Modular humeral implant
US20030233151 *Jun 12, 2002Dec 18, 2003Lund Arnold A.Above & below knee prosthesis - leg coupler
US20040102856 *Aug 21, 2002May 27, 2004Kennet HellbergLock mechanism on a prosthetic device
US20040204770 *Apr 9, 2003Oct 14, 2004Curtis Michael J.Three prong adapter
US20060116775 *Jan 5, 2006Jun 1, 2006Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Compliant fixation for pelvis
US20060129247 *Feb 9, 2006Jun 15, 2006Bioment Manufacturing Corp.Intramedullary compliant fixation
US20060161261 *Mar 20, 2006Jul 20, 2006Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Method and apparatus for constructing a modular acetabulum
US20070095162 *Sep 18, 2006May 3, 2007Thyssenkrupp Presta AgDevice for securing two relatively movable parts
US20070168045 *Jan 5, 2007Jul 19, 2007Slemker Tracy CDouble-wall prosthetic limb assembly
US20110144756 *Oct 12, 2010Jun 16, 2011Bickley Barry TMethod and apparatus for restoring a joint, including the provision and use of a longitudinally-adjustable and rotationally-adjustable joint prosthesis
US20110190907 *Jan 28, 2011Aug 4, 2011Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Transdermal Intraosseous Device
US20140121783 *Mar 12, 2013May 1, 2014Randall D. AlleyAdaptable Socket System, Method, and Kit
US20140324185 *Jan 7, 2014Oct 30, 2014Simplicity Orthopedics, Inc.Method and apparatus for restoring a joint, including the provision and use of a longitudinally-adjustable and rotationally-adjustable joint prosthesis
WO2004091430A2 *Apr 8, 2004Oct 28, 2004Curtis Michael JThree prong adapter
WO2004091430A3 *Apr 8, 2004Mar 31, 2005Michael J CurtisThree prong adapter
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/36, 623/33
International ClassificationA61F2/00, A61F2/78, A61F2/50, A61F2/80
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2220/0033, A61F2002/30504, A61F2002/3038, A61F2/78, A61F2002/7875, A61F2002/5067, A61F2002/5073, A61F2220/0025, A61F2/80
European ClassificationA61F2/78, A61F2/80
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 12, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: FILLAUER, INC., TENNESSEE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COOP, BRIAN T.;REEL/FRAME:012799/0182
Effective date: 20020402