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Publication numberUS20030201693 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/417,713
Publication dateOct 30, 2003
Filing dateApr 16, 2003
Priority dateMar 8, 2001
Also published asUS6552460, US20020125781
Publication number10417713, 417713, US 2003/0201693 A1, US 2003/201693 A1, US 20030201693 A1, US 20030201693A1, US 2003201693 A1, US 2003201693A1, US-A1-20030201693, US-A1-2003201693, US2003/0201693A1, US2003/201693A1, US20030201693 A1, US20030201693A1, US2003201693 A1, US2003201693A1
InventorsJohn Bales
Original AssigneeBales John E.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brushless electro-mechanical machine
US 20030201693 A1
Abstract
An electromotive machine comprises a stator element and a rotor element, the stator element including at least one set of four toroidally shaped electromagnetic members, the electromagnetic members arranged along an arc a predetermined distance apart defining a stator arc length. Each of the members has a slot, and the rotor element comprises a disc adapted to pass through the slots. The disc contains a plurality of permanent magnet members spaced side by side about a periphery thereof and arranged so as to have alternating north-south polarities. These permanent magnet members are sized and spaced such that within the stator arc length the ratio of stator members to permanent magnet members is about four to six. The electromagnetic members are energized in a four phase push-pull fashion to create high torque and smooth operation.
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Claims(15)
1. An electromotive machine comprising a stator element and a rotor element, the stator element including at least one set of four toroidally shaped electromagnetic members, said electromagnetic members arranged along an arc a predetermined distance apart defining a stator arc length, each of said members having a slot, the rotor element comprising a disc adapted to pass through said slots, said disc containing a plurality of permanent magnet members spaced side by side about a periphery thereof and arranged so as to have alternating north-south polarities, the permanent magnet members being sized and spaced such that within said stator arc length the ratio of stator members to permanent magnet members is about four to six.
2. The electromotive machine of claim 1, further including at least a second set of four toroidally shaped electromagnet members positioned symmetrically with respect to said first set along said arc.
3. The electromotive machine of claim 1, further including at least one motor drive electronics module for energizing said set of electromagnet members with current according to a predetermined sequence.
4. The electromotive machine of claim 3, further including Hall effect sensors situated adjacent selective ones of said electromagnetic members and providing trigger signals to said electronics module to enable said electronics module to execute said predetermined sequence.
5. The electromotive machine of claim 1 wherein each of said permanent magnet members are spaced about 10 apart as measured between radial lines extending through a center of each magnet member.
6. An electromotive machine comprising
(a) a stator assembly including at least one electromagnet module, said electromagnet module comprising at least four electromagnetic members spaced about 15 apart, each of said electromagnetic members having a slot, said electromagnetic members arranged side by side wherein said slots are aligned with each other, and
(b) a rotor assembly comprising a rotary member having a periphery, the rotary member including a plurality of permanent magnet members arranged about said periphery side by side in alternating north-south polarities and spaced about 10 apart.
7. The electromotive machine of claim 6, further including a driver circuit coupled to said electromagnet module for energizing said electromagnetic members in an alternating polarity sequence.
8. The electromotive machine of claim 7, further including Hall effect sensors spaced along said lineal space adjacent to said permanent magnet members for providing trigger signals to said driver circuit.
9. The electromotive machine of claim 6 wherein said stator assembly includes at least a pair of electromagnet modules.
10. The electromotive machine of claim 9 wherein said rotary member is a disk or wheel.
11. The electromotive machine of claim 10 wherein said permanent magnet members are disc-shaped.
12. The electromotive machine of claim 13 wherein each permanent magnet member has a diameter, and a spacing between adjacent permanent magnet members does not exceed 10% of said diameter.
13. The electromotive machine of claim 6 wherein the stator and rotor assemblies are configured as a linear actuator.
14. The electromotive machine of claim 6, further including a switching module for switching said driver circuit off and for coupling an output of said stator assembly to a rectifier circuit for charging a battery.
15. The electromotive machine of claim 1, further including a drive circuit for providing drive current to said electromagnetic members thereby causing said rotor to rotate, and a switching module for turning off said drive circuit thereby allowing said stator module to provide current to charge a battery.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The following invention relates to a brushless electromechanical machine for converting electrical energy into mechanical motion and vice-versa. More specifically, the invention relates to an electric motor/generator having self-starting capabilities, high torque and increased efficiency.
  • [0002]
    Electric motors employing brushes are characterized by low efficiency and require elaborate starter mechanisms. Recently, a type of brushless motor has been developed which employs an electromagnet having a stator comprised of a plurality of toroidal pole pieces. The pole pieces each have a narrow gap to permit the passage of a disk shaped rotor. The rotor includes a plurality of permanent magnet members spaced about the periphery of the disk. As the permanent magnet members pass through the gap in the stator poles, the magnetic circuit is completed. With appropriate switching circuitry, this combination can be made to function as a brushless electric motor. An example of such construction is shown in the U.S. patent to Porter, U.S. Pat. No. 5,179,307.
  • [0003]
    In the Porter motor, the permanent magnets on the rotor are widely spaced apart. The rotor is a disk having permanent magnet members situated about its periphery and spaced 36 apart. The driving circuitry is triggered by combinations of light emitting diodes and photosensitive transistors arranged on opposite sides of the rotor disk. Apertures in the rotor disk permit light from and LED to fall on a photosensitive transistor at appropriate points in the rotation of the rotor disk. This causes the driving current to cause current to flow in the coil.
  • [0004]
    A problem with the motor of the '307 patent is that the permanent magnets are spaced too far apart about the periphery of the rotor disk for the machine to operate efficiently. This wide spacing of permanent magnet members would require a large mass rotor operating as a flywheel with enough energy stored in the rotor to provide considerable rotational momentum. A large mass rotor, however, would be impossible to start without some type of auxiliary starter mechanism. Additionally, this motor cannot easily reverse its direction.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    The present invention provides a construction for an electromotive machine which can be either an electric motor or a generator. The electromotive machine includes a stator element and a rotor element where the stator element includes at least one set of four toroidally shaped electromagnetic members where the electromagnetic members are arranged spaced apart along an arc to define a stator arc length. Each of the electromagnetic members includes a slot and a rotor element comprising a disk adapted to pass through the aligned slots of the electromagnetic members. The rotor contains a plurality of permanent magnet members spaced side-by-side about a periphery of the disk and arranged so as to have alternating north/south polarities. The permanent magnet members are sized and spaced such that within the stator arc length, the ratio of stator members to permanent magnet members is about 4 to 6.
  • [0006]
    Although the electromotive machine of the invention will work with one set of four toroidal electromagnets, a second set may be positioned symmetrically along a circular arc defined by the first set. Additional sets of four toroidal electromagnetic members may be used if desired.
  • [0007]
    The machine includes at least one motor drive electronics module for energizing the toroidal electromagnetic members with current according to a predetermined sequence. The sequence is triggered by Hall effect sensors placed adjacent the electromagnetic members along the arc. The Hall effect sensors sense changes in the magnetic field and provides trigger signals to the electronics module so that the electronics module can energize the electromagnetic members in a predetermined sequence. Since the ratio of electromagnet stator members to permanent magnets on the outer periphery of the disk is about 4 to 6, the toroidal electromagnets are operated in push-pull fashion in which switching occurs when a pair of magnets passes the centerline of an electromagnetic member.
  • [0008]
    The machine may also be operated in reverse as a generator using the rotor as a mechanical input device. In this configuration current induced in the coils by the turning of the rotor charges a battery. In an automobile, for example, the machine may operate first as a starter motor and then switch over to an alternator.
  • [0009]
    The foregoing and other objectives, features, and advantages of the invention will be more readily understood upon consideration of the following detailed description of the invention, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0010]
    [0010]FIG. 1 is a perspective schematic view of the electromechanical machine of the present invention.
  • [0011]
    [0011]FIG. 2 is a top view of the electromechanical machine of the present invention employing two sets of electromagnetic members.
  • [0012]
    [0012]FIG. 2A is a side cutaway view of FIG. 2 taken along line 2-2.
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a drive module for use when the electromechanical machine is being used as an electric motor.
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a Hall effect sensor used in connection with the electronic drive module of FIG. 3.
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 5 is a partial plan schematic view of the electromechanical machine of FIG. 1.
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 6 is a timing diagram illustrating the switching characteristics of the electronic drive module of FIG. 3.
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 7 is a partial perspective view of the electromechanical machine of the present invention configured as a linear actuator.
  • [0018]
    FIGS. 8A-8D represents a schematic view of the toroidal electromagnetic members and the permanent magnet members illustrating the four-phase switching characteristics of the electronics driver module of FIG. 3.
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 9 is a partial top view of an electromotive machine of the invention.
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a circuit employing the invention as a combination starter motor and alternator.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0021]
    An electromechanical machine 10 is shown schematically in FIG. 1. The machine 10 includes a plurality of toroidally shaped electromagnets 12. There are four such electromagnets 12 a, 12 b, 12 c and 12 d. The electromagnets 12 a-d are arranged along an arc having a predetermined length. Each of the electromagnets is toroidally shaped and each has a gap 14 (refer to FIG. 2A). The gaps 14 are aligned which permits the outer edge of a wheel or disk 16 to pass through them. The disk 16 has an output shaft 18 which may be coupled to any suitable device such as a fan or a tub for a washing machine (not shown). The output shaft could also be coupled to some source of rotational energy such as a drive shaft. In this configuration, the motor is initially used as a starter motor and then switches into a generator or alternator mode.
  • [0022]
    The disk includes a plurality of permanent magnet members 13 a, 13 b which are arranged in alternate north-south polarity. The magnets 13 a, b are sized and spaced so that within the stator arc length the ratio of toroid electromagnets 12 a-d to permanent magnets 13 a, b is always about 4 to 6. The permanent magnets are closely spaced, having spaces between each adjacent magnet that does not exceed 10% of the diameter of the uniformly sizes magnets 13 a, b.
  • [0023]
    Referring to FIG. 2, if desired, two groups of electromagnet members 20 and 22, respectively, may be used. Each of the sets 20 and 22 contains at least four (4) toroidal electromagnet members 22 a-d and 20 a-d respectively. Further, if desired, more sets of electromagnet members may be used depending upon the type of application desired. Each of the electromagnetic members in a set contains a slot and the slots are aligned along an arc allowing the flywheel 24 to pass through the slots. As in the example of FIG. 1, the flywheel 24 includes a plurality of permanent magnet members 26 having alternating north-south polarities about the periphery of the flywheel 24 that are in all respects the same as magnets 13 a, 13 b.
  • [0024]
    The electromechanical machine of the present invention may be configured to operate either as a motor or as a generator. For example, when acting as a motor or a motor/starter, the electromagnets 12 a-d are electronically switched in polarity to attract and then repel the appropriate permanent magnets 13 a, b in the flywheel. This applies a rotational force to the flywheel and spins the output shaft 18. Since there are no mechanical gears needed, the starting action is silent. Conventional automotive starter motors, however, are noisy. Once the engine is running, the machine can be converted to a generator by decoupling the driving electronics module. The permanent magnets 13 a, b moving past the electromagnets 12 a-d with the driving circuitry now switched off can be used to generate electrical power.
  • [0025]
    Toroidal cores are used for the electromagnets in this machine since they are the most efficient transformer core configuration. Toroidal electromagnets are self-shielding since most of the flux lines are contained within the core. In addition, the flux lines are essentially uniform over the entire length of the magnetic path. The slot 14 that is formed in each of the toroidal electromagnetic members would normally cause a decrease in flux density. However, the action of the moving permanent magnet members keeps the gap filled with permanent magnet material and thus maintains the field integrity within the core.
  • [0026]
    Referring to FIG. 3, a pair of integrated circuits IC1 and IC2 are coupled to two electromagnet members consisting of electromagnets 12 a and 12 c. It will be appreciated that an identical electronics module would be used to drive electromagnets 12 b and 12 d. The ICs, IC1 and IC2, have output gates coupled to transistors Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4 respectively. IC1 and IC2 are half bridge MOSFET drivers which are triggered by Hall effect sensor IC5, (refer to FIG. 4). The Hall effect sensor IC5 has its outputs coupled to the inputs of IC1 and IC2, respectively. Output line IC5, pin 2 is coupled to the input line at pin 2 of IC1. Similarly, output line IC5, pin 3 is coupled to input line 2 of IC2. There is another Hall effect sensor (not shown) for electromagnets 12 b and 12 d which operates the same way but which is positioned so as to generate its signal at a phase angle which lags the signal from
  • [0027]
    IC5. The result is that electromagnetic member pairs are energized 180 out of phase with each other. This is illustrated by the timing diagram of FIG. 6.
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 6 shows a four-phase timing diagram that repeats for every 10 of rotation of the rotor 16. The magnets 13 a, b are spaced 10 apart while the electromagnetic members 12 a-d are spaced 15 apart. The timing relationship between the magnets and the coils is shown best in FIGS. 8A-8D.
  • [0029]
    The arrows in FIG. 8 for each phase indicate the lines of attraction and/or repulsion between the permanent magnets and the coils based upon the polarity of the energizing current from the driver module pairs of IC's of FIG. 3. FIG. 8 illustrates schematically the waveform of FIG. 6. IC1 and IC2 generate driver currents 180 out of phase so that when coil 12 a is high, 12 c is low and vice versa. Another driver module pair of IC's (not shown) does the same thing with coils 12 b, 12 d but out of phase with respect to toroidal coils 12 a, 12 c by 5. The Hall sensors are placed along the stator in advance of the rotor and are spaced apart by 5 in order to trigger their respective IC's at a phase angle difference of 5. The result is a very smooth rotor drive made possible by the sizing and spacing of the magnets so that the ratio of coils to magnets within the arc length of the electromagnet members 12 a-12 d is always 4 to 6. Thus, a pair of alternate north-south pole magnets are experiencing opposite polarity fields when they are centered within the gaps of alternate electromagnets 12 a, 12 c, while north-south pairs of magnets, each halfway within the slots of the other pair of electromagnets 12 b, 12 d, are experiencing the switching of the polarity of current through those electromagnets 12 b, d.
  • [0030]
    Referring to FIG. 7 the machine of the present invention may be operated as a linear actuator. In this embodiment the magnets may be of a rectangular shape. In this case, the stator arc length is measured along a straight line and it should be understood that the term stator arc length need have no particular shape as it may be used with stator/rotor configurations of differing types. In addition, the magnets need have no particular shape to be effective. As long as the ratio of electromagnetic members to permanent magnets is about 4 to 6 within the arc length occupied by the stator coils, the invention will operate as desired.
  • [0031]
    Referring to FIG. 9, the Hall sensors IC5 and IC6 are spaced apart by 5 radially so that trigger signals will be generated in the proper phase with each other. The Hall sensors are affixed to a stator housing (not shown). It can be appreciated from FIG. 9 that the term “stator arc length” includes an arc that is slightly longer than the length between each end of the 4 electromagnets 12 a-d and includes areas where the fields generated by those electromagnetic members influence the permanent magnets 13 a, b. In FIG. 9, this area is indicated by the dashed lines. Although the arc in FIG. 9 has been shown as substantially a straight line, it is to be understood that it may represent either a linear device or a circular arc.
  • [0032]
    Referring to FIG. 10, a rotor or flywheel 50 is coupled to a shaft 52 which may in turn be coupled to the drivetrain of an automobile (not shown). Permanent magnets 54 a (North polarity) and 54 b (South polarity) are situated about the periphery of the rotor 50. A stator module 56 is situated adjacent the rotor 50 and includes a set of four toroidal electromagnetic members having substantially the same configuration as shown in FIG. 1. A switching module 58 switches between a circuit that accepts an input from a motor drive module 60 and one that provides an output to a rectifier and regulator module 62. The regulator module 62 charges a battery 64.
  • [0033]
    Signals on input lines labeled “start” and “run” respectively control the function of the switching module 58. In the start mode a circuit like the circuit of FIG. 3 is turned on in the switching module. Once the motor (not shown) has been turned on, a signal is provided to the “run” line turning off the circuit of FIG. 3 and allowing current from the stator module 56 to flow directly to the rectifier and regulator module 62.
  • [0034]
    The terms and expressions which have been employed in the foregoing specification are used therein as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention, in the use of such terms and expressions, of excluding equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, it being recognized that the scope of the invention is defined and limited only by the claims which follow.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7145308 *Jan 24, 2006Dec 5, 2006Theodore O ChaseFloating armature electric motor and method of assembly
US7327587Sep 30, 2004Feb 5, 2008General Electric CompanySystem and method for power conversion
US7863784 *Aug 14, 2006Jan 4, 2011Apex Drive Laboratories, IncAxial flux permanent magnet machines
US20060072353 *Sep 30, 2004Apr 6, 2006Mhaskar Uday PSystem and method for power conversion
US20090309463 *Aug 14, 2006Dec 17, 2009Apex Drive Laboratories, Inc.Brushless electromechanical machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification310/268
International ClassificationH02K41/03, H02K1/14, H02P9/30, H02K1/27, H02K21/16, H02K3/28
Cooperative ClassificationH02K1/141, H02K41/03, H02P9/30, H02K3/28, H02K1/2793, H02K2201/15, H02K21/16
European ClassificationH02K1/27D, H02K41/03, H02P9/30, H02K3/28, H02K21/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 29, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: MOTILE, INC., OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BALES, MR. JOHN E.;REEL/FRAME:015837/0573
Effective date: 20010716
Mar 30, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: MOTILE CORPORATION, OREGON
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MOTILE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:015841/0113
Effective date: 20010831
Owner name: PRIMOTIVE CORPORATION, OREGON
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MOTILE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:015841/0246
Effective date: 20030318
Mar 31, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: APEX DRIVES LABORATORIES INC., OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PRIMOTIVE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:015841/0909
Effective date: 20040225