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Publication numberUS20030199295 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/126,317
Publication dateOct 23, 2003
Filing dateApr 19, 2002
Priority dateApr 19, 2002
Publication number10126317, 126317, US 2003/0199295 A1, US 2003/199295 A1, US 20030199295 A1, US 20030199295A1, US 2003199295 A1, US 2003199295A1, US-A1-20030199295, US-A1-2003199295, US2003/0199295A1, US2003/199295A1, US20030199295 A1, US20030199295A1, US2003199295 A1, US2003199295A1
InventorsOlaf Vancura
Original AssigneeOlaf Vancura
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus displays selected preferences
US 20030199295 A1
Abstract
A casino game is visible to the player and others in the casino. A place thereon displays information about a plurality of player selected personal preferences. Controls accessible to the player allow selection of preferences. A computer connects to the controls to present the preference selected by the player on the place. The computer allows the player to personalize the gaming experience so that others become spectators. Audio, video and/or illumination connect to the computer and controls so color appears on the place as a personal preference. The controls select choices about the player's mood during play if the control couples to the computer as input for showing the player's mood. The place has a video screen, light emitting diodes, liquid crystal or plasma panel located in a top box visible to the player and others. A method for presenting preferences on the place visible to the player and others has steps including allowing the player to select at least one of the plurality of preferences for presentation and changing the preferences for personal choice of the gaming experience. The step of presenting includes audio and/or video display of what the player has selected. The step of allowing the player to change the selection includes presenting the change of the selection including aroma or massage by vibrating the player's chair.
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Claims(21)
hat is claimed:
1) An apparatus for a player to wager upon a casino game of chance, the apparatus visible to the player and others in the casino comprising:
a place on the apparatus for presenting to the player and the others in the casino, before and during play of the game, information about selections of the player from a plurality of preferences;
one or more controls on the apparatus accessible to the player for allowing the player to select one of the plurality of personal player preferences about the nature of the gaming experience before or during play of the game, and
a computer in the apparatus responsive to the wager and connected to the one or more controls for presenting the preference selected by the player on the place so that the nature of the player's gaming experience is personalized by the player in accord with the selected preference and so that others may be made aware of the preferences and be involved in the play as spectators.
2) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein an audio presentation connects to the one or more controls, the audio presentation emanating from the place for presenting so that sound can be available to the player and others before and/or during the play of the game.
3) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a video presentation connects to the one or more controls, the video presentation appears on the place of the personal preferences selected by the player for presentation.
4) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein an illumination presentation connects to the one or more controls, the illumination presentation having color appearing on the place of the personal preference selected by the player for presentation.
5) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the one or more controls are for selecting choices about the player's mood during play including the states of happiness, sadness or awfulness during play and the one or more controls connects to the computer for change by the player during play to reflect moods due for example to wins and losses achieved by the player.
6) The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the computer is coupled to the one or more controls to receive input therefrom and show the player's indicated moods on the place.
7) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the place is a video screen located above the casino game of chance in a top box of the apparatus so the video screen is visible to the player and others in the casino.
8) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the place is in a top box of the apparatus and the top box has mounted light emitting diodes therein for transmitting signals concerning the player's selection.
9) The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the place shows play personal preference selection or change selected from the group of ambiance, theme, décor, motif, atmosphere, milieu, appearance.
10) A method for a player in a casino to present one or more preferences at a place on a casino game of chance visible to the player and others in the casino, the method comprising the steps of presenting comprising:
displaying player preference choices before or during the casino game of chance to the player;
allowing the player to select at least one of the plurality of preference choices for presentation on the place, and
presenting the selected player personal preference so that is visible to the player and others.
11) The method of claim 10 with the step of allowing the player to change the at least one of the plurality of personal preferences selected about the nature of the gaming experience on the casino game of chance.
12) The method of claim 10 with the step of presenting including providing audio with video of what the player has selected.
13) The method of claim 10 with the step of presenting including displaying information on the mood of the player apparent to the others in the casino.
14) The method of claim 10 wherein the step of allowing the player to change includes showing the player personal preference selection or change selected from the group of ambiance, theme, décor, motif, atmosphere, milieu, appearance.
15) The method of claim 10 wherein the step of allowing the player to select the selection includes providing an aroma.
16) The method of claim 10 wherein the step of allowing the player to select includes vibrating a chair for the player.
17) The method of claim 10 with the step of displaying including modifying the appearance of the place in a top box based on player selected personal preference.
18) The method of claim 10 with the step of displaying including modifying the appearance of the casino game of chance with controls accessible to the player based on player selected personal preference.
19) A method for a player in a casino game to modify an external appearance of the casino game based on personal preference so as to be visible to the player and others in the casino, the method comprising the steps of:
displaying to the player information on the casino game about possible preferences for the external appearance of the casino game;
allowing the player to input personal preference for appearance of the casino game from the information, and
modifying the external appearance of the casino game to conform to the player personal preference input selected from the information.
20) The method of claim 19 wherein the displaying step includes modifying the external appearance of a top box on the casino game.
21) The method of claim 19 wherein the displaying step includes modifying the external appearance of the casino game.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] METHODS FOR A CUSTOMIZED CASINO GAME U.S. Ser. No. 09/965,165 filed Sep. 26, 2001.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO A “MICROFICHE APPENDIX”

[0003] Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] 1. Field of the Invention

[0005] The present invention relates to casino games of chance and, in particular, to improvements in the methods of players being able to preferentially personalize the gaming machine by player selection.

[0006] 2. Description of Related Art Including Information Disclosed Under 37 CFR 1.97 and 1.98

[0007] Slot machines have become the most important contributor to revenue on casino floors. Several methods have historically been adopted in order to try to attract or woo players to a particular machine.

[0008] First, those with a theme are often selected for play. The theme somehow connects with the player's emotions, moods, or fond memories of previous play. It is common to have the same inner workings on many different machines as the outside of the machine including the symbols and the casino or manufacturer can easily change the slot glass. The machine signage, symbols, and slot glass can be replaced with very little down time. Hence, a “new” machine is available for play in short order. Thus, to the player the same machine may have an entirely different look and theme in a matter of minutes.

[0009] For video slot machines, the “swapping out” of games is even easier and may be accomplished in large part by simply replacing the software. There are multi-game machines whereat the player can select one or more different games to play. So if a player is not satisfied with the game play, a touch screen menu allows the player to change the game or denomination. Consequently, the game manufacturers provide player choice in an effort to provide differentiation of game play.

[0010] As an example of minimal differentiation, IGT's game “Austin Powers” has three different top glass designs for the same base game. As such, players may sit at the machine with the glass they prefer. The base game is identical, however.

[0011] As a further example of minimal differentiation, IGT's game “Fortune Cookie” allows the player to touch an on-screen reel symbol which changes from “MSG” to “No MSG.” While the “MSG” or “No MSG” symbols are a part of the game play (i.e., they appear on the reels themselves), the player choice does not affect game outcome. The effect is on-screen and subtle; as such one must be in the game's immediate vicinity to discern it.

[0012] While many machines utilize multimedia (e.g., sound, lights, visual displays) to enhance the game play and serve as attract modes, these multimedia presentations are invariably identical on each machine. For example, one of the most popular gaming machines repeats the phrase “Wheel of Fortune” as an attraction while not being played, and makes the noise of a wheel spinning to excite the players and bystanders during play. Also cash less games exist that print a ticket while making the noise of coins falling in the tray, although no coins are dispensed. While these audio presentations add to the player appeal of the game, there is nothing personalized in these games.

[0013] Unfortunately, currently, players who walk into casinos and look at rows and rows of slot machines see basically identical machines with different packaging. That is, slot manufacturers have taken care to differentiate their product lines from those of competitors. But slot manufacturers have done very little to differentiate individual machines within a product line. Basically, all machines of a specific title are “cookie-cutter” copies of each other.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 6,350,199 has a gaming apparatus for an interactive video game to be displayed on a video display with a game controller to control the outcome of a game played on the gaming machine for display. A player interface couples to the gaming apparatus and is configured to input information data personally identifying a player operating the gaming machine. This personal identification data is then integrated into the game for integral display in the game outcome on the display. The game presentation is customized to include personal information relating to the player for display during play. Such personal information may include the player's name, age, birth date, digitized facial pictures of player and/or of the player's family, etc. Player interaction and interest substantially increase. The game controller has a first memory containing data to provide video content associated with the game. A second memory contains other data to provide video content associated with the personal identification data. The first memory is a “video” EPROM, while the second memory is a “video” RAM for temporarily storing the personal identification data. The game includes a video figurine having a head portion with a blank face slot for the digitized picture data of the player's face insertion whenever the figurine appears in the game presentation during play of the game. Thus, during a card game such as video electronic poker or video electronic blackjack, for example, the player's face may be presented in the King face card. The player interface can be a card reader for reading encoded personal identification data from a card, such as a SMARTCARD having a memory chip. Another player interface includes a keypad for allowing the player to key in information, or a network computer system electronically coupled to the game controller.

[0015] U.S. Pat. No. 6,315,666 has gaming machines and methods of use in which a main or primary display for displaying the outcome of a primary game and a secondary display for presenting primary, secondary, or even “tertiary information.” Tertiary information refers to information that is not directly related to the play of a primary or secondary game. Tertiary information includes, for example, billboard information, advertisements, television programming, player attraction material, animations, casino kiosks, video conferencing, and combinations all put into the machine by the game manufacture or casino not the player. The video display is a substitute for displaying some or all of the information currently provided on the top glass or belly glass on a conventional slot machine. Regardless of where the video display is located and how much space it occupies, it may introduce substantial flexibility in presenting primary and secondary information to actual and potential players. The content may fall under one of at least three categories: primary information, secondary information, and tertiary information. Primary information includes indications of status and outcome of the play. Secondary information is notices of slot tournaments, progressive games, bonusing schemes, and other incentives challenging the player to keep playing or to play in a particular manner. It may provide a menu for casino services such as help from an attendant, ordering drinks and food, reserving taxi cabs, obtaining tickets for shows, conducting banking transactions, learning about the availability of health clubs, shops, restaurants, etc., provided in a single centralized location within a casino. Thus allowing the user to access the kiosk from the gaming machine at which he or she is currently positioned without leaving the machine and continuing play. The player communicates his or her requests via a menu displayed on the secondary display screen. The menu driven requests might include, for example, car reservations, drink requests, movie, dinner or theater reservations, messages for a particular room, taxi cab requests, etc. Television on the video display via a cable, for example, sporting events, talk shows, game shows, soap operas, advertisements, situation comedies, etc. In addition, broadcasts of competitive events on which the player can wager, dog racing or horse racing events. Also, information available on the Internet can be provided for the players.

[0016] Two-way communication provided between the gaming player and a casino attendant or other individual by a camera and microphone on the gaming machine. A gaming machine with camera and microphone allows display of the player's image. Fresh ornamentation and incentives that are useful for attracting potential players can be changed and displayed. Examples of successful slot machine themes include “Red White and Blue,” “Double Diamond,” and “Wild Cherry.” In multi-game machines, multiple games such as keno, video poker, etc., pay tables may be provided on a CRT screen in response to menu driven commands on a touch screen portion of the CRT. Some machines have two screens with the top one providing the pay table.

[0017] The forgoing equipment and techniques seek to provide more services for the player but have nothing to personalize the playing experience and have not addressed the need for having player preference aspects of the gaming experience under the player's control. Those will be addressed in the following specification.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0018] While the foregoing have attempted various methods of increasing player appeal and control, none of them satisfactorily gives the player control over the external appearance, type, or style of the gaming machine being played. What is proposed herein is an entirely different approach in which the player customizes the look of the gaming machine in a personal way.

[0019] Active changes apart from the described changes made by the manufactures to slot glass that can be implemented are “attract mode” wherein the machine automatically changes by itself to attract play. To date, passive changes to the slot machine that modify the appearance of the machine during play or the capability of the player to make such modifications to attract players and/or keep the current player have not been tried and are not available. In particular, modifying the appearance of the machine to conform to a player's wishes is desirable but heretofore untried.

[0020] Perhaps this is because the manufacturers of gaming equipment and/or the casino have failed to recognize the personal relationship that grows between the player and “his or her” machine. The concept of “my” machine is antithetical to the reality of ownership and/or leasing which exists for such slot machines and gaming equipment. It is believed that in many instances, players would if they could take “their” machine home whenever they leave the casino. This despite the fact that the machine is perhaps no different from 1,000 other similar machines in use at any time. Despite the fact also, that the “cookie-cutter” effect exists. For tourists from states that allow private ownership, gaming machines can be purchased and shipped to their residence for personal use. Locals, those that live near casinos, also have their favorite gaming machines that they frequent and feel that they have an investment in because of frequent play.

[0021] The manufacturers and/or casinos have a strong business interest in providing the variety of gaming experiences explained herein to keep the products available to their customers fresh and appealing. The problem then is how to let the player personalize the gaming machine while accommodating regulations and at a reasonable cost.

[0022] The player proactively chooses the appearance in a way that is apparent not only to the player but also to those about the gaming machine in the casino. Signage, audio and the like can be altered by the player to connect with the gaming machine on a special basis and spell out to all who care that the particular gaming machine is “his, hers, or mine” as the case may be. It could be a “lucky” color or colors in the top box, preferred music or indicia indicating the theme of the game, player's name, player-input artwork, or even mood. For example, if the player is on a winning or losing streak, the corresponding mood of happy, sad or anxious can be shown. Alternately, if the player is waiting to meet perhaps Rhoda, then the name “Rhoda” or some other such message may be displayed. Or, the player may wish to celebrate a birthday, the 4th of July, or some other holiday or event. Or, the player may, via touch-screen, sketch (with his/her finger) a picture that is then displayed as a “signature” piece. What is important is that in each case, the player provides input that dictates and/or modifies the external appearance of the game. This serves not only to draw interest to the game (or bank of games) from passersby, but also to customize the gaming experience from the player's personal point of view.

[0023] During play of the game, the player has access to input for controlling the top box display with an audio, video and/or liquid crystal display on to which the player's preference may be displayed or presented. As an example, say the wife is playing somewhere in the casino and husband has agreed to meet her at 6:00 PM for dinner. Anyone who has been in this situation knows it can be difficult. However, with a personalization of the top box display presentation, the process of finding one's spouse can be simplified. In particular, the plan would be to look for the machine with, e.g., the hounds-tooth pattern displayed on the gaming machine, or playing “their song”.

[0024] In the instant invention, the player may choose one of a plurality of personalized presentations that in no way alter the game or interfere with any regulatory of compliance matters. In a preferred environment, an on-screen replica of a computer keyboard could allow almost any type of input but specific offensive phrases, etc. could be controlled within logic. In a simple version, a few choices of say different colors or a showing of the player's name from a tracking card could be inexpensively added to the top box for all to see. Thus the gaming machine personal presentation might show or say, “Mona's machine! Just watch me win the jackpot!” Alternately, the color-scheme of the top and base boxes (accomplished, e.g., via multi-color LED displays) may be selected by the player to conform to the player's alma mater, favorite hockey team, etc. In this fashion, too, other customers who recognize a game's particular appearance will know who is playing the game, even at a distance.

[0025] Clearly, many other themes and manners of signage and/or audio presentation are possible, as will be apparent to players and skilled artisans. The salient features required are a personalization of the currently played gaming machine, and controls for the player to modify this currently selected presentation. The presentation may even relate to the theme of a selected game shown on the player's screen and/or the top box.

[0026] Too, the monetary value and/or difficulty of the game may also be presented thus saying to those about the machine look how smart or fortunate the player happens to be.

[0027] It is an advantage of the present invention that the player may make personal or preferential changes to the appearance of the gaming machine.

[0028] It is a further advantage of the present invention that the improvement described herein has almost no learning curve yet still affords considerable player empowerment and preference in the appearance of the gaming machine being played.

[0029] It is a further advantage that the customization afforded to the player of the slot machine is a conversation piece and attract mode to passersby, even those viewing the machine at a considerable distance.

[0030] As a preferred embodiment, the player is offered the choice of a plurality of top box presentations from which to pre-select before or during the play of the game. As with so many computer devices and their operation, it is expected that the variety of player choice will, if popular, expand at a rate similar to that which computer power has grown. The player will be afforded almost limitless choices for base and/or top box presentations, for example via a touch screen.

[0031] The play may include depicting to the player, before play of the base game or upon insertion of a player's card or a bill into the bill acceptor, information about currently selected personal preferences for presentation on the top box. In a preferred embodiment, there is the step of allowing the player to pre-select one of the plurality of presentations for personalizing the gaming machine before or during the play of the casino game. In practice, it is desirable to have this option available to the player also while the game is idle, or in between games. This is so that a new player may immediately be able to select his/her desired personal preferences and then initiate play.

[0032] An advantage of this disclosure involves the step of coupling the play of the game or theme to the selected preference so that the playing of the game may be shown to the player as well as other players. The draw of other players into what one player has displayed is of commercial and psychological value in that it validates the original player's selection and also stimulates more play of like gaming machines. Camaraderie ensues and the group's interaction follows, which enhances play for the casino and validation for the player. Communication about the play via top box messages about the gaming machine turns an essentially solitary endeavor into a social and therefor more enjoyable pastime. In addition to communication with other players, the messaging may be for casino personnel to ask for help, change, or a cocktail or beverage. The controls accessible to the player may be as simple as a few switches keyed to choices, something like a hand computer pad and stylet on the touch screen or keyboard input. The interactive features of this disclosure can extend beyond the top box and player's screen. The player's connection or feeling of ownership can be enhanced by allowing player selection of a vibrating chair to massage the player. In the IGT Lucy slot machine chocolate fragrance is built into the gaming machine by the manufacture. That, aroma therapy is no selectable of by player preference used to relax and continue the player's enjoyable experience. The gaming machine can be equipped to provide those and other similar interactive preferred activities as well as change of the display.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

[0033]FIG. 1 is perspective view of a video slot machine for a casino game of chance having the player selectable preferences for practice of the method.

[0034]FIG. 2 a flow diagram of preferred methods of play wherein preferences may be selected.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0035] While the examples illustrating the play and different options for the casino games are explained herein, skilled artisans will appreciate that many variations of the execution of selection and presentation of personal preferences will be possible. The specific examples presented should not be considered limiting and the particular casino game equipment shown in FIG. 1 is merely for illustration of but one example of form including a video slot machine for a base game and possibly a bonus game played on the same touch screen. U.S. Pat. No. 6,210,279 incorporated herein by reference has a touch screen directly applied, e.g. bonded, to the CRT screen exposed surface so a limited number of push-button actuators control play and select one of several games that can be played on the machine. In '279 the player of the game of the video slot machine can use the touch screen or push buttons to change the playable game elements, such as discarding and drawing new cards when playing poker, choosing paylines and wagers in a video slot, or choosing numbers in keno. A part of the screen can be made to receive instruction via a stylet as do hand computer note pads.

[0036] The possible player preferences are not as in '279 to change the game, its play or outcome. The possible player preferences may control by selection or change the gaming experience including ambiance, theme, décor, motif, atmosphere, milieu, appearance, etc. Throughout this disclosure the terms, “plurality of preferences” refers to all of the mentioned preferences and their range of equivalents presented a choices for the player to select before or during play. Thus opportunities for personalization of the gaming experience are provided to each player with the method and apparatus herein disclosed.

[0037] A preferred casino game of chance 10 for at least one player is shown in FIG. 1. The casino game of chance 10 includes a computer 11 to run the game with images accessible and visible to the player of the casino game of chance 10. Controls 12 may be in the form of touch switches on or off the video screen 13 both are shown in FIG. 1 as will be described herein after in this disclosure. Controls 12 may be used to input player choices and change a top box display 14 for presentation or other features of the player's gaming experience personalizing the casino game of chance 10 during play. The player preferential selection controls nothing in the activities of the gaming machine, e.g., the game play or return to the player. Thus, it is an advantage of the instant invention that no regulatory or compliance issues are raised by the player's control of the features of the gaming experience. The player control is primarily selection from a plurality of preferences for presentation of, e.g., audio with or sans video, aroma, chair vibration, etc.

[0038] It is preferred that one or more controls 12 change input to computer 11 for signaling the personal preference selected by the player from the plurality of preferences displayed on video screen 13 to present an image on top box display 14. Specifically, the player enters a “selection mode” and is given a menu of choices including theme or color scheme (Blue+Red) for multi-color light emitting diodes, cathode ray tube or plasma or liquid crystal panel in top-box display 14. The controls 12 can be free form permitting the player to draw a smiley-face via touch-screen with his/her finger. Player then hits “implement” button of control 12 on touch-screen and the machine goes to this mode of presentation. The player may then, at some later time, touch another on-screen button to re-enter the “selection mode” to again alter or change the appearance. Lights or light emitting diodes 16 or another cathode ray tube, liquid crystal or plasma panel or like but are preferably all designated as, monitor 15 in top box display 14 are shown in FIG. 1. Skilled artisans can use any other suitable top box display 14 to present the selection made from the plurality of player selectable preferences to other players in the casino. The plurality of player selectable preferences shown at top box display 14 may thus be shown in any form on light emitting diodes or lights 16 or monitor 15 as top box display 14.

[0039] A form of presenting the currently selected personal preference is, for example and not limiting, the changing of top box display 14 according to the player's input at video screen 13 so that others in the casino can see what is happening during play. The change in the top box display 14 is intended to involve the overall external look, style and presentation of the gaming machine, as might be visible or audible by one or more casino guests both in the nearby area and at a reasonable distance.

[0040] As explained, the game surface 11 may be an interactive structure such as a touch video screen 13, see FIG. 1. For the purpose of selection a series of identified buttons or switches as controls 12 positioned on or off video screen 13 can be used by the player to choose one of the plurality of player selectable preferences for presentation. During play the currently selected preference or personalized gaming experience, is shown to the player and others in the casino about that casino game of chance 10. Lights or light emitting diodes 16 for illumination as shown generally located in FIG. 1, may alter the appearance or be representative of the theme of the casino game selected for play; they can flash, message or be different colors as desired. Indicia 17 on top box display 14 can communicate the player's mood, identify player or the like in accord with the player's personalized preferences selected via controls 12 on or off video screen 13. The selected theme of the casino game of chance could then appear on the player's video screen 13 on the gaming surface as well as the top box display 14. Thus, the player's selection of any preferred theme would during game play be shown to those about the player in the casino. The casino game of chance 10 could include a bonus game shown on top box display 14 at monitor 15. That is, a knowledge-based trivia game wherein play on video screen 13 is also shown on top box display 14 so others in the casino can see the questions asked and answered. For example, the player's preference selection at video screen 13 is a category in a knowledge-based trivia game. Moreover if the player is very good at answering the questions then all can learn how the game is played and be stimulated to try that gaming machine or another similar game machine. The top-box display 14 portrays to others in the area of this gaming machine that this player's personal preference is a specific trivia game. The selected player's personal preference may indicate the player aptitude and thus surrounding watchers can perhaps join in and help the befuddled player with answers to trivia. Then the communal or group interaction works to draw in other players and encourage more play. This may be accomplished by multi-color light emitting diodes 16 on one form of the top box display 14 or monitor 15 tied to computer 11.

[0041] Input comes from the player's current selected preference on the gaming machine at video screen 13. Monitor 15 is in top box display 14 may have colors, graphics, text, sound or all of them etc. and it can be used to portray the player's selected preference and/or game play. Specifically, the subject selected as a personal preference is shown to other casino guests by color, images, messages, sound bites and/or all of those on top box display 14 as well. Simple changes as the particular illumination on the top box display 14 or complete audio visual presentations on the top box display 14 reinforce the personal preferences or feelings of the player and piques the interest and curiosity of the other people thereabout in the casino.

[0042] In another embodiment, the player may simply change the overall appearance of the game e.g., lighting colors, attract modes, visual displays, etc. Thus, a selected choice is shown and is not necessarily an element or theme of the game play but something the player particularly likes to have on the top box display 14. For example, upon inserting a bill in an automatic bill acceptor 18 to initiate play, the player may be prompted on the player's video screen 13 as to his or her current desire or preference by being given a choice of a plurality of preferences from which to select. The player's mood choices may include, “Happy”, “Sad”, “Awful”, “Winner”, “Loser”, etc. Alternately, the choices for player status may be “Single”, “Married”, “Available”, etc. Monitor 15 of top box display 14 may correspondingly portray an image such as a smiley face, sad face, cringing face, relevant depictions etc. so that passers by may also know the mood or status of the player. The music emanating from top box display 14 at speaker 19 associated with play or wins may be based on the player's mood as selected with controls 12 and as supplied by the computer 11 for presentation. In practice, it would be desirable to give the player the option to change the selected mood, with the accompanying non regulatory provoking changes in the game or the play. In this way the game is further personalized to the player and the player's success can be seen and enjoyed by all.

[0043] In yet another embodiment, the player selects the type of music that the game will use. The choices may be “Rock 'n Roll”, “Country”, “New Wave”, “Disco”, etc. The player selects his/her preference from a menu on video screen 13. Thereafter, all of the music within the game (including sounds for winning pays, bonus games, etc.) may be according to the player's preference.

[0044] Controls 12 carried on or near the game surface 11 are located to be visible and available to the player. It is not essential to show the player preferences from which to select on video screen 13 but a simulated keyboard thereon could be used for that purpose as control 12 within this disclosure. The selection control 12 is for choosing and displaying player selected personal preferences is perhaps more a function of the type of casino game of chance 10 than anything else. The selection control 12 can include any interactive structure such as the player touching control 12 buttons or virtual switches on the player's video screen 13 for the purpose of selection or to specifically input preferences to control the top box display 14. FIG. 1 illustrates such options in a general way but skilled artisans would understand how to accomplish the may various techniques for player selection.

[0045] The use of player choice empowers the player to personalize the gaming experience. Selection of preference and interaction including active choices including aroma or massage during play as personally preferred by and deemed favorable to the player of the casino game of chance 10. Regarding aroma a scent can be activated by heat application to a chemical agent 20 within the game of chance 10 as with heater 21 shown in the cut away of FIG. 1. Controls 12 can also operate a vibrator in chair 22 as shown in FIG. 1.

[0046] Simply apparatus 23 for a player to play in a casino a casino game of chance 10 for a bet thereon is visible to the player and others in the casino in FIG. 1. A place 24 is on the apparatus 23 in the form of top box display 14 connects to controls 12 perhaps on video screen 13 via computer 11 that presents to the player and to others in the casino the player's plurality of personal preferences 25. The presentations are selected before and during play of the game. The player selects from information about his/her plurality of preferences 25. One or more controls 12 on the apparatus 23 accessible to the player allows selection of one of the plurality of personal preferences 25 shown to player at video screen 13 and about playing the game of chance 10 before or during play thereof.

[0047] Furthermore, computer 11 in the apparatus 23 responds to the bet and connects the one or more controls 12 for selection of the plurality of preference 25 by the player for presentation on the place 24 preferably on top box display 14. Computer 11 is provided so that the player according to the selected one of the plurality of preference 25 can personalize playing the game of chance 10 and so that others may be involved in the play as spectators by watching top box display 14. An audio presentation via speaker 19 connects to the one or more controls 12 and the audio presentation emanates near place 24 so that sound can be available to the player and others before and/or during the play of the game of chance 10. A video presentation connects to the one or more controls 12 and the video presentation appears on the place 24 of the personal preferences 25 selected by the player for presentation.

[0048] An illuminated presentation couples through the computer 11 to the one or more controls 12 so color appears on or about place 24 of the personal preferences 25 selected by the player for presentation. The one or more controls 12 are for selecting choices about the player's mood during play. Mood choices including the states of happiness, sadness or awfulness during play connect to the one or more controls 12 coupled to computer 11 for change by the player during play to reflect current moods due for example, to wins and losses achieved. Thus computer 11 is coupled to the one or more controls 12 to receive input therefrom and show the player's indicated moods on place 24. The top box display 14 may be simply monitor 15, light emitting diodes 16 and/or indicia 17 located above casino game of chance 10 within or about place 24. If top box display 14 is monitor 15, it is visible to the player and others in the casino. Place 24 in the top box display 14 is positioned for transmitting information concerning the player's selection so all those around the casino game may observe.

[0049] A method in FIG. 2 includes steps for a player in a casino to present one or more of the plurality of preferences 25 on place 24 on casino game of chance 10 visible to the player and others in the casino. The method has steps of presenting including displaying to the player and the others in the casino information of the plurality of preferences 25 on place 24. Allowing the player to select at least one of the plurality of preferences 25 for presentation on the place 24 is a step. The step of changing the selected one of the plurality of preferences on the casino game of chance 10 for presentation so the selected preference is visible to the player at video screen 13 and others at top box display 14 of place 24. The step of presenting includes audio and/or video display concerning what the player has selected. The method with the step of presenting has making information on the mood of the player apparent to the others in the casino. The method step of allowing the player to change the selection includes providing an aroma. The step of allowing the player to change the selection includes vibrating chair 22 for the player.

[0050] The apparatus and method allow personal selection shown to the player at video screen 13 and displaying presentations on top box display 14 at place 24 for enhanced enjoyment and perhaps group awareness and interaction. When, how or what the selection are all within the scope of the claims that follow.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/16
International ClassificationG07F17/32
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/3232, G07F17/32
European ClassificationG07F17/32E6, G07F17/32
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 19, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: MIKOHN GAMING CORPORATION, NEVADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VANCURA, OLAF;REEL/FRAME:012828/0334
Effective date: 20020419