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Publication numberUS2003187 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1935
Filing dateOct 2, 1933
Priority dateOct 2, 1933
Publication numberUS 2003187 A, US 2003187A, US-A-2003187, US2003187 A, US2003187A
InventorsGood Francis R
Original AssigneeFrederick H Shaw
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automobile radio device
US 2003187 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 28, 1935. F. R. GOOD AUTOMOBILE RADIO DEVICE Filed Oct. 2, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 May 28, 1935. 2,003,187

F. R. GOOD AUTOMOBILE RADIO DEVICE Filed Oct. 2, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 28, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE fty one-hundredths Glenside, Pa.

Application October 2,

14 Claims.

This invention relates to automobile radio devices and has for its principal object the provision of novel means for eiectivelyl preventing interference between the automobile engine and the radio receiver. The ignition system of an automobile engine causes disturbance effects on the radio receiver as is well known and this has been counteracted by the provision of suppressor resistors in the spark plug leads of the engine and sometimes in the common distributor lead as well. While these Suppressors have solved this problem, they have presented a new problem in that they deleteriously affect the engine performance after a certain length of time or after a certain driven mileage. This is caused by the continuous inclusion in the ignition system of the relatively high impedance resistors.

An object of the present invention is to provide means for rendering the suppressor resistors inoperative at will so that they may be used only during such times as the radio receiver is being used.

Another object of the invention is to provide means for simultaneously rendering all of the suppressor resistors inoperative at will for the stated purpose.

A further object of the invention is to provide means at a common point, such as at the engine distributor, for controlling all of the suppressor resistors.

A still further object of the invention is to provide remotely controlled manually or automatically operable means for the stated purpose` Other objects will be apparent hereinafter.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a distributor embodying the invention and showing one of the spark plugs and spark plug leads associated therewith;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the distributor;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the distributor with the upper movable part removed;

Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view along the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating clearly the principles of the invention; and

Fig. 6 is a schematic diagram of an automatic control device which may be used.

Referring particularly to Fig. 1, there is shown a distributor I which receives high tension current via common lead 2 from the usual induction coil (not shown) and which distributes or supplies the high tension current to the spark plugs 3 (only one shown) via conductors 4. In its general'construction and in its operation, the disto Frederick H. Shaw,

1933, Serial No. 691,886

(Cl. Z-14) tributor is similar to conventional commonly employed devices of this type. In fact, the present invention requires very little modication of the conventional distributor and, with the few necessary changes, the conventional distributor may be used. The suppressor resistor which is now employed generally and which is connected in each of the spark plug leads 4 is shown at 5. In accordance with the present invention, each of the spark plug leads takes the form of a two-conductor lead, one conductor of which is directly connected to the spark plug or to the spark plug side of the suppressor resistor, as at S. It will be understood that although only one of the spark plugs and its associated lead is shown for the purpose of illustration, the others are identical.

The distributor comprises a stationary part 9 and an upper movable part IB. Stationary part 9 carries and houses the rotor II of the distributor which successively engages contacts I2 connected via conductors I3 to the spark plug leads, as is customary. The high tension current is brought into the distributor centrally thereof and is led to the rotor via the conducting element I4 in conventional fashion. Each of the conductors I3 terminates at its upper end in a contact I5 which is selectively engageable by a pair of contact buttons I6 and I'I carried by the movable part I0. with tubular openings I8 in which coil springs I 9 and the contact buttons I6 and I'I are disposed, the buttons being carried at the lower ends of the springs. The ends of the spark plug leads 4 are made connectable to the distributor by contact elements 2D attached to the spark plug leads and insertable in openings I8 to engage the coil springs I9. The springs function to resiliently press the contact buttons I6 and I'I downward so as to insure good electrical contact with contact I5. It will now be apparent that rotary movement of part Il] of the distributor in opposite directions will cause either of the contact buttons I6 and I'I to be brought into engagement with contact I5, thereby causing the suppressor resistor 5 to be included in or excluded from the spark plug lead, depending upon the position oi the movable part IG.

The stationary part 9 of the distributor is provided with a centrally located elongated recess 2l within which is disposed a common suppressor resistor 22 as above mentioned. A transverselyextending arm 23 is electrically connected to the resistor at one terminal thereof and also connected to a longitudinally-extending rod or To this end, part I is provided pin 24. A second transversely extending arm having an attaching and connecting portion 25 is carried within a recess 2'1 in part and is electrically connected to the suppressor resistor 22 by means of the coil spring 28, the spring serving to resiliently hold the resistor in place and in good electrical contact Ywith its associated. elements. Arm 25 is disposed in a different vertical plane from that of arm 23 and is arranged so that its extended end serves as a contact 29 which is engageable by contact button 39 carried by the movable part I. The upper end of rod Zllis spaced from contact 2s and constitutes a second contact 3|, (see Fig. B which is also engageable by contact button 36. Part IU of the distributor is provided with an eccentrically-located tubular opening 32 which carries a coil spring 33 and the button 35 attached thereto, the spring urging the button downward. Connection is made to the distributor by a connector element Sli attached tov the end of conductor 2. The spaced contacts 2S a-nd 3i vare located on an Varc which is traversed by contact button 3B during rotary movement of part lil.

It will be seen then that at the same time that part lil is rotated to effect the inclusion or exclusion of suppressor resistors E, the common suppressor resistor. 22 is likewise included in or exeluded from the ignition system. When the contact button 3B engages contact 29, a circuit is completed through arm 25 and suppressor resistor 22 to conductor element l. When contact button 36 engages contact 3l, however, a circuit is completed through rod 24 and arm 23 to conductor element I4, which circuit does not include thesuppressor resistor. Y V

` As will be seen from Fig. 3, the contact elements are so arranged that the circuits are made before they are broken to prevent arcing and consequent damage. This merely necessitates having the space between the selectable contacts smaller than the diameters of the single contact so that the latter is enabled to bridge the former.

The annular.v skirt or ange 35 of. partV le carries a ring 3S which has a circular projection 3,'1 fitting into a recess or groove 38 inthe under-V side of Vthe-peripheral portion of part 9. During movement of part i9, projection 37 rides in groovel 38. A recess 38 (see Fig. 4) is formed in part 9 and in the recess there is provided an extending block 4t! having spaced recesses 4| and i2 therein. A spring-pressed button 43 is carried by ring 3@ and is adapted to seat itself in recesses 4l and 2. The button rides from one recess to the other and serves to lock part Ii! at each of its rotary movements. The limits of the rotary movement of part lil are thus defined.

In order to provide for remote control of the movable part IE so as to enable the operator of the automobile to operate the device at will, there is provided an integral lug i4 on part l0 to which is connected a wire or rod d5 leading to the dashboard or instrument panel oi the automobile or to any convenient point for remote operation. This general method of remote control is common and is found, for example, in the ordinary choke. By moving the connector wire or rod back and forth, part ID may be rotated in either direction to effect thev desired switching. It will be understood, of course, that any other suitable method of remote control maybe utilized.

The diagram of Fig. 5 illustratesmore clearly the principles of the invention. The switching elements are designated by the same numerals as yhave been used hereinbefore, and the switchingV operation to eiect the insertion Vor removal of the suppressor resistors may be readily visualized. Although the illustration shows the invention applied to a four-cylinder automobile, it will be obvious that it may be applied to automobiles having any number of cylinders.

In Fig. 6, there is shown a device which adapts the invention for either manual or automatic remote control'. The usual automobile battery is shown at t6 and is connectedv to a reversing switch El which may take the form of a barrel switch actuatable by a key d8. For the purpose of illustration, the switching elements of the switch Yare diagrammatically shown. The positive and negative terminals of battery it are connected, respectively, via conductors i9 and 5B, to terminals 5l and 52 of the switch. The positive battery terminal is also connected via conductor 53 to switch terminal 563. One of the supply lines 55 for the radio receiver is connected to the negative terminal of the battery, while the other supply line 5t is connected to switch terminal 5l.

.There is also provided' a polarized solenoid device 58 comprising a coil or winding b9 and a movable core or armature tl. A pair of switching devices El and 62 are located at opposite ends of the solenoid device. Theseswitching devices are similar and each comprises a stationary contact B3 and a movable spring contact arm 54 having an extended end 65 in the path or" core Si). vThe switching devices areself-closing by virtue vof the resilient nature of the spring arms 5f! and are adapted to Vbe opened by engagement of core 60 with the extending portion 55. v

Theextremities of coil 59 are connected to the movable arms of the switching devices as illustrated. The movable arm of switching device 6l is connected via conductor t6 to switch terminal Bl, while the movable arm of switching device 53 is connected via conductor 58 to switchterminal 69. The stationary contact of switching device til is connected via conductor 7E to switch terminal ii, while the stationary contactV of switching device 52 is connected via conductor 'I2 to switch terminal i3. Condensers 'M may be connected across Ythecontacts of the switching devices to prevent arcing. Y

An arrn is formed integral or attached to the solenoid core 69 and this arm is slidingly secured to the slotted end of ar pivoted lever 'i5 having a handle portion Tl. The lever may have attached thereto a graduated sector 'i8 to indicate positioning of the lever with respect to some xed'or stationary mark. The remote control rod or wire d5 above mentioned is connected to the pivoted lever. It will be apparent that the remote control may be affected manuallyrby moving lever 16 or automatically by operation of the solenoid device.

Considering the automatic operation of the device, when switch 4T is'turned to theleft, so that the movable switch elements contact the left hand vice S2V will be open and switching device Si will be closed. There will be completed, therefore, a circuit from the positive side .of the battery through switch terminals i and 69, conductor S8, the solenoid coil 59, the closedcontacts of switchingndevice 6|, conductor l0, switch terminalsflt Cil CIK

and 52 and conductor 5G to 'the negative side of the battery. 'I'he solenoid is so polarized that this application of the battery potential causes the energized solenoid to move its core or ai' to the lower position. Switching device i ill close immediately upon movement of the core, but this will have no effect, as will be apparent.

When the core reaches its lowerrnost position and opens switching device 6i, the above-traced circuit will be opened. Such movement of the core moves the movable part of the distributor in a manner to exclude the suppressor resistors from the ignition system.

When it is desired to use the radio receiver, switch 47 is thrown to the right and it will be apparent that the supply circuit for the receiver will be completed through closed switch terminals 54 and 5l. At the same time, a potential of reverse polarity will be applied to the solenoid coil through the following circuit. From the positive side of battery 46, through conductor switch terminals and 61, conductor S6, through the solenoid coil from the lower end thereof, the closed contacts of switching device 62, conductor 12, switch terminals 'I3 and 52 and conductor 5D to the negative side of the battery. This reverse energization of the polarized solenoid will cause the core thereof to move upward so as to cause the movable distributor part to move in a manner to include the suppressor resistors in the ignition system.

Although a specic illustration and description of; the invention has been herein given, it will be understood that various changes and modications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. In its broadest aspect, the invention contemplates the control of the suppressor resistors and this may be effected in any suitable manner. The distributor has been chosen as the point at which to effect the desired switching only because it is a convenient point for doing so. It is conceivable, for example, that the shunt circuits associated with the suppressor resistors might be controlled directly at the dash or instrument panel of the automobile, but this would necessitate extensive Wiring. Other modifications and changes will occur to persons skilled in the art in the application of the broad principles of the invention.

Although the invention has been described with particular reference to an automobile radio receiver, it will be obvious that it is applicable to any radio equipped vehicle having an ignition system, such as an aeroplane, or other vehicle.

I claim:

l. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system, comprising means for reducing the disturbing effects of said system on said radio receiver, and means for rendering said first-mentioned means ineffective to deleteriously aifect the current flow in said system during periods of non-use of said receiver.

2. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system, comprising at least one impedance element adapted to be interposed in said system to reduce the disturbing effects thereof on said radio receiver, and means comprising a selectable shunt path about said element for rendering said element ineffective during periods of non-use of said receiver.

3. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system, comprising a plurality of impedance elements interposed in said system to reduce the disturbing effects thereof on said radio receiver, and means operable from the vehicle operators position for simultaneously rendering all of said elements ineffective to delcteriously affect the current flow in said system during periods of non-use of said receiver.

4. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system including a distributor, cornprising a plurality of impedance elements connected to conductors connected to said distributor to reduce the disturbing effects of said system on said radio receiver, and means at said distributor for simultaneously rendering all of said elements ineffective to deleteriously aect the current flow in said system during periods o non-use of said receiver.

5. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system including a distributor, comprising a plurality of impedance elements connected to conductors connected to said distributor to reduce the disturbing effects of said system on said radio receiver, and remotely controllable means at said distributor for simultaneously rendering all of said elements ineffective to deleteriously affect the current flow in said system during periods of non-use of said receiver.

6. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system including a. distributor, coniprising a plurality of impedance elements connected to conductors connected to said distributor to reduce the disturbing effects of said systern on said radio receiver, conductors shunting said elements and terminating at said distributor, and selective switching means at said distributor for including either group of conductors in said system.

7. A device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system including a distributor, comprising a plurality of impedance elements connected to conductors connected to said distributor to reduce the disturbing effects of said system on said radio receiver, conductors shunting said elements and terminating at said distributor, and selective switching means at said distributor for including either group of conductors in said system, Said switching means comprising cooperating contacts carried by relatively movable parts of said distributor.

8. In a device for a radio receiver-equipped vehicle having an internal combustion engine with an ignition system including a distributor having relatively movable parts, an impedance element carried by one of said distributor parts, and means comprising switching contacts carried by said distributor parts for including said impedance element in said system during periods of use of said receiver to reduce the disturbing effects of said system on said receiver, and for excluding said impedance element from said systern during periods of non-use of said receiver.

9. The combination with an automobile engine provided with spark plugs and having a radio-ignition interference suppressor constantly connected in series with each spark plug, or" manually operable means for simultaneously short-circuiting said interference Suppressors at will.

10. In combination with ari automobile enginelhaving spark plugs, and a radio-ignition interference suppressor for each spark plug, of manually operable means to selectively cause iiow of ignition current to said spark plugs either through or around said Suppressors, as desired.

11. Means for guarding a radio receiving apparatus from ignition interference on motor Vehicles comprising, in combination, an on and off switch for said radio receiving apparatus, oscillation suppressing devices connected in circuit with certain of the spark plugs of the ignition system, and means controlled by the Inovement of the on and on vsvvitch of said radio receiving apparatus for shunting said oscillation Vsuppressing devices in the oi position of the tion system -including a multiplicity of spark plugs and aVV distribution circuit, oscillation prevention means connected in said distribution circuit and in series with certain of said spark plugs, and magnetic means actuated by said controller for rendering said oscillation prevention means effective in the on position of said controller and ineiective in the o position of said controller.

13. The method of guarding radio receiving apparatus from interference emanating from motor vehicle ignition systems which consists Vin increasing the impedance oi the ignition system When the radio receiving apparatus is in operation and restoring the ignition system to the original value of impedance when the radio receiving apparatus is not in operation.

14. The method of increasing the engine eiciency of radio apparatus equipped motor cars which consists in increasing the damping of the distribution circuit of the ignition system when the radio apparatus is placed in operation and decreasing the damping of the distribution cir- Y

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Classifications
U.S. Classification123/633, 361/253, 315/85, 455/307, 338/1, 455/297
International ClassificationF02P7/00, F02P7/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02P7/025
European ClassificationF02P7/02A3