Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20030218013 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/154,162
Publication dateNov 27, 2003
Filing dateMay 23, 2002
Priority dateMay 23, 2002
Publication number10154162, 154162, US 2003/0218013 A1, US 2003/218013 A1, US 20030218013 A1, US 20030218013A1, US 2003218013 A1, US 2003218013A1, US-A1-20030218013, US-A1-2003218013, US2003/0218013A1, US2003/218013A1, US20030218013 A1, US20030218013A1, US2003218013 A1, US2003218013A1
InventorsSanford Altman
Original AssigneeAltman Sanford D.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container for substances
US 20030218013 A1
Abstract
A base and receptacle combination designed to hold materials that are too voluminous or are packaged in non-structured containers and therefore cannot be retained in a conventional cup holder.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(69)
What is claimed is:
1. A device for containment of substances comprising:
a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
2. A device of claim 1, wherein said receptacle is capable of being collapsed into said base, whereby said device is contained within the space occupied by said base.
3. A device of claim 1, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
4. A device of claim 1, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
5. A device of claim 1, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
6. A device of claim 1, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
7. A device of claim 1, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
8. A device of claim 1, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
9. A device of claim 1, wherein said base is provided with a flange, to be inserted within a groove located on said inner side of said receptacle, allowing said base to be removably attached to said receptacle.
10. A device for containment of particulate substances comprising:
a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
11. A device of claim 10, wherein said receptacle is capable of being collapsed into said base, whereby said device is contained within the space occupied by said base.
12. A device of claim 10, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
13. A device of claim 10, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
14. A device of claim 10, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said particulate substance to be placed in said receptacle.
15. A device of claim 10, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said particulate substance to be placed in said receptacle.
16. A device of claim 10, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
17. A device of claim 10, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
18. A device of claim 10, wherein said base is provided with a flange, to be inserted within a groove located on said inner side of said receptacle, allowing said base to be removably attached to said receptacle.
19. A device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising:
a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
20. A device of claim 19, wherein said receptacle is capable of being collapsed into said base, whereby said device is contained within the space occupied by said base.
21. A device of claim 19, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
22. A device of claim 19, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
23. A device of claim 19, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said items to be placed in said receptacle.
24. A device of claim 19, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said items to be placed in said receptacle.
25. A device of claim 19, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
26. A device of claim 19, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
27. A device of claim 19, wherein said base is provided with a flange, to be inserted within a groove located on said inner side of said receptacle, allowing said base to be removably attached to said receptacle.
28. A collapsible device for containment of substances comprising:
a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
29. A device of claim 28, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
30. A device of claim 28, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
31. A device of claim 28, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
32. A collapsible device for containment of particulate substances comprising:
a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
33. A device of claim 32, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said particulate substance to be placed in said receptacle.
34. A device of claim 32, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said particulate substance to be placed in said receptacle.
35. A device of claim 32, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
36. A collapsible device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising:
a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining said substances wherein said receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and said affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and,
a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein said base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, said mouth affixed to said affixing end of said receptacle.
37. A device of claim 36, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said items to be placed in said receptacle.
38. A device of claim 36, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said items to be placed in said receptacle.
39. A device of claim 36, wherein said base is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
40. A device for containment of substances comprising:
a receptacle, where in said receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines an aperture for introduction of said substances to said receptacle, and said second end is located opposite of said first end; and,
a base, wherein said base is designed to allow said device to be secured in an upright position.
41. A device of claim 40, wherein said base is capable of being collapsed into said receptacle, whereby said base is contained within the space occupied by said receptacle.
42. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
43. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
44. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
45. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
46. A device of claim 40, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
47. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
48. A device of claim 40, wherein said receptacle is fitted with a rigid second end, wherein said rigid second end provides additional support for said receptacle.
49. A device of claim 40, wherein said base is capable of securing said receptacle to the arm of a seat.
50. A device for containment of particulate substances comprising:
a receptacle, where in said receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines an aperture for introduction of said substances to said receptacle, and said second end is located opposite of said first end; and,
a base, wherein said base is designed to allow said device to be secured in an upright position.
51. A device of claim 50, wherein said base is capable of being collapsed into said receptacle, whereby said base is contained within the space occupied by said receptacle.
52. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
53. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
54. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
55. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
56. A device of claim 50, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
57. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
58. A device of claim 50, wherein said receptacle is fitted with a rigid second end, wherein said rigid second end provides additional support for said receptacle.
59. A device of claim 50, wherein said base is capable of securing said receptacle to the arm of a seat.
60. A device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising
a receptacle, where in said receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein said first end defines an aperture for introduction of said substances to said receptacle, and said second end is located opposite of said first end; and,
a base, wherein said base is designed to allow said device to be secured in an upright position.
61. A device of claim 60, wherein said base is capable of being collapsed into said receptacle, whereby said base is contained within the space occupied by said receptacle.
62. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is capable of being disassembled into its component parts for storage when not in use.
63. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is made of a flexible material.
64. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is variable in size depending on the volume of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
65. A device of claim 60, wherein said base is capable of securing said receptacle to the arm of a seat.
66. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is variable in stiffness depending on the weight of said substance to be placed in said receptacle.
67. A device of claim 60, wherein said base is variable in size and is configured to fit a cup holder.
68. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is fitted with support struts, wherein said struts support the sides of said receptacle.
69. A device of claim 60, wherein said receptacle is fitted with a rigid second end, wherein said rigid second end provides additional support for said receptacle.
Description
    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates generally to the field of containers, and more particularly, to a container that is designed to hold materials that are too voluminous or are packaged in non-structured containers and therefore cannot be retained in a conventional cup holder.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Over the last decade cup holders have proliferated and are now found in many locations including movie theaters, sporting/event arenas, automobiles and baby strollers to name a few. These holders serve as a convenience to those who use them to hold beverages or other products capable of being placed in a cup thereby fitting within the holder. Other items (i.e. popcorn) are too voluminous or are packaged in non-structured containers and therefore cannot be placed in these holders. This is a problem as Americans continue to consume snack foods at record numbers.
  • [0003]
    Ninety-three percent of Americans snack, with 50 percent of them doing so two or three times a day; 40 percent at least four times a day; and 13 percent five or more times a day. Source: International Dairy Deli Bakery Association's What's in Store report, volume 13, September 1998. In 1998 an estimated 133,400,000 Americans watched the Superbowl on television. Following is a list of just some of the things they ate during this event:
    Snack Food (in millions of pounds)
    Potato chips 11.2
    Tortilla chips 8.2
    Pretzels 4.3
    Popcorn 3.8
    Snack Nuts 2.5
  • [0004]
    Almost 89 percent of U.S. households buy potato chips in a year, replenishing about every three weeks. 76 percent buy tortilla chips and replenish about every 32 days. 63 percent buy pretzels and replenish about every 37 days. Annual per capita consumption of snack foods has increased from 17.9 pounds in 1983 to 23.4 pounds in 1995. The industry now boasts approximately $38 billion in annual sales. http://www.snackandbakery.com/media.asp. These statistics do not even account for other items that come in non-structured packaging, such as candy.
  • [0005]
    Previous attempts have been made to provide a device capable of accommodating unconventional configurations such as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,315,153 to Osborn (the '153 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 439,116 to White (the '116 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 436,166 to Berkey (the '166 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 6,099,062 to Siegel (the '062 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 409,747 to Aiken (the '747 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 400,763 to Taylor, et al. (the '763 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 397,915 to McNaughton (the '915 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 396,284 to Schaefer (the '284 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 5,676,340 to Ruhnau (the '340 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 377,740 to Swanson (the '740 patent); U.S. Pat. No. Des. 370,392 to Flanagan (the '392 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 5,490,653 to Ingwersen (the '653 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 5,326,064 to Sapien (the '064 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 5,052,649 to Hunnicutt (the '649 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 4,854,468 to Dahlquist, II, et al (the '468 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 3,878,571 to Seeley (the '571 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 3,579,652 to Ericson (the '652 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 2,666,310 to Hill (the '310 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 1,846,748 Palmer (the '748 patent) all of which are incorporate herein by reference.
  • [0006]
    The '153 patent describes an adapter for adapting a conventional cup holder to hold a wide arrange of containers. The adapter provides for a removable insert, which can be used to further adapt the adapter to accommodate various container sizes, and, provide insulation to the container to maintain the temperature of the drink in the container generally constant, illustrated in FIG. 1. One disadvantage of this invention is that it is not adapted for use with voluminous materials (e.g. popcorn) and does not provide appropriate storage for non-structured packaged material.
  • [0007]
    The '116 patent describes the ornamental design for a universal holder/adapter for beverage container receptacles, illustrated in FIG. 1. Similar to above, a disadvantage of this invention is that it is not adapted for use with voluminous materials (e.g. popcorn) and does not provide appropriate storage for non-structured packaged material.
  • [0008]
    The '166 patent describes the ornamental design for a female urine specimen cup method, illustrated in FIG. 1. Again, the disadvantage of this invention is that it is not adapted for use with voluminous materials (e.g. popcorn) and does not provide appropriate storage for non-structured packaged material.
  • [0009]
    The '062 patent describes a beverage container receptacle for a cup holder of given diameter provided as an automotive vehicle accessory including a substantially cylinder-shaped lower section having a diameter less than that of the automotive vehicle cup holder accessory, a substantially cubed-shaped upper section having a length greater than the diameter of the cup holder accessory, and a connecting surface joining an upper end of the lower section and a lower end of the upper section, with the connecting surface being of a construction and composition to support the weight of a beverage carton or bottle fitted through the upper section of the receptacle and towards its lower section, illustrated in FIG. 1. One disadvantage of this invention is that it is not adapted to stow away in order to be unobtrusive when not in use.
  • [0010]
    The '747 patent describes the ornamental design for a urine specimen collector, illustrated in FIG. 1. As above, a disadvantage of this invention is that it is not adapted to stow away in order to be unobtrusive when not in use.
  • [0011]
    The '763 patent describes the ornamental design for a holder for over-sized beverage containers, illustrated in FIG. 1. A disadvantage of the '763 patent is that it has a large opening extending the length of the container, such a configuration could not contain such substances as popcorn.
  • [0012]
    The '915 patent describes the ornamental design for an adaptable beverage holder, illustrated in FIG. 1. The disadvantage of the '915 patent is that it has a large opening extending the length of the container, such a configuration could not contain such substances as popcorn.
  • [0013]
    The '284 patent describes the ornamental design for a female incontinence device, illustrated in FIG. 1. This device appears to lack the ability to contain any substances outside of the cup section.
  • [0014]
    The '340 patent describes an adapter for holding over-sized beverage containers for use in cylindrical beverage receptacles found in many vehicles, the adapter having an enlarged upper portion to receive the beverage containers and a lower portion comprising an insertion base sized to fit within the vehicle beverage receptacle, illustrated in FIG. 1. The disadvantage of the '340 patent is that it has a large openings extending the length of the container, such a configuration could not contain such free-flowing substances as popcorn.
  • [0015]
    The '740 patent describes the ornamental design for a travel holder receptive to varying sizes of beverage containers, illustrated in FIG. 1. The disadvantage of the '740 patent is that it has a large openings extending the length of the container, such a configuration could not contain such free-flowing substances as popcorn.
  • [0016]
    The '392 patent describes the ornamental design for a large beverage container, illustrated in FIG. 1. The disadvantage of the '392 patent is that it has a large opening extending the length of the container, such a configuration could not contain such free-flowing substances as popcorn.
  • [0017]
    The '653 patent describes a cup holder accessory for supporting an over-sized drink cup in a standard-sized drink cup receptacle, is provided with a base element that cooperates with the standard-sized drink cup receptacle, with an over-sized drink cup receptacle supported by and rotatable relative to the base element, and a fastener element joining the base element, the over-sized drink cup receptacle element, and the cam element into a unitary assembly, illustrated in FIG. 2. One disadvantage of the '653 patent is that it require multiple moving parts to provide a cup holder for a larger than standard size. In addition, the enlarged cup holder cannot accommodate free-flowing substances due to its low threshold.
  • [0018]
    The '064 patent describes a holder that comprises an upper section with a generally longitudinal slot forming a passage through a tubular wall member, a lower section with an open first end and an opposite second end, a connecting means for attaching the upper section with the lower section, and an end closure at the bottom of the lower section is disclosed, illustrated in FIG. 1. A shortcoming of the '064 patent is that the longitudinal slot does not allow for containment of free-flowing substances like peanuts, or other similar snack foods.
  • [0019]
    The '649 patent describes a beverage holder for placement into a beverage receptacle and for receiving a beverage container such as a beer or carbonated drink can, held within an insulated beverage holder, illustrated in FIG. 1. One disadvantage of this invention is its design, which necessitates the use of an insulating sleeve for a standard-sized beverage container.
  • [0020]
    The '468 patent describes a device for stabilizing and supporting a large cup whose base diameter exceeds the smaller diameter of a support receptacle such as is typically provided in a moving vehicle, illustrated in FIG. 1. A disadvantage of the '468 patent is that it is not designed to hold items that are not already in their own containers, for example, loose snack foods like peanuts and popcorn.
  • [0021]
    The '571 patent describes a collective device for obtaining relatively uncontaminated specimens of urine from a human female which device comprises a liquid container, a funnel detachably secured to the container, after use, without violation of sterility. The removable lid closes the chamber constituted by the interior of the container and funnel, maintaining sterility until the lid is removed prior to use, illustrated in FIG. 2. One disadvantage of the present invention is that it is composed of multiple parts and needs assembly before use. In addition, it is not properly pre-configured to fit standard cup holder slots that are present in automobiles, chair arms in sports arenas, etc.
  • [0022]
    The '652 patent describes a funnel for use in the collection of urine specimens having a side wall of flexible material and two openings at either end and a rigid member coupled about one end to hold the opening in an open position and to provide a foundation for a sealing cap, illustrated in FIG. 1.
  • [0023]
    The '310 patent describes a holder for both flat bottom and conical paper cups, the holder being of the single end type, and having a single cup receiving cavity into which a cup of either type may be positioned, illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. This invention is not configured to reduce its size by providing an embodiment with a collapsible material holder. In addition, it is not specifically designed to provide containment for loose particulate-like substances.
  • [0024]
    The '748 patent describes a package embodying a container and goods, the body of the container being flexible and transparent and including a reinforcing base which is hollow in its bottom side, the contents of the package being observable yet protected, illustrated in FIG. 1. One disadvantage of this invention is that it is meant to be drawn together at the top and sealed for storage than actually being used to dispense the product.
  • [0025]
    Consequently, there is a need in the art for a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder.
  • [0026]
    There is a further need in the art for a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts.
  • [0027]
    There is a further need in the art for a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts and fits in a standard sized cup holder, such as those found in movie theaters, automobiles, strollers and event arenas.
  • [0028]
    There is a further need in the art for a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder. There is a further need in the art for a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts.
  • [0029]
    There is a further need in the art for a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts and fits in a standard sized cup holder, such as those found in movie theaters, automobiles, strollers and event arenas.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0030]
    The present invention solves significant problems in the art by providing A device for containment of substances comprising: a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0031]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a device for containment of particulate substances comprising: a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0032]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising: a receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0033]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a collapsible device for containment of substances comprising: a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0034]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a collapsible device for containment of particulate substances comprising: a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0035]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a collapsible device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising: a flexible receptacle, defining an orifice for retaining the substances wherein the receptacle has a first end, an affixing end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines a first aperture having a first diameter, and the affixing end defines a second aperture having a second diameter; and, a base configured to fit a cup holder, wherein the base has a mouth, a bottom, inner and outer sides and is generally cylindrical in shape, the mouth affixed to the affixing end of the receptacle.
  • [0036]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a device for containment of substances comprising: a receptacle, where in the receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines an aperture for introduction of the substances to the receptacle, and the second end is located opposite of the first end; and, a base, wherein the base is designed to allow the device to be secured in an upright position.
  • [0037]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a device for containment of particulate substances comprising: a receptacle, where in the receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines an aperture for introduction of the substances to the receptacle, and the second end is located opposite of the first end; and, a base, wherein the base is designed to allow the device to be secured in an upright position.
  • [0038]
    In an alternate embodiment, what is provided is a device for containment of items packaged in non-structured containers comprising: a receptacle, where in the receptacle comprises a first end, a second end, a middle portion, and inner and outer sides, wherein the first end defines an aperture for introduction of the substances to the receptacle, and the second end is located opposite of the first end; and, a base, wherein the base is designed to allow the device to be secured in an upright position.
  • [0039]
    Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder.
  • [0040]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts.
  • [0041]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing items from non-structured packaging to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts and fits in a standard sized cup holder, such as those found in movie theaters, automobiles, strollers and event arenas.
  • [0042]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder.
  • [0043]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts.
  • [0044]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a device capable of containing voluminous particulate matter to be held in a conventional cup holder that saves space by collapsing in on itself or separating into its component parts and fits in a standard sized cup holder, such as those found in movie theaters, automobiles, strollers and event arenas.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0045]
    [0045]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the device according to the invention.
  • [0046]
    [0046]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the collapsible nature of the invention.
  • [0047]
    [0047]FIG. 2a is a top view of a preferred embodiment of the collapsible nature of the invention.
  • [0048]
    [0048]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the strut-supported embodiment of the invention.
  • [0049]
    [0049]FIG. 3a is a top view of the strut supported embodiment of the invention.
  • [0050]
    [0050]FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the device according to the invention.
  • [0051]
    [0051]FIG. 4a is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the device according to the invention.
  • [0052]
    [0052]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the device according to the invention utilizing a cup and receptacle with the flange and groove attachment mechanism.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0053]
    Referring initially to FIG. 1 of the drawings, in which like numerals indicate like elements throughout the several views, in a preferred embodiment a device 2 is provided for the containment of substances which are typically packaged in non-structured containers. Examples of such substances include potato chips, pretzels, peanuts, popcorn, corn chips, candy and other like-kind snack foods. The device is provided with a funnel like receptacle 4, which can be of varying rigidity and varying size depending on the characteristics of the substance to be held in the device 2. The receptacle 4 is affixed to a base 6 by any known technique in the relevant art, such that the seal between the receptacle 4 and the base 6 prevents any of the contained substance from escaping via the seal. Should the substance being contained by the device 2 be such that the rigidity of the receptacle 4 would not be sufficient to support it, struts 8 may be added for additional support, see FIGS. 3 and 3a. The struts could either be incorporated within the receptacle 4, or may be a part of the base 6.
  • [0054]
    [0054]FIGS. 2 and 2a depict the collapsible nature of the device 2. When not in use, the receptacle 4 can be compressed to be enclosed completely within the base 6, thereby saving space, protecting the device, and preventing non-desirable matter from getting into the device through the open end of the receptacle 4.
  • [0055]
    In an alternate embodiment, the invention can be a more traditionally shaped square receptacle 10 as depicted in FIGS. 4 and 4a. The receptacle 10 being generally equipped to provide material containment and having a means 16 for either attaching to a seat arm, as in FIG. 4 or to fit within a cup holder, see FIG. 4a. The receptacle could be supported at the bottom with a rigid structure 12 such as cardboard or plastic. The cup holder variant, FIG. 4a, could be modified such that the cup 14 could be stored within the receptacle 10 and pulled down only when needed. In the cup-stored position then, the receptacle 10 would appear to be a conventional square-shaped bag.
  • [0056]
    Another alternate embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 5, which portrays a generally cone shaped receptacle 20 that is generally equipped to provide material containment and which can be of varying rigidity and varying size depending on the characteristics of the substance to be held in the receptacle 20. The receptacle is detachably affixed to and used in combination with a generally cup shaped base 22. The attachment mechanism is essentially a flange 24 located on the upper, open portion of the base 22, whereby the flange 24 is inserted into a groove 26 located on the inner surface of the receptacle 20. The base 22 is capable of being placed within a conventional cup holder, such as those found in automobiles, at movie theaters and in sports arenas.
  • [0057]
    Accordingly, it will be understood that the preferred embodiment of the present invention has been disclosed by way of example and that other modifications and alterations may occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the appended claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1846748 *Jun 16, 1930Feb 23, 1932Palmer Gilbert HPackage
US3252635 *Sep 8, 1964May 24, 1966Rosenhan Cort AExtension collar for liquid containers such as paint cans
US3285495 *Aug 18, 1965Nov 15, 1966Plastics IncReusable food package with integral adjustable closure
US4779998 *Sep 26, 1986Oct 25, 1988Rock-Tenn CompanyComposite bag-like package
US4852757 *Apr 21, 1988Aug 1, 1989Milton GoldAdapter for expanding the volume of a container
US4930644 *Dec 22, 1988Jun 5, 1990Robbins Edward S IiiThin film container with removable lid and related process
US5100607 *Apr 29, 1989Mar 31, 1992Robbins Edward S IiiBlow-molding methods to form containers having upper and lower sections of different thicknesses
US5573131 *Oct 26, 1994Nov 12, 1996Devine Holdings, LlcApparatus for forming a container to hold a drinking cup at the bottom end of the container and to hold food in the upper portion of the container
US5857504 *May 13, 1998Jan 12, 1999Tremblay; ChristianCollapsible funnel
US20020090974 *Oct 25, 2001Jul 11, 2002Peter HagnCombined front-end circuit for wireless transmission systems
US20020145295 *Feb 3, 2001Oct 10, 2002Frank Jane E.Bottomless bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7219815Dec 30, 2003May 22, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for dispensing two different substrates
US8550550 *Jul 6, 2010Oct 8, 2013Joseph D. CasseseSeat arm cup holder for snack foods
US8814263Aug 30, 2013Aug 26, 2014Joseph D. CasseseContainers and serving trays for snack foods
US8967381Aug 29, 2013Mar 3, 2015Joseph D. CasseseContainers and serving trays for snack foods
US20050178788 *Dec 30, 2003Aug 18, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for dispensing two different substrates
US20070000927 *Apr 10, 2006Jan 4, 2007Grund Michael JFood container for vehicle cup holders
US20100314387 *Dec 16, 2010Cassese Joseph DContainers and Serving Trays for Snack Foods
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/4.03
International ClassificationB65D21/08, B65D85/60, B65D8/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/08, B65D85/60
European ClassificationB65D21/08