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Publication numberUS2003950 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1935
Filing dateMay 18, 1934
Priority dateMay 18, 1934
Publication numberUS 2003950 A, US 2003950A, US-A-2003950, US2003950 A, US2003950A
InventorsJosef Pejchar
Original AssigneeJosef Pejchar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger ring, bracelet, and the like
US 2003950 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 4, 1935: J PEJCHAR 2,003,950

FINGER RING, BRACELET, AND THE LIKE Filed may 18, 1934 ATTORNEYS.

Patented June 4, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,003,950 FINGER RING, BRACELET, AND THE LIKE Josef Pejchar, Corona, N. Y. Application May 18, 1934, Serial No. 726,270

8 Claims.

My present invention relates to articles of personal wear or adornment, such as finger rings,

bracelets, wrist-watch straps, ear-rings, pendants, and the like. The object of my invention is to provide a simple, efiicient and ornamental connection between a body member and a setting memberholding a gem or other ornamental object.

According to my invention, the setting member has a plurality of prongs forholdingthe gem or other ornamental object, and at least two of such prongs, located at opposite portions of the setting member, servenot only as holding elements for such object, but also for connecting the a setting member with other elements, for instance with the two ends of a, body member, either directly or indirectly. Thus according to my invention at least,twooppositelylocated prongs of said setting member have a double function.

invention are, illustrated by the. accompanying drawing, in which, Fig. ilis apside elevation of a finger ring made according to my. invention; Fig. 2 shows the same ring partly infelevation. and partly in section; Fig. 3 is a top view of such ring; Fig. 4 is a perspective view of thepronged setting member; Fig.- 5 isaitop view of another embodiment in which the bodyv member of :the finger ring has a form different from the one shown in Figs; 1, 2, and 3; Figs.i,6 and '7. illustrate another I finger ring according to my invention, in side elevation (partlyrin section)" and top viewrespectively; Fig.- 8 illustrates still, another finger ring embodying my invention, side elevation with partsinsection; Fig. 9 is a topview of the ring shown in Fig. 8,,and Fig. 10 shows the blank from which the setting member employediin Figs. 1

8 and'9 is formed; Fig. 11 is a. view similar to Fig. 8', and showing a slightly different form of the body member; Fig. 12 is a perspective view of another form of body member which I may. use, for instance as a substitute for those'shown in the preceding'figurea'and Fig.13 shows a. pendant or like article .embodying my invention.

iIn Figs. 1, 2, and 3 -I have shown ametallic body member 20 of annular form adaptedto form the main portion of a finger ring.-"',This member has spaced enlarged ends 2| with centrally located' openings 22 'of rectangular or other suitable shape. These openings, which extend from'the inner surface of the ringto its outer; surface, are adapted to'receive two oppositeprongs 23 of a metallic setting member 24. The latter is preferably curved in one direction to correspond to the'curvature of the body member 20, as shown A number 'of embodiments exemplifying my invention.

in Figs. 1, 2 and 4. The setting member has additional prongs 25 located laterally, the four prongs 23, 25 serving to hold an ornamental object 26, which may be a precious or semi-precious stone, or an imitation jewel, or any other suitable v5 object. When such object is a stone or jewel, the prongs are properly shaped to form seats for holding the stone or jewel, in any well-known or approved manner. In this case the setting member is preferably apertured, as indicated at 21, 10 so that the jewel will show to better advantage. The prongs 23, 25 are formed from extensions or tabs which originallyextend outwardly from the outer edge of the setting member 24 and are subsequently bent to extend substantially at right 51 angles to the plane of such member, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 4. The two prongs 23 are preferably tapered as illustrated. When in the position shown in Fig. 4, the prongs 23 are readily inserted into the openings 22 of the body member 20,2], as indicated in Fig. 2. The jewel 26 being then placed in position, the free ends of the prongs 23, 25 are bent inwardly to hold the jewel as shown in Fig. 1, thus completing the manufacture of the finger ring.

It will be noted that each of the prongs 23 has a double function, namely, first, to hold the jewel or other ornamental object 26, and second, to connect the setting member 24 with the body member 20. Preferably, the prongs 23 extend loosely through the openings 22, the width of the latter, measured circumferentially of the ring, being considerably greater than the thickness of the said prongs. Thus a certain amount of play, circumferentially of the ring, is aiforded for {35 the ends 2| of the body member 20 relatively to the setting member 24. As the split body member 20 is naturally somewhat elastic, this play enables the ring to adjust itself, within certain limits, to fingers of different sizes, and moreover enables'the ring to bereadily removed when desired, and prevents it from cutting into the flesh, thus avoiding discomfort and the danger of infection.

While I prefer to have a loose connection between the setting member 24 and the body member 20, this is not absolutely essential, and I might connect these two members rigidly, for instance by soldering the prongs 23 in the openings 22, and still retain some of the advantages of my ('50 The construction shown in Fig. 5 differs from the one described above only by'the shape of the metallic body member or rather-of its ends2l, which are shown'of a shapesim'ulating thelooped ends of a cord. .Throughthe ,open'ings 22"iof these ends extend the prongs 23 of the setting member 24, which is shown of exactly the same construction as in Figs. 1 to 4. The prongs 23 preferably pass through these openings loosely, so as to give the ends 2 l some play in a circumferential direction, in the same manner as explained with reference to Figs. 1 to 4, but if desired, the ends 2| may be soldered or otherwise rigidly secured to the setting member 24.

In the two constructions so far described, the ends of the body member are connected directly with two prongs (23) of the setting member. In Figs. 6 to 11 I have shown three forms of my invention in which this connection is made indirectly, through an intermediate connecting member.

In Figs. 6 and '7, the setting member24 with its prongs 23, 25 may be of the, samecharacteras set forth above in connection with Figs. l to 5. The prongs 23, instead of fitting directly into'openings in the endsof thebodymember, are passed outwardly through openings 28 in connecting members 29, here shown as rectangular links curved circumferentially to conform to the shape of the ring. One of the transverse members of each linkis hooked into the adjacent prong 23, the

;other transverse member extends through an eye or opening 22 in the respective end 2| of the body'member2fi'f. The connections at one or both ends of each link 29 may be rigid, as by soldering. I prefer, however, that each end of each link should form a hinge or pivotal connection with the adjacent body or setting member, to permit a slight motion about an axis parallel to the axis of the finger ring. Furthermore, I prefer that the width of the opening 28, measured circumferentially of the ring, should be so much greater than the thickness of the prongs 23 as to permit a certain amount of circumferential play of the connecting member 29 relatively to the set- .ting member 24. If desired, similar circumferential play might be permitted at the points where the connecting members 29 fit into the ends 2!" of the body member It will be noted that the two eyes 22" are in the same plane, which is perpendicular to the axis of the ring.

In he construction illustrated by Figs. 8, 9, and 10, the body member 20" and the'connecting members 29 are of the same construction as in Figs. 6 and ;7. The settingmember is of a construction somewhat different from the one shown .in Figs. 1 to '7. Fig. 10 shows the blank from which I form the setting member of Figs. 8 and 9. This member has an apertured rectangular portion 24a with projections or tabs 25a extending -outwardly and adpated to be bent upwardly and inwardly to form two opposite prongs, corresponding in function to the prongs 25 of Figs. 1 to 7. The other two prongs are formed from a central strip extending lengthwise of the rectangular portion 24a and slit or cut at its middle, as indicated at 30. This forms two strips or tabs 23a. which extend from the inner edge of the apertured 'portion 240, and after being bent up constitute fasteningprongs 23a to hold the jewel or other ornamental object 26. One of the transverse members of each connecting member or link 29 is hooked into the adjacent prong 23a, in the same'manner as described in connection with Figs. 6 and '7. The other transverse member of the connecting member 29 is passed through the j openings 22" at the ends 2| of the body member 20", in the same manner as in Figs.- 6 and '7,

The construction shown in Fig. 11 differs from this respect that the ends 2 la of the body member 20 are bent outwardly (instead of inwardly) to form the openings or eyes 22a.

In Fig. 12 I have shown a body member 201) formed by a double flexible cord which may be bent into the shape of a split ring as illustrated, with loops or eyes 221) corresponding to the openings 22 of Fig. 5. The two runs of the cord are held together by metal clamps 31. The body member 20b might be formed of a single piece of cord the ends of which would be fastened in one of the clamps 3 I, preferably the middle clamp. Instead of this, the member 20?) might be made in two pieces, with their four ends fastened in the central clamp 3|. The body member shown in Fig. 12 may be used as a substitute for the body member of Fig. 5, or of Fig. 11, or of any of the other embodiments of my invention described above.

Theforms of my invention described so far have an annular body member with spaced ends connected directly or indirectly with the setting member.

vmaybe, forinstance, a link of a necklace or chain,.or part of a cord of the character shown .in 'Fig. :12, or a'loop forming part of an ear ring, .etc. At 3| I haverindicated a metal clamp for fastening the two runs or strands of this body member, so that the end He will form an eye or openinglzcto receive one, of the prongs '23 of the setting member :24, which is shown as of substantially .the same character as in Figs. 1

to 5. As; in the forms. of my invention described above, this prong 23 has the double function of holding the jewel or other ornament 26' and of connecting the body member 200 with the set- 11ting"member 24.-In somecases, one or more. additional setting members may be connected with the first. Thus Fig..13 shows a second setting member 24cconnected with the first by :means of a linkor connecting member 29 of *the same characteras the members 29 of Figs.

For the, sake of clearer illustration, the jewel or other ornamental object has been omitted at various places in the drawing, but it will 'be understood that wherever I have shown a setting member with prongs, such prongs are intended to hold an ornamental object.

I'hayestatedwith respect to some forms of my invention, that the connection of the setting member with the body member (whether direct or indirect) may be rigid instead of loose; this remark will apply to all the embodiments illustrated. Generally, however, the loose connection will be preferred.

Various modifications may be made without 'departing from' the nature of my invention as defined in the appended claims.

Iclaim: 1 An article of the character described, comprisinga setting member having a plurality of. holding prongsextending on thesame side of saidmembenan ornamental object set between said -prongs andheld by them, and a body memberi having spaced ends connectedwith two oppothelone illustrated by Figs. 8, 9, and -l0-only in site holding prongs of said I setting member.

2. An article of the character described, comprising a setting member having a plurality of prongs, an ornamental object held by said prongs, and a body member having spaced ends connected with two opposite holding prongs of said setting member.

3. An article of the character described, comprising an annular body member the ends of which are spaced from each other, a setting member located between said spaced ends and provided with a plurality of prongs two of which align circumferentially of the body member and are connected with said ends of the body member, and an ornamental object held by said prongs.

4. An article of the character described, comprising an annular body member the ends of which are spaced from each other, a setting member located between said spaced ends and provided with a plurality of prongs two of which align circumferentially of the body member and are connected loosely with said ends of the body member to permit circumferential play and an ornamental object held by said prongs.

5. An article of the character described, comprising an annular body member the ends of which are spaced from each other, a. setting member located betwen said spaced ends and provided with a plurality of prongs, an ornamental object held by said prongs, and connecting members extending circumferentially of the body member and interposed between the respective ends of the body member and prongs located at opposite ends of the setting member.

6. An article of the character described, comprising an annular body member the ends of which are spaced from each other, a setting member located between said spaced ends and provided with a plurality of prongs some of which extend from the outer edge of the setting member and others from the inner edge thereof, two of said prongs being connected with said ends of the body member, and an ornamental object held by said prongs.

7. An article of the character described, comprising a setting member having a plurality of holding prongs, an ornamental object held by said prongs, and elements connected with two opposite holding prongs of said setting member.

8. An article of the character described, comprising a setting member having longitudinally aligning holding prongs at opposite ends and lateral holding prongs, an ornamental object held by said prongs, and elements connected with said longitudinally aligning opposite prongs of the setting member.

JOSEF PEJCHAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2605032 *Nov 25, 1949Jul 29, 1952Hunt David LPin cushion
US2763140 *Dec 8, 1954Sep 18, 1956Uncas Mfg CompanyFinger ring with setting mounted on slots in ring shank
US4781038 *May 26, 1987Nov 1, 1988Hab Tool, Inc.Linkable gem setting
US4972685 *Jun 7, 1989Nov 27, 1990D. Swarovski & Co.Mount for gems
US4974429 *May 25, 1989Dec 4, 1990Ferrara Carl JCombined bracelet and pendant
US5671613 *Oct 10, 1995Sep 30, 1997Hoover & Strong, IncorporatedGem setting having notched prongs
US7096690 *Jun 19, 2003Aug 29, 2006Tommy J JamesBracelet and pendant
US7228605 *Feb 28, 2003Jun 12, 2007Keystone Findings, Inc.Method of forming a gem setting
US7730743Mar 30, 2007Jun 8, 2010Hoover & Strong, Inc.Gem setting having grooved channel walls and methods of setting gems
US8701438 *Jul 5, 2011Apr 22, 2014William S. KovelReconfigurable bracelet system
EP0346698A1 *Jun 1, 1989Dec 20, 1989D. Swarovski & Co.Setting for ornamental stones
Classifications
U.S. Classification63/27, D11/36, 63/26, 63/3, 63/15
International ClassificationA44C17/00, A44C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationA44C17/02
European ClassificationA44C17/02