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Publication numberUS20030233695 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/176,162
Publication dateDec 25, 2003
Filing dateJun 19, 2002
Priority dateJun 19, 2002
Publication number10176162, 176162, US 2003/0233695 A1, US 2003/233695 A1, US 20030233695 A1, US 20030233695A1, US 2003233695 A1, US 2003233695A1, US-A1-20030233695, US-A1-2003233695, US2003/0233695A1, US2003/233695A1, US20030233695 A1, US20030233695A1, US2003233695 A1, US2003233695A1
InventorsPaul Golde
Original AssigneeIntersport Fashions West, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foul-weather sport glove and method
US 20030233695 A1
Abstract
A weather-resistant glove for wear particularly by operators and passengers of open-air sport motor vehicles includes an outer glove shell and in inner glove liner, each having an elongate gauntlet cuff portion. The gauntlet cuff portion has an inner gauntlet and an outer gauntlet cooperatively defining a water catch basin, from which a drain opens outwardly of the glove at or near the lowest point of this basin while the user's hands are in a typical downwardly angled position on the sport motor vehicle. Water dribbling along a leeward side of the user's arms and into the gauntlets of the gloves will be caught in the water catch basins and is then drained outwardly of the glove without wetting the user's hands.
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Claims(14)
I claim:
1. A water resistant glove comprising: a water resistant outer glove shell having a hand portion and a gauntlet cuff portion joining at a wrist portion of the glove, with said gauntlet cuff portion including an elongate outer gauntlet cuff, and an inner cuff also of water resistant material sealingly attaching within said outer gauntlet cuff part adjacent to a wrist of the glove, said outer and said inner cuffs cooperatively defining a water catch basin, and a drain opening outwardly from said water catch basin adjacent to said wrist of the glove.
2. The water resistant glove of claim 1 wherein said outer gauntlet cuff part is of conical shape to flare upwardly along the forearm of a wearer of the glove, said inner cuff is substantially of straight cylindrical shape and flares less than said outer cuff part.
3. The water resistant glove of claim 2 wherein said inner cuff is provided with an elastic band adjacent to its opening to urge the inner gauntlet cuff near its opening toward the wearer's forearm.
4. The water resistant glove of claim 1 wherein said outer gauntlet cuff part is of conical shape to flare upwardly along the forearms of the wearer of the glove, said inner gauntlet cuff part also being of conical shape to similarly flare upwardly along the forearms of the wearer.
5. The water resistant glove of claim 4 wherein said inner gauntlet cuff part is provided with a flexible resilient lip seal member adjacent to the opening of this cuff part, said lip seam member being cooperable in water-resistant relationship with a sleeve of an outer garment worn by a wearer of said glove.
6. The water resistant glove of claim 1 wherein said drain includes a grommet opening outwardly on said glove from said water catch basin.
7. The water resistant glove of claim 1 wherein said outer gauntlet cuff part includes an elongate slit opening extending from a distal end of the gauntlet cuff part toward but short of said band portion of the glove, and a closure device for selectively opening and closing this slit opening whereby, when said opening of said outer gauntlet cuff part is opened the gauntlet cuff part is easily turned inside out to invert partially over the hand portion of the glove.
8. A glove for use by an operator of an open sport motor vehicle, which vehicle positions the forearms and hands of the operator generally in a downwardly angled position, the glove being especially configured to resist water running downwardly along a sleeve of an outer garment of the operator and entering the inside of the gloves to wet the operator's hands, said glove comprising:
a water proof outer glove part having a hand portion and a gauntlet cuff portion with a flaring outer gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm and over a sleeve of the operator's outer garment;
an inner liner part of the glove also having an inner gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm and cooperating with said outer gauntlet cuff part to define a water catch basin therebetween, said water catch basin receiving water running downwardly along the sleeve of the operator's outer garment, said inner gauntlet cuff part and said outer gauntlet cuff part being sealingly united at a lower extent thereof generally adjacent to and above the operator's hand, and a drain extending from said water catch basin outwardly of said glove to draining away received water.
9. A method of preventing the hands of an operator of an open-air sport motor vehicle, which vehicle positions the forearms and hands of the operator generally in a downwardly angled position, from getting wet because of water running downwardly along an outer garment over the operator's forearms and then entering the inside of the gloves to wet the operator's hands, said method comprising steps of:
providing a pair of gloves each with a water proof outer glove part having a hand portion and a gauntlet portion with a flaring outer gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm and over a sleeve of the outer garment;
providing each glove with an inner liner part also having an inner gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm;
utilizing said inner and outer gauntlet cuff parts of each glove to cooperatively define a water catch basin therebetween; and sealingly uniting said inner gauntlet cuff part and said outer gauntlet cuff part at a lower extent of said water catch basin generally adjacent to and above the operator's hands to prevent water in said water catch basin from flowing into said hand part;
utilizing said water catch basin of said gloves to receive water running downwardly along the sleeves of the operator's outer garment; and
providing a drain extending from each said water catch basin outwardly of said glove to draining away water received therein.
10. A water resistant glove to be worn with a jacket in rain and wet outdoor weather conditions, said glove having a hand portion with fingers and a thumb and a gauntlet cuff portion, said glove being especially constructed and configured to cooperate with a jacket sleeve for resisting entry into the glove hand portion of water running downwardly along the jacket sleeve, said glove comprising:
a water resistant outer glove shell having a hand portion with fingers and a thumb, a wrist portion, and a gauntlet cuff portion joining said wrist portion of the glove;
said gauntlet cuff portion including an elongate outer gauntlet cuff part, and an inner cuff part also of water resistant material sealingly attaching within said outer gauntlet cuff part adjacent to said wrist of the glove;
said outer and said inner cuffs cooperatively defining a water catch basin circumscribing a forearm of a wearer above the wrist; and
a drain opening outwardly from said water catch basin adjacent to said wrist of the glove.
11. The water resistant glove of claim 10 wherein said outer gauntlet cuff part flares outwardly as it extends upwardly along a forearm of a wearer of the glove, said gauntlet cuff part flaring sufficiently that said gauntlet cuff part may be inverted over the wrist and hand portion of the glove by turning said gauntlet cuff part inside out and leaving said inner cuff part exposed in preparation to putting on said glove.
12. The water resistant glove of claim 10 wherein said inner cuff part is substantially coextensive in length and is no longer than said outer gauntlet cuff part.
13. The water resistant glove of claim 10 further including a pad of abrasion resistant material securing to said gauntlet cuff part, whereby the forearm of the wearer is shielded from abrasion by said abrasion resistant pad.
14. The water resistant glove of claim 13 wherein said outer gauntlet cuff part defines an elongate slit opening extending from a distal end of said outer cuff part toward but short of said wrist portion of said glove, a fastener providing for said elongate slit opening to be selectively opened and secured closed, and said gauntlet cuff part being configured to be turned inside out partially over the wrist and hand portions of the glove when said fastener is opened and said elongate slit opening is opened to allow said gauntlet cuff part to flare.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention is in the field of gloves. More particularly, the present invention relates to a weather resistant glove to be worn by an operator or passenger of an open-air sport motor vehicle, such as a motorcycle or snowmobile. Most particularly, a glove according to the present invention is especially configured to prevent rain water and other moisture (which water may be on the outer garments of such an operator or passenger during foul weather conditions) from running down a sleeve of the outer garment and into a cuff or gauntlet of the glove to wet the operator's hands.

[0003] 2. Related Technology

[0004] Operators and passengers of motorcycles and other open-air sport motor vehicles have for years sought to protect themselves from the elements. It is well understood that allowing oneself to become wet and/or cold during operation of such sport motor vehicles greatly contributes to rider and passenger fatigue and greatly increases the risk of accident due to such fatigue. Accordingly, during foul weather conditions, in addition to wearing protective outer clothing and garments such operators and passengers have conventionally worn water proof or water resistant gloves. These gloves are worn in an attempt to keep the hands warm and dry. After the importance of maintaining both the head and feet warm and dry, it is well understood that keeping the hands from being cold or wet is probably the next most important consideration in avoiding premature discomfort and fatigue. However, cold, wet hands are a common source of discomfort for operators and passengers of sport motor vehicles.

[0005] However, with some sport motor vehicles the position of the operator or passenger places their lower arms and hands in a downwardly angled position so that rain water and other moisture present on their outer garments (i.e., on a jacket, coat, or rain suit, for example) can run down the arms of the outer garment and into the cuff or gauntlet of the water proof or water resistant gloves. With conventional gloves, water entering the glove via the cuff or gauntlet is not prevented from running into the remainder of the glove, to wet the hands of the operator or passenger.

[0006] Under foul weather conditions, once a person's hands are wetted by water entering their gloves along the inside of the cuff or gauntlet, then the person will be very uncomfortable. Because the insulating qualities of a glove are largely lost once the inside of the glove is wet (i.e., once the insulation and/or lining is wet), the person's hands may become very cold. In fact, depending on the weather conditions and the degree of exposure to the moving air around the vehicle, the person may be at risk of experiencing frost bite of their fingers within the wet gloves even if outside air temperature conditions are not so severe that this would be considered a risk otherwise. Such is the case in the operation of an open-air sport motor vehicle because the operator's or passenger's hands in the wet gloves may be exposed to the moving stream of air caused by operation of the vehicle. Thus, evaporative cooling may add greatly to the chilling effect caused by the moving stream of air so that heat extraction from hands in wet gloves is much faster and occurs over a greater surface area than otherwise would be the case. Even if frost bite is not a risk, having wet cold hands within conventional water proof gloves can be very uncomfortable.

[0007] In view of the above, a need has been recognized in the relevant art for gloves that will resist entry of water along the cuff or gauntlet of the gloves.

[0008] Examples of gloves in the related technology are presented by U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,918,096; 5,628,069; and 5,636,382. The '096 is believed to relate to a protective glove for use by a motorcycle rider to prevent or reduce abrasion. This glove, it is believed, would not be suitable for foul weather wear to protect the motorcycle rider's hands from rain water.

[0009] Similarly, the glove seen in the '069 patent is believed to teach a bi-stable spring arrangement that eases, it is asserted, the stress necessary to curve the fingers about the handlebar grips of a motorcycle. Again, this glove appears to be unsuitable for use in foul weather conditions. The glove seen in the '382 patent appears intended to protect the hands of a wearer from environmental irritants. Apparently, this glove is part of a protective suit that might be worn to protect a person from chemicals, biotoxins, and other contaminants. The glove includes an outer glove portion with a gauntlet, and an inner liner glove portion, also with a similar gauntlet. The gauntlets are not sealingly related to the sleeves of the wearers outer garment, nor is there any provision made to drain moisture that may run downwardly along the wearer's sleeves into the gauntlets of the glove.

[0010] A more recent attempt to address this problem is set out in U.S. Pat. No. 6,128,785. The glove of the '785 patent is not fully illustrated, but to the extent that this patent can be understood from the text of the patent in conjunction with the fragmentary illustrations, it appears that an inner sleeve of waterproof material is provided within the gauntlet cuff of a glove, with the inner sleeve intended to extend above the gauntlet cuff so that water entering the gauntlet cuff along a jacket sleeve will drain from the open upper end of the gauntlet cuff before reaching a sufficiently high level to flow over the upper end of the inner sleeve and into the hand portion of the glove.

[0011] The glove of the '785 patent has a number of deficiencies. First among these deficiencies is that a wearer of the glove can not be sure that the inner sleeve of the glove in fact extends up the forearm above the level of the open upper end of the gauntlet cuff of the glove. This is especially the case when the wearer is using the glove as it was intended and is also wearing a protective garment (which garment may also be somewhat bulky), such as a motorcycle jacket intended for foul weather wear. In this case, the jacket will probably have elastic cuffs, or zippered cuffs, or perhaps gusseted cuffs with closure straps. In either of these cases, the wearer will try to tuck the inner sleeve of the glove of the '785 patent into the cuff of the jacket and up along the wearer's forearms. Even with bare hands, this objective can be a challenge. But, especially once the wearer gets one glove on and attempts to tuck and extend the inner sleeve of the other glove, the project is very difficult is not impossible. Thus, the inner sleeve of the '785 patent may not extend above the level of the outer gauntlet cuff, and water will drain over the top of this inner sleeve and into the hand portion of the glove.

[0012] SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] In view of the deficiencies of the related technology, a primary object of this invention is to avoid one or more of these deficiencies.

[0014] More particularly, it is an object of this invention to provide a weather resistant glove for use by operators and passengers of open-air sport motor vehicles.

[0015] Another object is to provide such a weather resistant glove which has provisions for stopping the further flow toward a wearers hands of water that finds its way into the glove.

[0016] Still another object is to provide such a glove with provisions to allow the drainage of water that does find its way into the glove, before this water can reach and wet the hands of the wearer of the gloves.

[0017] Accordingly, the present invention according to one aspect provides a water resistant glove to be worn by an operator or passenger of an open-air sport motor vehicle. This glove comprises a water resistant outer glove shell having a hand portion and a gauntlet portion with an elongate outer gauntlet cuff part, and an inner gauntlet cuff part also of water resistant material sealingly attached within the outer gauntlet cuff part adjacent to the wrist of the glove and cooperating with the outer gauntlet cuff part to define a water catch basin, and a drain opening outwardly from the water catch basin.

[0018] According to another aspect, the present invention provides a method of preventing the hands of an operator of an open-air sport motor vehicle, which vehicle is of the type which positions the forearms and hands of the operator generally in a downwardly angled position, from getting wet because of water running downwardly along an outer garment over the operator's forearms and then entering the inside of the gloves to wet the operator's hands. This method includes steps of: providing a pair of gloves each with a water proof outer glove part having a hand portion and a gauntlet portion with a flaring outer gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm and over a sleeve of the outer garment; providing each glove with an inner liner part also having an inner gauntlet cuff part extending upwardly along the operator's forearm; utilizing the inner and outer gauntlet cuff parts of each glove to cooperatively define a water catch basin therebetween; and sealingly uniting the inner gauntlet cuff part and the outer gauntlet cuff part at a lower extent of the water catch basin generally adjacent to and above the operator's hands to prevent water in the water catch basin from flowing into the hand part of the gloves.

[0019] Additionally, a method according to the present invention may include steps of: defining a water catch basin at the cuff of a glove by utilizing an inner and an outer water resistant cuff sleeves, utilizing the water catch basin of the gloves to receive water running downwardly along the sleeves of the operator's outer garment; and providing a drain extending from the water catch basin outwardly of the glove to drain away water received therein.

[0020] A better understanding of the present invention will be obtained from reading the following description of a single preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invention when taken in conjunction with the appended drawing Figures, in which the same features (or features analogous in structure or function) are indicated with the same reference numeral throughout the several views. It will be understood that the appended drawing Figures and description here following relate only to one or more exemplary preferred embodiments of the invention, and as such, are not to be taken as implying a limitation on the invention. No such limitation on the invention is implied, and none is to be inferred.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

[0021]FIG. 1 provides a fragmentary perspective view of a motorcycle rider wearing a pair of gloves embodying the present invention;

[0022]FIG. 2 provides an enlarged perspective view of the right-hand glove of the motorcycle rider seen in FIG. 1;

[0023]FIG. 3 is a view of the palm side of the left-hand one of the pair of gloves being worn by the motorcycle rider of FIG. 1;

[0024]FIG. 4 provides a cross sectional view showing the cooperation of the glove seen in FIGS. 1-3 with a sleeve of a jacket worn by the motorcycle rider;

[0025]FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of components of the gloves seen in FIGS. 1-4; and

[0026]FIGS. 6 and 7 are respective perspective and cross sectional views like FIGS. 2 and 4, but showing an alternative embodiment of a glove according to the present invention;

[0027]FIG. 8 provides a view of the palm side of a left glove of a third alternative embodiment of the invention;

[0028]FIG. 9 is a view of the glove seen in FIG. 8 with a gauntlet cuff zipper open;

[0029]FIG. 10 is a view of the glove seen in FIGS. 8 and 9, with the gauntlet cuff of the glove inverted over the hand portion of the glove; and

[0030]FIG. 11 is a fragmentary view similar to views 8-10, showing the third alternative embodiment of glove preparatory to cooperation with a sleeve of the wearer's jacket, and with part of the glove cut away for clarity of illustration.

DERAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0031] Viewing first FIGS. 1 and 2 in conjunction, a motorcycle rider 10 is seen riding a motorcycle 12. Because of the speed of movement of the motorcycle, the rider 10 is subjected to a moving air stream, indicated on FIG. 1 by arrow 14. The rider 10 is wearing a protective jacket 16, which includes sleeves 16 a. The riders hands are protected by gloves 18 according to the present invention. It will be understood that the present inventive gloves 18 are not limited to their use by motorcycle riders, and that other operators and occupants of sports motor vehicles may benefit from the use of gloves according to this invention. Especially, riders and passengers of open-air sport motor vehicles, such as motorcycles and snowmobiles, may benefit from the advantages offered by the gloves of the present invention.

[0032] In the case illustrated in FIG. 1, the rider 10 is also wearing protective boots, and a helmet (not individually referenced in FIG. 1). The rider 10 may be wearing a pair of heavy denim jeans, leather pants, or other protective and possibly water resistant pants (not referenced on FIG. 1), as will be appreciated by those ordinarily skilled in the pertinent arts.

[0033] Importantly, during foul weather conditions, the rider 10 will be exposed to rain, and to mist thrown up and splashing from the tires of other vehicles, as is indicated by the droplet characters, and the arrowed reference numeral 20 on FIG. 1. While the jacket 16, pants, boots, and gloves 18 of the rider 10 may be successful in keeping the rider dry despite all this rain, mist, and splashing 20, the exterior surfaces of the rider's jacket 16 will be wet with water. Under these conditions, water forms into droplets that may run down the underside of the rider's forearms, as is arrowed on FIGS. 1 and 2 indicating the droplets with the arrowed numeral 22.

[0034] As is seen in FIG. 2 particularly, the droplets of water 22 may be kept from forming on the windward side of the riders arms (i.e., the windward side of the sleeves 16 a as seen in FIG. 1) by the wind 14 provided by the motion of the motorcycle 12. However, on the leeward side of the rider's forearms, the droplets 22 may run down the rider's arms and toward the gloves 18. Now, those ordinarily skilled in the pertinent arts will appreciate that if the rider 10 were wearing conventional motorcycle gloves, then the water droplets 22 could run into the gauntlet cuff portion of the gloves, and continue on into the hand portion of the gloves, to wet the riders hands, as explained above. However, the rider 10 is seen in FIG. 1 to be wearing gloves 18 embodying the present invention.

[0035] Viewing FIGS. 3-5 in conjunction with FIGS. 1 and 2, and with attention especially to FIG. 3, it is seen that the gloves 18 according to the present invention include an outer water resistant or water proof shell part 24, which includes a hand portion 24 a and a gauntlet cuff portion 24 b. The hand portion 24 a includes fingers 26 and a thumb 28 as is conventional. The gauntlet cuff portion 24 b includes an elongate gauntlet cuff 30. This gauntlet cuff 30 is generally conical in shape and flares as it extends upwardly along the rider's forearms, to allow the gauntlet cuff 30 to be received over the jacket sleeves 16 a, as is illustrated in the drawing Figures.

[0036] Intermediate of the hand portion 24 a and the gauntlet cuff portion 24 b, the glove includes a wrist band member 32, which may be elasticized or may be adjustable (i.e., with a circumferential strap and buckle, for example) in order to securely retain the gloves 18 on the wearer's hands. The outer glove shell part 24 may be formed of leather or fabric, and may be water proof, water resistant, or water permeable. Preferably, in the interest of providing a combination of features and protections for the rider 10, the outer shell part 24 is formed of leather which has good abrasion resistance in the event of a spill by the rider 10 from the motorcycle 12. However, this leather is especially treated to make is absorb less water than leather ordinarily would, so that the soaking of the gloves with water during foul weather is reduced, and also the effect of evaporative cooling from the air stream 14 is also reduced.

[0037] Now, FIG. 5 shows that the glove 18 includes, in addition to the outer shell part 24, an inner waterproof liner part 34. This liner part 34 is preferably formed of fabric (such as a high-strength nylon fabric, for example) that is impregnated with a flexible polymer (such as polyurethane) to make the fabric waterproof. This fabric material is then flocked on one side (which becomes the inside of the liner part 34) to provide both a pleasing feel for the fabric against the rider's hands, and to provide an insulative quality for the gloves 10. While it is not illustrated in FIGS. 1-5, those ordinarily skilled in the pertinent arts will recognize that in addition to the outer shell part and inner liner part, the gloves 18 may include another glove-shaped part intermediate of the shell and liner, and which additional part may be fabricated of an insulative material, such as Thinsulate™, for example, to provide an even higher insulation rating for the gloves 18.

[0038] As FIG. 5 illustrates, the liner part 34 includes a hand portion 34 a, formed with fingers 36, and a thumb 38. Also, the liner part 34 is formed with an elongate gauntlet cuff portion 34 b. This gauntlet cuff portion 34 b includes an outer gauntlet cuff 40, which is preferably the same length and shape as the gauntlet cuff 30. That is, the gauntlet cuff portion 40 extends and flares up the rider's forearm about the same length as the cuff portion 30. Thus, when the outer shell part 24 and liner part 34 are combined during manufacturing of the gloves 18, these parts (cuff portions 24 b and 34 b) are stitched together at a seam, indicated with the arrowed numeral 42. The seams of the glove 10 may be sealed with water proof tape or other sealing material as necessary in order to insure the water tightness of the stitched seams (i.e., so that water does not wick through the seams along the stitching thread).

[0039] Within the outer gauntlet cuff 40 is a second or inner cuff 44, which is preferably about the same length as the gauntlet cuffs 30 and 40 (viewing FIGS. 3, 4, and 5). That is, the inner cuff 44 is substantially coextensive with and not longer than the outer gauntlet cuff part 24 a (recalling cuff parts 30 and 40), and the inner cuff 44 further does not flare outwardly quite so much as it extends up the wearer's forearm (viewing FIG. 4 and 5). That is, the inner cuff 44 is almost of straight cylindrical shape, although it may flare somewhat. The inner and outer cuffs 40 and 44 are sealingly united to one another at a seam indicated with the arrowed numeral 46 (which is also preferably sealed with water proof tape), and define between them an annular water catch basin, indicated with the arrowed numeral 48 on FIGS. 4 and 5. It is to be noted that although in FIG. 4 this basin 48 opens downwardly, this is just a convenience of illustration, and the depicted position for the glove 18 is not limiting. Preferably, the inner cuff 44 is provided with a circumferential elastic 50, so that it yieldably grips the rider's forearm (not seen in the drawing Figures, but suggested in FIG. 4).

[0040] As FIGS. 3, and 5 best illustrate, in order to drain the water catch basin 48, the gloves 18 are also provided with a pair of grommets 52 which open from the water catch basin 48 onto the outside of the outer shell 24 (i.e., through both the gauntlet cuff part 24 b of the shell 24, and through the outer gauntlet cuff part 34 b—so that these grommets appear in both parts of FIG. 5). These grommets 52 are preferably positioned in view of the fact that in the ordinary riding position of the rider 10 as is seen in FIG. 1, the rider's hands will be generally somewhat palm-downward on the grips of the motorcycle, and at least one of the pair of grommets 52 is thus near to or at the lowest point of the water catch basin 48. Consequently, as is illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 by the arrowed numerals 52 a, the water from within catch basin 48 is drained outwardly of the gloves 18. In other words, the water level in the catch basin 48 never reaches the level of the open upper end of the gauntlet cuff, and never reaches the level of the open upper end of inner cuff 44. Thus, this water cannot flow into the inside of the glove where the wearer's hand is located. It is to be noted that the invention is not limited to use of any particular number of grommets 52, or even to the use of grommets to form the drain opening(s) from the catch basin 48. In other words, a simple hole, slit, or section of water permeable material located at approximately the location indicated for the grommets 52 will suffice to let the basin 48 drain.

[0041] It is seen in FIG. 4, that the gloves 18 are preferably worn with the inner second cuff 44 disposed within the sleeve 16 a of the rider's jacket 16 (that is, within the cuff of the jacket sleeve). The outer cuff 30 is worn in the usual position over the lower part of this sleeve (i.e., over and about the jacket cuffs of the jacket sleeves 16 a). As a result, should any water (recalling the droplets 22) make its way down the rider's sleeves 16 a and into the gloves 18, this water will enter the water catch basin 48, will be drained via grommets 52, and will not be received into the hand parts 24 of the gloves to wet the rider's hands. Any water received into the catch basin 48 is quickly drained from the gloves via grommets 52, as the arrows 52 a illustrate.

[0042] At this point it is well to consider how it is that a wearer of the gloves 10 may accomplish putting them on, especially once the first glove is on a hand, and the second glove is to be put on and the cuffs arranged with the sleeve of the wearer's jacket as is seen in FIG. 4. One way this can be done is for the wearer with bare hands to preparatorily roll or invert each outer gauntlet cuff toward and partially over the hand portion of the glove, leaving the inner cuff 44 extended and exposed. Now the wearer puts on the jacket 16, and puts on the first glove 18. With the other bare hand, the inner cuff of the glove just put on can be easily arranged inside of the sleeve of the jacket. The outer cuff of the glove is then pulled or rolled to its position outside of and overlapping the cuff of the jacket sleeve (recalling FIGS. 3 and 4). Now the wearer puts on the other glove, and with a gloved finger can work the inner cuff 44 of the second glove inside of the jacket sleeve. Its not necessary for the wearer to insure that the inner cuff extends fully inside of the jacket sleeve cuff and upwardly to any particular level along the forearm, since the water level inside of the catch basin 48 never reaches a high level due to the draining function provided by grommets 52. Once this inner cuff is inserted into the jacket sleeves, the wearer again rolls or pulls the outer gauntlet cuff 30 of the second glove into its position as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. Now, the wearer's hands are protected against water entry to the hand portion of each glove, and will stay dry and warm.

[0043] Viewing now FIGS. 6 and 7 in conjunction with one another, an alternative embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. Because this alternative embodiment has several features in common with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, features which are the same as, or which are equivalent in structure or function to, features depicted and described above with reference to FIGS. 1-5, are indicated on FIGS. 6 and 7 with the same numeral used above, and increased by one-hundred (100).

[0044] As seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, the gloves 118 include an outer water resistant or water proof shell part 124, with a hand portion 124 a and a gauntlet portion 124 b. The hand portion 124 a includes fingers parts 126 and a thumb part (not seen in the drawing Figures). The gauntlet portion 124 b includes an elongate gauntlet cuff 130. A wrist band 132 encircles the glove 118 to adjustably secure each glove 118 on the rider's hands. The gloves 118 also include an inner waterproof liner part 134. This liner part 134 may also include an insulation liner (not illustrated in the drawing Figures). The liner part 134 includes a hand portion formed with finger parts and a thumb part.

[0045] This embodiment also includes an elongate gauntlet cuff portion 134 b. This gauntlet cuff portion 134 b includes a first outer gauntlet cuff 140, which is preferably the same length as the gauntlet cuff 130 so that these gauntlet cuffs are united by a seam, indicated with the arrowed numeral 142. However, this embodiment also includes a second “inner” gauntlet cuff 144, which again is preferably both just a little longer than the gauntlet cuffs 130 and 140 (or coextensive in length with the cuffs 130 and 140), and flares outwardly almost as much as it extends up the wearer's forearm (viewing FIG. 6 and 7). The gauntlet cuff 144 is referred to as an “inner” cuff, firstly because it is within the outer cuff 130, although it is configured to allow it to be disposed preferably outside of the cuff and sleeve 116 a of the rider's jacket 116, as is seen in FIG. 6. Thus, the glove of FIGS. 6 and 7 has two coaxial cuffs, both of which may be disposed outside of the sleeves 116 a of the rider's jacket 116. Also, although this embodiment may also be worn in the same way as the embodiment seen in FIGS. 1-5 (i.e., with the gauntlet cuff 144 within the jacket sleeves 116 a) if the rider 10 chooses, it also allows the rider 10 the option of quickly pulling the cuffs 130/140 and 144 over the forearm portions of the jacket sleeves 116 a, as is seen in FIGS. 6 and 7. As will be explained, this option provides a flexibility of use and an increased increment of utility for the embodiment of FIGS. 6 and 7.

[0046] In order to provide a degree of water resistance at the interface of the inner cuff 144 and the sleeves 116 a (indicated on FIGS. 6 and 7 with the arrowed numeral 54), the cuff 144 is provided with both a circumferential elastic 150 and with a thin, tapering, resilient lip-seal feature (indicated with arrowed numeral 56). The lip seal feature 56 self-biases into water resistant engagement with the sleeve 116 a at the interface 54, in addition to being urged into engagement with the jacket sleeve 16 a by the elastic 150.

[0047] As with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, the embodiment of FIGS. 6 and 7 defines a water catch basin 148 between the gauntlet cuffs 130 and 140. A pair of grommets 152 open from the water catch basin 148 onto the outside of the outer glove shell 124. Water from within the water catch basin 148 is drained outwardly of the gloves 118, as is depicted by arrowed numerals 152 a.

[0048] While, as was pointed out above, the gloves of FIGS. 6 and 7 may also be worn as is seen in FIG. 4 (i.e., with the cuffs 144 inside of the jacket sleeves), the lip seal feature 56 allows the rider 10 to quickly don the gloves 118 without having to arrange the inner cuffs of the gloves under the respective sleeves of the jacket 16. This option may be preferred under exigent circumstances, and especially when a rider is about to embark on a trip of relatively short distance in inclement conditions. That is, time may be saved by the rider choosing to wear the gloves as is seen in FIGS. 6 and 7 because they can be put on quickly just like conventional motorcycle gloves. On the other hand, if the rider is about to embark on a longer ride, a small amount of extra time and effort may be taken to position the gloves of FIGS. 6 and 7 as is seen in FIG. 4, so that the gloves 118 provide essentially complete water resistance to keep the rider's hands dry and warm.

[0049] Considering now FIGS. 8-11, a third alternative embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. Because this third alternative embodiment also has several features in common with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, and of FIGS. 6 and 7, features which are the same as, or which are equivalent in structure or function to, features depicted and described above with reference to FIGS. 1-5, or on FIGS. 6 and 7 are indicated with the same numeral used above, and increased by two-hundred (200).

[0050] This third alternative embodiment of weather resistant glove particularly offers convenience and speed in putting on the gloves, even when the first glove has been put on and the second glove has to be put on and arranged into cooperation with the jacket sleeve 16 a with the first gloved hand. As mentioned above, the first and second embodiments of the invention have an outer gauntlet cuff which (with bare hands) can be turned inside out or inverted over the hand portion of the glove in preparation to putting on the gloves. However, motorcycle riding gloves frequently include cushioning or armoring or abrasion resistant panels, such as Kevlar™, or carbon fiber material. Such panels are not easily folded or bent, and if such were included on the cuff portion of the first or second embodiments this would make the cuff of the gloves difficult to invert or turn inside out over the hand portion of the glove in preparation to putting on the gloves. The third alternative embodiment of this invention provides a glove with an outer gauntlet cuff that is particularly easy to turn inside out or invert over the hand portion of the glove, and is also easily righted to its normal operative position even with both hands gloved.

[0051] The gloves 218 according to the third embodiment of the present invention include an outer water resistant or water proof shell part 224 with a hand portion 224 a and a gauntlet cuff portion 224 b. In this case, the gauntlet cuff portion 224 b may be provided with one or more abrasion resistant pads 224 c, although the invention is not so limited. The gauntlet cuff portion 224 b also includes an elongate zipper or slide fastener 58, with a zipper pull 58 a positioned adjacent to the free end of the gauntlet cuff 224 a when the zipper is closed (viewing FIG. 8). As is seen in FIG. 9, when the zipper pull 58 a is moved to the proximal end of the zipper (that is, adjacent to the hand portion of the glove 218), the gauntlet cuff 224 b easily flares out even further, revealing the inner cuff 244, as is seen in FIG. 9.

[0052] Considering now FIG. 10, it is seen that with the zipper pull moved adjacent to the hand portion of the glove 218, with the zipper 58 opened, the gauntlet cuff 224 b is easily inverted or turned inside out partially over the hand portion of the glove 218. Once the gauntlet cuff 224 b is turned inside out, the inner cuff 244 is fully exposed, viewing FIG. 10. The gauntlet cuff of the glove 218 may easily be turned inside out using bare hands in preparation to putting on the gloves 218, and can even be turned inside out using a gloved hand, once the zipper 58 is opened as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10.

[0053]FIG. 11 illustrates how conveniently the glove 218 may be arranged in cooperation with a jacket sleeve, to insert the inner cuff 244 into the jacket sleeve cuff. That is, in this case, the jacket sleeve cuff is illustrated to include a gusseted closure 62, with a slit 62 a spanned by a gusset 64. The slit is closed by a closure strap 66 having sections 68 a, 68 b of a hook-and-loop fastener. Alternatively, the jacket cuff may include an elasticized cuff closure, or a zippered cuff closure, for example. But, with the cuff closure 62 opened (i.e., in this case, with the gusseted cuff closure opened as seen in FIG. 11), the inner cuff 244 of the glove 218 is easily inserted into the sleeve of the jacket. As is seen in FIG. 11, the wearer can preparatorily slide the jacket sleeve up a little along the forearm, and then put on the glove 218, extending the inner cuff 244 upwardly along the forearm, and then can slide the jacket cuff toward the wrist (indicated by arrows 70) while tucking in the inner glove cuff 244. Then, the wearer closes the gusseted cuff closure, as is indicated by arrow 72. Next, the wearer turns the outer glove cuff 224 b right side out, as is indicated by arrows 74. When the glove cuff 224 b is turned right side out, it laps over the cuff of the jacket sleeve, and takes the position seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 for the first embodiment of the present inventive glove. In order to retain and secure the outer gauntlet cuff 224 b in its proper position, the wearer closes zipper 58, which is easily done with a gloved hand. Importantly, all of the steps illustrated in FIG. 11 can be carried out easily even after the first hand is gloved.

[0054] While the present invention has been depicted, described, and is defined by reference to two particularly preferred embodiments of the invention, such reference does not imply a limitation on the invention, and no such limitation is to be inferred. The invention is capable of considerable modification, alteration, and equivalents in form and function, as will occur to those ordinarily skilled in the pertinent arts. For example, the outer gauntlet cuff of the third embodiment of the invention, which is depicted as being closed by a zipper, may be closed by any convenient structure or mechanism. The outer gauntlet cuff may be of gusseted construction also, and may still have a gusset sized sufficiently to allow the gauntlet cuff to be turned inside out over the hand portion of the glove, and to ease this operation of turning the gauntlet cuff inside out, and then returning it to its normal position for wear of the inventive glove. Thus, it is clear that the depicted and described preferred embodiments of the invention are exemplary only, and are not exhaustive of the scope of the invention. Consequently, the invention is intended to be limited only by the spirit and scope of the appended claims, giving full cognizance to equivalents in all respects.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7237273 *Sep 30, 2005Jul 3, 2007Adeti Seguridad Industrial, S.A. De C.V.Double face work gloves
US7895768 *Jan 7, 2008Mar 1, 2011Behrouz VossoughiAbsorbent glove
US7900275 *Oct 29, 2007Mar 8, 2011Warrior Sports, Inc.Protective sports glove with floating cuff portion
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/161.1, 2/162, 2/161.6
International ClassificationA41D19/015
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/015, A41D2600/102
European ClassificationA41D19/015
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 19, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: INTERSPORT FASHIONS WEST, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GOLDE, PAUL;REEL/FRAME:013030/0950
Effective date: 20020618