Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20040016184 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/206,385
Publication dateJan 29, 2004
Filing dateJul 26, 2002
Priority dateJul 26, 2002
Publication number10206385, 206385, US 2004/0016184 A1, US 2004/016184 A1, US 20040016184 A1, US 20040016184A1, US 2004016184 A1, US 2004016184A1, US-A1-20040016184, US-A1-2004016184, US2004/0016184A1, US2004/016184A1, US20040016184 A1, US20040016184A1, US2004016184 A1, US2004016184A1
InventorsRobert Huebsch, Joerg Hutmacher
Original AssigneeHuebsch Robert J., Hutmacher Joerg F.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustical ceiling tile
US 20040016184 A1
Abstract
A ceiling tile includes a first layer and a second layer. The first layer includes first and second planar surfaces. The second layer is comprised of at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight and is joined adjacent to the first planar surface.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. A ceiling tile comprising:
a first layer having first and second planar surfaces;
a second layer comprised of at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight joined adjacent the first planar surface.
2. The ceiling tile of claim 1, further including a third layer comprised of at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight joined adjacent the second planar surface.
3. The ceiling tile of claim 2, further including a first adhesive layer between the second layer and the first planar surface and a second adhesive layer between the third layer and the second planar surface.
4. The ceiling tile of claim 3, wherein the adhesive is a thermoplastic bonding agent.
5. The ceiling tile of claim 3, wherein the adhesive is a hot melt adhesive.
6. The ceiling tile of claim 1, wherein the first layer comprises a foam core.
7. The ceiling tile of claim 1, wherein the ceiling tile is less than 0.6 inches thick.
8. The ceiling tile of claim 1, wherein the ceiling tile has a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis is between five (5) and eight (8) feet long and the second axis is between three (3) and four (4) feet long.
9. The ceiling tile of claim 1, wherein the ceiling tile has a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis is about eight (8) feet long and the second axis is about four (4) feet long.
10. An acoustical ceiling tile comprising:
a foam panel having first and second surfaces, the foam panel comprised of an open-cell melamine foam; and
a first laminated layer impregnated with fiberglass and joined to the first surface of the foam panel.
11. The acoustical ceiling tile of claim 10, further including a second laminated layer impregnated with fiberglass and joined to the second surface of the foam panel.
12. The acoustical ceiling tile of claim 10, wherein the first laminated layer is joined to the first surface by an adhesive therebetween.
13. The acoustical tile of claim 11, wherein the second laminated layer is joined to the second surface by an adhesive therebetween.
14. The acoustical tile of claim 13, wherein the adhesive is a hot melt or a pressure sensitive adhesive.
15. The ceiling tile of claim 10, wherein the foam panel is less than 0.6 inches thick.
16. The ceiling tile of claim 10, wherein the foam panel is about 0.4 inches thick.
17. The ceiling tile of claim 10, wherein the foam panel has a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis is between five (5) and eight (8) feet long and the second axis is between three (3) and four (4) feet long.
18. The ceiling tile of claim 10, wherein the foam panel has a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis is about (eight) 8 feet long and the second axis is about four (4) feet long.
19. A ceiling tile comprising:
two opposed layers surrounding a foam core made from an open-cell melamine foam, the two opposed layers comprised of a material having at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight.
20. The ceiling tile of claim 19, wherein the two layers are joined to the foam core with an adhesive layer therebetween.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates to ceiling tiles and, in particular, to a high strength acoustical ceiling tile.

BACKGROUND

[0002] In the field of building construction, it is a common practice to install suspended ceilings in new or existing structures. Various alternative structural systems and methods are used for hanging a support frame at the approximate level of the desired ceiling and then affixing ceiling tiles, panels, or the like to the frame. Such frames typically are formed from channels that, in cross section, are in the shape of a “T”, an “I”, or other suitable shape. They may be made from aluminum, steel, plastic or other materials that are suitable for the intended use. The tiles, panels and other surfacing materials commonly are made from cellulose, plastic, glass, and other appropriate materials.

[0003] Many such ceiling systems are known and in common use. However, many have shortcomings and difficulties that make them difficult to install, unattractive, or otherwise unacceptable in varying degrees. Therefore, improvements are desirable.

SUMMARY

[0004] In one aspect of the present invention, a ceiling tile is disclosed. The ceiling tile includes a first layer and a second layer. The first layer includes first and second planar surfaces. The second layer is comprised of at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight and is joined adjacent to the first planar surface.

[0005] In another aspect of the present invention, an acoustical ceiling tile includes a foam panel and a first laminated layer. The foam panel has first and second surfaces and is comprised of an open-cell melamine foam. The first laminated layer is impregnated with fiberglass and joined to the first surface of the foam panel.

[0006] In another aspect of the present invention, a ceiling tile includes two opposed layers surrounding a foam core. The foam core is made from an open-cell melamine foam. The two opposed layers comprise a material having at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight.

[0007] A more complete appreciation of the present invention and its scope may be obtained from the accompanying drawings, that are briefly described below, from the following detailed descriptions of presently preferred embodiments of the invention and from the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] The invention may be more completely understood in consideration of the following detailed description of various embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

[0009]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an example embodiment of a ceiling tile according to the present disclosure.

[0010]FIG. 2 is a fragmented, perspective view of an example embodiment of a suspended ceiling grid usable with the ceiling tile of FIG. 1 according to the present disclosure.

[0011]FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the ceiling grid of FIG. 2, taken along lines 3-3, with the ceiling tile of FIG. 1 suspended therein according to the present disclosure.

[0012]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of an example embodiment of the ceiling tile of FIG. 1 according to the present disclosure.

[0013]FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of another example embodiment of a ceiling tile according to the present disclosure.

[0014] While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0015] In the following description of preferred embodiments of the present disclosure, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the disclosure might be practiced. It is understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

[0016] In general, the present disclosure discusses a ceiling tile for use in a suspended ceiling grid system. The ceiling tile is a lightweight, multi-layer ceiling tile that has a high strength and other desirable properties.

[0017]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a ceiling tile 10 usable in a suspended ceiling grid system. The ceiling tile 10 has many industrial applications, but is especially suited for suspended ceilings that include a framework with individual ceiling tiles suspended by flanges or lips in the framework.

[0018]FIG. 2 is a fragmented, perspective view of an example embodiment of such a suspended ceiling grid system 20. The suspended ceiling grid system 20 is an exposed grid system 22. The exposed grid system 22 comprises first members 24 and second members 26. Generally, the first members 24 and second members 26 are configured and arranged perpendicular to each other to form the exposed grid system 26. Preferably, the first members are main runners 28. Preferably, the second members are cross runners 30.

[0019] The exposed grid system 22 further comprises third members 32. The third members are typically configured and arranged vertically and typically are attached to another structure above the exposed grid system 22. Preferably, the third members 32 are hangers 34. The suspended ceiling grid system 20 generally defines rectangular areas 36. The rectangular areas 36 defined can be of any suitable dimension. Typically the rectangular areas are formed in standard sizes, for example, twenty-four (24) inches by twenty-four (24) inches.

[0020]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the suspended ceiling grid system 20 taken along lines 3-3. Typically, the second members 26 and cross runners 30 have a T-shaped cross-sectional area as illustrated in FIG. 3. However, any suitable cross-sectional shape can be used. Likewise, the first members 24 and main runners 28 typically have a T-shaped cross-sectional area, although not shown, but can have any suitable cross-sectional shape. Preferably, the ceiling tile 10 fits within the rectangular area 36, described above, such that the ceiling tile 10 is supported by the first and second members 24, 26.

[0021]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional area of the ceiling tile 10 of FIG. 1 taken along line 4-4. Preferably, the ceiling tile 10 includes a first layer 101, a second layer 102, and a third layer 103. In general, the second layer 102 is sandwiched, or placed between, the first layer 101 and the third layer 103. Preferably, the first layer 101 is attached, bonded, or joined to the second layer 102. Likewise, the third layer 103 is attached, bonded, or joined to the second layer 102 to form an unified ceiling tile 10.

[0022] In the example embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the first layer 101 is attached to the second layer 103 by a fourth layer 104. Preferably, the fourth layer 104 comprises an adhesive like material. Likewise, the third layer 103 is attached to the second layer 102 by a fifth layer 105. Preferably, the fifth layer 105 comprises an adhesive like material. It is noted that the first layer 101 could be chemically bonded to the second layer 102 without the need for the fourth layer 104. Likewise, the third layer 103 could be chemically bonded to the second layer 102 without the need for the fifth layer 105.

[0023] Typically, the second layer 102 comprises a foam core 110 and includes first and second planar surfaces 112, 114. One example of suitable foam core 110 is preferably made from an open-cell melamine material, such as WILLTEC® foam, available from Illbruck Architectural Products in Minneapolis, Minn. Of course, any suitable material for the second layer 102 can be used. The first layer 101 is joined adjacent the first surface 112 of the second layer 102 and the third layer 103 is joined adjacent the second surface 114 of the second layer 102.

[0024] The first and third layers 101, 103 are preferably a white fleece material, although any suitable material might be used. Preferably, the white fleece material includes at least ten (10) percent fiberglass by weight. Typically, the white fleece material includes between sixty-five (65) and seventy (75) percent fiberglass by weight. More preferably, the first and third layers 101, 103 are made from a fiberglass mat with adhesive, such as MICROLITH® glass fiber mat available from Johns Manville, Corp., as Type SM-H 50/34 B51. This preferred material combines the first and fourth layers 101, 104 into one fiberglass mat with adhesive, and the third and fifth layers 103, 105 into one fiberglass mat with adhesive. The adhesive can be, for example, a thermoplastic bonding agent.

[0025] The first and third layers 101, 103 are advantageous. One advantage is that the first layer and third layers 101, 103 add strength to the ceiling tile 10, which might otherwise sag under its own weight. The first and third layers 101, 103 also add a pleasing aesthetic appearance to the ceiling tile 10 when it is installed.

[0026] While the example embodiment shown includes two layers 101, 103 surrounding the second layer 102, it is possible to have only one layer on either side of the second layer 102. FIG. 5 illustrates another example embodiment in which only one adjacent layer is used in a ceiling tile 200. Referring now to FIG. 5, if only one layer 220 is used, it is preferably on a surface 212 of a second layer 210 oriented downwards as the ceiling tile 200 is placed in the framework of the suspended ceiling described previously herein. In this orientation, the layer 220 is in tension and tends to keep the second layer 210 from sagging, and the layer 220 also presents an aesthetically pleasing appearance. Of course, the ceiling tile 200 could also be oriented upwards, or in the reverse direction. The layer 220 is joined to the second layer 210 by an adhesive zone 230 therebetween. Of course, the layer 220 could be joined to the second layer by chemical bonding.

[0027] Referring back to FIG. 4, the first and third layers 101, 103 are preferably laminated to the second layer 102 by adhesive layers 104, 105, respectively, between the first and third layers 101, 103 and the corresponding surface 112, 114 to which they are attached. Preferably, a hot melt or pressure sensitive adhesive is used to join the first and third layers 101, 103 to the second layer 102. The first and third layers 101, 103 might also be attached to the second layer 102 by coating or impregnating the first and third layers 101, 103 with a hot-melt adhesive.

[0028] The second layer 102, along with the first and third layers 101, 103, is then run through a heated nip roller assembly, not shown. The heated roller melts the adhesive on the first and third layers 101, 103 as the arrangement passes through the nip roller, thus joining the first and third layers 101, 103 to their respective surface 112, 114 of the second layer 102.

[0029] The ceiling tile of the present disclosure can be made thinner than a typical ceiling tile, due to its high strength and improved acoustical properties. For example, a twenty-four (24) inch square tile can be made 0.4 inches thick. The ceiling tile of the present disclosure can also be made into tiles ranging from twenty-four (24) inches by forty-eight (48) inches up to forty-eight (48) inches by ninety-six (96) inches that are 0.6 inches thick. The tile can be made to other dimensions in both thickness and length and width, and the example dimensions are used to demonstrate the high strength of the ceiling tile 10 of the present disclosure. The ceiling tile 10 of the present disclosure can be made as thin as 0.04 inches thick. The tiles generally have a first axis and a second axis, and the tile is typically longer along the first axis than along the second axis. The first axis is preferably between five (5) feet and eight (8) feet and the second axis is preferably between three (3) feet and four (4) feet.

[0030] The present invention should not be considered limited to the particular examples described above, but rather should be understood to cover all aspects of the invention as fairly set out in the attached claims. Various modifications, equivalent processes, as well as numerous structures to which the present invention may be applicable will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art to which the present invention is directed upon review of the instant specification.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7503428 *Mar 24, 2006Mar 17, 2009L.J. Avalon, L.L.C.Acoustic panel
US7798287 *Jan 20, 2005Sep 21, 2010Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical ceiling panels
US7799410Aug 31, 2007Sep 21, 2010Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with improved damping at select frequencies and methods for manufacturing same
US7805904 *Jan 17, 2008Oct 5, 2010Target Brands, Inc.Ceiling grid spanner
US7883763Apr 12, 2007Feb 8, 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with controlled water-vapor permeability and methods for manufacturing same
US7908818May 8, 2008Mar 22, 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Methods of manufacturing acoustical sound proofing materials with optimized fracture characteristics
US7921965Oct 27, 2004Apr 12, 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Soundproof assembly and methods for manufacturing same
US7987645Mar 29, 2007Aug 2, 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Noise isolating underlayment
US8567557Dec 22, 2011Oct 29, 2013Rob KuepferSound-muffling underlay tile systems
EP1918654A2Oct 24, 2007May 7, 2008Pinta acoustic GmbHCooled ceiling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/144, 52/506.07
International ClassificationE04B1/84, E04B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2001/8461, E04B9/001, E04B9/045
European ClassificationE04B9/04G, E04B9/00A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 17, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: PINTA ELEMENTS GMBH, GERMANY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PINTA FOAMTEC, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019573/0064
Effective date: 20070626
Jun 22, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: PINTA FOAMTEC, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:ILLBRUCK FOAMTEC, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019466/0160
Effective date: 20070531
Dec 21, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: ILLBRUCK FOAMTEC, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:ILLBRUCK, INC.;REEL/FRAME:017136/0107
Effective date: 20050916
Mar 11, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: ILLBRUCK, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HUEBSCH, ROBERT J.;HUTMACHER, JOERG F.;REEL/FRAME:013827/0919;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030220 TO 20030227