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Publication numberUS20040009380 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/440,034
Publication dateJan 15, 2004
Filing dateMay 16, 2003
Priority dateMay 16, 2002
Also published asCA2486179A1, EP1512193A2, US7087327, US20040126635, US20060172162, WO2003098730A2, WO2003098730A3, WO2003098730A8
Publication number10440034, 440034, US 2004/0009380 A1, US 2004/009380 A1, US 20040009380 A1, US 20040009380A1, US 2004009380 A1, US 2004009380A1, US-A1-20040009380, US-A1-2004009380, US2004/0009380A1, US2004/009380A1, US20040009380 A1, US20040009380A1, US2004009380 A1, US2004009380A1
InventorsMartin Pearson
Original AssigneeBallard Power Systems Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable array of fuel cell systems
US 20040009380 A1
Abstract
An array of fuel cell systems are electrically couplable in series and/or parallel combinations to provide a variety of output powers, output current and/or output voltages. The fuel cell systems are “hot swappable” and redundant fuel cell systems may automatically replace faulty fuel cell systems to maintain output power, current and/or voltage, with or without switching. The configuration of fuel cell systems may be automatic and may be based on desired power, current and/or voltage, and/or based on the operating parameters of the fuel cell systems and/or power supply system.
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Claims(41)
We/I claim:
1. A power supply system, comprising:
a power bus;
a first fuel cell system comprising a first fuel cell stack, a first electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the first fuel cell stack, a first series pass element electrically coupled in between the first fuel cell system and the first electrical power storage device, and a first regulating circuit controllingly coupled to the first series pass element;
a second fuel cell system comprising a second fuel cell stack, a second electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the second fuel cell stack, a second series pass element electrically coupled between the second fuel cell stack and the second electrical power storage device, and a second regulating circuit controlling coupled to the second series pass element;
a first switch selectively operable to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series in the power bus; and
a second switch selectively operable to electrically couple the second fuel cell system in series in the power bus.
2. The power supply system of claim 1 wherein the first switch is one of a contactor and a transistor.
3. The power supply system of claim 1, further comprising:
a third fuel cell system; and
a third switch selectively operable to electrically couple the third fuel cell system in series in the power bus.
4. The power supply system of claim 1, further comprising:
a third fuel cell system; and
a third switch selectively operable to electrically couple the third fuel cell system in the power bus in parallel with at least one of the first and the second fuel cell systems.
5. The power supply system of claim 1 wherein the first switch is selectively operable according to an operating condition of the first fuel cell system, and further comprising:
a first redundancy switch electrically coupled in series with the first switch and selectively operable therewith to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series to the power bus, the first redundancy switch being selectively operable according to an operating condition of at least the second fuel cell system.
6. The power supply system of claim 1 wherein the first switch is selectively operable according to an operating condition of the first fuel cell system, and further comprising:
a first redundancy switch electrically coupled in series with the first switch and selectively operable therewith to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series to the power bus, the first redundancy switch being selectively operable according to a voltage across the power bus.
7. The power supply system of claim 1 wherein the first switch is selectively operable according to an operating condition of the first fuel cell system, and further comprising:
a first redundancy switch electrically coupled in series with the first switch and selectively operable therewith to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series to the power bus, the first redundancy switch being selectively operable according to a desired output of the power supply system.
8. The power supply system of claim 1 wherein the first switch is selectively operable according to an operating condition of the first fuel cell system, and further comprising:
a first redundancy switch electrically coupled in series with the first switch and selectively operable therewith to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series to the power bus, the first redundancy switch being selectively operable according to at least one of a desired nominal power output of the power supply system, a desired nominal voltage output of the power supply system, and a desired nominal current output of the power supply system.
9. A power supply system, comprising:
a power bus;
a first fuel cell system comprising a first fuel cell stack, a first electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the first fuel cell stack, a first reactant supply system having a first control element operable to control a partial pressure of at least a first reactant to the first fuel cell stack;
a second fuel cell system comprising a second fuel cell stack, a second electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the second fuel cell stack, a second reactant supply system having a second control element operable to control a partial pressure of at least a first reactant to the second fuel cell stack;
a first switch selectively operable to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series in the power bus; and
a second switch selectively operable to electrically couple the second fuel cell system in series in the power bus.
10. A power supply system, comprising:
a power bus;
a plurality of fuel cell systems electrically couplable in series to the power bus, each of the fuel cell systems having a fuel cell stack and an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack;
a plurality of switches selectively operable to electrically decouple a respective one of the fuel cell systems from the power bus, each of the switches responsive to an operating condition of the respective one of the fuel cell systems; and
at least a first redundancy switch selectively operable to electrically couple a respective first one of the plurality of fuel cell systems to the power bus, the first redundancy switch responsive to an operating condition different from the operating condition of the respective first one of the plurality of fuel cells.
11. The power supply system of claim 10, further comprising:
an additional number of redundancy switches, each of the additional number of redundancy switches selectively operable to electrically couple a respective one of the fuel cell systems to the power bus in response to an operating condition different from the operating condition of the respective one of the fuel cells.
12. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is an operating condition of at least one of the fuel cell systems other than the respective first fuel cell system that the first redundancy switch is selectively operable to electrically couple to the power bus.
13. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is a voltage across an output of at least one of the fuel cell systems other than the respective first fuel cell system that the first redundancy switch is selectively operable to electrically couple to the power bus.
14. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein each of the fuel cell systems further comprise a number of sensors for determining a set of operating parameters of the respective fuel cell system and a processor configured to determine an operating condition of the respective fuel cell system based on the determined set of operating parameters, and wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is the operating condition determined by at least one of the processors.
15. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is at least one of a power output of the power bus, a voltage across the power bus and a current output of the power bus.
16. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is at least one of a desired nominal power output of the power supply system, a desired nominal voltage output of the power supply system, and a desired nominal current output of the power supply system.
17. The power supply system of claim 10, further comprising:
a controller communicatingly coupled to receive a set of operating parameters from each of the plurality of fuel cell systems, the controller configured to determine an operating condition of the fuel cell systems based on the received sets of operating parameters, and wherein the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to is the operating condition determined by the controller.
18. The power supply system of claim 10, further comprising:
a first diode electrically coupled in series in the power bus between the first and the second fuel cell systems.
19. The power supply system of claim 10 wherein the electrical power storage devices are at least one of a number of battery cells and a number of super-capacitors.
20. A power supply system, comprising:
a power bus;
at least two fuel cell systems; and
means for selectively electrically coupling the at least two fuel cell systems in series in the power bus, wherein each of the fuel cell systems comprises a fuel cell stack and an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack, the electrical power storage device comprising at least one of a battery and an ultracapacitor electrically coupled to a charging current limiter.
21. The power supply system of claim 20 wherein each of the fuel cell systems comprises a fuel cell stack and an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack, and means for controlling a flow of current from the fuel cell stack to the electrical power storage device and the power bus.
22. The power supply system of claim 20 wherein each of the fuel cell systems comprises a fuel cell stack and an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack, a series pass element electrically coupled between the fuel cell stack and the electrical power storage device, and regulating means for regulating a series pass element electrically coupled between the fuel cell stack and the electrical power storage device.
23. The power supply system of claim 20 wherein the means for selectively electrically coupling the at least two fuel cell systems in series comprises a respective switch for each of the fuel cell systems, each of the switches responsive to an operating condition of at least one of the other fuel cell systems.
24. The power supply system of claim 20 wherein the means for selectively electrically coupling the at least two fuel cell systems in series comprises a respective first switch and second switch for each of the fuel cell systems, each of the first switches responsive to an operating condition of at least one of the other fuel cell systems and each of the respective second switches responsive to an operating condition of the respective fuel cell system.
25. The power supply system of claim 20 wherein the means for selectively electrically coupling the at least two fuel cell systems in series comprises a controller responsive to a request for at least one of a desired power output, a desired current output and a desired voltage output of the power supply system.
26. A method of operating a power supply system having at least a first and a second fuel cell system, the method comprising:
electrically coupling a first fuel cell system in series to a power bus at a first time;
determining an existence of a fault condition;
in response to the fault condition, at a second time automatically electrically coupling a second fuel cell system to the power bus in series; and
automatically electrically decoupling the first fuel cell system from the power bus.
27. The method of claim 26 wherein determining an existence of a fault condition includes determining an operating condition of the first fuel cell system.
28. The method of claim 26 wherein determining an existence of a fault condition includes determining at least one of an output power, output voltage and output current of the first fuel cell system.
29. The method of claim 26 wherein determining an existence of a fault condition includes monitoring at least one of a battery current, a battery voltage, and a stack current in the first fuel cell system.
30. The method of claim 26 wherein determining an existence of a fault condition includes monitoring at least one of an ambient hydrogen level, an ambient oxygen level, and a reactant flow in the first fuel cell system.
31. The method of claim 26, further comprising:
electrically coupling a third fuel cell system to the power bus in series with the first fuel cell system at a third time, the third time being before the second time.
32. The method of claim 26, further comprising:
electrically coupling a third fuel cell system to the power bus in parallel with the first fuel cell system at a third time, the third time being before the second time.
33. The method of claim 26 wherein electrically coupling a first fuel cell system in series to a power bus at a first time includes closing a first switch electrically coupled between the fuel cell and the power bus and wherein electrically decoupling the first fuel cell system from the power bus includes opening a redundancy switch electrically coupled between the fuel cell and the power bus.
34. A method of operating a power supply system including a plurality of fuel cell systems, a first number of the fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series to a power bus and a second number of the fuel cell systems electrically couplable in series to the power bus, comprising:
determining an existence of a fault condition in at least one of the first number of fuel cell systems; and
automatically electrically coupling at least one of the second number of fuel cell systems to the power bus in series at a second time in response to the determination of the existence of the fault condition to maintain an electrical output on the power bus of the power supply system.
35. The method of claim 34, further comprising:
automatically electrically decoupling the at least one of the first number of fuel cell systems having the fault condition from the power bus.
36. The method of claim 34, further comprising:
for each of the fuel cell systems electrically coupled to the power bus, automatically regulating a flow of current from a fuel cell stack with respect to an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel across the fuel cell stack by way of at least one of a respective series pass element and a respective regulating circuit and a reactant delivery system and a control element.
37. The method of claim 34, further comprising:
replacing the at least one of the fuel cell systems having the fault condition with a replacement fuel cell system.
38. The method of claim 34, further comprising:
replacing the at least one of the fuel cell systems having the fault condition with a replacement fuel cell system; and
electrically coupling the replacement fuel cell system in series to the power bus in response to the additional fault condition to maintain an electrical output on the power bus of the power supply system
39. The method of claim 34 wherein automatically electrically coupling at least one of the second number of fuel cell systems to the power bus in series at a second time in response to the determination of the existence of the fault condition to maintain an electrical output on the power bus of the power supply system includes activating a first transistor electrically coupled between the fuel cell and the power bus in proportion to a decrease associated with the fault condition in at least one of an output power, an output current, and an output voltage of the at least one of the first number of fuel cell systems.
40. A method of operating a power supply system having a plurality of fuel cell systems, at least a number of the fuel cell systems selectively couplable in series on a power bus, the method comprising:
determining an existence of a fault condition in at least one of the fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series on the power bus; and
automatically activating a linear control element electrically coupling a redundant one of the fuel cell systems in series to the power bus in response to the determined existence of the fault condition to maintain an electrical output on the power bus of the power supply system.
41. The method of claim 40, further comprising:
determining an existence of a fault condition in at least one of the fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series on the power bus; and
automatically activating a transistor electrically coupling a redundant one of the fuel cell systems in series to the power bus in response to the determined existence of the fault condition to maintain an electrical output on the power bus of the power supply system.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] This disclosure generally relates to fuel cell systems and electric power plants incorporating them, and more particularly to power plants including one or more arrays of fuel cell systems.

[0003] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0004] Electrochemical fuel cells convert fuel and oxidant to electricity. Solid polymer electrochemical fuel cells generally employ a membrane electrode assembly (“MEA”) which includes an ion exchange membrane or solid polymer electrolyte disposed between two electrodes typically comprising a layer of porous, electrically conductive sheet material, such as carbon fiber paper or carbon cloth. The MEA contains a layer of catalyst, typically in the form of finely comminuted platinum, at each membrane electrode interface to induce the desired electrochemical reaction. In operation, the electrodes are electrically coupled for conducting electrons between the electrodes through an external circuit. Typically, a number of MEAs are electrically coupled in series to form a fuel cell stack having a desired power output.

[0005] In typical fuel cells, the MEA is disposed between two electrically conductive fluid flow field plates or separator plates. Fluid flow field plates have flow passages to direct fuel and oxidant to the electrodes, namely the anode and the cathode, respectively. The fluid flow field plates act as current collectors, provide support for the electrodes, provide access channels for the fuel and oxidant, and provide channels for the removal of reaction products, such as water formed during fuel cell operation. The fuel cell system may use the reaction products in maintaining the reaction. For example, reaction water may be used for hydrating the ion exchange membrane and/or maintaining the temperature of the fuel cell stack.

[0006] The stack's capability to produce current flow is a direct function of the amount of available reactant. Increased reactant flow increases reactant availability. The stack voltage varies inversely with respect to the stack current in a non-linear mathematical relationship. The relationship between stack voltage and stack current at a given flow of reactant is typically represented as a polarization curve for the fuel cell stack. A set or family of polarization curves can represent the stack voltage-current relationship at a variety of reactant flow rates.

[0007] In most practical applications, it is desirable to maintain an approximately constant voltage output from the fuel cell stack. One approach is to employ a battery electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell system to provide additional current when the demand of the load exceeds the output of the fuel cell stack and to store current when the output of the fuel cell stack exceeds the demand of the load, as taught in commonly assigned pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/017,470 entitled “Method and Apparatus for Controlling Voltage From a Fuel Cell System” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.436); Ser. No. 10/017,462 entitled “Method and Apparatus for Multiple Mode Control of Voltage From a Fuel Cell System” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.442) and Ser. No. 10/017,461 entitled “Fuel Cell System Multiple Stage Voltage Control Method and Apparatus” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.446), all filed Dec. 14, 2001.

[0008] The many different practical applications for fuel cell based power supplies require a large variety of different power delivery capabilities. In most instances it is prohibitively costly and operationally inefficient to employ a power supply capable of providing more power than required by the application. It is also costly and inefficient to design, manufacture and maintain inventories of different power supplies capable of meeting the demand of each potential application (e.g., 1 kW, 2 kW, 5 kW, 10 kW, etc.). Further, it is desirable to increase the reliability of the power supply, without significantly increasing the cost. Thus, a less costly, less complex and/or more efficient approach to fuel cell based power supplies is desirable.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] In one aspect, a power supply system comprises a power bus, a first fuel cell system, a second fuel cell system, a first switch selectively operable to electrically couple the first fuel cell system in series in the power bus, and a second switch selectively operable to electrically couple the second fuel cell system in series in the power bus. The fuel cell system may comprise a fuel cell stack and/or an electrical power storage device such as a battery or super or ultracapacitor electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack, and a regulating device such as a series pass element and regulating circuit and/or a reactant control system and control element to control a partial pressure of a reactant flow to the fuel cell stack.

[0010] In another aspect, a power supply system comprises a power bus, a plurality of fuel cell systems electrically couplable in series to the power bus, each of the fuel cell systems having a fuel cell stack and an electrical power storage device electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack, a plurality of switches selectively operable to electrically decouple a respective one of the fuel cell systems from the power bus, each of the switches responsive to an operating condition of the respective one of the fuel cell systems, and at least a first redundancy switch selectively operable to electrically couple a respective one of the plurality of fuel cell systems to the power bus, the first redundancy switch responsive to an operating condition different from the operating condition of the respective one of the plurality of fuel cells. For example, the operating condition that the first redundancy switch is responsive to may be an operating condition of at least one of the fuel cell systems other than the respective fuel cell system that the first redundancy switch is selectively operable to electrically couple to the power bus.

[0011] In yet another aspect, a power supply system comprises at least two fuel cell systems, and means for selectively electrically coupling the at least two fuel cell systems in series.

[0012] In a further aspect, a method of operating a power supply system having at least a first and a second fuel cell system, comprises electrically coupling a first fuel cell system in series to a power bus at a first time, determining an existence of a fault condition, in response to the fault condition, automatically electrically coupling a second fuel cell system to the power bus in series at a second time, and automatically electrically decoupling the first fuel cell system from the power bus at approximately the second time.

[0013] In yet a further aspect, a method of operating a power supply system having a plurality of fuel cell systems, a first number of the fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series to a power bus and a second number of the fuel cell systems electrically couplable in series to the power bus, comprises determining an existence of a fault condition in at least one of the first number of fuel cell systems, and automatically electrically coupling at least one of the second number of fuel cell systems to the power bus in series at a second time in response to the fault condition to maintain an electrical output of the power bus of the power supply system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014] In the drawings, identical reference numbers identify similar elements or acts. The sizes and relative positions of elements in the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. For example, the shapes of various elements and angles are not drawn to scale, and some of these elements are arbitrarily enlarged and positioned to improve drawing legibility. Further, the particular shapes of the elements as drawn, are not intended to convey any information regarding the actual shape of the particular elements, and have been solely selected for ease of recognition in the drawings.

[0015]FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a hybrid fuel cell system powering a load, the hybrid fuel cell system having a fuel cell stack, a battery, a series pass element, a first stage including a regulating circuit for controlling current flow through the series pass element and a second stage including a controller employing a voltage difference across the series pass element to reduce the energy dissipated by the series pass element via control of reactant partial pressure , the fuel cell system for use with an illustrated general embodiment of the invention.

[0016]FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a power supply system powering a load, the power supply system including a number of individual hybrid fuel cells systems forming a one-dimensional array of fuel cell systems electrically couplable in series to provide a desired power at a desired voltage and a desired current to the load.

[0017]FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a power supply system including a number of fuel cell systems forming a two-dimensional array of fuel cell systems electrically couplable in a variety of series and parallel combinations.

[0018]FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating a number of the fuel cell systems of FIG. 3 electrically coupled in a series combination to provide a desired output power at a first output voltage and a first output current.

[0019]FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram-illustrating a number of the fuel cell systems of FIG. 3 electrically coupled in a parallel combination to provide the desired output power at a second output voltage and a second output current.

[0020]FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram illustrating a number of the fuel cell systems of FIG. 3 electrically coupled in a series and parallel combination to provide the desired output power at a third output voltage and a third output current.

[0021]FIG. 7 is a flow diagram of a method of operating the power supply system of FIGS. 2 and 3 according to one exemplary embodiment which comprises replacing a faulty fuel cell system with a redundant fuel cell system.

[0022]FIG. 8 is a flow diagram of an optional step for inclusion in the method of FIG. 7.

[0023]FIG. 9 is a flow diagram of an optional step for inclusion with the method of FIG. 7.

[0024]FIG. 10 is a flow diagram showing a method of operating the power supply system of FIGS. 2 and 3 according to an additional or alternative exemplary embodiment including electrically coupling a number of fuel cell systems in a determined series and/or parallel combination to produce at least one of a desired power, voltage and current output.

[0025]FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a hybrid fuel cell system powering a load, the fuel cell system having a fuel cell stack, a series pass element, a regulating circuit or controller for controlling current flow through the series pass element, and an ultracapacitor based circuit as an electrical power storage device that simulates a battery (ultracapacitor battery simulator).

[0026]FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram of an alternative ultracapacitor based circuit suitable for use in the fuel cell system of FIG. 11.

[0027]FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram of a further alternative ultracapacitor based circuit suitable for use in the fuel cell system of FIG. 11.

[0028]FIG. 14 is an electrical schematic diagram of an ultracapacitor based circuit comprising a string of ultracapacitors electrically coupled in series, a linear mode charging current limiter, and a bypass diode.

[0029]FIG. 15 is an electrical schematic diagram of the ultracapacitor based circuit of FIG. 14 where the charging current limiter further comprises a pair of Darlington coupled transistors to limit power loss.

[0030]FIG. 16 is an electrical schematic diagram of the ultracapacitor based circuit of FIG. 15 where the charging current limiter further comprises circuitry to cut off the charging current in the event of an over voltage condition.

[0031]FIG. 17 is an electrical schematic diagram of the ultracapacitor based circuit of FIG. 16 where the charging current limiter further comprises circuitry to cut off charging current when a desired voltage is obtained across the ultracapacitors.

[0032]FIG. 18 is a flow diagram of one illustrated method of operating a hybrid fuel cell system.

[0033]FIG. 19 is a schematic diagram of a power system comprising one or more rectifier arrays, fuel cell hybrid module arrays, ultracapacitor battery simulator arrays, flywheel battery simulator arrays and/or rechargeable batteries.

[0034]FIG. 20 is a schematic diagram of one illustrated embodiment of a fuel cell hybrid module array suitable for use with the power system of FIG. 19.

[0035]FIG. 21 is a schematic diagram of a power supply system including a number of fuel cell systems forming a two-dimensional array of fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series and parallel to provide at least N+1 redundancy.

[0036]FIG. 22 is a schematic diagram of a power supply system including a number of fuel cell systems forming a two-dimensional array of fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series and parallel to provide multiple voltage levels with at least N+1 redundancy.

[0037]FIG. 23 is a schematic diagram of a power supply system including a number of fuel cell systems forming a two-dimensional array of fuel cell systems electrically coupled in series and parallel to provide multiple bipolar voltage levels With at least N+1 redundancy.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0038] In the following description, certain specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the various embodiments of the invention. However, one skilled in the art will understand that the invention may be practiced without these details. In other instances, well-known structures associated with fuel cells, fuel cell stacks, electrical power storage devices such as batteries, flywheels, and super- or ultracapacitors, reactant delivery systems, temperature control systems and fuel cell systems have not been shown or described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring descriptions of the embodiments of the invention. The terms supercapacitor and ultracapacitor are used interchangeably throughout the description and claims.

[0039] Unless the context requires otherwise, throughout the specification and claims which follow, the word “comprise” and variations thereof, such as, “comprises” and “comprising” are to be construed in an open, inclusive sense, that is as “including, but not limited to.”

[0040] Fuel Cell System Overview

[0041]FIG. 1 shows a hybrid fuel cell system 10 providing power to a load 12 for use in an illustrated embodiment of the invention. The load 12 typically constitutes the device to be powered by the hybrid fuel cell system 10, such as a vehicle, appliance, computer and/or associated peripherals. While the hybrid fuel cell system 10 is not typically considered part of the load 12, portions of the hybrid fuel cell system 10 such as the control electronics may constitute a portion or all of the load 12 in some possible embodiments.

[0042] The fuel cell system 10 comprises a fuel cell stack 14 composed of a number of individual fuel cells electrically coupled in series. The fuel cell stack 14 receives reactants, represented by arrow 9, such as hydrogen and air via a reactant supply system 16. The reactant supply system 16 may comprise one or more reactant supply reservoirs or sources 11, a reformer (not shown), and/or one or more control elements such as one or more compressors, pumps and/or valves 18 or other reactant regulating elements. Operation of the fuel cell stack 14 produces reactant product, represented by arrow 20, typically including water. The fuel cell system 10 may reuse some or all of the reactant products 20. For example, as represented by arrow 22, some or all of the water may be returned to the fuel cell stack 14 to humidify the hydrogen and air at the correct temperature and/or to hydrate the ion exchange membranes (not shown) or to control the temperature of the fuel cell stack 14.

[0043] The fuel cell stack 14 can be modeled as an ideal battery having a voltage equivalent to an open circuit voltage and a series resistance RS. The value of the series resistance RS is principally a function of stack current Is, the availability of reactants, and time. The series resistance RS varies in accordance with the polarization curves for the particular fuel cell stack 14. The series resistance RS can be adjusted by controlling the availability of reactants 9 to drop a desired voltage for any given current, thus allowing an approximately uniform stack voltage VS across a range of stack currents IS. The relationship between the reactant flow and the series resistance RSis illustrated in FIG. 1 by the broken line arrow 13. However, simply decreasing the overall reactant and reaction pressures within the fuel cell system 10 may interfere with the overall system operation, for example interfering with the hydration of the ion exchange membrane and/or temperature control of the fuel cell stack. To avoid these undesirable results, the fuel cell system 10 may adjust the reactant partial pressure, as explained in more detail below.

[0044] The fuel cell stack 14 produces a stack voltage VS across a high voltage bus formed by the positive and negative voltage rails 19 a, 19 b. The stack current IS flows to the load 12 from the fuel cell stack 14 via the high voltage bus. As used herein, “high voltage” refers to the voltage produced by conventional fuel cell stacks 14 to power loads 12, and is used to distinguish between other voltages employed by fuel cell system 10 for control and/or communications (e.g., 5V). Thus, high voltage and is not necessarily “high” with respect to other electrical systems.

[0045] The hybrid fuel cell system 10 comprises an electrical power storage device such as a supercapacitor and/or a battery 24 electrically coupled in parallel with the fuel cell stack 14 across the rails 19 a, 19 b of the high voltage bus to power the load 12. The open circuit voltage of the battery 24 is selected to be similar to the full load voltage of the fuel cell stack 14. An internal resistance RB of the battery 24 is selected to be much lower than the internal resistance of the fuel cell stack 14. Thus, the battery 24 acts as a buffer, absorbing excess current when the fuel cell stack 14 produces more current than the load 12 requires, and providing current to the load 12 when the fuel cell stack 14 produces less current than the load 12 requires. The voltage across the high voltage bus 19 a, 19 b will be the open circuit voltage of the battery 24 minus the battery discharging current multiplied by the value of the internal resistance RB of the battery 24. The smaller the internal resistance RB of the battery 24, the smaller the variations in bus voltage.

[0046] An optional reverse current blocking diode D1 can be electrically coupled between the fuel cell stack 14 and the battery 24 to prevent current from flowing from the battery 24 to the fuel cell stack 14. A drawback of the reverse current blocking diode D1 is the associated diode voltage drop. The fuel cell system 10 may also comprises other diodes, as well as fuses or other surge protection elements to prevent shorting and/or surges.

[0047] Fuel Cell System Control Stages

[0048] The fuel cell system 10 comprises two control stages; a first stage employing a series pass element 32 and a regulating circuit 34 for controlling current flow through the series pass element 32, and a second stage employing a controller 28 for adjusting reactant partial pressures to control the series resistance RS of the fuel cell stack 14. The first and second stages operate together, even simultaneously, in cooperation with the parallel coupled battery 24 to achieve efficient and continuous output voltage control while protecting the battery 24 and fuel cell stack 14 from damage.

[0049] The first stage is a relatively fast reacting stage, while the second stage is a slower reacting stage relative to the first stage. As discussed above, the battery 24 provides a very fast response to changes in load requirements, providing current to the load 12 when demand is greater than the output of the fuel cell stack 14 and sinking excess current when the output of the fuel cell stack 14 exceeds the demand of the load 12. By controlling the flow of current through the series pass element 32, the first stage ensures that the battery 24 is properly charged and discharged in an efficient manner without damage. By controlling the reactant partial pressures, and hence the series resistance RS, the second stage controls the efficiency of the fuel cell stack 14 operation (i.e., represented as the particular polarization curve on which the fuel cell is operating). Thus, the second stage limits the amount of heat dissipated by the series pass element 32 by causing more energy to be dissipated via the fuel cell stack 14 (i.e., via less efficient operation).

[0050] Where the fuel cell stack 14 dissipates energy as heat, this energy is recoverable in various portions of the fuel cell system, and thus can be reused in other portions of the fuel cell system (i.e., cogeneration). For example, the energy dissipated as heat may be recycled to the fuel cell stack 14 via an airflow, stack coolant, or via the reactants. Additionally, or alternatively, the energy dissipated as heat may be recycled to a reformer (not shown), other portion of the fuel cell system 10, or to some external system. Additionally, limiting the amount of energy that the series pass element 32 must dissipate, can reduce the size and associated cost of the series pass element 32 and any associated heat sinks.

[0051] The details of the first and second stages are discussed in detail below.

[0052] First Stage Overview, Series Pass Element Regulator

[0053] With continuing reference to FIG. 1, the first stage of the fuel cell system 10 comprises the series pass element 32 electrically coupled between the fuel cell stack 14 and the battery 24 for controlling a flow of current IS from the fuel cell stack 14 to the battery 24 and the load 12. The first stage of the fuel cell system 10 also comprises the regulating circuit 34 coupled to regulate the series pass element 32 based on various operating parameters of the fuel cell system 10. The series pass element 32 can, for example, take the form of a field effect transistor (“FET”), having a drain and source electrically coupled between the fuel cell stack 14 and the battery 24 and having a gate electrically coupled to an output of the regulating circuit 34.

[0054] The first stage of the fuel cell system 10 comprises a number of sensors for determining the various operating parameters of the fuel cell system 10. For example, the fuel cell system 10 comprises a battery charge current sensor 36 coupled to determine a battery current IB. Also for example, the fuel cell system 10 comprises a fuel cell stack current sensor 38 coupled to determine the stack current IS. Further for example, the fuel cell system 10 comprises a battery voltage sensor 40 for determining a voltage VB across the battery 24. Additionally, the fuel cell system 10 may comprise a battery temperature sensor 42 positioned to determine the temperature of the battery 24 or ambient air proximate the battery 24. While the sensors 36-42 are illustrated as being discrete from the regulating circuit 34, in some embodiments one or more of the sensors 36-42 may be integrally formed as part of the regulating circuit 34.

[0055] The first stage of the fuel cell system 10 may comprise a soft start circuit 15 for slowly pulling up the voltage during startup of the fuel cell system 10. The fuel cell system 10 may also comprise a fast off circuit 17 for quickly shutting down to prevent damage to the fuel cell stack 14, for example if a problem occurs in the reactant supply system of the stack, where load must be removed quickly to prevent damage to the stack, or if a problem occurs with the second stage control.

[0056] Second Stage Overview, Reactant Partial Pressure Controller

[0057] The second stage of the fuel cell system 10 comprises the controller 28, an actuator 30 and the reactant flow regulator such as the valve 18. The controller 28 receives a value of a first voltage V1 from an input side of the series pass element 32 and a value of a second voltage V2 from an output side of the series pass element 32. The controller 28 provides a control signal to the actuator 30 based on the difference between the first and second voltages V1, V2 to adjust the flow of reactant to the fuel cell stack 14 via the valve 18 or other reactant flow regulating element.

[0058] Since the battery 24 covers any short-term mismatch between the available reactants and the consumed reactants, the speed at which the fuel cell reactant supply system 16 needs to react can be much slower than the speed of the electrical load changes. The speed at which the fuel cell reactant supply system 16 needs to react mainly effects the depth of the charge/discharge cycles of the battery 24 and the dissipation of energy via the series pass element 32.

[0059] Power Supply System

[0060]FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of a power supply system 50 including a one-dimensional array 52 of a fuel cells systems, collectively referenced as 10, that are electrically couplable in series to positive and negative voltage rails 56 a, 56 b, respectively, that form a power bus 56 for supplying power to the load 12. A respective diode, collectively referenced as 58, is electrically coupled between the positive and negative outputs of each of the fuel cell systems 10. The illustrated power supply system 50 comprises a number M+1 fuel cell systems, which are individually referenced as 10(1)-10(M+1), the number in the parenthesis referring to the position of the fuel cell system 10 in the array. The ellipses in FIG. 2 illustrate that the power supply system 50 may comprise additional fuel cell systems (not explicitly shown) between the third fuel cell system 10(3) and the Mth fuel cell system 10(M). One or more of the fuel cell systems (e.g., 10(M+1)) may serve as a “redundant” fuel cell system, being electrically coupled in series on the power bus 56 as needed, for example, when one of the other fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M) is faulty or when the load 12 requires additional power or voltage.

[0061] The power supply system 50 may employ one or more fault switches such as a contactor or transistor 60, that can automatically disconnect a respective fuel cell system 10 in the event of a fault or failure. For example, the fault transistor 60 may open upon a fault or failure in the fuel cell system's 10 own operating condition or upon a fault or failure in the operating condition of the power supply system 50.

[0062] The power supply system 50 may employ one or more redundancy switches, such as a contractor or transistor 62, that can manually or automatically electrically couple a respective fuel cell system 10(M+1) to the power bus 56 based on a condition other than the fuel cell system's 10(M+1) own operating condition. For example, where another fuel cell system 10 is faulty, the redundancy transistor 62 may close to electrically couple the redundant fuel cell system 10(M+1) to the power bus 56 to maintain the power, voltage and current to the load 12. Also for example, where a higher output power is desired, the redundancy transistor 62 may close to electrically couple the redundant fuel cell system 10(M+1) to the power bus 56 to adjust the power, voltage and current to the load 12.

[0063] While manual operation may be possible, the power supply system 50 may comprise control logic 64 for automatically controlling the operation of the redundancy switch (e.g., transistor 62).

[0064] The control logic 64 may receive an input from one or more of the other fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M), the input relating to an operating condition of the respective fuel cell system 10(1)-10(M) (i.e., “connect on failure of Unit 1 through M”). For example, the control logic 64 may receive voltage, current and/or power measurements related to the fuel cell stack 14 and/or electrical power storage 24 of the fuel cell system 10. Such measurements may include, but are not limited to, stack current IS, stack voltage VS, battery current IB, and battery voltage VB, and/or temperature. Also for example, the control logic 64 may receive logical values relating to the operating condition of various systems of the fuel. cell system 10, including, but not limited to, an ambient hydrogen level, an ambient oxygen level, and a reactant flow. In this respect, reference is made to commonly assigned U.S. application Ser. No. 09/916,240, filed Jul. 25, 2001 and entitled “FUEL CELL SYSTEM METHOD, APPARATUS AND SCHEDULING” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.409).

[0065] Additionally, or alternatively, the control logic 64 may receive an input from other components of the power supply system 50, such as voltage and current sensors coupled to determine a voltage or current at various points on the power bus 56. For example, the control logic 64 may receive a voltage reading corresponding to the voltage across the power bus measured at a “top” of the one-dimensional array 52, allowing the control logic 64 to indirectly detect a fault in one or more of the fuel cell systems 10 by detecting a measurement below an expected threshold value (i.e., “connect if VX<M×24V”). The threshold for detecting a fault condition may be predefined in the control logic 64 or may be set by a user or operator via a user interface 66 such as analog or digital controls, or a graphical user interface on a special purpose or general purpose computer.

[0066] Additionally or alternatively, the control logic 64 may receive an input from the user or operator via the user interface 66 which may comprise a set of user controls to set operating parameters such as power, voltage, and or current thresholds, to set desired parameters such as desired power, desired voltage or desired current nominal values, to provide electrical configuration information, to provide switching signals, and/or to signals to override the automatic operating aspects of the control logic 64. The user interface 66 may be remote from the remainder of the power supply system 50. The control logic 64 can be embodied in one or more of hardwired circuitry, firmware, micro-controller, application specific processor, programmed general purpose processor, and/or instructions on computer-readable media.

[0067] Where the output voltage of the fuel cell systems 10 can be tightly controlled, such as under the first and/or second stage operation discussed above, the series coupling of the fuel cell systems 10 is possible. Thus any desired number of fuel cell systems 10 may be electrically coupled in series to realize any integer multiple of voltage output of the individual fuel cell system 10. For example, where each fuel cell system 10 produces 24 volts across the rails 19 a, 19 b, three fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(3) are electrically couplable to produce 72 volts across the power bus 56. More generally stated, a number M of fuel cell systems 10 can be electrically coupled in series to produce M times the nominal fuel cell system voltage across the power bus 56. Additionally, the series coupling renders the position of the redundant fuel cell system 10(M+1) in the one-dimensional array 52 unimportant.

[0068]FIG. 3 shows a two-dimensional array 68 of fuel cell systems 10, arranged in a number M of rows and a number N of columns for powering the load 12 via the power bus 56. The fuel cell systems 10 are individually referenced 10(1,1)-10(M,N), where the first number in the parenthesis refers to a row position and the second number in the parenthesis refers to a column position of the fuel cell system 10 in the two-dimensional array 68. The ellipses in FIG. 3 illustrate that the various rows and columns of the two-dimensional array 68 may comprise additional fuel cell systems (not explicitly shown). The diodes 58, fault and redundancy switches 60, 62, respectively, control logic 64, and user interface 66 have been omitted from FIG. 3 for clarity of illustration.

[0069] Each of the fuel cell systems 10(1,1)-10(M,N) is individually couplable to the power bus 56 to provide a variety of desired output power, voltage or current. The fuel cell systems 10(1-M,1), 10(1-M,2), 10(1-M,3)-10(1-M,N) in each column 1-M are electrically couplable in series to one another. The fuel cell systems 10(1,1-N), 10(2,1-N), 10(3,1-N)-10(M,1-N) in each row 1-N are electrically couplable in parallel to one another. From FIG. 3 and this description, one skilled in the art will recognize that the two-dimensional array 68 permits the series coupling of fuel cell systems 10 to adjust an output power of the power supply system 50 by adjusting an output voltage. One skilled in the art will also recognize that the two-dimensional array 68 permits the parallel coupling of fuel cell systems 10 to adjust the output power of the power supply system 50 by adjusting an output current. One skilled in the art will further recognize that the two-dimensional array 68 permits the series and parallel coupling of fuel cell systems 10 to adjust the output power of the power supply system 50 by adjusting both the output current and the output voltage. Thus, for the illustrated embodiment where each fuel cell system produces, for example, 1 kW at 24 volts and 40 amps, a maximum output power of N×M kW is possible. One skilled in the art will further recognize that the one- and two-dimensional array structures discussed herein refer to electrically coupable positions relative to one another, and do not necessary require that the fuel cell systems 54 be physically arranged in rows and/or columns.

EXAMPLE

[0070] FIGS. 4-6 illustrate three different electrical configurations of the fuel cell systems 10 of the two-dimensional array 68 of FIG. 3, to produce a desired output power, for example 4 kW where each fuel cell system 10 is capable of providing 1 kW at 24 volts and 40 amps. In particular, FIG. 4 shows one illustrated example employing four of the fuel cell systems 10(1,1)-10(4,1) from the first column of the two-dimensional array 68 electrically coupled in series to provide 4 kW of power at 96 volts and 40 amps. FIG. 5 shows an illustrated embodiment of four of the fuel cell systems 10(1,1)-10(1,4) of a first row of the two-dimensional array 68 electrically coupled in parallel to provide 4 kW of power at 24 volts and 160 amps. FIG. 6 shows an illustrated example employing four fuel cell systems 10(1,1), 10(1,2), 10(2,1), 10(2,2) of the two-dimensional array 68, where two pairs of series coupled fuel cell systems 10(1,1), 10(2,1) and 10(1,2), 10(2,2) are electrically coupled in parallel to produce 4 kW of power at 48 volts and 80 amps. One skilled in the art will recognize from these teachings that other combinations and permutations of electrical couplings of the fuel cell systems 10 of the two-dimensional array 68 are possible.

[0071] Operation

[0072]FIG. 7 shows a method 100 of operating the power supply system 50 according to one exemplary illustrated embodiment, which is discussed with reference to FIG. 2. The method 100 may be embodied in the control logic 64, discussed above.

[0073] In step 102, the control logic 64 electrically couples a number M of fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M) in series on the power bus 56 by selectively operating appropriate ones of the switches 60, 62. In step 104, the control logic 64 determines if there is a fault. For example, the control logic 64 may determine whether any of the parameters of one of the fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M) is outside of an acceptable range, or exceeds, or falls below, an acceptable threshold. As discussed above the control logic 64 may receive voltage, current and/or power measurements related to the fuel cell stack 14 and/or electrical power storage 24 of the fuel cell system 10. Additionally, or alternatively, the control logic 64 may receive logical values relating to the operating condition of various systems of the fuel cell system 10. Additionally, or alternatively, the control logic 64 may receive an input from other components of the power supply system 50, such as voltage and current sensors coupled to determine a voltage or current at various points on the power bus 56. The control logic 64 can comprise comparison circuitry such as a comparator, or instructions for comparing the received values to defined range and/or threshold values, for example, ensuring that the total voltage across the power bus 56 is above a defined threshold or within a defined range. Alternatively, or additionally, the control logic 64 can rely on a set of logical values returned by the individual fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M), such as a “1” or “0” corresponding to one or more operating conditions of the respective fuel cell system 10(1)-10(M).

[0074] If there is no fault, the method 100 returns to step 104, performing a monitoring loop. If there is a fault, the control logic 64 electrically couples the redundant fuel cell system 10(M+1) in series on the power bus 56 in step 106, for example, by sending an appropriate signal to the corresponding redundant switch such as by applying a signal to a gate of the redundant transistor 62. The fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M+1) are “hot swappable” so the power supply system 50 does not have to be shutdown.

[0075] In optional step 108, the control logic 64 electrically decouples the faulty fuel cell system, for example 10(3), from the power bus 56, for example, by sending an appropriate signal to the corresponding fault switch such as by applying a signal to a gate of the fault transistor 60. In optional step 110, a user or service technician replaces the faulty fuel cell system 10(3) in the array 52 of the power supply system 50. The replacement fuel cell system 10 may serve as a redundant fuel cell system for a possible eventual failure of another fuel cell system 10.

[0076]FIG. 8 shows an optional step 112 for inclusion in the method 100. In step 112, an additional fuel cell system 10 is electrically coupled in series on the power bus 50 with one or more of the fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M). For example, where the faulty fuel cell system 10(3) has been replaced, the replacement fuel cell system may be electrically coupled in series to increase the power output of the power supply system 50.

[0077]FIG. 9 shows an optional step 114 for inclusion in the method 100. In step 114, an additional fuel cell system 10 is electrically coupled in parallel on the power bus 52 with one or more of the fuel cell systems 10(1)-10(M). From this description, one skilled in the art will recognize that the method 100 may employ any variety of series and/or parallel combinations of fuel cell systems 10.

[0078]FIG. 10 shows a method 130 of operating the power supply system 50 according to an additional, or alternative, illustrated embodiment, which is discussed with reference to the two-dimensional array 68 of FIG. 3. Thus, the power supply system 50 may employ the method 130 in addition to, or alternatively from, the method 100.

[0079] In step 132, the control logic 64 determines at least one of a desired power, voltage and current output from the power supply system 50. The desired values may be defined in the control logic 64 or the control logic 64 may receive the desired value(s) from the user or operator by way of the user interface 66. In step 134, the control logic 64 determines an electrical configuration of series and/or parallel combinations of a number of fuel cell systems 10(1,1)-10(M,N) to provide the desired power, voltage and/or current. In step 136, the control logic 64 operates a number of the redundant switches such as a transistor 60 (FIG. 2, only one shown) to electrically couple respective ones of fuel cell systems 10(1,1)10(M,N) into the determined electrical configuration.

[0080] The above description shows that any number of fuel cell systems 10 are electrically couplable in series and/or parallel combinations to form a combined power supply system 50 for powering the load 12 at a desired voltage and current.

[0081] The fuel cell systems 10 can take the form of any of the fuel cell systems discussed above, for example, the fuel cell system 10 illustrated in FIG. 1. As discussed above, the power supply system 50 takes advantage of a matching of polarization curves between the fuel cell stacks 14 and the respective electrical power storage 24 to allow series coupling of fuel cell systems. One approach to achieving the polarization curve matching includes the first stage regulating scheme generally discussed above. Another approach includes controlling a partial pressure of one or more reactant flows based on a deviation of a voltage across the electrical power storage 24 from a desired voltage across the electrical power storage 24. A further approach includes controlling a partial pressure of one or more reactant flows based on a deviation of an electrical storage charge from a desired electrical storage charge. The electrical power storage charge can be determined by integrating the flow of charge to and from the electrical power storage 24. Other approaches may include phase or pulse switching regulating or control schemes. Reasons for employing a series configuration include the cost advantage, and the configuration having the highest efficiency at the full output power point if the stack voltage equals the battery float voltage at that point, e.g., efficiency can exceed 97% in a 24V system with no R.F. noise problem. While the fuel cell systems 10 are illustrated having two stages, in some embodiments the power supply system 50 may incorporate one or more fuel cell systems 10 having only one of the stages, either the first or the second stage.

[0082]FIG. 11 shows another embodiment of a hybrid fuel cell system 10 operable to power an external load 12. In contrast to the previously discussed embodiments, the fuel cell system 10 of FIG. 11 employs an ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 as an electrical power storage device 24 (FIG. 1), the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 being configured to simulate a battery.

[0083] The fuel cell system 10 may comprise one or more internal loads 202, which represent the various active components of the fuel cell system 10, for example, processors, sensors, indicators, valves, heaters, compressors, fans, and/or actuators such as solenoids. These internal loads 202 are typically referred to as the “balance of system” or “balance of plant” (BOP). The internal loads 202 are electrically coupled to receive power from the fuel cell stack 14 via the power bus 19 a, 19 b. The fuel cell system 10 may also comprise one or more current sensors 204 and voltage sensors 206.

[0084] The ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 comprises a number of ultracapacitors C1-Cn electrically coupled in series between the rails 19 a, 19 b of the voltage bus. A charging current limiter 208 is electrically coupled in series with the ultracapacitors C1-Cn to limit charging current to the ultracapacitors C1-Cn. A bypass diode D2 is electrically coupled across the charging current limiter 208 to provide a path for discharge current which bypasses the charging current limiter 208. A reverse charging diode D3 prevents the ultracapacitors C1-Cn from charging in the reverse direction, for example, when connected in series with other electrical power storage devices 24 or hybrid fuel cell systems 10.

[0085] A number of surge diodes DS are electrically coupled across respective ones of the ultracapacitors C1-Cn. The surge diodes DS equalize the voltage across each of the ultracapacitors C1-Cn during charging, and thus may limit the voltage across any ultracapacitor C1-Cn to the surge rating of the ultracapacitor C1-Cn. For example, typical ultracapacitors C1-Cn may have a working voltage of approximately 2.5 volts. As illustrated, the ultracapacitors C1-Cn may be connected in series to achieve higher working voltages. Thus, for example, four surge diodes DS electrically coupled across respective ultracapacitors C1-Cn may limit the voltage across the respective ultracapacitor C1-Cn to approximately 2.8 volts, which is the typical surge rating of the ultracapacitors C1-Cn.

[0086] The bypass diode D2 is selected such that if the voltage on the capacitor bank (i.e., the series coupled ultracapacitors) rises above the point where all of the ultracapacitors C1-Cn have approximately 2.8 volts across them, and all surge diodes DS turn ON, the voltage drop across the current limiter 208 will rise to limit the current through the surge diodes DS and prevent a short circuit.

[0087]FIG. 11 shows the charging current limiter 208 and bypass diode D2 positioned at one end of the string of ultracapacitors C1-Cn. FIG. 12 shows the charging current limiter 208 and bypass diode D2 positioned at the other end of the string of ultracapacitors C1-Cn. FIG. 13 shows the charging current limiter 208 and bypass diode D2 positioned between the ends of the string of ultracapacitors C1-Cn. Thus, it is apparent that the charging current limiter 208 and bypass diode D2 may be positioned at either end, or anywhere in the string of ultracapacitors C1-Cn.

[0088]FIG. 14 shows one embodiment of the charging current limiter 208 in the form of a linear mode charging current limiter. The charging current limiter 208 comprises a charging current limiting transistor Q1, feed back transistor Q2. first resistor R1, second resistor R2 and Zener diode D4. The charging current limiting transistor Q1 comprises a pair of active terminals (e.g., collector and emitter) and a control terminal (e.g., base), the active terminals electrically coupled in series with the ultracapacitors C1-Cn. The feedback transistor Q2 comprises a pair of active terminals (e.g., collector and emitter) and a control terminal (e.g., base), the active terminals electrically coupled between rails 19 a, 19 b and the control terminal electrically coupled to the emitter of the charging current limiting transistor Q1. The first resistor R1 is electrically coupled between the control terminal of the feedback transistor Q2 and one rail 19 b of the voltage bus. The second resistor R2 and Zener diode D4 are electrically coupled between the control terminal of the charging current limiting transistor Q1 and the other rail 19 a of the voltage bus.

[0089] In use, the linear mode charging current limiter 208 passes charging current when the terminal voltage V1-V0 is above some defined threshold voltage. When a voltage greater than the sum of the Zener voltage of Zener diode D4 and the voltage required to turn ON the charging current limiting transistor Q1 (e.g., approximately 0.7 volts) is applied to the terminals of the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200, current will begin to flow into the control terminal of the charging current limiting transistor Q1. This causes current to flow into the collector of the charging current limiting transistor Q1, and begins charging the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn. When the current from the emitter of the charging current limiting transistor Q1 is sufficiently high to cause approximately 0.7 volts across the first resistor R1, the feedback transistor Q2 begins to turn ON. This reduces the current through the charging current limiting transistor Q1. In this way, the charging current of the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn is limited to approximately 0.7 volts divided by the value of the first resistor R1. For example, if the first resistor R1 is approximately 0.175 ohms, then the charging current would be limited to approximately 4 amps.

[0090] The circuit configuration of FIG. 14 also minimizes the current drawn from the ultracapacitors C1-Cn when storing charge (i.e., when not on float charge). When a voltage less than the sum of the Zener voltage of Zener diode D4 (e.g., approximately 24 volts) and the voltage required to turn ON the charging current limiting transistor Q1 (e.g., approximately 0.7 volts) is applied to the terminals of the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200, no current will be drawn from the ultracapacitors C1-Cn, which will consequently maintain their charge for relatively long intervals.

[0091]FIG. 15 shows another embodiment of the charging current limiter 208, adding a pair of transistors, pair of resistors and diode, coupled in a Darlington circuit configuration Q3, to the embodiment of FIG. 14. The Darlington circuit Q3 is electrically coupled between the base of the charging current limiting transistor Q1 and the Zener diode D4, reducing the current ID3 flowing through the second resistor R2 and the Zener diode D4. While slightly more complicated than the embodiment of FIG. 14, the configuration of FIG. 15 reduces power lost through the second resistor R2 and Zener diode D3.

[0092]FIG. 16 shows a further embodiment of the charging current limiter 208, that adds over voltage circuitry that cuts off the charging current in an over voltage situation, to the embodiment of FIG. 15. The over voltage circuitry comprises an over voltage transistor Q4, over voltage Zener diode D5, and over voltage resistor R3. The emitters of the over voltage transistor Q4 and feed back transistor Q2 are commonly coupled, and the collectors of the over voltage transistor Q4 and feed back transistor Q2 are also commonly coupled. The over voltage Zener diode D5 and over voltage resistor R3 are electrically coupled between the base of the over voltage transistor Q4 and one rail of the voltage bus.

[0093] When the terminal voltage of the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn exceeds a sum of the Zener voltage of the Zener diode D5 (e.g., approximately 30 volts) and the voltage required to turn ON the over voltage transistor Q4 (e.g., approximately 0.7 volts), the over voltage transistor Q4 turns OFF both the feedback transistor Q2 and charging current limiting transistor Q1, thus preventing further charging current from entering the ultracapacitors C1-Cn. Although the over voltage cutoff is not a feature inherent in batteries, it is desirable in a hybrid fuel cell system to account for the rise in voltage of the fuel cell stack 14 in no load conditions (e.g., open circuit voltage or OCV). The embodiment of FIG. 16 also has the advantage of limiting the heat produced by the charging current limiting transistor Q1 and consequently the size of any associated heat sink.

[0094]FIG. 17 shows yet a further embodiment of the charging current limiter 208, that adds circuitry to cut off charging current when the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn reaches a desired voltage, to the embodiment of FIG. 16. The circuitry comprises a voltage setting transistor Q5, voltage setting Zener diode D6, and voltage setting resistor R4. Active terminals of the voltage setting transistor Q5 are electrically coupled between the base of the over voltage transistor Q4 and the rail of the voltage bus. The voltage setting Zener diode D6 and voltage setting resistor R4 are electrically coupled between the base of the voltage setting transistor Q5 and the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn. The embodiment of FIG. 17 has the advantage of limiting the heat produced by the charging current limiting transistor Q1 and consequently the size of any heat sink associated. The embodiment of FIG. 17 also saves power and improves overall system efficiency.

[0095] The embodiments of FIGS. 11-17 are compatible with, and complimentary to, previously discussed concepts, any may also be employed with black start techniques discussed in commonly assigned U.S. application Ser. No. 10/388,191, filed Mar. 12, 2003 and titled “BLACK START METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR A FUEL CELL POWER PLANT, AND FUEL CELL POWER PLANT WITH BLACK START CAPABILITY” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.483).

[0096] In the embodiments of FIGS. 11-17, the fuel cell system 10 behaves as a two-mode power supply. The output is controlled by two settings: 1) an output current limit; and 2) an output voltage limit. When the load resistance is high enough to draw a current lower than the output current limit, the fuel cell system 10 acts as a constant voltage source to set the output voltage limit. When the load resistance is low enough to draw a current higher than the output current limit at the output voltage limit set point, the fuel cell system 10 acts as a constant current source set to the output current limit. Charging current limiting is handled by the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200, rather than via the series pass element 32 (FIG. 1) in battery charging current limit mode discussed in reference to FIG. 1. It would be advantageous to incorporate the charging current limiting in other electrical power storage device circuitry, even where the electrical power storage device comprises a battery rather than an ultracapacitor, since this would prevent the in rush of current when, for example, a dead or discharged battery is plugged into a system with charged batteries.

[0097] For a fuel cell system 10 employing a Ballard Nexa™ fuel cell stack, the output voltage limit would be set at or below the open circuit voltage (OCV) of the fuel cell stack 14 (e.g., approximately 54.8 volts), and the output current limit would be set such that the fuel cell stack current limit and the fuel cell system's thermal limits were not exceeded. For example, if the output power limit is 1.3 kW, the output current limit would be approximately 23.7 amps.

[0098] The ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 acts as a DC/DC converter. The balance of plant 202 (FIG. 11) is typically run on 24 VDC derived from the output of the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200, rather than directly from the stack voltage.

[0099] The ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 may have an input voltage range of 55 volts (at OCV) to 25.5 volts (at full load). If the input voltage (i.e., stack voltage) falls below 25.5 volts, the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 may lower its output current limit to the point where the input voltage does not go any lower. If the input current (i.e., stack current) rises to 48 amps, the ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 may lower its output current limit to the point where the input current would not any higher.

[0100]FIG. 18 shows a method 300 of operating a fuel cell system 10 employing an ultracapacitor battery simulator circuit 200 according to one illustrated embodiment. In step 302, charging current is supplied, for example, from the fuel cell stack 14. In step 304, the charging current limiting transistor Q1 and feedback transistor Q2 limit charging current supplied to the ultracapacitors C1-Cn below a charging current limit threshold. In step 306, the surge diodes DS limit the voltage across each of the ultracapacitors C1-Cn. In step 308, the over voltage transistor Q4 stops the supply of charging current to the ultracapacitors C1-Cn in the event of an over voltage condition. In step 310, the voltage setting transistor Q5 stops the supply of charging current to the ultracapacitors C1-Cn if the desired voltage across the bank of ultracapacitors C1-Cn has been attained. In step 312, the ultracapacitors C1-Cn, discharge via the bypass diode D2, bypassing the charging current limiter 208.

[0101]FIG. 19 shows a power system 500 for supplying power to a load 12 via rails 556 a, 556 b of a DC bus. The power system 500 receives power from a power grid 502, typically in the form of three-phase AC power. The power system 500 comprises one or more rectifier arrays 504(1)-504(n), which receive the AC power from the power grid 502 and rectify the power. The rectified power may be supplied to the load 12 via the DC bus 556 a, 556 b. The array of rectifiers 504(1)-504(n) serves as a primary source of DC power to continuously power the load 12, and to recharge a variety of electrical power storage devices 24.

[0102] The power system 500 includes an array of one or more fuel cell hybrid modules 510(1)-510(n). The array of fuel cell hybrid modules 510(1)-510(n) provide continuous backup power to the load 12 via the DC bus 556 a, 556 b, for example, in the event of an interruption of the power grid 502.

[0103] The power system 500 may also include an array of one or more ultracapacitor battery simulators 200(1)-200(n) that may store energy for load bridging and providing surge (i.e., demand) power. Additionally, or alternatively, the power system 500 may include a fly wheel battery simulator 506, that may store energy for load bridging and providing surge power. The fly wheel battery simulator 506 may employ circuitry similar to that described for the ultracapacitor battery simulator 200. Additionally, or alternatively, the power system 500 may include one or more rechargeable batteries 508 that store energy for load bridging and providing surge power. These electrical power storage devices may supply power to the load 12 via the DC bus formed by rails 556 a, 556 b.

[0104]FIG. 20 shows a fuel cell hybrid module array 510, suitable for use in the power system 500 of FIG. 19. The fuel cell hybrid module array 510, includes first and second fuel cell stacks 14 electrically coupled in series and associated balance of plant 202, regulator 517 (e.g., series pass element 32 and regulating circuit 34 of FIGS. 1 and 11) and an ultracapacitor battery simulator array 200. The fuel cell hybrid module array 510 may also include a electrical power storage device 509, such as ultracapacitor battery simulators 200(1)-200(n), fly wheel battery simulator 506, or rechargeable batteries 508 of FIG. 19. The ultracapacitor battery simulator arrays 200 provide dynamic response for the fuel cell hybrid modules, supplying and absorbing current quickly in response to load requirements, while stacks 14 and balance of plants 202 respond more slowly. Electrical power storage device 509 provides energy for load bridging and providing surge power. This configuration may permit a smaller number of ultracapicitors to be used in battery simulator arrays 200 than would be the case if they were also required to provide load bridging and surge capacity. In some embodiments, in turn, this may result in an overall reduction in the number of ultracapacitors employed in the power plant.

[0105] Auxiliary devices, such as hydrogen supply solenoid valves 210 (or ventilation fans or flow switches (not shown)), can be powered from center bus 556 a. One or more equalizing circuits may be employed to aid in system startup by balancing the load to provide a reference. The equalizing circuits may take the form of a string of resistors 212 between bus 556 a, 556 b and 556 c. Other active or passive means of balancing the load on center bus 556 a may also be employed, if desired, such as an active controller that shares a load to maintain a particular voltage level.

[0106]FIG. 21 shows a two-dimensional array 468 of fuel cell systems 10, arranged in a number M of rows and a number N of columns to form a power system for powering one or more loads 12 via the power bus 456 a, 456 b. The fuel cell systems 10 are individually referenced 10(1,1)-10(M,N) where the first number in the parentheses refers to a row position and the second number in the parentheses refers to a column position of fuel system 10 in the two-dimensional array 468. The ellipses in FIG. 21 illustrate that various rows and columns of the two-dimensional array 468 may comprise additional fuel cell systems (not explicitly shown). While not illustrated, other multi-dimensional arrays of fuel cell systems 10 are also possible, for example, three-dimensional arrays of fuel cell systems 10.

[0107] The two-dimensional array 468 of FIG. 21 is similar to that of FIG. 3, however, comprises links 490 electrically coupling the fuel cell systems 10 forming a row (e.g., 10(3,1), 10(3,2), 10(3,3), . . . 10(3,N)) for providing at least N+1 redundancy. The two-dimensional array 468 may omit the diodes 58, fault and redundancy switches 60, 62, and other elements of the previously discussed embodiments. The links 490 provide redundancy, preventing the failure of a single fuel cell system 10 from eliminating an entire voltage string (column). For example, without the links 490, if fuel cell system 10(2,1) was to fail, then fuel cell systems 10(1,1), 10(3,1) through 10(M,1) would be unavailable. The links 490 prevent the loss of any individual fuel cell system 10 in a column from hindering the ability to fully supply the load 12. As discussed below, the links 490 may be tapped or may form taps, to produce desired potentials on the rails of voltage buses.

[0108]FIG. 22 shows an embodiment of the two-dimensional array 468 capable of providing multiple voltage levels with at least N+1 redundancy. A second column of fuel cell systems 10(1,2), 10(2,2), 10(3,2) . . . 10(M,2) can supply 40 amps at M×24 volts to a first load 12 a via a voltage bus form by taps or rails 456 a, 456 b. A third column of fuel cell systems 10(1,3), 10(2,3) can supply 40 amps at 48 volts to a second load 12 b via a second voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 b, 456 c. A third column of fuel cell systems 10(1,4) can supply 40 amps at 24 volts to a third load 12 c via a voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 b, 456 d. If the load requires more current, additional columns of fuel cell systems 10 can be added between the rails of the corresponding voltage bus. Thus in the exemplary system, current can be increased in multiples of 40 amps by adding fuel cell systems 10 to the array 468.

[0109] A first column of fuel cell systems 10(1,1), 10(2,1), 10(3,1) . . . 10(M,1) provides redundancy for each of the other fuel cell systems 10 in the two-dimensional array 468. The number of fuel cell systems 10 in the first column is equal to the number of fuel cell systems 10 in the largest column of the array 469 to ensure at least N+1 redundancy. By employing a single column of fuel cell systems 10(1,1)-10(M,1), redundancy is provided to each of the other columns, without the need to provide specific fuel cell systems for each column. This obtains at least the desired N+1 redundancy with fewer fuel cell system 10 then in previously described embodiments.

[0110]FIG. 23 illustrates another embodiment of a two-dimensional array 468 of fuel cell systems 10 suitable for supplying multiple bipolar voltage levels with redundancy. The second column of fuel systems 10(−2,2), 10(−1,2), 10(1,2), 10(2,2), 10(3,2), 10(4,2), 10(5,2) is capable of supplying 40 amps at 120 volts to the first load 12 a via a voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 a, 456 b. A third column of fuel cell systems 10(−2,3), 10(−1,3), 10(1,3), 10(2,3) is capable of supplying 40 amps at +48 volts to the second load 12 b via a voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 a, 456 c, or supplying 40 amps at −48 volts to a third load 12C via a voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 a, 456 d. A fourth column of fuel cell systems 10(−1,4), 10(1,4) is capable of supply 40 amps at +24 volts to a fourth load 12 d via voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 a, 456 e, or supplying 40 amps at −24 volts to a fifth load 12 e via voltage bus formed by taps or rails 456 a, 456 f. Again, a first column of fuel cell systems 10(−2,1), 10(−1,1), 10(1,1), 10(2,1), 10(3,1), 10(4,1), 10(5,1) provides at least N+1 redundancy to all the remaining fuel cell systems 10 in the array 468.

[0111] While not illustrated, the array 468 may employ one or more equalizing circuits to aid in system startup by balancing the load to provide a reference. The equalizing circuits may be as described in relation to FIG. 20, above. Where the fuel cell systems 10 employ ultracapacitors, for example, equalizing devices for the intermediate voltages across any number of series connected fuel cell systems 10 may be added to improve the source impedance (stiffness) of the intermediate buses.

[0112] The embodiment of FIG. 23 is particularly suitable for providing power conditioning and/or power backup in telephone related applications, such as telephone switching offices which typically employ 24 volts for wireless communications such as Personal Communications Services (PCS) and microwave repeater stations, 48 volts for traditional communications via wire (Wireline), and 120 volts DC for switching operations and substations.

[0113] Conclusion

[0114] The disclosed embodiments provide a “building block” or “component” approach to the manufacture of power supply systems, allowing a manufacturer to produce a large variety of power supply systems from a few, or even only one, basic type of fuel cell system 10. This approach may lower design, manufacturer and inventory costs, as well as providing redundancy to extend the mean time between failures for the resulting end user product (i.e., the power system). This approach may also simplify and reduce the cost of maintenance or repair.

[0115] Although specific embodiments of, and examples for, the power supply system and method are described herein for illustrative purposes, various equivalent modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as will be recognized by those skilled in the relevant art. For example, the teachings provided herein can be applied to fuel cell systems 10 including other types of fuel cell stacks 14 or fuel cell assemblies, not necessarily the polymer exchange membrane fuel cell assembly generally described above. Additionally or alternatively, the fuel cell system 10 can interconnect portions of the fuel cell stack 14 with portions of the electrical power storage device, such as cells of the battery, flywheel, or ultracapacitor bank 24. The fuel cell system 10 can employ various other approaches and elements for adjusting reactant partial pressures, or may operate without regard to partial pressure. The various embodiments described above can be combined to provide further embodiments.

[0116] All of the U.S. patents, U.S. patent application publications, U.S. patent applications, foreign patents, foreign patent applications and non-patent publications referred to in this specification and/or listed in the Application Data Sheet, including but not limited to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/916,240, filed Jul. 25, 2001, and entitled “FUEL CELL SYSTEM METHOD, APPARATUS AND SCHEDULING” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.409); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/017,470, filed Dec. 14, 2001, and entitled “METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING VOLTAGE FROM A FUEL CELL SYSTEM” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.436); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/017,462, filed Dec. 14, 2001, and entitled “METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MULTIPLE MODE CONTROL OF VOLTAGE FROM A FUEL CELL SYSTEM” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.442); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/017,461, filed Dec. 14, 2001, and entitled “FUEL CELL SYSTEM MULTIPLE STAGE VOLTAGE CONTROL METHOD AND APPARATUS” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.446); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/388,191, filed Mar. 12, 2003 and entitled “BLACK START METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR A FUEL CELL POWER PLANT, AND FUEL CELL POWER PLANT WITH BLACK START CAPABILITY” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.483); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/______, filed May 16, 2003, using Express Mail No. EV347013124US and entitled “METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FUEL CELL SYSTEMS” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.495); U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/______, filed May 16, 2003, using Express Mail No. EV347013138US and entitled “ELECTRIC POWER PLANT WITH ADJUSTABLE ARRAY OF FUEL CELL SYSTEMS” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.499); and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/______, filed May 16, 2003, using Express Mail No. EV347013141US and entitled “POWER SUPPLIES AND ULTRACAPACITOR BASED BATTERY SIMULATOR” (Attorney Docket No. 130109.500), are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. Aspects of the invention can be modified, if necessary, to employ systems, circuits and concepts of the various patents, applications and publications to provide yet further embodiments of the invention.

[0117] These and other changes can be made to the invention in light of the above-detailed description. In general, in the following claims, the terms used should not be construed to limit the invention to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification claimed, but should be construed to include all fuel cell systems that operate in accordance with the claims. Accordingly, the invention is not limited by the disclosure but instead its scope is to be determined entirely by the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification429/431, 429/432, 429/467, 429/513, 429/430
International ClassificationH01M8/00, H01M16/00, H01M8/04, H01M8/24
Cooperative ClassificationY02E60/50, H01M16/003, H01M8/0494, H01M8/04947, H01M8/04917, H01M8/0491, H01M8/249, H01M8/04007, H01M8/04089, H01M8/04753, H01M8/0488
European ClassificationH01M8/24P, H01M8/04H6K2D, H01M8/04H6K6D, H01M8/04C2, H01M8/04H6K4D, H01M8/04H6K4F, H01M8/04H6D2, H01M8/04H6K6F, H01M16/00F
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 19, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC., CANADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PEARSON, MARTIN T.;REEL/FRAME:013993/0348
Effective date: 20030811