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Publication numberUS20040006774 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/453,385
Publication dateJan 8, 2004
Filing dateJun 3, 2003
Priority dateMar 8, 1999
Also published asUS6578203, US8239910, US8732781, US20080287059, US20120284754, US20140218536
Publication number10453385, 453385, US 2004/0006774 A1, US 2004/006774 A1, US 20040006774 A1, US 20040006774A1, US 2004006774 A1, US 2004006774A1, US-A1-20040006774, US-A1-2004006774, US2004/0006774A1, US2004/006774A1, US20040006774 A1, US20040006774A1, US2004006774 A1, US2004006774A1
InventorsTazwell Anderson, Mark Wood
Original AssigneeAnderson Tazwell L., Wood Mark A.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Video/audio system and method enabling a user to select different views and sounds associated with an event
US 20040006774 A1
Abstract
A video/audio system includes an interface device that receives a plurality of audio and video signals from a plurality of sources. The interface device combines these signals into various combinations and transmits the combinations to a receiver. The receiver is configured to interface one of the combinations of signals with a user. In this regard, the receiver allows the user to select one of the combinations, and in response, the receiver separates the video signal(s) of the selected combination from the audio signal(s) of the selected combination. Then, the receiver renders the video signal(s) via a display device and produces a sound defined by the audio signal(s) via a speaker. Accordingly, the user is able to control which set of audio and video signals are interfaced with the user.
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Claims(22)
Now, therefore, the following is claimed:
1. A system, comprising:
a plurality of audio combiners, each of said audio combiners configured to receive audio signals and to combine said audio signals into a combined signal;
a plurality of signal modulators, each of said signal modulators configured to receive a video signal and said combined signal from one of said audio combiners and to combine and modulate said received video signal and combined signal into a modulated signal; and
a signal combiner configured to receive modulated signals from said signal modulators and to combine said modulated signals into a multiplexed signal, said signal combiner further configured to transmit said multiplexed signal.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein at least one of said audio signals is combined by each of said audio combiners.
3. The system of claim 1, further comprising:
a plurality of receivers, each of said receivers configured to receive said multiplexed signal, to demultiplex said multiplex signal, to receive inputs from a user, to select at least one of said video signals and one of said combined signals based on said inputs, to render said one video signal, and to produce sounds based on said one audio signal.
4. The system of claim 3, wherein said each receiver includes a head mounted display to render said one video signal.
5. The system of claim 3, further comprising:
a signal separator configured to receive a combined signal, to separate a first audio signal from said combined signal, to separate a first video signal from said combined signal, to transmit said first audio signal to one of said audio combiners, and to transmit said first video signal to one of said signal modulators.
6. A method, comprising the steps of:
receiving a plurality of audio signals;
receiving a plurality of video signals;
combining said audio and video signals to form a plurality of combined signals, said combined signals defining different combinations of said video and audio signals;
combining said combined signals into a single multiplexed signal;
transmitting said multiplexed signal;
receiving said multiplexed signal;
receiving inputs from a user;
demultiplexing said multiplexed signal to recover said combined signals;
selecting one of said recovered combined signals based on said inputs from said user;
rendering at least one video signal included in said one recovered combined signal based on said selecting step; and
producing sound defined by at least one audio signal included in said one recovered combined signal based on said selecting step.
7. The method of claim 6, further comprising the step of performing said rendering step via a head mounted display.
8. The method of claim 6, wherein at least one of said audio signals is transmitted from an ultra high frequency (UHF) radio.
9. The method of claim 6, wherein said plurality of audio signals includes a first audio signal defining a sound and a second audio signal defining said sound and wherein said first audio signal is included within one of said combined signals and said second audio signal is included in another one of said combined signals.
10. The method of claim 6, wherein said plurality of video signals includes a first video signal defining an image and a second video signal defining said image and wherein said first video signal is included within one of said combined signals and said second video signal is included in another one of said combined signals.
11. A method of doing business, said method comprising the steps of:
providing receivers to users attending an event at a stadium;
receiving a plurality of audio signals associated with said event;
receiving a plurality of video signals associated with said event;
combining said audio and video signals to form a plurality of combined signals, said combined signals defining different combinations of said video and audio signals;
transmitting said combined signals to said receivers; and
retrieving said receivers from said users.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein each of said combined signals includes at least one of said audio signals and at least one of said video signals.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein said plurality of audio signals includes a first audio signal defining a sound and a second audio signal defining said sound and wherein said first audio signal is included within one of said combined signals and said second audio signal is included in another one of said combined signals.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein said plurality of video signals includes a first video signal defining an image and a second video signal defining said image and wherein said first video signal is included within one of said combined signals and said second video signal is included in another one of said combined signals.
15. The method of claim 11, wherein one of said audio signals is transmitted from a radio station.
16. The method of claim 11, wherein one of said audio signals is transmitted from a ultra high frequency (UHF) radio located at said event.
17. The method of claim 11, wherein said event is a sporting event.
18. The method of claim 11, wherein said event is an auto race.
19. The method of claim 11, further comprising the step of requesting payment from said users.
20. The method of claim 11, wherein each of said receivers includes a head mounted display for rendering said video signals.
21. The method of claim 11, further comprising the steps of:
receiving said combined signals at one of said receivers;
receiving inputs from one of said users at said one receiver;
selecting one of said combined signals based on said inputs;
rendering at least one of said video signals defined by said one combined signal to said user; and
generating sound based on at least one of said audio signals defined by said one combined signal.
22. The method of claim 21, further comprising the steps of:
combining said combined signals into a single multiplexed signal; and
demultiplexing said multiplexed signal after receiving said multiplexed at said one receiver,
wherein said transmitting step includes the step of transmitting said multiplexed signal and said receiving said combined signals step includes the step of receiving said multiplexed signal.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This document claims priority to and the benefit of the filing date of copending provisional application entitled “Audio/Video Signal Distribution System for Head Mounted Displays,” assigned serial No. 60/123,341, and filed Mar. 8, 1999, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] The present invention generally relates to video and audio signal processing techniques and, in particular, to a system and method for receiving video and audio signals from a plurality of sources and for providing a user with multiple combinations of these signals to select from.

[0004] 2. Related Art

[0005] Audio and video signals are generated from a plurality of sources during many events. For example, at an auto race, television crews usually position cameras at various locations within view of a race track. These cameras generate video signals defining views of the race track from various perspectives. In addition, microphones positioned at various locations generate audio signals defining different sounds at the auto race. For example, microphones may be located close to the race track to receive sounds produced by the vehicles participating in the race, and microphones may be located close to television commentators to receive the comments of the commentators as they observe and comment on the race.

[0006] One of the video signals and one or more of the audio signals are usually selected and combined together at a television station to form a combined video/audio signal. This signal is then modulated and transmitted so that users having a television can receive the combined signal via the television. The television demodulates the combined signal and displays an image defined by the video signal on a display screen and reproduces the sounds defined by the audio signals via speakers. Therefore, the sights and sounds of the race can be viewed and heard via the television.

[0007] In addition, one or more of the audio signals, such as audio signals defining the comments of radio commentators, are usually selected and modulated at a radio station to form a radio signal. This radio signal is then transmitted as a wireless signal so that users having radios can receive the signal via a radio. The radio demodulates the signal and reproduces the sounds defined by the radio signal via speakers.

[0008] However, users viewing and/or hearing the sights and sounds of the race via televisions and/or radios are not usually given the opportunity to select which video and/or audio signals are modulated and transmitted to the television and/or radio. Therefore, the user is only able to receive the signals modulated and transmitted to the television and/or radio, even though the user may prefer to receive the other audio and/or video signals that are generated at the auto race.

[0009] Spectators who actually attend the auto race are usually given more options to view and/or hear the sights and/or sounds of the race from different perspectives. In this regard, a plurality of monitors are usually located at a particular location in the stadium. As used herein, “stadium” shall be defined to mean any non-movable structure having a large number (i.e., thousands) of seats, wherein an event occurs at (i.e., within a close proximity) of the seats such that spectators sitting in the seats can view the event. An “event” is any occurrence viewed by a spectator.

[0010] Each monitor within the stadium receives one of the aforementioned video signals and displays an image defined by the received video signal. Therefore, a spectator can view the monitor displaying the image that has a perspective desirable to the spectator. However, the monitor having the desired perspective is often not located in a convenient location for the spectator. In this regard, the spectator usually must leave his seat (or other location) in the stadium and go to a location where the spectator, along with other spectators, can view the monitor displaying the desired perspective.

[0011] Thus a heretofore unaddressed need exists in the industry for providing a system and method that enables a spectator to conveniently view an event from different perspectives.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0012] The present invention overcomes the inadequacies and deficiencies of the prior art as discussed hereinbefore. Generally, the present invention provides a video/audio system and method for receiving video and audio signals from a plurality of sources and for providing a user with multiple combinations of these signals to select from.

[0013] The present invention include an interface device that receives a plurality of audio and video signals from a plurality of sources. The interface device combines these signals into various combinations and transmits the combinations to a receiver. The receiver is configured to interface one of the combinations of signals with a user. In this regard, the receiver allows the user to select one of the combinations, and in response, the receiver separates the video signal(s) of the selected combination from the audio signal(s) of the selected combination. Then, the receiver renders the video signal(s) via a display device and produces a sound defined by the audio signal(s) via a speaker. Accordingly, the user is able to control which set of audio and video signals are interfaced with the user.

[0014] Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to one skilled in the art upon examination of the following detailed description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. It is intended that all such features and advantages be included herein within the scope of the present invention and protected by the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] The invention can be better understood with reference to the following drawings. The elements of the drawings are not necessarily to scale relative to each other, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the invention. Furthermore, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

[0016]FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating a video/audio system in accordance with the present invention.

[0017]FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating a detailed view of an interface device depicted in FIG. 1.

[0018]FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating a detailed view of a receiver depicted in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0019] The preferred embodiment of the present invention will be described hereafter in the context of auto racing applications. However, the scope of the present invention should not be so limited, and it should be apparent to one skilled in the art that the principles of the present invention may be employed in the context of other applications, particularly in the context of other sporting events (e.g., football games, basketball, games, baseball games, hockey matches, etc.).

[0020]FIG. 1 depicts a video/audio system 20 implementing the principles of the present invention. At least one video signal 22 and at least one audio signal 25 are received by an interface device 28. Each of the received video signals 22 defines a view of the race from a different perspective. For example, the video signals 22 may be generated by different video cameras located at different locations around the stadium, including inside at least some of the vehicles participating in the race.

[0021] Furthermore, each of the audio signals 25 defines different sounds associated with the race. For example, at least one of the audio signals 25 may be generated from a microphone located close to the track or in one of the vehicles such that the audio signal 25 defines noise from the vehicles participating in the race. Alternatively, at least one of the audio signals 25 may define the comments of television commentators, and at least one of the audio signals 25 may define the comments of radio commentators. Furthermore, at least one of the audio signals 25 may define the comments between one of the drivers participating in the race and the driver's pit crew.

[0022] Some of the video and audio signals 22 and 25 can be unmodulated when transmitted to the interface device 28 and, therefore, do not need to be demodulated by the system 20. However, some of the video and audio signals 22 and 25 may need to be demodulated by the system 20. For example, at least one of the audio signals 25 defining the comments of the radio commentators may be modulated as a radio signal for transmission to radios located at or away from the stadium, and at least one of the video signals 25 may be modulated as a television signal for transmission to televisions located at or away from the stadium. In addition, the comments between a driver and the driver's pit crew are usually transmitted via ultra high frequency (UHF) radio waves, which are known to be modulated signals. Therefore, as shown by FIG. 1, the system 20 preferably includes demodulators 32 configured to receive and demodulate the video and/or audio signals 22 and 25.

[0023] It is possible for some of the video and audio signals 22 and 25 to be received from a combined signal 35, which is comprised of at least one video signal 22 combined with at least one audio signal 25. For example, the combined signal 35 may be a television signal modulated for transmission to televisions located at or away from the track stadium. To facilitate the combination of different audio signals 25 with the video signal(s) 22 defined by the combined signal 35, a separator 37 preferably separates the combined signal 35 into its respective video signal 22 and audio signal 25, as shown by FIG. 1.

[0024] Various configurations of the separator 37 may exist without departing from the principles of the present invention. FIG. 1 depicts a possible implementation of the separator 37. In this regard, the separator 37 includes an audio signal filter 41 designed to filter out any audio signals 25 from the combined signal 35 and to transmit the resulting video signal(s) 22 to interface device 28. Furthermore, the separator 37 also includes a video signal filter 43 designed to filter out any video signals 22 from the combined signal 35 and to transmit the resulting audio signal(s) 25 to interface device 28. If more than one video signal 22 or more than one audio signal 25 is included in the combined signal 35, then the separator 37 may include additional filters (not shown) to separate the multiple video and/or audio signals 22 and 25 into individual signals before transmitting the signals 22 and 25 to the interface device 28.

[0025]FIG. 2 depicts a more detailed view of the interface device 28. The interface device 28 includes audio combiners 52 configured to receive audio signals 25 and to combine the received audio signals 25 into a single combined audio signal 55. As shown by FIG. 2, each audio combiner 52 preferably receives a different combination of audio signals 25, although it is possible for any one of the combined signals 55 to include the same combination of audio signals 25 as any other combined signal 55. Note that when an audio combiner 52 receives only one audio signal 25, the combined signal 55 output by the combiner 52 matches the one signal 25 received by the combiner 52.

[0026] As an example, one of the combined signals 55 may include an audio signal 25 defining comments between a driver and the driver's pit crew and also an audio signal 25 defining sounds (i.e., vehicular noises) received by a microphone located in the driver's vehicle. Another of the combined signals 55 may include the aforementioned audio signals 25 as well as an audio signal 25 defining a radio commentator's comments. Another combined signal 55 may only include an audio signal 25 defining a television commentator's comments. Accordingly, the combined signals 55 preferably define different combinations of sounds. It should be noted that combinations of audio signals 25 other than those described hereinabove are possible.

[0027] As shown by FIG. 2, each combined signal 55 is transmitted to a respective signal modulator 61. Each signal modulator 61 is also configured to receive a respective one of the video signals 25 received by the interface device 28. Each signal modulator 61 is configured to combine the received combined signal 55 and video signal 25 and to modulate the received signals 55 and 25 on a unique frequency range. The signal modulator 61 is then designed to transmit the modulated signal 64, which comprises the combined signal 55 and the video signal 25 received by the signal modulator 61, to a combiner 67. The combiner 67 is configured to combine each of the modulated signals 64 transmitted from each of the signal modulators 61 into a single combined (i.e., multiplexed) signal 71. This combined signal 71 is then transmitted to a plurality of receivers 75.

[0028] Various techniques exist for transmitting combined signal 71 to receivers 75. For example, a coaxial cable may be used to transmit the combined signal 71 to each of the receivers 75. In another example, the system 20 may include a wireless transmitter (not shown) that transmits the combined signal 71 to the receivers 75. Any technique for transmitting the combined signal 71 to the receivers 75 should be suitable for implementing the present invention.

[0029] A more detailed view of receiver 75 is shown by FIG. 3. Receiver 75 preferably includes a demodulator 82. The demodulator 82 is configured to demodulate the combined signal 71 and to separate (i.e., demultiplex) the combined signal 71 into signals 84 based on frequency, such that each signal 84 respectively corresponds with one of the modulated signals 64. In this regard, the demodulator 82 recovers the individual signals 64 as signals 84, and each signal 84 is, therefore, defined by the same video and audio signals 22 and 25 that define its corresponding modulated signal 64. Therefore, like modulated signals 64, each signal 84 is preferably comprised of a unique combination of video and audio signals 22 and 25.

[0030] Signals 84 are transmitted from demodulator 82 to a multiplexer 88, which also receives control signals 92 from a user interface 94. The user interface 94 preferably includes buttons or other types of switches that enable a spectator to select one of the signals 84 via control signals 92. In this regard, the multiplexer 88, through techniques well known in the art, selects one of the signals 84 based on control signals 92 and outputs the selected signal 84 as output signal 97, as shown by FIG. 3.

[0031] The receiver 75 includes an audio signal filter 41 configured to filter the audio signal(s) 25 out of signal 97. Therefore, only the video signal(s) 22 within signal 97 are transmitted to a display screen 101, which is configured to render the received video signal(s) 22 (i.e., display an image defined by the received video signal(s) 22) to the spectator.

[0032] The receiver 75 also includes a video signal filter 43 configured to filter the video signal(s) 22 out of signal 97. Therefore, only the audio signal(s) 25 within signal 97 are transmitted to a speaker 103, which is configured to produce sounds defined by the received audio signal(s) 25, through techniques well known in the art.

[0033] In the preferred embodiment, the display screen 101 and speaker 103 are included within a head mounted display (HMD), which is a well known device of the prior art. An example of a head mounted display suitable for implementing the, present invention is fully described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,844,656, entitled “Head Mounted Display with Adjustment Components” and filed on Nov. 7, 1996, by Ronzani et al., which is incorporated herein by reference. Furthermore, when the combined signal 71 is transmitted via a coaxial cable, the receiver 75 may be located at a spectator's stadium seat or other convenient location. When the combined signal 71 is transmitted via a wireless transmitter, the receiver 75 is portable, and a spectator may carry the receiver 75 with him and choose where he would like to view the images and hear the sounds produced by the receiver 75.

[0034] Accordingly, the spectator may remain in his seat (or other convenient location) and control, by manipulating buttons or other types of switches in the user interface 94, which combination of video and audio signals 22 and 25 are respectively transmitted to display screen 101 and speaker 103. Therefore, the system 20 gives the spectator more flexibility in how the spectator views the race and, as a result, makes the race a more enjoyable experience.

OPERATION

[0035] The preferred use and operation of the video/audio system 20 and associated methodology are described hereafter.

[0036] Assume for illustrative purposes only that a spectator would like to attend an auto race and would like to have access to an in-car view from a camera within his favorite driver's car. In addition, the spectator would also like to continuously hear the dialogue between the aforementioned driver and the driver's pit crew, as well as the comments provided by his favorite radio commentator. It should be apparent that other views and/or sounds may be desirable in other examples.

[0037] In the past, the spectator would have to attend the race and acquire (as well as tune) a radio to receive the commentator's comments and a radio to receive the radio signals transmitted between the driver and the driver's pit crew. Then, the spectator would have to locate a monitor at the stadium displaying the in-car view that he desires to see. The spectator would then remain within sight of the monitor and listen to the two radios. If the monitor is not located in a desirable location for viewing the race, the spectator would have to choose between viewing the monitor and viewing the race at a desirable location. Furthermore, the handling of multiple radios is generally cumbersome and distracting.

[0038] However, in accordance with the present invention, the user attends the race and is provided a receiver 75 for his individual use. In the preferred embodiment, the receiver 75 is located at the spectator's seat within the stadium. However, the receiver 75 may be located at other convenient locations, and when the combined signal 71 is transmitted via a wireless transmitter, the spectator may carry the receiver 75 around with him to any desirable location in or around the stadium.

[0039] The spectator then manipulates buttons or other types of switches at user interface 94 to control which signal 84 is output by multiplexer 88 and, therefore, which signals 22 and 25 are respectively received by display 101 and speaker 103. Accordingly, the spectator may use the receiver 75 to see the desired view of the race (i.e., the in-car view) and to hear the desired sounds of the race (i.e., the sounds received by the microphone in his favorite driver's car, the dialogue between the driver and the driver's pit crew, and the comments from the radio commentator).

[0040] In this regard, the interface device 28 preferably receives at least a video signal 22 defining the in-car view of his favorite driver and a plurality of audio signals 25 defining the sounds received by the microphone in his favorite driver's car, the dialogue between the driver and the driver's pit crew, and the comments from the radio commentator. At least one of the audio combiners 52 combines these audio signals 25 into a combined signal 55. One of the signal modulators 61 receives this combined signal 55 and the video signal 22 defining the desired in-car view. This video signal 22 is modulated and combined with the foregoing combined signal 55 by one of the signal modulators 61 to create a modulated signal 64. This modulated signal 64 is combined with other modulated signals 64 and transmitted to the spectator's receiver 75 via combiner 67.

[0041] The demodulator 82 in the spectator's receiver 75 demodulates and separates the received signal 71 into separate signals 84. Based on the control signals 92 received from user interface 94, the multiplexer 88 allows only the signal 84 defined by the aforementioned video and audio signals 22 and 25 to pass. Therefore, these video and audio signals 22 and 25 are respectively transmitted to the display 101 and speaker 103 and the spectator may enjoy the view and sounds that he selected.

[0042] It should be noted that it is not necessary for the spectator to keep the receiver 75 within the stadium. In this regard, the signal 71 may be transmitted via satellites and/or communication networks to various locations around the world, and the spectator may select the view and sounds he prefers the most from just about any location capable of receiving signal 71.

[0043] It should also be noted that the receiver 75 may be retrieved from the spectator after the spectator is finished viewing the event so that the receiver can be provided to another spectator for another event at the stadium. Each spectator is preferably charged a usage fee for spectator's use of the receiver 75.

[0044] Furthermore, the present invention has been described herein in the context of auto racing. However, the system 20 may be useful in other applications as well. The system 20 would be useful in any application where it is desirable for the user to control the types of views and sounds of an event that are presented to the user. For example, the present invention could be particularly useful in any type of sporting event or other type of event attended by a large number of people.

[0045] It should be emphasized that the above-described embodiments of the present invention, particularly, any “preferred” embodiments, are merely possible examples of implementations, merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the invention. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described embodiment(s) of the invention without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the invention. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of the present invention and protected by the claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7657920Jul 21, 2006Feb 2, 2010Marc ArseneauSystem and methods for enhancing the experience of spectators attending a live sporting event, with gaming capability
US8198219Feb 16, 2009Jun 12, 2012Basf SeMethod for producing solid materials on the basis of synthetic polymers and/or biopolymers and use thereof
US9059809Feb 20, 2012Jun 16, 2015Steven M. KoehlerSystem and method for listening to teams in a race event
US9065984Mar 7, 2013Jun 23, 2015Fanvision Entertainment LlcSystem and methods for enhancing the experience of spectators attending a live sporting event
WO2006020376A2 *Jul 26, 2005Feb 23, 2006Radioactive Vision IncMethod of transmitting audio and video signals overs radio and television channels
WO2009103681A1Feb 16, 2009Aug 27, 2009Basf SeMethod for producing solid materials on the basis of synthetic polymers and/or biopolymers and use thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification725/147, 725/59, 725/135, 348/723
International ClassificationH04S1/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04N21/2368, H04N21/4341, H04N21/41407, H04N21/6131, H04N21/482, H04N21/2365, H04N21/41415, H04N21/2383, H04N21/21805, H04N21/4347, H04N21/4382, H04S1/002, H04N7/0806, H04N5/45, H04N5/4403
European ClassificationH04S1/00A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 21, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: IMMERSION ENTERTAINMENT, LLC, GEORGIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ANDERSON, JR. TAZWELL L.;WOOD, MARK A.;REEL/FRAME:013895/0140;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030806 TO 20030808