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Publication numberUS20040018541 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/607,095
Publication dateJan 29, 2004
Filing dateJun 26, 2003
Priority dateApr 9, 1998
Also published asUS6620987
Publication number10607095, 607095, US 2004/0018541 A1, US 2004/018541 A1, US 20040018541 A1, US 20040018541A1, US 2004018541 A1, US 2004018541A1, US-A1-20040018541, US-A1-2004018541, US2004/0018541A1, US2004/018541A1, US20040018541 A1, US20040018541A1, US2004018541 A1, US2004018541A1
InventorsStephen Allen, Karen Broglie, Karlene Butler, Robert Cressman
Original AssigneeAllen Stephen M., Broglie Karen E., Butler Karlene H., Cressman Robert F.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Isolated nucleic acids; chimera gene; adjust gene expression
US 20040018541 A1
Abstract
This invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid fragment encoding a starch R1 phosphorylation protein. The invention also relates to the construction of a chimeric gene encoding all or a portion of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein, in sense or antisense orientation, wherein expression of the chimeric gene results in production of altered levels of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein in a transformed host cell.
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Claims(19)
What is claimed is:
1. An isolated polynucleotide comprising:
(a) a nucleotide sequence encoding a polypeptide having starch R1 phosphorylation activity, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18 have at least 85% sequence identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or
(b) a full-length complement of the nucleotide sequence of (a).
2. The polynucleotide of claim 1, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18 have at least 90% sequence identity based on the Clustal alignment method.
3. The polynucleotide of claim 1, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18 have at least 95% sequence identity based on the Clustal alignment method.
4. The polynucleotide of claim 1 wherein the polypeptide comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18.
5. The polynucleotide of claim 1, wherein the nucleotide sequence comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 17.
6. A vector comprising the polynucleotide of claim 1.
7. A recombinant DNA construct comprising the polynucleotide of claim 1 operably linked to at least one regulatory sequence.
8. A method for transforming a cell, comprising transforming a cell with the polynucleotide of claim 1.
9. A cell comprising the recombinant DNA construct of claim 7.
10. A method for producing a plant comprising transforming a plant cell with the polynucleotide of claim 1 and regenerating a plant from the transformed plant cell.
11. A plant comprising the recombinant DNA construct of claim 7.
12. A seed comprising the recombinant DNA construct of claim 7.
13. An isolated polypeptide having starch R1 phosphorylation activity, wherein the polypeptide has an amino acid sequence of at least 85% sequence identity, based on the Clustal V method of alignment, when compared to SEQ ID NO: 18.
14. The polypeptide of claim 13, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide has at least 90% sequence identity, based on the Clustal V method of alignment, when compared to SEQ ID NO: 18.
15. The polypeptide of claim 13, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide has at least 95% sequence identity, based on the Clustal V method of alignment, when compared to SEQ ID NO: 18.
16. The polypeptide of claim 13, wherein the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide comprises SEQ ID NO: 18.
17. A method for isolating a polypeptide having starch R1 phosphorylation activity, wherein the method comprises:
transforming a cell with the recombinant DNA construct of claim 7;
growing the cell in culture medium; and
isolating the polypeptide from the cell or culture medium.
18. A method of altering the level of expression of a polypeptide having starch RI phosphorylation activity in a host cell comprising: (a) transforming a host cell with the recombinant DNA construct of claim 7; and (b) growing the transformed host cell under conditions that are suitable for expression of the recombinant DNA construct wherein expression of the recombinant DNA construct results in production of altered levels of the polypeptide in the transformed host cell.
19. An isolated polynucleotide comprising:
(a) a first nucleotide sequence encoding a first polypeptide comprising at least 600 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the first polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20 have at least 80% identity based on the Clustal alignment method,
(b) a second nucleotide sequence encoding a second polypeptide comprising at least 1337 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the second polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO: 18 have at least 80% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or
(c) the complement of the first or second nucleotide sequence, wherein the complement and the first or second nucleotide sequence contain the same number of nucleotides and are 100% complementary.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/679,933 filed Oct. 5, 2000, now pending, which is a continuation of International Application No. PCT/US99/07639 filed Apr. 8, 1999, now pending, which claims priority benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/081,143 filed Apr. 9, 1998.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention is in the field of plant molecular biology. More specifically, this invention pertains to nucleic acid fragments encoding starch RI phosphorylation proteins in plants and seeds.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Starch is a mixture of two polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin. Amylose is an unbranched chain of up to several thousand α-D-glucopyranose units linked by α-1,4 glycosidic bonds. Amylopectin is a highly branched molecule made up of up to 50,000 α-D-glucopyranose residues linked by α-1,4 and α-1,6 glycosidic bonds. Approximately 5% of the glycosidic linkages in amylopectin are α-1,6 bonds, which leads to the branched structure of the polymer.

[0004] Amylose and amylopectin molecules are organized into granules that are stored in plastids. The starch granules produced by most plants are 15-30% amylose and 70-85% amylopectin. The ratio of amylose to amylopectin and the degree of branching of amylopectin affects the physical and functional properties of the starch. Functional properties, such as viscosity and stability of a gelatinized starch determine the usefulness and hence the value of starches in food and industrial applications.

[0005] The R1 protein of potato appears to be a granule associated enzyme that is involved in starch phosphorylation (Lorberth, R. et al. (1998) Nature Biotechnology 16:473-477). Nucleic acid fragments encoding starch R1 phosphorylation proteins have been isolated from other species, including rice (PCT International Application No. PCT/EP99/08506) and corn (Patent Application No. DE19653176-A1).

[0006] R1 activity has been associated with starch degradation in potato tubers. Studies have shown that inhibition of RI activity leads to the synthesis of modified starch that is not degraded by enzymes present in potato tissue. If changes in starch degradation are a direct consequence of changes in the degree of phosphorylation this suggests that starch phosphorylation is an important modification that promotes degradation.

[0007] Accordingly, the availability of nucleic acid sequences encoding all or a portion of R1 proteins in other plants would facilitate studies to better understand starch degradation and provide genetic tools for the manipulation of starch modification, biosynthesis and metabolism in plant cells.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] The present invention concerns an isolated polynucleotide comprising: (a) a first nucleotide sequence encoding a first polypeptide comprising at least 50 or 100 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the first polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (b) a second nucleotide sequence encoding a second polypeptide comprising at least 100 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the second polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO:14 have at least 90% or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (c) a third nucleotide sequence encoding a third polypeptide comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the third polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (d) a fourth nucleotide sequence encoding a fourth polypeptide comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the fourth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10 have at least 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (e) a fifth nucleotide sequence encoding a fifth polypeptide comprising at least 350 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the fifth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based. on the Clustal alignment method, (f) a sixth nucleotide sequence encoding a sixth polypeptide comprising at least 600 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the sixth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (g) a seventh nucleotide sequence encoding a seventh polypeptide comprising at least 1337 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the seventh polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO:18 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or (h) the complement of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, or seventh nucleotide sequence, wherein the complement and the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, or seventh nucleotide sequence contain the same number of nucleotides and are 100% complementary. The first polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, the second polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO:14, the third polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2, the fourth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:10, the fifth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:12, the sixth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20, and the seventh polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO: 18. The first nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, the second nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:7, or SEQ ID NO:13, the third nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:1, the fourth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:9, the fifth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:11, the sixth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:19, and the seventh nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:15 or SEQ ID NO:17. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh polypeptides preferably are starch R1 phosphorylation proteins.

[0009] In a second embodiment, the present invention relates to a chimeric gene comprising any of the isolated polynucleotides of the present invention operably linked to a regulatory sequence.

[0010] In a third embodiment, the present invention relates to a vector comprising any of the isolated polynucleotides of the present invention.

[0011] In a fourth embodiment, the present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide fragment comprising a nucleotide sequence comprised by any of the polynucleotides of the present invention, wherein the nucleotide sequence contains at least 30, 40, or 60 nucleotides.

[0012] In a fifth embodiment, the present invention relates to an isolated polypeptide comprising: (a) a first amino acid sequence comprising at least 50 or 100 amino acids, wherein the first amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (b) a second amino acid sequence comprising at least 100 amino acids, wherein the second amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO: 14 have at least 90% or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (c) a third amino acid sequence comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the third amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (d) a fourth amino acid sequence comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the fourth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:10 have at least 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (e) a fifth amino acid sequence comprising at least 350 amino acids, wherein the fifth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:12 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (f) a sixth amino acid sequence comprising at least 600 amino acids, wherein the sixth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or (g) a seventh amino acid sequence comprising at least 1337 amino acids, wherein the seventh amino. acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO:18 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method. The first amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, the second amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO: 14, the third amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2, the fourth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:10, the fifth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12, the sixth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20, and the seventh amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO: 18. The polypeptide preferably is a starch R1 phosphorylation protein.

[0013] In a sixth embodiment, the present invention relates to a method for transforming a cell comprising introducing any of the isolated polynucleotides of the present invention into a cell, and the cell transformed by this method. Advantageously, the cell is eukaryotic, e.g., a yeast or plant cell, or prokaryotic, e.g., a bacterium.

[0014] In a seventh embodiment, the present invention relates to a virus, preferably a baculovirus, comprising any of the isolated polynucleotides of the present invention or any of the chimeric genes of the present invention.

[0015] In an eighth embodiment, the invention relates to a method of selecting an isolated polynucleotide that affects the level of expression of a starch RI phosphorylation protein or enzyme activity in a host cell, preferably a plant cell, the method comprising the steps of: (a) constructing an isolated polynucleotide of the present invention or an isolated chimeric gene of the present invention; (b) introducing the isolated polynucleotide or the isolated chimeric gene into a host cell; (c) measuring the level of the starch Ri phosphorylation protein or enzyme activity in the host cell containing the isolated polynucleotide; and (d) comparing the level of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein or enzyme activity in the host cell containing the isolated polynucleotide with the level of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein or enzyme activity in the host cell that does not contain the isolated polynucleotide.

[0016] In a ninth embodiment, the invention concerns a method of obtaining a nucleic acid fragment encoding a substantial portion of a starch RI phosphorylation protein, preferably a plant starch Ri phosphorylation protein, comprising the steps of: synthesizing an oligonucleotide primer comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least one of 60 (preferably at least one of 40, most preferably at least one of 30) contiguous nucleotides derived from a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs:l, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19, and the complement of such nucleotide sequences; and amplifying a nucleic acid fragment (preferably a cDNA inserted in a cloning vector) using the oligonucleotide primer. The amplified nucleic acid fragment preferably will encode a substantial portion of a starch R1 phosphorylation protein amino acid sequence.

[0017] In a tenth embodiment, this invention relates to a method of obtaining a nucleic acid fragment encoding all or a substantial portion of the amino acid sequence encoding a starch R1 phosphorylation protein comprising the steps of: probing a cDNA or genomic library with an isolated polynucleotide of the present invention; identifying a DNA clone that hybridizes with an isolated polynucleotide of the present invention; isolating the identified DNA clone; and sequencing the cDNA or genomic fragment that comprises the isolated DNA clone.

[0018] In an eleventh embodiment, this invention concerns a method for positive selection of a transformed cell comprising: (a) transforming a host cell with the chimeric gene of the present invention or an expression cassette of the present invention; and (b) growing the transformed host cell, preferably a plant cell, such as a monocot or a dicot, under conditions which allow expression of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein polynucleotide in an amount sufficient to complement a null mutant to provide a positive selection means.

[0019] In a twelfth embodiment, this invention relates to a method of altering the level of expression of a starch R1 phosphorylation protein in a host cell comprising: (a) transforming a host cell with a chimeric gene of the present invention; and (b) growing the transformed host cell under conditions that are suitable for expression of the chimeric gene wherein expression of the chimeric gene results in production of altered levels of the starch R1 phosphorylation protein in the transformed host cell.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING AND SEOUENCE LISTING

[0020] The invention can be more fully understood from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawing and Sequence Listing which form a part of this application.

[0021]FIG. 1 depicts an alignment of amino acid sequences of starch R1 phosphorylation protein encoded by the nucleotide sequences derived from corn clone p0126.cnlbz79r (SEQ ID NO:16), a contig assembled from rice clones rlm4n.pk003.p17 and rlr6.pk0099.d9 and PCR fragment sequence (SEQ ID NO:18), and soybean clone scrlc.pk004.nl9 (SEQ ID NO:20), and the starch R1 phosphorylation protein from Solanum tuberosum (NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21). Amino acids which are conserved among all and at least two sequences with an amino acid at that position are indicated with an asterisk (*). Dashes are used by the program to maximize alignment of the sequences.

[0022] Table 1 lists the polypeptides that are described herein, the designation of the cDNA clones that comprise the nucleic acid fragments encoding polypeptides representing all or a substantial portion of these polypeptides, and the corresponding identifier (SEQ ID NO:) as used in the attached Sequence Listing. Table 1 also identifies the cDNA clones as individual ESTs (“EST”), sequences of the entire cDNA inserts comprising the indicated cDNA clones (“FIS”),. sequences of contigs assembled from two or more ESTs (“Contig”), sequences of contigs assembled from one or more FISs and one or more ESTs or PCR fragment sequence (“Contig*”), or sequences encoding the entire protein derived from an EST, an FIS, a contig, or an FIS and PCR fragment sequence (“CGS”). The sequence descriptions and Sequence Listing attached hereto comply with the rules governing nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications as set forth in

TABLE 1
Starch R1 Phosphorylation Proteins
SEQ ID NO:
Clone (Nucleo- (Amino
Protein (Plant Source) Designation Status tide) Acid)
Starch R1 Phosphory- acs2c.pk001.g20 EST  1  2
lation
Protein (Arabidopsis)
Starch R1 Phosphory- ecr1c.pk007.l19 EST  3  4
lation
Protein (Ginger)
Starch R1 Phosphory- emm1c.pk001. EST  5  6
lation p18
Protein (Moss)
Starch R1 Phosphory- etr1c.pk003.c21 EST  7  8
lation
Protein (Cattail)
Starch R1 Phosphory- Contig of Contig*  9 10
lation rlm4n.pk003.p17
Protein (Rice) rl0n.pk088.j11
rlr6.pk0099.d9
(FIS)
Starch R1 Phosphory- Contig of Contig* 11 12
lation scr1c.pk003.e3
Protein (Soybean) ses4d.pk0019.b5
sl1.pk0109.f9
sl2.pk0041.d7
(FIS)
src3c.pk006.d11
(FIS)
src3c.pk026.j6
(FIS)
Starch R1 Phosphory- scr1c.pk002.k14 EST 13 14
lation
Protein (Soybean)
Starch R1 Phosphory- p0126.cnlbz79r CGS 15 16
lation
Protein (Corn)
Starch R1 Phosphory- Contig of CGS 17 18
lation rlm4n.pk003.p17
Protein (Rice) rlr6.pk0099.d9
(FIS)
PCR fragment
sequence
Starch R1 Phosphory- scr1c.pk004.n19 CGS 19 20
lation (FIS)
Protein (Soybean)

[0023] The Sequence Listing contains the one letter code for nucleotide sequence characters and the three letter codes for amino acids as defined in conformity with the IUPAC-IUBMB standards described in Nucleic Acids Res. 13:3021-3030 (1985) and in the Biochemical J 219 (No. 2):345-373 (1984) which are herein incorporated by reference. The symbols and format used for nucleotide and amino acid sequence data comply with the rules set forth in 37 C.F.R. §1.822.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0024] In the context of this disclosure, a number of terms shall be utilized. The terms “polynucleotide”, “polynucleotide sequence”, “nucleic acid sequence”, and “nucleic acid fragment”/“isolated nucleic acid fragment” are used interchangeably herein. These terms encompass nucleotide sequences and the like. A polynucleotide may be a polymer of RNA or DNA that is single- or double-stranded, that optionally contains synthetic, non-natural or altered nucleotide bases. A polynucleotide in the form of a polymer of DNA may be comprised of one or more segments of cDNA, genomic DNA, synthetic DNA, or mixtures thereof. An isolated polynucleotide of the present invention may include at least one of 60 contiguous nucleotides, preferably at least one of 40 contiguous nucleotides, most preferably one of at least 30 contiguous nucleotides derived from SEQ ID NOs:1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, or 19, or the complement of such sequences.

[0025] The term “isolated” polynucleotide refers to a polynucleotide that is substantially free from other nucleic acid sequences, such as other chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA and RNA, that normally accompany or interact with it as found in its naturally occurring environment. Isolated polynucleotides may be purified from a host cell in which they naturally occur. Conventional nucleic acid purification methods known to skilled artisans may be used to obtain isolated polynucleotides. The term also embraces recombinant polynucleotides and chemically synthesized polynucleotides.

[0026] The term “recombinant” means, for example, that a nucleic acid sequence is made by an artificial combination of two otherwise separated segments of sequence, e.g., by chemical synthesis or by the manipulation of isolated nucleic acids by genetic engineering techniques. As used herein, “contig” refers to a nucleotide sequence that is assembled from two or more constituent nucleotide sequences that share common or overlapping regions of sequence homology. For example, ihe nucleotide sequences of two or more nucleic acid fragments can be compared and aligned in order to identify common or overlapping sequences. Where common or overlapping sequences exist between two or more nucleic acid fragments, the sequences (and thus their corresponding nucleic acid fragments) can be assembled into a single contiguous nucleotide sequence.

[0027] As used herein, “substantially similar” refers to nucleic acid fragments wherein changes in one or more nucleotide bases results in substitution of one or more amino acids, but do not affect the functional properties of the polypeptide encoded by the nucleotide sequence. “Substantially similar” also refers to nucleic acid fragments wherein changes in one or more nucleotide bases does not affect the ability of the nucleic acid fragment to mediate alteration of gene expression by gene silencing through for example antisense or co-suppression technology. “Substantially similar” also refers to modifications of the nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention such as deletion or insertion of one or more nucleotides that do not substantially affect the functional properties of the resulting transcript vis-a-vis the ability to mediate gene silencing or alteration of the functional properties of the resulting protein molecule. It is therefore understood that the invention encompasses more than the specific exemplary nucleotide or amino acid sequences and includes functional equivalents thereof. The terms “substantially similar” and “corresponding substantially” are used interchangeably herein.

[0028] Substantially similar nucleic acid fragments may be selected by screening nucleic acid fragments representing subfragments or modifications of the nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention, wherein one or more nucleotides are substituted, deleted and/or inserted, for their ability to affect the level of the polypeptide encoded by the unmodified nucleic acid fragment in a plant or plant cell. For example, a substantially similar nucleic acid fragment representing at least one of 30 contiguous nucleotides derived from the instant nucleic acid fragment can be constructed and introduced into a plant or plant cell. The level of the polypeptide encoded by the unmodified nucleic acid fragment present in a plant or plant cell exposed to the substantially similar nucleic fragment can then be compared to the level of the polypeptide in a plant or plant cell that is not exposed to the substantially similar nucleic acid fragment.

[0029] For example, it is well known in the art that antisense suppression and co-suppression of gene expression may be accomplished using nucleic acid fragments representing less than the entire coding region of a gene, and by using nucleic acid fragments that do not share 100% sequence identity with the gene to be suppressed. Moreover, alterations in a nucleic acid fragment which result in the production of a chemically equivalent amino acid at a given site, but do not effect the functional properties of the encoded polypeptide, are well known in the art. Thus, a codon for the amino acid alanine, a hydrophobic amino acid, may be substituted by a codon encoding another less hydrophobic residue, such as glycine, or a more hydrophobic residue, such as valine, leucine, or isoleucine. Similarly, changes which result in substitution of one negatively charged residue for another, such as aspartic acid for glutamic acid, or one positively charged residue for another, such as lysine for arginine, can also be expected to produce a functionally equivalent product. Nucleotide changes which result in alteration of the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the polypeptide molecule would also not be expected to alter the activity of the polypeptide. Each of the proposed modifications is well-within the routine skill in the art, as is determination of retention of biological activity of the encoded products. Consequently, an isolated polynucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least one of 60 (preferably at least one of 40, most preferably at least one of 30) contiguous nucleotides derived from a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19, and the complement of such nucleotide sequences may be used in methods of selecting an isolated polynucleotide that affects the expression of a starch R1 phosphorylation protein in a host cell. A method of selecting an isolated polynucleotide that affects the level of expression of a polypeptide in a virus or in a host cell (eukaryotic, such as plant or yeast, prokaryotic such as bacterial) may comprise the steps of: constructing an isolated polynucleotide of the present invention or an isolated chimeric gene of the present invention; introducing the isolated polynucleotide or the isolated chimeric gene into a host cell; measuring the level of a polypeptide or enzyme activity in the host cell containing the isolated polynucleotide; and comparing the level of a polypeptide or enzyme activity in the host cell containing the isolated polynucleotide with the level of a polypeptide or enzyme activity in a host cell that does not contain the isolated polynucleotide.

[0030] Moreover, substantially similar nucleic acid fragments may also be characterized by their ability to hybridize. Estimates of such homology are provided by either DNA-DNA or DNA-RNA hybridization under conditions of stringency as is well understood by those skilled in the art (Hames and Higgins, Eds. (1985) Nucleic Acid Hybridisation, IRL Press, Oxford, U.K.). Stringency conditions can be adjusted to screen for moderately similar fragments, such as homologous sequences from distantly related organisms, to highly similar fragments, such as genes that duplicate functional enzymes from closely related organisms. Post-hybridization washes determine stringency conditions. One set of preferred conditions uses a series of washes starting with 6X SSC, 0.5% SDS at room temperature for 15 min, then repeated with 2X SSC, 0.5% SDS at 45° C. for 30 min, and then repeated twice with 0.2X SSC, 0.5% SDS at 50° C. for 30 min. A more preferred set of stringent conditions uses higher temperatures in which the washes are identical to those above except for the temperature of the final two 30 min washes in 0.2X SSC, 0.5% SDS was increased to 6° C. Another preferred set of highly stringent conditions uses two final washes in 0.1X SSC, 0.1% SDS at 65° C.

[0031] Substantially similar nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention may also be characterized by the percent identity of the amino acid sequences that they encode to the amino acid sequences disclosed herein, as determined by algorithms commonly employed by. those skilled in this art. Suitable nucleic acid fragments (isolated polynucleotides of the present invention) encode polypeptides that are at least about 70% identical, preferably at least about 80% identical to the amino acid sequences reported herein. Preferred nucleic acid fragments encode amino acid sequences that are about 85% identical to the amino acid sequences reported herein. More preferred nucleic acid fragments encode amino acid sequences that are at least about 90% identical to the amino acid sequences reported herein. Most preferred are nucleic acid fragments that encode amino acid sequences that are at least about 95% identical to the amino acid sequences reported herein. Suitable nucleic acid fragments not only have the above identities but typically encode a polypeptide having at least 50 amino acids, preferably at least 100 amino acids, more preferably at least 150 amino acids, still more preferably at least 200 amino acids, and most preferably at least 250, 350, 600, or 1337 amino acids. Sequence alignments and percent identity calculations were performed using the Megalign program of the LASERGENE bioinformatics computing suite (DNASTAR Inc., Madison, Wis.). Multiple alignment of the sequences was performed using the Clustal method of alignment (Higgins and Sharp (1989) CABIOS. 5:151-153) with the default parameters (GAP PENALTY=10, GAP LENGTH PENALTY=10). Default parameters for pairwise alignments using the Clustal method were KTUPLE 1, GAP PENALTY=3, WINDOW=5 and DIAGONALS SAVED=5.

[0032] A “substantial portion” of an amino acid or nucleotide sequence comprises an amino acid or a nucleotide sequence that is sufficient to afford putative identification of the protein or gene that the amino acid or nucleotide sequence comprises. Amino acid and nucleotide sequences can be evaluated either manually by one skilled in the art, or by using computer-based sequence comparison and identification tools that employ algorithms such as BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool; Altschul et al. (1993) J. Mol. Biol. 215:403-410; see also www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST!). In general, a sequence of ten or more contiguous amino acids or thirty or more contiguous nucleotides is necessary in order to putatively identify a polypeptide or nucleic acid sequence as homologous to a known protein or gene. Moreover, with respect to nucleotide sequences, gene-specific oligonucleotide probes comprising 30 or more contiguous nucleotides may be used in sequence-dependent methods of gene identification (e.g., Southern hybridization) and isolation (e.g., in situ hybridization of bacterial colonies or bacteriophage plaques). In addition, short oligonucleotides of 12 or more nucleotides may be used as amplification primers in PCR in order to obtain a particular nucleic acid fragment comprising the primers. Accordingly, a “substantial portion” of a nucleotide sequence comprises a nucleotide sequence that will afford specific identification and/or isolation of a nucleic acid fragment comprising the sequence. The instant specification teaches amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoding polypeptides that comprise one or more particular plant proteins. The skilled artisan, having the benefit of the sequences as reported herein, may now use all or a substantial portion of the disclosed sequences for purposes known to those skilled in this art. Accordingly, the instant invention comprises the complete sequences as reported in the accompanying Sequence Listing, as well as substantial portions of those sequences as defined above.

[0033] “Codon degeneracy” refers to divergence in the genetic code permitting variation of the nucleotide sequence without effecting the amino acid sequence of an encoded polypeptide. Accordingly, the instant invention relates to any nucleic acid fragment comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes all or a substantial portion of the amino acid sequences set forth herein. The skilled artisan is well aware of the “codon-bias” exhibited by a specific host cell in usage of nucleotide codons to specify a given amino acid. Therefore, when synthesizing a nucleic acid fragment for improved expression in a host cell, it is desirable to design the nucleic acid fragment such that its frequency of codon usage approaches the frequency of preferred codon usage of the host cell.

[0034] “Synthetic nucleic acid fragments” can be assembled from oligonucleotide building blocks that are chemically synthesized using procedures known to those skilled in the art These building blocks are ligated and annealed to form larger nucleic acid fragments which may then be enzymatically assembled to construct the entire desired nucleic acid fragment. “Chemically synthesized”, as related to a nucleic acid fragment, means that the component nucleotides were assembled in vitro. Manual chemical synthesis of nucleic acid fragments may be accomplished using well established procedures, or automated chemical synthesis can be performed using one of a number of commercially available machines. Accordingly, the nucleic acid fragments can be tailored for optimal gene expression based on optimization of the nucleotide sequence to reflect the codon bias of the host cell. The skilled artisan appreciates the likelihood of successful gene expression if codon usage is biased towards those codons favored by the host. Determination of preferred codons can be based on a survey of genes derived from the host cell where sequence information is available.

[0035] “Gene” refers to a nucleic acid fragment that expresses a specific protein, including regulatory sequences preceding (5′ non-coding sequences) and following (3′ non-coding sequences) the coding sequence. “Native gene” refers to a gene as found in nature with its own regulatory sequences. “Chimeric gene” refers any gene that is not a native gene, comprising regulatory and coding sequences that are not found together in nature. Accordingly, a chimeric gene may comprise regulatory sequences and coding sequences that are derived from different sources, or regulatory sequences and coding sequences derived from the same source, but arranged in a manner different than that found in nature. “Endogenous gene” refers to a native gene in its natural location in the genome of an organism. A “foreign-gene” refers to a gene not normally found in the host organism, but that is introduced into the host organism by gene transfer. Foreign genes can comprise native genes inserted into a non-native organism, or chimeric genes. A “transgene” is a gene that has been introduced into the genome by a transformation procedure.

[0036] “Coding sequence” refers to a nucleotide sequence that codes for a specific amino acid sequence. “Regulatory sequences” refer to nucleotide sequences located upstream (5′ non-coding sequences), within, or downstream (3′ non-coding sequences) of a coding sequence, and which influence the transcription, RNA processing or stability, or translation of the associated coding sequence. Regulatory sequences may include promoters, translation leader sequences, introns, and polyadenylation recognition sequences. “Promoter” refers to a nucleotide sequence capable of controlling the expression of a coding sequence or functional RNA. In general, a coding sequence is located 3′ to a promoter sequence. The promoter sequence consists of proximal and more distal upstream elements, the latter elements often referred to as enhancers. Accordingly, an “enhancer” is a nucleotide sequence which can stimulate promoter activity and may be an innate element of the promoter or a heterologous element inserted to enhance the level or tissue-specificity of a promoter. Promoters may be derived in their entirety from a native gene, or may be composed of different elements derived from different promoters found in nature, or may even comprise synthetic nucleotide segments. It is understood by those skilled in the art that different promoters may direct the expression of a gene in different tissues or cell types, or at different stages of development, or in response to different environmental conditions. Promoters which cause a nucleic acid fragment to be expressed in most cell types at most times are commonly referred to as “constitutive promoters”. New promoters of various types useful in plant cells are constantly being discovered; numerous examples may be found in the compilation by Okamuro and Goldberg (1989) Biochemistry of Plants 15:1-82. It is further recognized that since in most cases the exact boundaries of regulatory sequences have not been completely defined, nucleic acid fragments of different lengths may have identical promoter activity.

[0037] “Translation leader sequence” refers to a nucleotide sequence located between the promoter sequence of a gene and the coding sequence. The translation leader sequence is present in the fully processed mRNA upstream of the translation start sequence. The translation leader sequence may affect processing of the primary transcript to mRNA, mRNA stability or translation efficiency. Examples of translation leader sequences have been described (Turner and Foster (1995) Mol. Biotechnol. 3:225-236).

[0038] “3′ non-coding sequences” refer to nucleotide sequences located downstream of a coding sequence and include polyadenylation recognition sequences and other sequences encoding regulatory signals capable of affecting MRNA processing or gene expression. The polyadenylation signal is usually characterized by affecting the addition of polyadenylic acid tracts to the 3′ end of the MRNA precursor. The use of different 3′ non-coding sequences is exemplified by Ingelbrecht et al. (1989) Plant Cell 1:671-680.

[0039] “RNA transcript” refers to the product resulting from RNA polymerase-catalyzed transcription of a DNA sequence. When the RNA transcript is a perfect complementary copy of the DNA sequence, it is referred to as the primary transcript or it may be a RNA sequence derived from posttranscriptional processing of the primary transcript and is referred to as the mature RNA. “Messenger RNA (mRNA)” refers to the RNA that is without introns and that can be translated into polypeptides by the cell. “cDNA” refers to DNA that is complementary to and derived from an MRNA template. The cDNA can be single-stranded or converted to double stranded form using, for example, the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. “Sense-RNA” refers to an RNA transcript that includes the mRNA and so can be translated into a polypeptide by the cell. “Antisense RNA” refers to an RNA transcript that is complementary to all or part of a target primary transcript or mRNA and that blocks the expression of a target gene (see U.S. Pat. No. 5,107,065, incorporated herein by reference). The complementarity of an antisense RNA may be with any part of the specific nucleotide sequence, i.e., at the 5′ non-coding sequence, 3′ non-coding sequence, introns, or the coding sequence. “Functional RNA” refers to sense RNA, antisense RNA, ribozyme RNA, or other RNA that may not be translated but yet has an effect on cellular processes.

[0040] The term “operably linked” refers to the association of two or more nucleic acid fragments on a single polynucleotide so that the function of one is affected by the other. For example, a promoter is operably linked with a coding sequence when it is capable of affecting the expression of that coding sequence (i.e., that the coding sequence is under the transcriptional control of the promoter). Coding sequences can be operably linked to regulatory sequences in sense or antisense orientation.

[0041] The term “expression”, as used herein, refers to the transcription and stable accumulation of sense (mRNA) or antisense RNA derived from the nucleic acid fragment of the invention. Expression may also refer to translation of MRNA into a polypeptide. “Antisense inhibition” refers to the production of antisense RNA transcripts capable of suppressing the expression of the target protein. “Overexpression” refers to the production of a gene product in transgenic organisms that exceeds levels of production in normal or non-transformed organisms. “Co-suppression” refers to the production of sense RNA transcripts capable of suppressing the expression of identical or substantially similar foreign or endogenous genes (U.S. Pat. No. 5,231,020, incorporated herein by reference).

[0042] A “protein” or “polypeptide” is a chain of amino acids arranged in a specific order determined by the coding sequence in a polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide. Each protein or polypeptide has a unique function.

[0043] “Altered levels” or “altered expression” refers to the production of gene product(s) in transgenic organisms in amounts or proportions that differ from that of normal or non-transformed organisms.

[0044] “Null mutant” refers here to a host cell which either lacks the expression of a certain polypeptide or expresses a polypeptide which is inactive or does not have any detectable expected enzymatic function.

[0045] “Mature protein” or the term “mature” when used in describing a protein refers to a post-translationally processed polypeptide; i.e., one from which any pre- or propeptides present in the primary translation product have been removed. “Precursor protein” or the term “precursor” when used in describing a protein refers to the primary product of translation of mRNA; i.e., with pre- and propeptides still present. Pre- and propeptides may be but are not limited to intracellular localization signals.

[0046] A “chloroplast transit peptide” is an amino acid sequence which is translated in conjunction with a protein and directs the protein to the chloroplast or other plastid types present in the cell in which the protein is made. “Chloroplast transit sequence” refers to a nucleotide sequence that encodes a chloroplast transit peptide. A “signal peptide” is an amino acid sequence which is translated in conjunction with a protein and directs the protein to the secretory system (Chrispeels (1991) Ann. Rev. Plant Phys. Plant Mol. Biol. 42:21-53). If the protein is to be directed to a vacuole, a vacuolar targeting signal (supra) can further be added, or if to the endoplasmic reticulum, an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (supra). may be added. If the protein is to be directed to the nucleus, any signal peptide present should be removed and instead a nuclear localization signal included (Raikhel (1992) Plant Phys. 100:1627-1632).

[0047] “Transformation” refers to the transfer of a nucleic acid fragment into the genome of a host organism, resulting in genetically stable inheritance. Host organisms containing the transformed nucleic acid fragments are referred to as “transgenic” organisms. Examples of methods of plant transformation include Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (De Blaere et al. (1987) Meth EnzymoL 143:277) and particle-accelerated or “gene gun” transformation technology (Klein et al. (1987) Nature (London) 327:70-73; U.S. Pat. No. 4,945,050, incorporated herein by reference). Thus, isolated polynucleotides of the present invention can be incorporated into recombinant constructs, typically DNA constructs, capable of introduction into and replication in a host cell. Such a construct can be a vector that includes a replication system and sequences that are capable of transcription and translation of a polypeptide-encoding sequence in a given host cell. A number of vectors suitable for stable transfection of plant cells or for the establishment of transgenic plants have been described in, e.g., Pouwels et al., Cloning Vectors: A Laboratory Manual, 1985, supp. 1987; Weissbach and Weissbach, Methods for Plant Molecular Biology, Academic Press, 1989; and Flevin et al., Plant Molecular Biology Manual, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1990. Typically, plant expression vectors include, for example, one or more cloned plant genes under the transcriptional control of 5′ and 3′ regulatory sequences and a dominant selectable marker. Such plant expression vectors also can contain a promoter regulatory region (e.g., a regulatory region controlling inducible or constitutive, environmentally- or developmentally-regulated, or cell- or tissue-specific expression), a transcription initiation start site, a ribosome binding site, an RNA processing signal, a transcription termination site, and/or a polyadenylation signal.

[0048] Standard recombinant DNA and molecular cloning techniques used herein are well known in the art and are described more fully in Sambrook et al. Molecular Cloning. A Laboratory Manual; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press: Cold Spring Harbor, 1989 (hereinafter “Maniatis”).

[0049] “PCR” or “polymerase chain reaction” is well known by those skilled in the art as a technique used for the amplification of specific DNA segments (U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,683,195 and 4,800,159).

[0050] The present invention concerns an isolated polynucleotide comprising: (a) a first nucleotide sequence encoding a first polypeptide comprising at least 50 or 100 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the first polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (b) a second nucleotide sequence encoding a second polypeptide comprising at least 100 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the second polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO: 14 have at least 90% or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (c) a third nucleotide sequence encoding a third polypeptide comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the third polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (d) a fourth nucleotide sequence encoding a fourth polypeptide comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the fourth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10 have at least 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (e) a fifth nucleotide sequence encoding a fifth polypeptide comprising at least 350 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the fifth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:12 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 950/o identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (f) a sixth nucleotide sequence encoding a sixth polypeptide comprising at least 600 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the sixth polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or. 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (g) a seventh nucleotide sequence encoding a seventh polypeptide comprising at least 1337 amino acids, wherein the amino acid sequence of the seventh polypeptide and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:16 or SEQ ID NO:18 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or (h) the complement of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, or seventh nucleotide sequence, wherein the complement and the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, or seventh nucleotide sequence contain the same number of nucleotides and are 100% complementary. The first polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, the second polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO:14, the third polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2, the fourth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:10, the fifth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:12, the sixth polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20, and the seventh polypeptide preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:16 or SEQ ID NO:18. The first nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, the second nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:7, or SEQ ID NO:13, the third nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1, the fourth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:9, the fifth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11, the sixth nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:19, and the seventh nucleotide sequence preferably comprises the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:15 or SEQ ID NO:17. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh polypeptides preferably are starch R1 phosphorylation proteins.

[0051] Nucleic acid fragments encoding at least a portion of several starch RI phosphorylation proteins have been isolated and identified by comparison of random plant cDNA sequences to public databases containing nucleotide and protein sequences using the BLAST algorithms well known to those skilled in the art. The nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention may be used to isolate cDNAs and genes encoding homologous proteins from the same or other plant species. Isolation of homologous genes using sequence-dependent protocols is well known in the art. Examples of sequence-dependent protocols include, but are not limited to, methods of nucleic acid hybridization, and methods of DNA and RNA amplification as exemplified by various uses of nucleic acid amplification technologies (e.g., polymerase chain reaction, ligase chain reaction).

[0052] For example, genes encoding other starch RI phosphorylation protein, either as cDNAs or genomic DNAs, could be isolated directly by using all or a portion of the instant nucleic acid fragments as DNA hybridization probes to screen libraries from any desired plant employing methodology well known to those skilled in the art. Specific oligonucleotide probes based upon the instant nucleic acid sequences can be designed and synthesized by methods known in the art (Maniatis). Moreover, an entire sequence can be used directly to synthesize DNA probes by methods known to the skilled artisan such as random primer DNA labeling, nick translation, end-labeling techniques,. or RNA probes using available in vitro transcription systems. In addition, specific primers can be designed and used to amplify a part or all of the instant sequences. The resulting amplification products can be labeled directly during amplification reactions or labeled after amplification reactions, and used as probes to isolate full length cDNA or genomic fragments under conditions of appropriate stringency.

[0053] In addition, two short segments of the instant nucleic acid fragments may be used in polymerase chain reaction protocols to amplify longer nucleic acid fragments encoding homologous genes from DNA or RNA. The polymerase chain reaction may also be performed on a library of cloned nucleic acid fragments wherein the sequence of one primer is derived from the instant nucleic acid fragments, and the sequence of the other primer takes advantage of the presence of the polyadenylic acid tracts to the 3′ end of the mRNA precursor encoding plant genes. Alternatively, the second primer sequence may be based upon sequences derived from the cloning vector. For example, the skilled artisan can follow the RACE protocol (Frohman et al. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. USA 85:8998-9002) to generate cDNAs by using PCR to amplify copies of the region between a single point in the transcript and the 3′ or 5′ end. Primers oriented in the 3′ and 5′ directions can be designed from the instant sequences. Using commercially available 3′ RACE or 5′ RACE systems (BRL), specific 3′ or 5′ cDNA fragments can be isolated (Ohara et al. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:5673-5677; Loh et al. (1989) Science 243:217-220). Products generated by the 3′ and 5′ RACE procedures can be combined to generate full-length cDNAs (Frohman and Martin (1989) Techniques 1:165). Consequently, a polynucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least one of 60 (preferably one of at least 40, most preferably one of at least 30) contiguous nucleotides derived from a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs:1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 and the complement of such nucleotide sequences may be used in such methods to obtain a nucleic acid fragment encoding a substantial portion of an amino acid sequence of a polypeptide.

[0054] The present invention relates to a method of obtaining a nucleic acid fragment encoding a substantial portion of a starch Ri phosphorylation protein, preferably a substantial portion of a plant starch R1 phosphorylation protein, comprising the steps of: synthesizing an oligonucleotide primer comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least one of 60 (preferably at least one of 40, most preferably at least one of 30) contiguous nucleotides derived from a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs:1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19, and the complement of such nucleotide sequences; and amplifying a nucleic acid fragment (preferably a cDNA inserted in a cloning vector) using the oligonucleotide primer. The amplified nucleic acid fragment preferably will encode a portion of a starch RI phosphorylation protein.

[0055] Availability of the instant nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences facilitates immunological screening of cDNA expression libraries. Synthetic peptides representing portions of the instant amino acid sequences may be synthesized. These peptides can be used to immunize animals to produce polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies with specificity for peptides or proteins comprising the amino acid sequences. These antibodies can be then be used to screen cDNA expression libraries to isolate full-length CDNA clones of interest (Lerner (1984) Adv. Immunol. 36:1-34; Maniatis).

[0056] In another embodiment, this invention concerns viruses and host cells comprising either the chimeric genes of the invention as described herein or an isolated polynucleotide of the invention as described herein. Examples of host cells which can be used to practice the invention include, but are not limited to, yeast, bacteria, and plants.

[0057] As was noted above, the nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention may be used to create transgenic plants in which the disclosed polypeptides are present at higher or lower levels than normal or in cell types or developmental stages in which they are not normally found. This would have the effect of altering the level of starch phosphorylation in those transgenic plants.

[0058] Overexpression of the proteins of the instant invention may be accomplished by first constructing a chimeric gene in which the coding region is operably linked to a promoter capable of directing expression of a gene in the desired tissues at the desired stage of development. The chimeric gene may comprise promoter sequences and translation leader sequences derived from the same genes. 3′ Non-coding sequences encoding transcription termination signals may also be provided. The instant chimeric gene may also comprise one or more introns in order to facilitate gene expression.

[0059] Plasmid vectors comprising the instant isolated polynucleotide (or chimeric gene) may be constructed. The choice of plasmid vector is dependent upon the method that will be used to transform host plants. The skilled artisan is well aware of the genetic elements that must be present on the plasmid vector in order to successfully transform, select and propagate host cells containing the chimeric gene. The skilled artisan will also recognize that different independent transformation events will result in different levels and patterns of expression (Jones et al. (1985) EMBO J 4:2411-2418; De Almeida et al. (1989) Mol. Gen. Genetics 218:78-86), and thus that multiple events must be screened in order to obtain lines displaying the desired expression level and pattern. Such screening may be accomplished by Southern analysis of DNA, Northern analysis of MRNA expression, Western analysis of protein expression, or phenotypic analysis.

[0060] For some applications it may be useful to direct the instant polypeptides to different cellular compartments, or to facilitate its secretion from the cell. It is thus envisioned that the chimeric gene described above may be further supplemented by directing the coding sequence to encode the instant polypeptides with appropriate intracellular targeting sequences such as transit sequences (Keegstra (1989) Cell 56:247-253), signal sequences or sequences encoding endoplasmic reticulum localization (Chrispeels (1991) Ann Rev. Plant Phys. Plant MoL BioL 42:21-53), or nuclear localization signals (Raikhel (1992) Plant Phys. 100: 1627-1632) with or without removing targeting sequences that are already present. While the references cited give examples of each of these, the list is not exhaustive and more targeting signals of use may be discovered in the future.

[0061] It may also be desirable to reduce or eliminate expression of genes encoding the instant polypeptides in plants for some applications. In order to accomplish this, a chimeric gene designed for co-suppression of the instant polypeptide can be constructed by linking a gene or gene fragment encoding that polypeptide to plant promoter sequences. Alternatively, a chimeric gene designed to express antisense RNA for all or part of the instant nucleic acid fragment can be constructed by linking the gene or gene fragment in reverse orientation to plant promoter sequences. Either the co-suppression or antisense chimeric genes could be introduced into plants via transformation wherein expression of the corresponding endogenous genes are reduced or eliminated.

[0062] Molecular genetic solutions to the generation of plants with altered gene expression have a decided advantage over more traditional plant breeding approaches. Changes in plant phenotypes can be produced by specifically inhibiting expression of one or more genes by antisense inhibition or cosuppression (U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,190,931, 5,107,065 and 5,283,323). An antisense or cosuppression construct would act as a dominant negative regulator of gene activity. While conventional mutations can yield negative regulation of gene activity these effects are most likely recessive. The dominant negative regulation available with a transgenic approach may be advantageous from a breeding perspective. In addition, the ability to restrict the expression of a specific phenotype to the reproductive tissues of the plant by the use of tissue specific promoters may confer agronomic advantages relative to conventional mutations which may have an effect in all tissues in which a mutant gene is ordinarily expressed.

[0063] The person skilled in the art will know that special considerations are associated with the use of antisense or cosuppression technologies in order to reduce expression of particular genes. For example, the proper level of expression of sense or antisense genes may require the use of different chimeric genes utilizing different regulatory elements known to the skilled artisan. Once transgenic plants are obtained by one of the methods described above, it will be necessary to screen individual transgenics for those that most effectively display the desired phenotype. Accordingly, the skilled artisan will develop methods for screening large numbers of transformants. The nature of these screens will generally be chosen on practical grounds. For example, one can screen by looking for changes in gene expression by using antibodies specific for the protein encoded by the gene being suppressed, or one could establish assays that specifically measure enzyme activity. A preferred method will be one which allows large numbers of samples to be processed rapidly, since it will be expected that a large number of transformants will be negative for the desired phenotype.

[0064] In another embodiment, the present invention relates to an isolated polypeptide comprising: (a) a first amino acid sequence comprising at least 50 or 100 amino acids, wherein the first amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (b) a second amino acid sequence comprising at least 100 amino acids, wherein the second amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO:14 have at least 90% or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (c) a third amino acid sequence comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the third amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (d) a fourth amino acid sequence comprising at least 150 amino acids, wherein the fourth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:10 have at least 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (e) a fifth amino acid sequence comprising at least 350 amino acids, wherein the fifth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, (f) a sixth amino acid sequence comprising at least 600 amino acids, wherein the sixth amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method, or (g) a seventh amino acid sequence comprising at least 1337 amino acids, wherein the seventh amino acid sequence and the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:16 or SEQ ID NO:18 have at least 80%, 85%, 90%, or 95% identity based on the Clustal alignment method. The first amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, the second amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:8, or SEQ ID NO:14, the third amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2, the fourth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10, the fifth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:12, the sixth amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:20, and the seventh amino acid sequence preferably comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 or SEQ ID NO: 18. The polypeptide preferably is a starch RI phosphorylation protein.

[0065] The instant polypeptides (or portions thereof) may be produced in heterologous host cells, particularly in the cells of microbial hosts, and can be used to prepare antibodies to these proteins by methods well known to those skilled in the art. The antibodies are useful for detecting the polypeptides of the instant invention in situ in cells or in vitro in cell extracts. Preferred heterologous host cells for production of the instant polypeptides are microbial hosts. Microbial expression systems and expression vectors containing regulatory sequences that direct high level expression of foreign proteins are well known to those skilled in the art. Any of these could be used to construct a chimeric gene for production of the instant polypeptides. This chimeric gene could then be introduced into appropriate microorganisms via transformation to provide high level expression of the encoded starch R1 phosphorylation protein. An example of a vector for high level expression of the instant polypeptides in a bacterial host is provided (Example 6).

[0066] All or a substantial portion of the polynucleotides of the instant invention may also be used as probes for genetically and physically mapping the genes that they are a part of, and used as markers for traits linked to those genes. Such information may be useful in plant breeding in order to develop lines with desired phenotypes. For example, the instant nucleic acid fragments may be used as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Southern blots (Maniatis) of restriction-digested plant genomic DNA may be probed with the nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention. The resulting banding patterns may then be subjected to genetic analyses using computer programs such as MapMaker (Lander et al. (1987) Genomics 1:174-181) in order to construct a genetic map. In addition, the nucleic acid fragments of the instant invention may be used to probe Southern blots containing restriction endonuclease-treated genomic DNAs of a set of individuals representing parent and progeny of a defined genetic cross. Segregation of the DNA polymorphisms is noted and used to calculate the position of the instant nucleic acid sequence in the genetic map previously obtained using this population (Botstein et al. (1980) Am. J Hum. Genet. 32:314-331).

[0067] The production and use of plant gene-derived probes for use in genetic mapping is described in Bernatzky and Tanksley (1986) Plant Mol. Biol. Reporter 4:37-41. Numerous publications describe genetic mapping of specific cDNA clones using the methodology outlined above or variations thereof. For example, F2 intercross populations, backcross populations, randomly mated populations, near isogenic lines, and other sets of individuals may be used for mapping. Such methodologies are well known to those skilled in the art.

[0068] Nucleic acid probes derived from the instant nucleic acid sequences may also be used for physical mapping (i.e., placement of sequences on physical maps; see Hoheisel et al. In: Nonmammalian Genomic Analysis: A Practical Guide, Academic press 1996, pp. 319-346, and references cited therein).

[0069] In another embodiment, nucleic acid probes derived from the instant nucleic acid sequences may be used in direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping (Trask (1991) Trends Genet. 7:149-154). Although current methods of FISH mapping favor use of large clones (several to several hundred, KB; see Laan et al. (1995) Genome Res. 5:13-20), improvements in sensitivity may allow performance of FISH mapping using shorter probes.

[0070] A variety of nucleic acid amplification-based methods of genetic and physical mapping may be carried out using the instant nucleic acid sequences. Examples include allele-specific amplification (Kazazian (1989) J. Lab. Clin Med 11:95-96), polymorphism of PCR-amplified fragments (CAPS; Sheffield et al. (1993) Genomics 16:325-332), allele-specific ligation (Landegren et al. (1988) Science 241:1077-1080), nucleotide extension reactions (Sokolov (1990) Nucleic Acid Res. 18:3671), Radiation Hybrid Mapping (Walter et al. (1997) Nat. Genet. 7:22-28) and Happy Mapping (Dear and Cook (1989) Nucleic Acid Res. 1 7:6795-6807). For these methods, the sequence of a nucleic acid fragment is used to design and produce primer pairs for use in the amplification reaction or in primer extension reactions. The design of such primers is well known to those skilled in the art. In methods employing PCR-based genetic mapping, it may be necessary to identify DNA sequence differences between the parents of the mapping cross in the region corresponding to the instant nucleic acid sequence. This, however, is generally not necessary for mapping methods.

[0071] Loss of function mutant phenotypes may be identified for the instant CDNA clones either by targeted gene disruption protocols or by identifying specific mutants for these genes contained in a maize population carrying mutations in all possible genes (Ballinger and Benzer (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad Sci USA 86:9402-9406; Koes et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 92:8149-8153; Bensen et al. (1995) Plant Cell 7:75-84). The latter approach may be accomplished in two ways. First, short segments of the instant nucleic acid fragments may be used in polymerase chain reaction protocols in conjunction with a mutation tag sequence primer on DNAs prepared from a population of plants in which Mutator transposons or some other mutation-causing DNA element has been introduced (see Bensen, supra). The amplification of a specific DNA fragment with these primers indicates the insertion of the mutation tag element in or near the plant gene encoding the instant polypeptide. Alternatively, the instant nucleic acid fragment may be used as a hybridization probe against PCR amplification products generated from the mutation population using the mutation tag sequence primer in conjunction with an arbitrary genomic site primer, such as that for a restriction enzyme site-anchored synthetic adaptor. With either method, a plant containing a mutation in the endogenous gene encoding the instant polypeptide can be identified and obtained. This mutant plant can then be used to determine or confirm the natural function of the instant polypeptides disclosed herein.

EXAMPLES

[0072] The present invention is further defined in the following Examples, in which parts and percentages are by weight and degrees are Celsius, unless otherwise stated. It should be understood that these Examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the invention, are given by way of illustration only. From the above discussion and these Examples, one skilled in the art can ascertain the essential characteristics of this invention, and without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, can make various changes and modifications of the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions. Thus, various modifications of the invention in addition to those shown and described herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing description. Such modifications are also intended to fall within the scope of the appended claims.

[0073] The disclosure of each reference set forth herein is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

Example 1 Composition of cDNA Libraries: Isolation and Seguencing of cDNA Clones

[0074] cDNA libraries representing mRNAs from various Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), ginger (Curcuma zedoaria), cattail (Typha latifolia), moss (Brachythecium oxycladon, Plagiomnium cuspidatum, Amblystegium varium), corn (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) tissues were prepared. The characteristics of the libraries are described below.

TABLE 2
cDNA Libraries from Arabidopsis, Ginger, Cattail, Moss, Corn, Rice and
Soybean
Library Tissue Clone
acs2c Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta fertilized acs2c.pk001.g20
carpels with developing seeds 6-7 days after
fertilization
ecr1c Ginger (Curcuma zedoaria. aka shoti starch) ecr1c.pk007.l19
developing rhizomes
emm1c Moss of three variety (Brachythecium emm1c.pk001.
oxycladon, Plagiomnium cuspidatum, p18
Amblystegium varium)
etr1c Cattail (Typha latifolia) root etr1c.pk003.c21
rlm4n Rice Leaf 15 Days After Germination rlm4n.pk003.p17
Harvested 2-72 Hours Following Infection
With Magnaporta grisea (4360-R-62 and
4360-R-67)*
nl0n Rice (Oryza sativa L.) 15 day old leaf* rl0n.pk088.j11
rlr6 Rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf 15 days after rlr6.pk0099.d9
germination, 6 hours after infection of strain
Magaporthe grisea 4360-R-62 (AVR2-
YAMO); Resistant
scr1c Soybean (Glycine max L., 2872) embryo- scr1c.pk003.e3
genic suspension culture subjected to 4 scr1c.pk002.k14
vacuum cycles and collected 12 hrs later scn1c.pk004.n19
ses4d Soybean (Glycine max L.) embryogenic ses4d.pk0019.b5
suspension 4 days after subculture
sl1 Soybean (Glycine max L.) Two week old sl1.pk0109.f9
developing seedlings
sl2 Soybean (Glycine max L.) two week old sl2.pk0041.d7
developing seedlings treated with 2.5 ppm
chlorimuron
src3c Soybean (Glycine max L., Bell) 8 day old src3c.pk006.d11
root inoculated with eggs of cyst nematode src3c.pk026.j6
Heterodera glycines (Race 14) for 4 days.
p0126 Corn Leaf Tissue From V8-Y10 Stages**, p0126.cnlbz79r
Pooled, Night-Harvested

[0075] cDNA libraries may be prepared by any one of many methods available. For example, the cDNAs may be introduced into plasmid vectors by first preparing the cDNA libraries in Uni-ZAP™ XR vectors according to the manufacturer's protocol (Stratagene Cloning Systems, La Jolla, Calif.). The Uni-ZAP™ XR libraries are converted into plasmid libraries according to the protocol provided by Stratagene. Upon conversion, cDNA inserts will be contained in the plasmid vector pBluescript. In addition, the cDNAs may be introduced directly into precut Bluescript II SK(+) vectors (Stratagene) using T4 DNA ligase (New England Biolabs), followed by transfection into DH10B cells according to the manufacturer's protocol (GIBCO BRL Products). Once the cDNA inserts are in plasmid vectors, plasmid DNAs are prepared from randomly picked bacterial colonies containing recombinant pBluescript plasmids, or the insert cDNA sequences are amplified via polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for vector sequences flanlking the inserted cDNA sequences. Amplified insert DNAs or plasmid DNAs are sequenced in dye-primer sequencing reactions to generate partial cDNA sequences (expressed sequence tags or “ESTs”; see Adams et al., (1991) Science 252:1651-1656). The resulting ESTs are analyzed using a Perkin Elmer Model 377 fluorescent sequencer.

[0076] Full-insert sequence (FIS) data is generated utilizing a modified transposition protocol. Clones identified for FIS are recovered from archived glycerol stocks as single colonies, and plasmid DNAs are isolated via alkaline lysis. Isolated DNA templates are reacted with vector primed M13 forward and reverse oligonucleotides in a PCR-based sequencing reaction and loaded onto automated sequencers. Confirmation of clone identification is performed by sequence alignment to the original EST sequence from which the FIS request is made.

[0077] Confirmed templates are transposed via the Primer Island transposition kit (PE Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif.) which is based upon the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 transposable element (Devine and Boeke (1994) Nucleic Acids Res. 22:3765-3772). The in vitro transposition system places unique binding sites randomly throughout a population of large DNA molecules. The transposed DNA is then used to transform DH10B electro-competent cells (Gibco BRL/Life Technologies, Rockville, Md.) via electroporation. The transposable element contains an additional selectable marker (named DHFR; Fling and Richards (1983) Nucleic Acids Res. 11:5147-5158), allowing for dual selection on agar plates of only those subcloneso containing the integrated transposon. Multiple subclones are randomly selected from each transposition reaction, plasmid DNAs are prepared via alkaline lysis, and templates are sequenced (ABI Prism dye-terminator ReadyReaction mix) outward from the transposition event site, utilizing unique primers specific to the binding sites within the transposon.

[0078] Sequence data is collected (ABI Prism Collections) and assembled using Phred/Phrap (P. Green, University of Washington, Seattle). Phrep/Phrap is a public domain software program which re-reads the ABI sequence data, re-calls the bases, assigns quality values, and writes the base calls and quality values into editable output files. The Phrap sequence assembly program uses these quality values to increase the accuracy of the assembled sequence contigs. Assemblies are viewed by the Consed sequence editor (D. Gordon, University of Washington, Seattle).

Example 2 Identification of cDNA Clones

[0079] cDNA clones encoding starch R1 phosphorylation protein were identified by conducting BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool; Altschul et al. (1993) J Mol. Biol. 215:403-410; see also www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST/) searches for similarity to sequences contained in the BLAST “nr” database (comprising all non-redundant GenBank CDS translations, sequences derived from the 3-dimensional structure Brookhaven Protein Data Bank, the last major release of the SWISS-PROT protein sequence database, EMBL, and DDBJ databases). The cDNA sequences obtained in Example 1 were analyzed for similarity to all publicly available DNA sequences contained in the “nr” database using the BLASTN algorithm provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The DNA sequences were translated in all reading frames and compared for similarity to all publicly available protein sequences contained in the “nr” database using the BLASTX algorithm (Gish and States (1993) Nat. Genet. 3:266-272) provided by the NCBI. For convenience, the P-value (probability) of observing a match of a cDNA sequence to a sequence contained in the searched databases merely by chance as calculated by BLAST are reported herein as “pLog” values, which represent the negative of the logarithm of the reported P-value. Accordingly, the greater the pLog value, the greater the likelihood that the cDNA sequence and the BLAST “hit” represent homologous proteins.

[0080] ESTs submitted for analysis are compared to the genbank database as described above. ESTs that contain sequences more 5- or 3-prime can be found by using the BLASTn algorithm (Altschul et al (1997) Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402.) against the Du Pont proprietary database comparing nucleotide sequences that share common or overlapping regions of sequence homology. Where common or overlapping sequences exist between two or more nucleic acid fragments, the sequences can be assembled into a single contiguous nucleotide sequence, thus extending the original fragment in either the 5 or 3 prime direction. Once the most 5-prime EST is identified, its complete sequence can be determined by Full Insert Sequencing as described in Example 1. Homologous genes belonging to different species can be found by comparing the amino acid.sequence of a known gene (from either a proprietary source or a public database) against an EST database using the tBLASTn algorithm. The tBLASTn algorithm searches an amino acid query against a nucleotide database that is translated in all 6 reading frames. This search allows for differences in nucleotide codon usage between different species, and for codon degeneracy.

Example 3 Characterization of cDNA Clones Encoding Starch R1 Phosphorylation Protein

[0081] The BLASTX search using the EST sequences from clones listed in Table 3 revealed similarity of the polypeptides encoded by the cDNAs to starch Ri phosphorylation protein from Solanum tuberosum (NCBI GenBank Identifier (GI) No. 3287270).

[0082] In the process of comparing the ESTs it was found that rice clones rlm4n.pk003.pl7, r10n.pk088.j11 and rlr6.pk0099.d9 had overlapping regions of homology. Soybean clones scr1c.pk003.e3, ses4d.pk0019.b5, s11.pk0109.f9, s12.pk0041.d7, src3c.pk006.d11 and src3c.pk026.j6 were also found to have overlapping regions of homology. Using this homology it was possible to align the ESTs and assemble two individual contigs encoding unique rice and soybean starch R1 phosphorylation proteins.

[0083] Shown in Table 3 are the BLAST results for individual ESTs (“EST”), the sequences of the entire cDNA inserts comprising the indicated cDNA clones (“FIS”), the sequences of contigs assembled from two or more ESTs (“Contig”), sequences of contigs assembled from one or more FISs and one or more ESTs or PCR fragment sequence (“Contig*”), or sequences encoding an entire protein derived from an EST, an FIS, a contig, or an FIS and PCR fragment sequence (“CGS”):

TABLE 3
BLAST Results for Sequences Encoding Polypeptides Homologous
to Solanum tuberosum Starch R1 Phosphorylation Protein
BLAST pLog Score
Clone Status NCBI GI No. 3287270
acs2c.pk001.g20 EST 62.10
ecr1c.pk007.l19 EST 75.00
emm1c.pk001.p18 EST 56.00
etr1c.pk003.c21 EST 53.00
Contig of Contig* >250.00
rlm4n.pk003.p17
rl0n.pk088.j11
rlr6.pk0099.d9 (FIS)
Contig of Contig* >250.00
scr1c.pk003.e3
ses4d.pk0019.b5
sl1.pk0109.f9
sl2.pk0041.d7 (FIS)
src3c.pk006.d11 (FIS)
src3c.pk026.j6 (FIS)
scr1c.pk002.k14 EST 94.70

[0084] The sequence of a portion of the cDNA insert from clone acs2c.pkOO l.g20 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 1; the deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA, which represents 11% of the protein (middle region), is shown in SEQ ID NO:2. The sequence of a portion of the cDNA insert from clone ecrlc.pk007.119 is shown in SEQ ID NO:3; the deduced amino acid sequence of this CDNA, which represents 9.7% of the protein (middle region) is shown in SEQ ID NO:4. The sequence of a portion of the cDNA insert from clone emm1c.pk001 .p18 is shown in SEQ ID NO:5; the deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA, which represents 10.7% of the protein (middle region) is shown in SEQ ID NO:6. The sequence of a portion of the cDNA insert from clone etrlc.pkOO3.c21 is shown in SEQ ID NO:7; the deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA, which represents 7.7% of the protein (middle region), is shown in SEQ ID NO:8.

[0085] The sequence of the rice contig composed of clones rlm4n.pk003.p17, r10n.pk088.j11 and r1r6.pk0099.d9 is shown in SEQ ID NO:9; the deduced amino acid sequence of this contig, which represents 33% of the protein (C-terminal region) is shown in SEQ ID NO: 10. A calculation of the percent similarity of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:10 and the Solanum tuberosum sequence (NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21) (using the Clustal algorithm) revealed that the protein encoded by the contig is 75.1% similar to the Solanum tuberosum starch R1 phosphorylation protein.

[0086] The sequence of the soybean contig composed of clones scr1c.pk003.e3, ses4d.pk0019.b5, s11.pk0019.f9, s12.pk0041.d7, src3c.pk006.d11 and src3c.pk026.j6 is shown in SEQ ID NO:11; the deduced amino acid sequence of this contig, which represents 40% of the protein (C-terminal region) is shown in SEQ ID NO: 12. A calculation of the percent similarity of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:12 and the Solanum tuberosum sequence (NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21) (using the Clustal algorithm) revealed that the protein encoded by the contig is 76.4% similar to the Solanum tuberosum starch R1 phosphorylation protein. The degree of similarity between the rice (SEQ ID NO:10) and soybean amino acid sequences (SEQ ID NO:12) was calculated to be 70.3% (using the Clustal algorithm).

[0087] The sequence of a portion of the cDNA insert from clone scr1c.pk002.k14 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 13; the deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA, which represents 11% of the protein (middle region), is shown in SEQ ID NO:14.

[0088] The sequence of the entire cDNA insert in clone r1r6.pk0099.d9 listed in Table 3 was assembled into a contig with nucleotide sequence obtained from corn clone r1m4n.pk003.p17, and a fragment obtained via PCR, to yield nucleotide sequence encoding a fill-length starch R1 phosphorylation protein. Further sequencing and searching of the DuPont proprietary database allowed the identification of a corn clone and another soybean clone encoding starch R1 phosphorylation protein. The BLASTX search using the EST sequences from clones listed in Table 4 revealed similarity of the polypeptides encoded by the cDNAs to starch Ri phosphorylation protein from Solanum tuberosum (NCBI GI Nos. 3287270 and 7489244). Shown in Table 4 are the BLAST results for individual ESTs (“EST”), the sequences of the entire cDNA inserts comprising the indicated cDNA clones (“FIS”), sequences of contigs assembled from two or more ESTs (“Contig”), sequences of contigs assembled from one or more FISs and one or more ESTs or PCR fragment sequence (“Contig*”), or sequences encoding the entire protein derived from an EST, an FIS, a contig, or an FIS and PCR fragment sequence (“CGS”).

TABLE 4
BLAST Results for Sequences Encoding Polypeptides Homologous
to Solanum tuberosum Starch R1 Phosphorylation Protein
BLAST Results
Clone Status NCBI GI No. BLAST pLog Score
p0126.cnlbz79r CGS 7489244 >180.00
Contig of CGS 3287270 >180.00
rlm4n.pk003.p17
rlr6.pk0099.d9 (FIS)
PCR fragment sequence
scr1c.pk004.n19 (FIS) CGS 3287270 >180.00

[0089]FIG. 1 presents an alignment of the amino acid sequences set forth in SEQ ID NOs: 16, 18, and 20 and the Solanum tuberosum sequence (NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21). The data in Table 5 represents a calculation of the percent identity of the amino acid sequences set forth in SEQ ID NOs:16, 18, and 20 and the Solanum tuberosum sequence (NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21).

TABLE 5
Percent Identity of Amino Acid Sequences Deduced From the Nucleotide
Sequences of cDNA Clones Encoding Polypeptides Homologous to
Solanum tuberosum Starch R1 Phosphorylation Protein
Percent Identity to
SEQ ID NO. NCBI GI No. 3287270; SEQ ID NO:21
16 64.2
18 64.3
20 68.4

[0090] Sequence alignments and percent identity calculations were performed using the Megalign program of the LASERGENE bioinformatics computing suite (DNASTAR Inc., Madison, Wis.). Multiple alignment of the sequences was performed using the Clustal method of alignment (Higgins and Sharp (1989) CABIOS. 5:151-153) withthe default parameters (GAP PENALTY=10, GAP LENGTH PENALTY=10). Default parameters for pairwise alignments using the Clustal method were KTUPLE 1, GAP PENALTY=3, WINDOW=5 and DIAGONALS SAVED=5.

[0091] Sequence alignments and BLAST scores and probabilities indicate that the nucleic acid fragments comprising the instant cDNA clones encode a substantial portion of a starch R1 phosphorylation protein. These sequences represent the first arabidopsis, ginger, moss, cattail, rice and soybean sequences encoding starch RI phosphorylation protein known to Applicant. A nucleic acid fragment that encodes starch R1 phosphorylation protein has been previously isolated from corn (Patent Application No. DE19653176-A1).

Example 4 Expression of Chimeric Genes in Monocot Cells

[0092] A chimeric gene comprising a cDNA encoding the instant polypeptide in sense orientation with respect to the maize 27 kD zein promoter that is located 5′ to the cDNA fragment, and the 10 kD zein 3′ end that is located 3′ to the cDNA fragment, can be constructed. The cDNA fragment of this gene may be generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the cDNA clone using appropriate oligonucleotide primers. Cloning sites (NcoI or SmaI) can be incorporated into the oligonucleotides to provide proper orientation of the DNA fragment when inserted into the digested vector pML103 as described below. Amplification is then performed in a standard PCR. The amplified DNA is then digested with restriction enzymes Ncol and SmaI and fractionated on an agarose gel. The appropriate band can be isolated from the gel and combined with a 4.9 kb NcoI-SmaI fragment of the plasmid pML 103. Plasmid pML 103 has been deposited under the terms of the Budapest Treaty at ATCC (American Type Culture Collection, 10801 University Blvd., Manassas, Va. 20110-2209), and bears accession number ATCC 97366. The DNA segnent from pML103 contains a 1.05 kb SalI-NcoI promoter fragment of the maize 27 kD zein gene and a 0.96 kb Smal-SalI fragment from the 3′ end of the maize 10 kD zein gene in the vector pGem9Zf(+) (Promega). Vector and insert DNA can be ligated at 15° C. overnight, essentially as described (Maniatis). The ligated DNA may then be used to transform E. coli XL1-Blue (Epicurian Coli XL-1 Blue™; Stratagene). Bacterial transformants can be screened by restriction enzyme digestion of plasmid DNA and limited nucleotide sequence analysis using the dideoxy chain termination method (Sequenase™ DNA Sequencing Kit; U.S. Biochemical). The resulting plasmid construct would comprise a chimeric gene encoding, in the 5′ to 3′. direction, the maize 27 kD zein promoter, a cDNA fragment encoding the instant polypeptide, and the 10 kD zein 3′ region.

[0093] The chimeric gene described above can then be introduced into com cells by the following procedure. Immature corn embryos can be dissected from developing caryopses derived from crosses of the inbred corn lines H99 and LH132. The embryos are isolated 10 to 11 days after pollination when they are 1.0 to 1.5 mm long. The embryos are then placed with the axis-side facing down and in contact with agarose-solidified N6 medium (Chu et al. (1975) Sci. Sin. Peking 18:659-668). The embryos are kept in the dark at 27° C. Friable embryogenic callus consisting of undifferentiated masses of cells with somatic proembryoids and embryoids borne on suspensor structures proliferates from the scutellum of these immature embryos. The embryogenic callus isolated from the primary explant can be cultured on N6 medium and sub-cultured on this medium every 2 to 3 weeks.

[0094] The plasmid, p35S/Ac (obtained from Dr. Peter Eckes, Hoechst Ag, Frankfurt Germany) may be used in transformation experiments in order to provide for a selectable marker. This plasmid contains the Pat gene (see European Patent Publication 0 242 236) which encodes phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT). The enzyme PAT confers resistance to herbicidal glutamine synthetase inhibitors such as phosphinothricin. The pat gene in p35S/Ac is under the control of the 35S promoter from Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (Odell et al. (1985) Nature 313:810-812) and the 3′ region of the nopaline synthase gene from the T-DNA of the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

[0095] The particle bombardment method (Klein et al. (1987) Nature 327:70-73) may be used to transfer genes to the callus culture cells. According to this method, gold particles (1 μm in diameter) are coated with DNA using the following technique. Ten μg of plasmid DNAs are added to 50 μL of a suspension of gold particles (60 mg per mL). Calcium chloride (50 μL of a 2.5 M solution) and spermidine free base (20 μL of a 1.0 M solution) are added to the particles. The suspension is vortexed during the addition of these solutions. After 10 minutes, the tubes are briefly centrifuged (5 sec at 15,000 rpm) and the supernatant removed. The particles are resuspended in 200 1 μL of absolute ethanol, centrifuged again and the supernatant removed. The ethanol rinse is performed again and the particles resuspended in a final volume of 30 μL of ethanol. An aliquot (5 μL) of the DNA-coated gold particles can be placed in the center of a Kapton™ flying disc (Bio-Rad Labs). The particles are then accelerated into the corn tissue with a Biolistic™ PDS-1000/He (Bio-Rad Instruments, Hercules Calif.), using a helium pressure of 1000 psi, a gap distance of 0.5 cm and a flying distance of 1.0 cm.

[0096] For bombardment, the embryogenic tissue is placed on filter paper over agarose-solidified N6 medium. The tissue is arranged as a thin lawn and covered a circular area of about 5 cm in diameter. The petri dish containing the tissue can be placed in the chamber of the PDS-1000/He approximately 8 cm from the stopping screen. The air in the chamber is then evacuated to a vacuum of 28 inches of Hg. The macrocarrier is accelerated with a helium shock wave using a rupture membrane that bursts when the He pressure in the shock tube reaches 1000 psi.

[0097] Seven days after bombardment the tissue can be transferred to N6 medium that contains gluphosinate (2 mg per liter) and lacks casein or proline. The tissue continues to grow slowly on this medium. After an additional 2 weeks the tissue can be transferred to fresh N6 medium containing gluphosinate. After 6 weeks, areas of about 1 cm in diameter of actively growing callus can be identified on some of the plates containing the glufosinate-supplemented medium. These calli may continue to grow when sub-cultured on the selective medium.

[0098] Plants can be regenerated from the transgenic callus by first transferring clusters of tissue to N6 medium supplemented with 0.2 mg per liter of 2,4-D. After two weeks the tissue can be transferred to regeneration medium (Fromm et al. (1990) Bio/Technology 8:833-839).

Example 5 Expression of Chimeric Genes in Dicot Cells

[0099] A seed-specific expression cassette composed of the promoter and transcription terminator from the gene encoding the P subunit of the seed storage protein phaseolin from the bean Phaseolus vulgaris (Doyle et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261:9228-9238) can be used for expression of the instant polypeptides in transformed soybean. The phaseolin cassette includes about 500 nucleotides upstream (5′) from the translation initiation codon and about 1650 nucleotides downstream (3′) from the translation stop codon of phaseolin. Between the 5′ and 3′ regions are the unique restriction endonuclease sites Nco I (which includes the ATG translation initiation codon), Sma I, Kpn I and Xba I. The entire cassette is flanked by Hind III sites.

[0100] The cDNA fragment of this gene may be generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the cDNA clone using appropriate oligonucleotide primers. Cloning sites can be incorporated into the oligonucleotides to provide proper orientation of the DNA fragment when inserted into the expression vector. Amplification is then performed as described above, and the isolated fragment is inserted into a pUC18 vector carrying the seed expression cassette.

[0101] Soybean embryos may then be transformed with the expression vector comprising sequences encoding the instant polypeptides. To induce somatic embryos, cotyledons, 3-5 mm in length dissected from surface sterilized, immature seeds of the soybean cultivar A2872, can be cultured in the light or dark at 26° C. on an appropriate agar medium for 6-10 weeks. Somatic embryos which produce secondary embryos are then excised and placed into a suitable liquid medium. After repeated selection for clusters of somatic embryos which multiplied as early, globular staged embryos, the suspensions are maintained as described below.

[0102] Soybean embryogenic suspension cultures can be maintained in 35 mL liquid media on a rotary shaker, 150 rpm, at 26° C. with florescent lights on a 16:8 hour day/night. schedule. Cultures are subcultured every two weeks by inoculating approximately 35 mg of tissue into 35 mL of liquid medium.

[0103] Soybean embryogenic suspension cultures may then be transformed by the method of particle gun bombardment (Klein et al. (1987) Nature (London) 327:70-73, U.S. Pat. No. 4,945,050). A DuPont Biolistic™ PDS1000/HE instrument (heliumretrofit) can be used for these transformations.

[0104] A selectable marker gene which can be used to facilitate soybean transformation is a chimeric gene composed of the 35S promoter from Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (Odell et al. (1985) Nature 313:810-812), the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene from plasmid pJR225 (from E. coli; Gritz et al.(1983) Gene 25:179-188) and the 3′ region of the nopaline synthase gene from the T-DNA of the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The seed expression cassette comprising the phaseolin 5′ region, the fragment encoding the instant polypeptide and the phaseolin 3′ region can be isolated as a restriction fragment. This fragment can then be inserted into a unique restriction site of the vector carrying the marker gene.

[0105] To 50 μL of a 60 mg/nL 1 μm gold particle suspension is added (in order): 5 μL DNA (1 μg/μL), 20 μL spermidine (0.1 M), and 50 μL CaCl2 (2.5 M). The particle preparation is then agitated for three minutes, spun in a microfuge for 10 seconds and the supernatant removed. The DNA-coated particles are then washed once in 400 1L 70% ethanol and resuspended in 40 μL of anhydrous ethanol. The DNA/particle suspension can be sonicated three times for one second each. Five μL of the DNA-coated gold particles are then loaded on each macro carrier disk.

[0106] Approximately 300-400 mg of a two-week-old suspension culture is placed in an empty 60×15 mm petri dish and the residual liquid removed from the tissue with a pipette. For each transformation experiment, approximately 5-10 plates of tissue are normally bombarded. Membrane rupture pressure is set at 1100 psi and the chamber is evacuated to a vacuum of 28 inches mercury. The tissue is placed approximately 3.5 inches away from the retaining screen and bombarded three times. Following bombardment, the tissue can be divided in half and placed back into liquid and cultured as described above.

[0107] Five to seven days post bombardment, the liquid media may be exchanged with fresh media, and eleven to twelve days post bombardment with fresh media containing 50 mg/mL hygromycin. This selective media can be refreshed weekly. Seven to eight weeks post bombardment, green, transformed tissue may be observed growing from untransformed, necrotic embryogenic clusters. Isolated green tissue is removed and inoculated into individual flasks to generate new, clonally propagated, transformed embryogenic suspension cultures. Each new line may be treated as an independent transformation event. These suspensions can then be subcultured and maintained as clusters of immature embryos or regenerated into whole plants by maturation and germination of individual somatic embryos.

Example 6 Expression of Chimeric Genes in Microbial Cells

[0108] The cDNAs encoding the instant polypeptides can be inserted into the T7 E. coli expression vector pBT430. This vector is a derivative of pET-3a (Rosenberg et al. (1987) Gene 56:125-135) which employs the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase 17 promoter system. Plasmid pBT430 was constructed by first destroying the EcoR I and Hind III sites in pET-3a at their original positions. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing EcoR I and Hind III sites was inserted at the BamH I site of pET-3a. This created pET-3aM with additional unique cloning sites for insertion of genes into the expression vector. Then, the Nde I site at the position of translation initiation was converted to an Nco I site using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The DNA sequence of pET-3aM in this region, 5′-CATATGG, was converted to 5′-CCCATGG in pBT430.

[0109] Plasmid DNA containing a cDNA may be appropriately digested to release a nucleic acid fragment encoding the protein. This fragment may then be purified on a 1% low melting agarose gel. Buffer and agarose contain 10 μg/ml ethidium bromide for visualization of the DNA fragment The fragment can then be purified from the agarose gel by digestion with GELase™ (Epicentre Technologies, Madison, Wis.) according to the manufacturer's instructions, ethanol precipitated, dried and resuspended in 20 μL of water. Appropriate oligonucleotide adapters may be ligated to the fragment using T4 DNA ligase (New England Biolabs (NEB), Beverly, Mass.). The fragment containing the ligated adapters can be purified from the excess adapters using low melting agarose as described above. The vector pBT430 is digested, dephosphorylated with alkaline phosphatase (NEB) and deproteinized with phenol/chloroform as described above. The prepared vector pBT430 and fragment can then be ligated at 16° C. for 15 hours followed by transformation into DH5 electrocompetent cells (GIBCO BRL). Transformants can be selected on agar plates containing LB media and 100 μg/mL ampicillin. Transformants containing the gene encoding the instant polypeptide are then screened for the correct orientation with respect to the T7 promoter by restriction enzyme analysis.

[0110] For high level expression, a plasmid clone with the cDNA insert in the correct orientation relative to the 17 promoter can be transformed into E. coli strain BL21(DE3) (Studier et al. (1986) J Mol. Biol. 189:113-130). Cultures are grown in LB medium containing ampicillin (100 mg/L) at 25° C. At an optical density at.600 nm of approximately 1, IPTG (isopropylthio-β-galactoside, the inducer) can be added to a final concentration of 0.4 mM and incubation can be continued for 3 h at 25°. Cells are then harvested by centrifugation and re-suspended in 50 μL of 50.mM Tris-HCl at pH 8.0 containing 0.1 mM DTT and 0.2 mM phenyl methylsulfonyl fluoride. A small amount of 1 mm glass beads can be added and the mixture sonicated 3 times for about 5 seconds each time with a microprobe sonicator. The mixture is centrifuged and the protein concentration of the supernatant determined. One μg of protein from the soluble fraction of the culture can be separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gels can be observed for protein bands migrating at the expected molecular weight.

1 21 1 490 DNA Arabidopsis thaliana unsure (418) n = a, c, g or t 1 gttgaagaaa agaatgtaga gccacttctt gagggtttgc ttgaagctcg tcaagagcta 60 aggccacttc tgctgaagtc ccatgaccgc ctcaaggatc tgttattctt ggacctcgct 120 cttgattcta ctgtcagaac agcgattgaa agaggatatg agcaattgaa tgatgctgga 180 cctgagaaaa tcatgtactt catcagccta gttcttgaaa atcttgccct ctcttcagat 240 gacaatgaag accttatata ctgcttgaag ggatggcaat ttgccctcga catgtgcaag 300 agcaaaaaag atcactgggc tctgtatgca aaatctgttc ttgacagaag cccgactagc 360 actggcaagc aaagctgaag aggtaccttg aaattctgca accatcggct gaatatcntg 420 gatctgtcnt ggagtcgatc agtccggctg ttaatntatt actggaagaa atnattcgag 480 ctggntntgc 490 2 161 PRT Arabidopsis thaliana UNSURE (117) Xaa = any amino acid 2 Val Glu Glu Lys Asn Val Glu Pro Leu Leu Glu Gly Leu Leu Glu Ala 1 5 10 15 Arg Gln Glu Leu Arg Pro Leu Leu Leu Lys Ser His Asp Arg Leu Lys 20 25 30 Asp Leu Leu Phe Leu Asp Leu Ala Leu Asp Ser Thr Val Arg Thr Ala 35 40 45 Ile Glu Arg Gly Tyr Glu Gln Leu Asn Asp Ala Gly Pro Glu Lys Ile 50 55 60 Met Tyr Phe Ile Ser Leu Val Leu Glu Asn Leu Ala Leu Ser Ser Asp 65 70 75 80 Asp Asn Glu Asp Leu Ile Tyr Cys Leu Lys Gly Trp Gln Phe Ala Leu 85 90 95 Asp Met Cys Lys Ser Lys Lys Asp His Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ala Lys Ser 100 105 110 Val Leu Asp Arg Xaa Arg Leu Ala Leu Ala Ser Lys Ala Glu Xaa Tyr 115 120 125 Leu Glu Ile Leu Gln Pro Ser Ala Glu Tyr Xaa Gly Ser Val Xaa Glu 130 135 140 Ser Ile Ser Pro Ala Val Asn Xaa Leu Leu Glu Glu Xaa Ile Arg Ala 145 150 155 160 Gly 3 490 DNA Curcuma zedoaria unsure (466) n = a, c, g or t 3 aggtgatgtt ggtcagcgta tccgagatga aatattagtt ttacagagaa acaatgactg 60 caagggagga atgatggagg aatggcatca gaagctacat aacaacacta gcccagatga 120 tgttgtgata tgccaggcac ttattgatta tgttaaaagt gattttgaca tcagtgtgta 180 ctgggacagt ttgaataaaa atggaataac caaggaacgt ttgttgagct atgatcgtgc 240 tattcattct gaaccaagtt tcaggagaga tcagaaagaa ggtcttttac gtgatctagg 300 aaactacatg aggacgttga aggcagttca ctctggtgca agatctcgag tctgccattg 360 ctacgtgtat gggttacaaa tctgagcgtc aagggcttta tggttggcgt tcaaataaac 420 cccgataggg ggattgccaa ctgggattcc ctgatctaaa ggaaantcaa tccaaaacat 480 gttgaaagat 490 4 144 PRT Curcuma zedoaria UNSURE (114) Xaa = any amino acid 4 Gly Asp Val Gly Gln Arg Ile Arg Asp Glu Ile Leu Val Leu Gln Arg 1 5 10 15 Asn Asn Asp Cys Lys Gly Gly Met Met Glu Glu Trp His Gln Lys Leu 20 25 30 His Asn Asn Thr Ser Pro Asp Asp Val Val Ile Cys Gln Ala Leu Ile 35 40 45 Asp Tyr Val Lys Ser Asp Phe Asp Ile Ser Val Tyr Trp Asp Ser Leu 50 55 60 Asn Lys Asn Gly Ile Thr Lys Glu Arg Leu Leu Ser Tyr Asp Arg Ala 65 70 75 80 Ile His Ser Glu Pro Ser Phe Arg Arg Asp Gln Lys Glu Gly Leu Leu 85 90 95 Arg Asp Leu Gly Asn Tyr Met Arg Thr Leu Lys Ala Val His Ser Gly 100 105 110 Ala Xaa Leu Glu Ser Ala Ile Ala Thr Cys Met Gly Tyr Lys Ser Glu 115 120 125 Arg Xaa Gly Phe Met Val Gly Val Gln Ile Asn Pro Asp Arg Gly Ile 130 135 140 5 487 DNA Brachythecium oxycladon unsure (336) n = a, c, g or t 5 cacaccaaga tctggttggt gccaagtctc gtaatatagc caacctgcga ggcaaacttc 60 cctcatggat tcatcttcca acttcagcag cattgccatt tggagttttc gagaaggttt 120 tagcagagcg catcaataag gatgtggcca cagaggttgc tgccctcagc aagcaacttg 180 ctaatggtga ttttagtaag ctccaggatg ctcgtgcaac ggtcttggga ctgaaagcac 240 ctccagcgtt ggttgatgaa ttgaagaaaa ctttgaaaga ctcaggtatg ccgtggcctg 300 gggatgaaag cgaggagaga tggactcaag cctggnctgc aatcaaaagg gtgtgggcct 360 caaaatggaa tgaaagagcc tacttcagta ctcgcaaagc caagatanat cacaagngac 420 ttgtgcatgg caagttatta gttcaagaga tcattcaagg ctgactatgc gntcgtcatt 480 catacca 487 6 159 PRT Brachythecium oxycladon UNSURE (110) Xaa = any amino acid 6 Asp Leu Val Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Ile Ala Asn Leu Arg Gly Lys 1 5 10 15 Leu Pro Ser Trp Ile His Leu Pro Thr Ser Ala Ala Leu Pro Phe Gly 20 25 30 Val Phe Glu Lys Val Leu Ala Glu Arg Ile Asn Lys Asp Val Ala Thr 35 40 45 Glu Val Ala Ala Leu Ser Lys Gln Leu Ala Asn Gly Asp Phe Ser Lys 50 55 60 Leu Gln Asp Ala Arg Ala Thr Val Leu Gly Leu Lys Ala Pro Pro Ala 65 70 75 80 Leu Val Asp Glu Leu Lys Lys Thr Leu Lys Asp Ser Gly Met Pro Trp 85 90 95 Pro Gly Asp Glu Ser Glu Glu Arg Trp Thr Gln Ala Trp Xaa Ala Ile 100 105 110 Lys Arg Val Trp Ala Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr 115 120 125 Arg Lys Ala Lys Ile Xaa His Lys Xaa Leu Val His Gly Lys Leu Leu 130 135 140 Val Gln Glu Ile Xaa Xaa Ala Asp Tyr Ala Xaa Val Ile His Thr 145 150 155 7 503 DNA Typha latifolia unsure (359) n = a, c, g or t 7 agaaaaacag ttcttcaatt agcacctcca aatccgttgg tagaagagtt gaaggaaaaa 60 atgcatggtg ctggaatgcc atggcctggt gatgaaggtg aatctcggtg ggaacaagca 120 tggatggcaa taaaaaaggt atgggcttca aaatggaatg agagagcata cttcagcacc 180 cgtaaagtaa agttggatca tgactatctt tgcatggctg tcctggtcca agaaattata 240 aatgcaagat tatgcatttg tgatccatac tactaaccca tcaaccggag acgcatcaag 300 agatatatgc tgaggtggtg aaaggactgg gagaagacac tagtgggaag cctacccang 360 gtcgtgcctt aaagcttcan ctgttaagna agaaacgatc ctaaactcnc caaaaaggtc 420 ctgggtttnc ccaaaattaa acccaaattg gcctgttcna taaagaaaga tcaatccanc 480 ntcaaaatta agnttcctaa tgg 503 8 115 PRT Typha latifolia UNSURE (83) Xaa = any amino acid 8 Arg Lys Thr Val Leu Gln Leu Ala Pro Pro Asn Pro Leu Val Glu Glu 1 5 10 15 Leu Lys Glu Lys Met His Gly Ala Gly Met Pro Trp Pro Gly Asp Glu 20 25 30 Gly Glu Ser Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Met ala Ile Lys Lys Val Trp 35 40 45 Ala Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr Arg Lys Val Lys 50 55 60 Leu Asp His Asp Tyr Leu Cys Met Ala Val Leu Val Gln Glu Ile Ile 65 70 75 80 Asn Ala Xaa Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn Pro Ser Thr Gly 85 90 95 Asp Ala Ser Xaa Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly Leu Gly Glu Asp 100 105 110 Thr Ser Gly 115 9 1633 DNA Oryza sativa unsure (874) n = a, c, g or t 9 tggtacctgc taccctgtct gctcttctga atcggattga tcctgttctt aggaatgttg 60 cacagcttgg aagttggcag gttataagcc cagttgaagt atcaggttac attgtagtgg 120 ttgatgaatt gcttgctgtt caaaacaaat cctatgataa accaactatc cttgtggcaa 180 agagtgtcaa gggagaggaa gaaataccag atggagttgt tggtgttatt acacctgata 240 tgccagatgt tctctcccat gtatcagtcc gagcaaggaa ttgcaaggtt ttatttgcaa 300 catgctttga tcctaacacc ttgtctgaac tccaaggaca tgatgggaaa gtgttttcct 360 tcaaacctac ttctgcagat atcacctata gggagattcc agagagtgaa ctgcaatcag 420 gttctctaaa tgcagaagct ggccaggcag tgccatctgt gtcattagtc aagaagaagt 480 ttcttggaaa atatgcaata tcagcagaag aattctctga ggaaatggtt ggggccaagt 540 ctcgcaacgt agcatacctc aaaggaaaag taccctcatg ggttggtgtc cctacatcag 600 ttgcgattcc atttgggacc tttgagaagg ttttgtctga tgaaatcaat aaggaagtcg 660 cgcaaaccat acaaatgctg aagggaaaac ttgctcaaga tgattttagt gctctaggcg 720 aaatacggaa aactgttctc aatttaactg ctcctactca actgatcaag gaactgaagg 780 agaagatgct aggctctgga atgccctggc ctggagatga aggtgaccaa cgttgggagc 840 aagcatggat ggcaattaaa aaggtttggg cgtnanaatg gaatgaaaga gcatatttta 900 gcactcgtaa ggtgaagctt gatcatgact acctttccat ggctgtactt gtacaagaaa 960 ttgtcaatgc agactatgcc tttgtcattc atactactaa cccatcatcg ggagattcgt 1020 ctgagatata tgctgaagtg gtgaaagggc ttggagaaac acttgtagga gcctatcctg 1080 gtcgcgccat gagctttgta tgtaagaaaa acgaccttga ctctcccaag gtactgggtt 1140 tcccaagcaa gccaattggt gtcttcataa agagatcaat catctttcgt tcggattcca 1200 acggtgagga tttagaaggg tatgctggag caagactgta tgatagtgtc cctatggatg 1260 aggaagatga agtcatagtc gactacaaca acggacccct cattacagat cagggattcc 1320 aaaaatccaa cctcccgagc attgcaccgg ctggtcatgc cattgaggag ctttatgggt 1380 ccccacagga tgttgagggt gcagtgaagg aagggaagct atacgtagta cagacaagac 1440 cacagatgta atctatatgt atattttata gccaagtcaa tcaggcaatg ttgtagagta 1500 agatatacgg gccgtgggac atgtataaca cgttacgccc ttttttttat tatttgcttt 1560 catactcaca atacactaat ttatagggct tattttatcg ccaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaag 1620 aaaaaaaaaa aaa 1633 10 482 PRT Oryza sativa UNSURE (291)..(292) Xaa = any amino acid 10 Val Pro Ala Thr Leu Ser Ala Leu Leu Asn Arg Ile Asp Pro Val Leu 1 5 10 15 Arg Asn Val Ala Gln Leu Gly Ser Trp Gln Val Ile Ser Pro Val Glu 20 25 30 Val Ser Gly Tyr Ile Val Val Val Asp Glu Leu Leu Ala Val Gln Asn 35 40 45 Lys Ser Tyr Asp Lys Pro Thr Ile Leu Val Ala Lys Ser Val Lys Gly 50 55 60 Glu Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp Gly Val Val Gly Val Ile Thr Pro Asp Met 65 70 75 80 Pro Asp Val Leu Ser His Val Ser Val Arg Ala Arg Asn Cys Lys Val 85 90 95 Leu Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe Asp Pro Asn Thr Leu Ser Glu Leu Gln Gly 100 105 110 His Asp Gly Lys Val Phe Ser Phe Lys Pro Thr Ser Ala Asp Ile Thr 115 120 125 Tyr Arg Glu Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Leu Gln Ser Gly Ser Leu Asn Ala 130 135 140 Glu Ala Gly Gln Ala Val Pro Ser Val Ser Leu Val Lys Lys Lys Phe 145 150 155 160 Leu Gly Lys Tyr Ala Ile Ser Ala Glu Glu Phe Ser Glu Glu Met Val 165 170 175 Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Val Ala Tyr Leu Lys Gly Lys Val Pro Ser 180 185 190 Trp Val Gly Val Pro Thr Ser Val Ala Ile Pro Phe Gly Thr Phe Glu 195 200 205 Lys Val Leu Ser Asp Glu Ile Asn Lys Glu Val Ala Gln Thr Ile Gln 210 215 220 Met Leu Lys Gly Lys Leu Ala Gln Asp Asp Phe Ser Ala Leu Gly Glu 225 230 235 240 Ile Arg Lys Thr Val Leu Asn Leu Thr Ala Pro Thr Gln Leu Ile Lys 245 250 255 Glu Leu Lys Glu Lys Met Leu Gly Ser Gly Met Pro Trp Pro Gly Asp 260 265 270 Glu Gly Asp Gln Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Met Ala Ile Lys Lys Val 275 280 285 Trp Ala Xaa Xaa Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr Arg Lys Val 290 295 300 Lys Leu Asp His Asp Tyr Leu Ser Met Ala Val Leu Val Gln Glu Ile 305 310 315 320 Val Asn Ala Asp Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn Pro Ser Ser 325 330 335 Gly Asp Ser Ser Glu Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly Leu Gly Glu 340 345 350 Thr Leu Val Gly Ala Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala Met Ser Phe Val Cys Lys 355 360 365 Lys Asn Asp Leu Asp Ser Pro Lys Val Leu Gly Phe Pro Ser Lys Pro 370 375 380 Ile Gly Val Phe Ile Lys Arg Ser Ile Ile Phe Arg Ser Asp Ser Asn 385 390 395 400 Gly Glu Asp Leu Glu Gly Tyr Ala Gly Ala Arg Leu Tyr Asp Ser Val 405 410 415 Pro Met Asp Glu Glu Asp Glu Val Ile Val Asp Tyr Asn Asn Gly Pro 420 425 430 Leu Ile Thr Asp Gln Gly Phe Gln Lys Ser Asn Leu Pro Ser Ile Ala 435 440 445 Pro Ala Gly His Ala Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr Gly Ser Pro Gln Asp Val 450 455 460 Glu Gly Ala Val Lys Glu Gly Lys Leu Tyr Val Val Gln Thr Arg Pro 465 470 475 480 Gln Met 11 2080 DNA Glycine max 11 aaataatgta cttcattagc ttggttcttg aaaatctcgc actttcatcg gatgacaatg 60 aagatcttat ctactgtttg aagggatggg atgttgcctt aagcatgtgc aagattaaag 120 atactcattg ggcattgtac gcaaaatcag tccttgacag aacccgtctt gcactaacaa 180 acaaggctca tttataccag gaaattctgc aaccatcggc agaatatctt ggatcactgc 240 ttggcgtgga caaatgggcc gtggaaatat ttactgaaga aattatccgt gctggatctg 300 ctgcttcttt gtctactctt ctaaatcgac tggatcctgt gctccgaaag acagctcatc 360 ttggaagctg gcaggttatt agcccagttg aaactgttgg atatgttgag gtcatagatg 420 agttgcttgc tgttcaaaac aaatcatatg agcgacctac aattttgata gccaagagtg 480 tgagaggaga ggaagaaatt ccagatggta cagttgctgt cctgacacct gatatgcccg 540 atgtcctatc ccatgtatct gtacgagcaa gaaatagcaa ggtgtgtttt gctacatgct 600 ttgatcccaa tatcctggct aacctccaag aaaataaagg aaagcttttg cgcttaaagc 660 caacatctgc tgatgtagtt tatagtgagg tcaaggaagg tgagttaatt gatgacaaat 720 caactcaact caaagatgtt ggttctgtgt cacccatatc tctggcccga aagaagttta 780 gtggtagata tgctgtctca tctgaagaat tcactggtga aatggttgga gctaaatctc 840 gtaatatctc ttatttaaaa gggaaagtag cttcttggat tggaattcct acctcggttg 900 ccataccatt tggagttttc gaacatgttc tttctgataa accaaaccag gcagtggctg 960 agagggtcaa taatttgaaa aagaagttaa ttgagggaga cttcagtgtt ctcaaggaga 1020 ttcgtgaaac agttctacaa ttgaatgcac catcccattt ggtagaggag ttgaaaacta 1080 aaatgaagag ttctggaatg ccgtggccgg gtgatgaagg tgaacaacga tgggagcaag 1140 cttggatagc tataaaaaag gtgtggggct ctaagtggaa tgaaagagca tacttcagca 1200 caagaaaagt gaaactcgac cacgaatatc tttccatggc agtccttgtt caagaagtga 1260 taaatgctga ctatgctttt gtcatccaca caactaaccc tgcctctgga gattcatcgg 1320 aaatatatgc tgaggtggta aagggacttg gagaaacact ggttggagct tatccaggtc 1380 gtgctttgag ttttatctgc aagaaacgtg atttgaactc tcctcaggtc ttaggtaatc 1440 ctagcaaacc tgtcggccta tttataagac ggtcaattat ttttcgatct gattccaatg 1500 gtgaagatct agaaggtaat gatggtgcag gtcattatga cagtgtccca atgggtgaac 1560 ccgagaaggt ggtgcttgat tattcttcag acaaactgat ccttgatggc agttttcgcc 1620 agtcaatctt gtccagcatt gcccgtgcag gaaatgaaat tgaagagttg tatggcactc 1680 ctcaggacat tgaaggtgtc atcaaggatg gaaaagtcta tgttgtccag accagaccac 1740 aaatgtagac ctccatacct atgtctttta agccaactac ctcaactatg ttctatgttc 1800 attcccgtgc aacatggcgt ttcaaacgtg gccgtggcag cttctgcgag tttaagagta 1860 acccgcggga ttaccaaatt tggccttata gatttattac acgtgatata ttgaaaatta 1920 aggaataatt tataagtgta taaacatgga ataatgtaaa ttaattaaaa aattagatgg 1980 tcttattctt tttccctact atatatattg tatgtactta cttcttccta attaaaattg 2040 ctattcaaag taaaaaaaaa aaagggggcg ccggtaccca 2080 12 581 PRT Glycine max 12 Ile Met Tyr Phe Ile Ser Leu Val Leu Glu Asn Leu Ala Leu Ser Ser 1 5 10 15 Asp Asp Asn Glu Asp Leu Ile Tyr Cys Leu Lys Gly Trp Asp Val Ala 20 25 30 Leu Ser Met Cys Lys Ile Lys Asp Thr His Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ala Lys 35 40 45 Ser Val Leu Asp Arg Thr Arg Leu Ala Leu Thr Asn Lys Ala His Leu 50 55 60 Tyr Gln Glu Ile Leu Gln Pro Ser Ala Glu Tyr Leu Gly Ser Leu Leu 65 70 75 80 Gly Val Asp Lys Trp Ala Val Glu Ile Phe Thr Glu Glu Ile Ile Arg 85 90 95 Ala Gly Ser Ala Ala Ser Leu Ser Thr Leu Leu Asn Arg Leu Asp Pro 100 105 110 Val Leu Arg Lys Thr Ala His Leu Gly Ser Trp Gln Val Ile Ser Pro 115 120 125 Val Glu Thr Val Gly Tyr Val Glu Val Ile Asp Glu Leu Leu Ala Val 130 135 140 Gln Asn Lys Ser Tyr Glu Arg Pro Thr Ile Leu Ile Ala Lys Ser Val 145 150 155 160 Arg Gly Glu Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp Gly Thr Val Ala Val Leu Thr Pro 165 170 175 Asp Met Pro Asp Val Leu Ser His Val Ser Val Arg Ala Arg Asn Ser 180 185 190 Lys Val Cys Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe Asp Pro Asn Ile Leu Ala Asn Leu 195 200 205 Gln Glu Asn Lys Gly Lys Leu Leu Arg Leu Lys Pro Thr Ser Ala Asp 210 215 220 Val Val Tyr Ser Glu Val Lys Glu Gly Glu Leu Ile Asp Asp Lys Ser 225 230 235 240 Thr Gln Leu Lys Asp Val Gly Ser Val Ser Pro Ile Ser Leu Ala Arg 245 250 255 Lys Lys Phe Ser Gly Arg Tyr Ala Val Ser Ser Glu Glu Phe Thr Gly 260 265 270 Glu Met Val Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Ile Ser Tyr Leu Lys Gly Lys 275 280 285 Val Ala Ser Trp Ile Gly Ile Pro Thr Ser Val Ala Ile Pro Phe Gly 290 295 300 Val Phe Glu His Val Leu Ser Asp Lys Pro Asn Gln Ala Val Ala Glu 305 310 315 320 Arg Val Asn Asn Leu Lys Lys Lys Leu Ile Glu Gly Asp Phe Ser Val 325 330 335 Leu Lys Glu Ile Arg Glu Thr Val Leu Gln Leu Asn Ala Pro Ser His 340 345 350 Leu Val Glu Glu Leu Lys Thr Lys Met Lys Ser Ser Gly Met Pro Trp 355 360 365 Pro Gly Asp Glu Gly Glu Gln Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Ile Ala Ile 370 375 380 Lys Lys Val Trp Gly Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr 385 390 395 400 Arg Lys Val Lys Leu Asp His Glu Tyr Leu Ser Met Ala Val Leu Val 405 410 415 Gln Glu Val Ile Asn Ala Asp Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn 420 425 430 Pro Ala Ser Gly Asp Ser Ser Glu Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly 435 440 445 Leu Gly Glu Thr Leu Val Gly Ala Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala Leu Ser Phe 450 455 460 Ile Cys Lys Lys Arg Asp Leu Asn Ser Pro Gln Val Leu Gly Asn Pro 465 470 475 480 Ser Lys Pro Val Gly Leu Phe Ile Arg Arg Ser Ile Ile Phe Arg Ser 485 490 495 Asp Ser Asn Gly Glu Asp Leu Glu Gly Asn Asp Gly Ala Gly His Tyr 500 505 510 Asp Ser Val Pro Met Gly Glu Pro Glu Lys Val Val Leu Asp Tyr Ser 515 520 525 Ser Asp Lys Leu Ile Leu Asp Gly Ser Phe Arg Gln Ser Ile Leu Ser 530 535 540 Ser Ile Ala Arg Ala Gly Asn Glu Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr Gly Thr Pro 545 550 555 560 Gln Asp Ile Glu Gly Val Ile Lys Asp Gly Lys Val Tyr Val Val Gln 565 570 575 Thr Arg Pro Gln Met 580 13 517 DNA Glycine max unsure (371) n = a, c, g or t 13 aaggtacagc caagttcttg ttgaataaaa tagcggaaat ggaaagtgag gcacaaaagt 60 ccttcatgca tcgatttaac attgcatcgg atttgataga tgaagctaaa aatgctggtc 120 aacaaggtct tgcggggatt ttggtgtgga tgagattcat ggctactagg cagctcatat 180 ggaacaaaaa ttacaatgtg aagccacgtg agataagtaa agcacaggat aggcttacag 240 acttgctcca ggatgtttat gcaagttacc cacagtatag ggaaattgtg aggatgatct 300 tgtcgactgt tggtcgtgga ggtgaaggag atgtcggaca gaggattcgg gatgaaatcc 360 ttgttatcca ngagaaataa tgattgtaaa ggtggaatga tggaggaatg gcaccagaaa 420 ttacacaata atactagtcc tgatgatgtt gtaatctgtc aagcactaat tgattatata 480 aatagtgact ttgntattgg tgtttactgg caaacat 517 14 171 PRT Glycine max UNSURE (123) Xaa = any amino acid 14 Gly Thr Ala Lys Phe Leu Leu Asn Lys Ile Ala Glu Met Glu Ser Glu 1 5 10 15 Ala Gln Lys Ser Phe Met His Arg Phe Asn Ile Ala Ser Asp Leu Ile 20 25 30 Asp Glu Ala Lys Asn Ala Gly Gln Gln Gly Leu Ala Gly Ile Leu Val 35 40 45 Trp Met Arg Phe Met Ala Thr Arg Gln Leu Ile Trp Asn Lys Asn Tyr 50 55 60 Asn Val Lys Pro Arg Glu Ile Ser Lys Ala Gln Asp Arg Leu Thr Asp 65 70 75 80 Leu Leu Gln Asp Val Tyr Ala Ser Tyr Pro Gln Tyr Arg Glu Ile Val 85 90 95 Arg Met Ile Leu Ser Thr Val Gly Arg Gly Gly Glu Gly Asp Val Gly 100 105 110 Gln Arg Ile Arg Asp Glu Ile Leu Val Ile Xaa Arg Asn Asn Asp Cys 115 120 125 Lys Gly Gly Met Met Glu Glu Trp His Gln Lys Leu His Asn Asn Thr 130 135 140 Ser Pro Asp Asp Val Val Ile Cys Gln Ala Leu Ile Asp Tyr Ile Asn 145 150 155 160 Ser Asp Phe Xaa Ile Gly Val Tyr Trp Gln Thr 165 170 15 4846 DNA Zea mays 15 ccacgcgtcc ggcttcatct tgctgatcgt gtccgtggct tcttgatact ccgtgactgt 60 ctccgtccga agcgagtgag caagccgacc aacagcggct gagattcgct gcaacgtcgg 120 tatcaaaagg tgtccgagcg gttgagattc gcgtgccatg tccggattca gtgccgcggc 180 caacgcagcg gcggctgagc ggtgcgcgct cgcgttccgc gcacggcccg cggcctcctc 240 gccagcgaag cggcagcagc agccgcagcc agcgtccctc cgacgcagcg ggggccagcg 300 ccgccccacg acgctctccg cctctagccg cggccccgtc gtgccgcgcg ccgtcgccac 360 gtccgcggac cgcgcgtccc ccgaccttat cggaaagttc acgctggatt ccaactccga 420 gctccaggtc gcagtgaacc cagcgccgca gggtttggtg tcagagatta gcctggaggt 480 gaccaacaca agcggttccc tgattttgca ttggggagcc cttcgcccgg acaagagaga 540 ttggatcctc ccgtccagaa aacctgatgg aacgacagtg tacaagaaca gggctctcag 600 gacacctttt gtaaagtcag gtgataactc cactctaagg attgagatag atgatcctgg 660 ggtgcacgcc attgagttcc tcatctttga cgagacacag aacaaatggt ttaaaaacaa 720 tggccagaat tttcaggttc agttccagtc gagccgccat cagggtactg gtgcatctgg 780 tgcctcctct tctgctactt ctaccttggt gccagaggat cttgtgcaga tccaagctta 840 ccttcggtgg gaaagaaggg gaaagcagtc atacacacca gagcaagaaa aggaggagta 900 tgaagctgca cgagctgagt taatagagga agtaaacaga ggtgtttctt tagagaagct 960 tcgagctaaa ttgacaaaag cacctgaagc acctgagtcg gatgaaagta aatcttctgc 1020 atctcgaatg cccatcggta aacttccaga ggatcttgta caggtgcagg cttatataag 1080 gtgggagcaa gcgggcaagc caaactatcc tcctgagaag caactggtag aatttgagga 1140 agcaaggaag gaactgcagg ctgaggtgga caagggaatc tctattgatc agttgaggca 1200 gaaaattttg aaaggaaaca ttgagagtaa agtttccaag cagctgaaga acaagaagta 1260 cttctctgta gaaaggattc agcgcaaaaa gagagatatc acacaacttc tcagtaaaca 1320 taagcataca cttgtggaag ataaagtaga ggttgtacca aaacaaccaa ctgttcttga 1380 tctcttcacc aagtctttac atgagaagga tggctgtgaa gttctaagca gaaagctctt 1440 caagttcggc gataaagaga tactggcaat ttctaccaag gttcaaaata aaacagaagt 1500 tcacttggca acaaaccata ccgacccact tattcttcac tggtctttgg caaaaaatgc 1560 tggagaatgg aaggcacctt ctccaaatat attgccatct ggttccacat tgctggacaa 1620 ggcgtgtgaa actgaattta ctaaatctga attggatggt ttgcattacc aggttgttga 1680 gatagagctt gatgatggag gatacaaagg aatgccattt gttcttcggt ctggtgaaac 1740 atggaaaaaa aataatggtt ctgatttttt cctagatttc agcacccatg atgtcagaaa 1800 tattaagtta aagggcaatg gtgatgctgg taaaggtact gctaaggcat tgctggagag 1860 aatagcagat ctggaggaag atgcccagcg atctcttatg cacagattca atattgcagc 1920 agatctagct gaccaagcca gagatgctgg acttttgggt attgttgggc tttttgtttg 1980 gattagattc atggctacca ggcaactaac atggaataag aactataatg tgaagccacg 2040 tgagataagc aaagcacagg ataggtttac agatgatctt gagaatatgt acaaagctta 2100 tccacagtac agagagatat taagaatgat aatggctgct gttggtcgcg gaggtgaagg 2160 tgatgttggt caacgcattc gtgatgagat attagtaata cagagaaata atgactgcaa 2220 aggtggaatg atggaagaat ggcaccagaa attgcacaac aatacaagcc cagatgatgt 2280 agtgatatgc caggccttaa ttgattatat caagagtgac tttgatataa gcgtttactg 2340 ggacaccttg aacaaaaatg gcataaccaa agagcgtctc ttgagctatg atcgtgctat 2400 tcattcagaa ccaaatttca gaagtgaaca gaaggcgggt ttactccgtg acctgggaaa 2460 ttacatgaga agcctaaagg ctgtgcattc tggtgctgat cttgaatctg ctatagcaag 2520 ttgtatggga tacaaatcag agggtgaagg tttcatggtt ggtgttcaga tcaatccagt 2580 gaagggttta ccatctggat ttccggagtt gcttgaattt gtgcttgaac atgttgagga 2640 taaatcagcg gaaccacttc ttgaggggct attggaagct cgagttgaac tgcgcccttt 2700 gcttcttgat tcgcgtgaac gcatgaaaga tcttatattt ttggacattg ctcttgattc 2760 taccttcagg acagcaattg aaaggtcata tgaggagctg aatgatgcag ccccagagaa 2820 aataatgtac ttcatcagtc ttgtccttga aaatcttgcg ctttcaattg acgacaatga 2880 agacatcctg tattgtttaa agggatggaa ccaagccttg gaaatggcta agcaaaaaga 2940 cgaccaatgg gcgctctatg ctaaagcatt tcttgacaga aacagacttg cccttgcgag 3000 caagggagaa caataccata atatgatgca gccctctgct gagtatcttg gctcgttact 3060 cagcatagac caatgggcag tcaatatctt cacagaagaa attatacgcg gtggatcagc 3120 tgctactctg tctgctcttc tgaaccgatt tgatcctgtt ttaaggaatg ttgctcacct 3180 cggaagttgg caggttataa gcccggttga agtatcaggt tatgtggttg tggttgatga 3240 gttacttgct gtccagaaca aatcttatga taaaccaacc atccttgtgg caaagagtgt 3300 caagggagag gaagaaatac cagatggagt agttggtgta attacacctg atatgccaga 3360 tgttctgtct catgtgtcag tccgagcaag gaatagcaag gtactgtttg cgacctgttt 3420 tgaccacacc actctatctg aacttgaagg atatgatcag aaactgtttt ccttcaagcc 3480 tacttctgca gatataacct atagggagat cacagagagt gaacttcagc aatcaagttc 3540 tccaaatgca gaagttggcc atgcagtacc atctatttca ttggccaaga agaaatttct 3600 tggaaaatat gcaatatcag ccgaagaatt ctctgaggaa atggttgggg ccaagtctcg 3660 gaatatagca tacctcaaag gaaaagtacc ttcatgggtc ggtgtcccaa cgtcagttgc 3720 gataccattt ggcacttttg agaaggtttt gtcagatggg cttaataagg aagtagcaca 3780 gagcatagag aagcttaaga tcagacttgc ccaagaagat tttagtgctc taggtgaaat 3840 aagaaaagtc gtccttaatc ttactgctcc tatgcaattg gttaatgagc tgaaggagag 3900 gatgctaggc tctggaatgc cctggcctgg tgatgaagga gacaagcgtt gggagcaagc 3960 atggatggct attaaaaagg tttgggcatc aaaatggaac gaaagagcat attttagcac 4020 acgcaaggtg aaacttgatc atgagtacct ttcgatggct gttctcgtgc aagaagttgt 4080 gaatgcagat tatgcttttg tcattcatac cacaaaccca tcgtctggag attcttctga 4140 gatatatgct gaagtggtga aagggcttgg cgagaccctc gtgggagcct atcctggtcg 4200 tgctatgagc tttgtttgca aaaaagatga ccttgactct cccaagttac ttggttaccc 4260 aagcaagcca attggtctct tcataaggca atcaatcatc ttccgttccg actccaacgg 4320 tgaggacctg gaaggttatg ctggagcagg attatatgat agtgtaccga tggatgagga 4380 ggatgaggtt gtacttgatt atacaactga ccctcttata gtagaccgtg gattccgaag 4440 ctcaatcctc tcaagcatag cacgggctgg ccatgccatc gaggagctat atggttctcc 4500 tcaggacgtc gagggagtag tgaaggatgg aaaaatctat gtagtccaga caagaccaca 4560 gatgtagtat gtatgcatct attagacagc tcaataagca ctgttgtacg cttgtatggt 4620 tgggacatat gggcgttatg gcatgtatag ttgtatgcct agatgtacaa cacgtgtact 4680 cgtatatata tatataaatg ctgaaacaag cattggtcct gtactgtagt ttctacattt 4740 cattgtcacc aataattaag tgtactccta tggctgggag tctatgaaaa tggacgtgtt 4800 gacttattgg gtaataaata atttatataa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaag 4846 16 1469 PRT Zea mays 16 Met Ser Gly Phe Ser Ala Ala Ala Asn Ala Ala Ala Ala Glu Arg Cys 1 5 10 15 Ala Leu Ala Phe Arg Ala Arg Pro Ala Ala Ser Ser Pro Ala Lys Arg 20 25 30 Gln Gln Gln Pro Gln Pro Ala Ser Leu Arg Arg Ser Gly Gly Gln Arg 35 40 45 Arg Pro Thr Thr Leu Ser Ala Ser Ser Arg Gly Pro Val Val Pro Arg 50 55 60 Ala Val Ala Thr Ser Ala Asp Arg Ala Ser Pro Asp Leu Ile Gly Lys 65 70 75 80 Phe Thr Leu Asp Ser Asn Ser Glu Leu Gln Val Ala Val Asn Pro Ala 85 90 95 Pro Gln Gly Leu Val Ser Glu Ile Ser Leu Glu Val Thr Asn Thr Ser 100 105 110 Gly Ser Leu Ile Leu His Trp Gly Ala Leu Arg Pro Asp Lys Arg Asp 115 120 125 Trp Ile Leu Pro Ser Arg Lys Pro Asp Gly Thr Thr Val Tyr Lys Asn 130 135 140 Arg Ala Leu Arg Thr Pro Phe Val Lys Ser Gly Asp Asn Ser Thr Leu 145 150 155 160 Arg Ile Glu Ile Asp Asp Pro Gly Val His Ala Ile Glu Phe Leu Ile 165 170 175 Phe Asp Glu Thr Gln Asn Lys Trp Phe Lys Asn Asn Gly Gln Asn Phe 180 185 190 Gln Val Gln Phe Gln Ser Ser Arg His Gln Gly Thr Gly Ala Ser Gly 195 200 205 Ala Ser Ser Ser Ala Thr Ser Thr Leu Val Pro Glu Asp Leu Val Gln 210 215 220 Ile Gln Ala Tyr Leu Arg Trp Glu Arg Arg Gly Lys Gln Ser Tyr Thr 225 230 235 240 Pro Glu Gln Glu Lys Glu Glu Tyr Glu Ala Ala Arg Ala Glu Leu Ile 245 250 255 Glu Glu Val Asn Arg Gly Val Ser Leu Glu Lys Leu Arg Ala Lys Leu 260 265 270 Thr Lys Ala Pro Glu Ala Pro Glu Ser Asp Glu Ser Lys Ser Ser Ala 275 280 285 Ser Arg Met Pro Ile Gly Lys Leu Pro Glu Asp Leu Val Gln Val Gln 290 295 300 Ala Tyr Ile Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Gly Lys Pro Asn Tyr Pro Pro Glu 305 310 315 320 Lys Gln Leu Val Glu Phe Glu Glu Ala Arg Lys Glu Leu Gln Ala Glu 325 330 335 Val Asp Lys Gly Ile Ser Ile Asp Gln Leu Arg Gln Lys Ile Leu Lys 340 345 350 Gly Asn Ile Glu Ser Lys Val Ser Lys Gln Leu Lys Asn Lys Lys Tyr 355 360 365 Phe Ser Val Glu Arg Ile Gln Arg Lys Lys Arg Asp Ile Thr Gln Leu 370 375 380 Leu Ser Lys His Lys His Thr Leu Val Glu Asp Lys Val Glu Val Val 385 390 395 400 Pro Lys Gln Pro Thr Val Leu Asp Leu Phe Thr Lys Ser Leu His Glu 405 410 415 Lys Asp Gly Cys Glu Val Leu Ser Arg Lys Leu Phe Lys Phe Gly Asp 420 425 430 Lys Glu Ile Leu Ala Ile Ser Thr Lys Val Gln Asn Lys Thr Glu Val 435 440 445 His Leu Ala Thr Asn His Thr Asp Pro Leu Ile Leu His Trp Ser Leu 450 455 460 Ala Lys Asn Ala Gly Glu Trp Lys Ala Pro Ser Pro Asn Ile Leu Pro 465 470 475 480 Ser Gly Ser Thr Leu Leu Asp Lys Ala Cys Glu Thr Glu Phe Thr Lys 485 490 495 Ser Glu Leu Asp Gly Leu His Tyr Gln Val Val Glu Ile Glu Leu Asp 500 505 510 Asp Gly Gly Tyr Lys Gly Met Pro Phe Val Leu Arg Ser Gly Glu Thr 515 520 525 Trp Lys Lys Asn Asn Gly Ser Asp Phe Phe Leu Asp Phe Ser Thr His 530 535 540 Asp Val Arg Asn Ile Lys Leu Lys Gly Asn Gly Asp Ala Gly Lys Gly 545 550 555 560 Thr Ala Lys Ala Leu Leu Glu Arg Ile Ala Asp Leu Glu Glu Asp Ala 565 570 575 Gln Arg Ser Leu Met His Arg Phe Asn Ile Ala Ala Asp Leu Ala Asp 580 585 590 Gln Ala Arg Asp Ala Gly Leu Leu Gly Ile Val Gly Leu Phe Val Trp 595 600 605 Ile Arg Phe Met Ala Thr Arg Gln Leu Thr Trp Asn Lys Asn Tyr Asn 610 615 620 Val Lys Pro Arg Glu Ile Ser Lys Ala Gln Asp Arg Phe Thr Asp Asp 625 630 635 640 Leu Glu Asn Met Tyr Lys Ala Tyr Pro Gln Tyr Arg Glu Ile Leu Arg 645 650 655 Met Ile Met Ala Ala Val Gly Arg Gly Gly Glu Gly Asp Val Gly Gln 660 665 670 Arg Ile Arg Asp Glu Ile Leu Val Ile Gln Arg Asn Asn Asp Cys Lys 675 680 685 Gly Gly Met Met Glu Glu Trp His Gln Lys Leu His Asn Asn Thr Ser 690 695 700 Pro Asp Asp Val Val Ile Cys Gln Ala Leu Ile Asp Tyr Ile Lys Ser 705 710 715 720 Asp Phe Asp Ile Ser Val Tyr Trp Asp Thr Leu Asn Lys Asn Gly Ile 725 730 735 Thr Lys Glu Arg Leu Leu Ser Tyr Asp Arg Ala Ile His Ser Glu Pro 740 745 750 Asn Phe Arg Ser Glu Gln Lys Ala Gly Leu Leu Arg Asp Leu Gly Asn 755 760 765 Tyr Met Arg Ser Leu Lys Ala Val His Ser Gly Ala Asp Leu Glu Ser 770 775 780 Ala Ile Ala Ser Cys Met Gly Tyr Lys Ser Glu Gly Glu Gly Phe Met 785 790 795 800 Val Gly Val Gln Ile Asn Pro Val Lys Gly Leu Pro Ser Gly Phe Pro 805 810 815 Glu Leu Leu Glu Phe Val Leu Glu His Val Glu Asp Lys Ser Ala Glu 820 825 830 Pro Leu Leu Glu Gly Leu Leu Glu Ala Arg Val Glu Leu Arg Pro Leu 835 840 845 Leu Leu Asp Ser Arg Glu Arg Met Lys Asp Leu Ile Phe Leu Asp Ile 850 855 860 Ala Leu Asp Ser Thr Phe Arg Thr Ala Ile Glu Arg Ser Tyr Glu Glu 865 870 875 880 Leu Asn Asp Ala Ala Pro Glu Lys Ile Met Tyr Phe Ile Ser Leu Val 885 890 895 Leu Glu Asn Leu Ala Leu Ser Ile Asp Asp Asn Glu Asp Ile Leu Tyr 900 905 910 Cys Leu Lys Gly Trp Asn Gln Ala Leu Glu Met Ala Lys Gln Lys Asp 915 920 925 Asp Gln Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ala Lys Ala Phe Leu Asp Arg Asn Arg Leu 930 935 940 Ala Leu Ala Ser Lys Gly Glu Gln Tyr His Asn Met Met Gln Pro Ser 945 950 955 960 Ala Glu Tyr Leu Gly Ser Leu Leu Ser Ile Asp Gln Trp Ala Val Asn 965 970 975 Ile Phe Thr Glu Glu Ile Ile Arg Gly Gly Ser Ala Ala Thr Leu Ser 980 985 990 Ala Leu Leu Asn Arg Phe Asp Pro Val Leu Arg Asn Val Ala His Leu 995 1000 1005 Gly Ser Trp Gln Val Ile Ser Pro Val Glu Val Ser Gly Tyr Val Val 1010 1015 1020 Val Val Asp Glu Leu Leu Ala Val Gln Asn Lys Ser Tyr Asp Lys Pro 1025 1030 1035 1040 Thr Ile Leu Val Ala Lys Ser Val Lys Gly Glu Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp 1045 1050 1055 Gly Val Val Gly Val Ile Thr Pro Asp Met Pro Asp Val Leu Ser His 1060 1065 1070 Val Ser Val Arg Ala Arg Asn Ser Lys Val Leu Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe 1075 1080 1085 Asp His Thr Thr Leu Ser Glu Leu Glu Gly Tyr Asp Gln Lys Leu Phe 1090 1095 1100 Ser Phe Lys Pro Thr Ser Ala Asp Ile Thr Tyr Arg Glu Ile Thr Glu 1105 1110 1115 1120 Ser Glu Leu Gln Gln Ser Ser Ser Pro Asn Ala Glu Val Gly His Ala 1125 1130 1135 Val Pro Ser Ile Ser Leu Ala Lys Lys Lys Phe Leu Gly Lys Tyr Ala 1140 1145 1150 Ile Ser Ala Glu Glu Phe Ser Glu Glu Met Val Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg 1155 1160 1165 Asn Ile Ala Tyr Leu Lys Gly Lys Val Pro Ser Trp Val Gly Val Pro 1170 1175 1180 Thr Ser Val Ala Ile Pro Phe Gly Thr Phe Glu Lys Val Leu Ser Asp 1185 1190 1195 1200 Gly Leu Asn Lys Glu Val Ala Gln Ser Ile Glu Lys Leu Lys Ile Arg 1205 1210 1215 Leu Ala Gln Glu Asp Phe Ser Ala Leu Gly Glu Ile Arg Lys Val Val 1220 1225 1230 Leu Asn Leu Thr Ala Pro Met Gln Leu Val Asn Glu Leu Lys Glu Arg 1235 1240 1245 Met Leu Gly Ser Gly Met Pro Trp Pro Gly Asp Glu Gly Asp Lys Arg 1250 1255 1260 Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Met Ala Ile Lys Lys Val Trp Ala Ser Lys Trp 1265 1270 1275 1280 Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr Arg Lys Val Lys Leu Asp His Glu 1285 1290 1295 Tyr Leu Ser Met Ala Val Leu Val Gln Glu Val Val Asn Ala Asp Tyr 1300 1305 1310 Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn Pro Ser Ser Gly Asp Ser Ser Glu 1315 1320 1325 Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly Leu Gly Glu Thr Leu Val Gly Ala 1330 1335 1340 Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala Met Ser Phe Val Cys Lys Lys Asp Asp Leu Asp 1345 1350 1355 1360 Ser Pro Lys Leu Leu Gly Tyr Pro Ser Lys Pro Ile Gly Leu Phe Ile 1365 1370 1375 Arg Gln Ser Ile Ile Phe Arg Ser Asp Ser Asn Gly Glu Asp Leu Glu 1380 1385 1390 Gly Tyr Ala Gly Ala Gly Leu Tyr Asp Ser Val Pro Met Asp Glu Glu 1395 1400 1405 Asp Glu Val Val Leu Asp Tyr Thr Thr Asp Pro Leu Ile Val Asp Arg 1410 1415 1420 Gly Phe Arg Ser Ser Ile Leu Ser Ser Ile Ala Arg Ala Gly His Ala 1425 1430 1435 1440 Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr Gly Ser Pro Gln Asp Val Glu Gly Val Val Lys 1445 1450 1455 Asp Gly Lys Ile Tyr Val Val Gln Thr Arg Pro Gln Met 1460 1465 17 4576 DNA Oryza sativa 17 cttacagata ttcgtgcaga tgagcggatt ctccgcggca gctgctgcgg ccgagcggtg 60 cgcgctcggc ctcggcgtcc acgcgcgccc cgcctcgccc tcgccggcgc tgctcccgcc 120 ggcggctctc cgccgcggcc gccgtctccc cgcggccacc accaccctcg ccgtctcccg 180 tcggagcctc ctcgcccctc gcgccatcgc cgcttccacc ggccgcgcct ccccgggcct 240 tgtcggaagg ttcaccctgg atgccaactc cgagcttaag gtgacattga acccagcacc 300 gcagggttcg gtggtggaga tcaatctaga ggcaactaac accagcggct ccctgatact 360 gcattggggc gcccttcgcc cggatagagg agaatggctc ctaccatccc ggaaaccaga 420 tggcacgaca gtgtacaaga acagggctct taggacgcct tttataaagt caggtgataa 480 ctccacgctg aaaattgaga tagatgatcc tgcagtgcaa gccattgagt tcctcatatt 540 tgatgaggca cggaataatt ggtacaaaaa caatggccag aatttccaaa ttcagctaca 600 agcgagccaa tatcaagggc agggtacatc tactgctact tcttctactg tggttccaga 660 ggatcttgtg cagatacaat catatcttcg gtgggaaaga aagggaaagc agtcatatac 720 acctgagcaa gagaaggagg agtatgaagc agcacgaact gagttgatag aggaattaaa 780 caagggtgtt tctttggaga agctacgagc gaaactgaca aagacacctg aggcaactga 840 tagtaatgct cctgcatctg aaagcactgt gactactaaa gtcccagagg aacttgtaca 900 agtccaggct tacataaggt gggagaaagc aggcaagcca aattatgccc cagagaagca 960 attggtcgag tttgaggaag caaggaagga actgcagtct gagttggata aggggacctc 1020 agttgagcag ttgaggaaca aaattttgaa agggaacatt gagacaaaag tttccaagca 1080 gctgaaggac aaaaaatact tttctgtgga aagaattcag cggaaaaaac gagatattgt 1140 gcaactactt aaaaaacaca agcctactgt tatggaagcg caagtagaga ctcctaaaca 1200 acccactgtt ctggatctct tcacaaagtc attacaggag caggataact gtgaggttct 1260 aagcagaaag cttttcaagt tcggtgacaa ggagatactg ggaattacca ccgttgctct 1320 aggaaaaacc aaagttcact tggcaacaaa ctatatggag ccacttatac ttcactgggc 1380 gttgtcaaaa gagaatggag agtggcaggc acctccctca agcatattgc catctggttc 1440 atcattgcta gacaaggcat gtgaaacttc attcagtgaa tatgaattga atggtctgca 1500 ttgtcaggtt gttgagatcg agcttgacga tggtggatac aagcggatgc cctttgttct 1560 ccggtctggt gaaacatgga tgaaaaataa tggctctgac ttttacttgg atttcagcac 1620 caaagttgca aaaaatacaa aggatactgg tgatgctggt aaaggcactg ctgaggcctt 1680 gcttgaaaga atagcagatc tagaggaaga tgcccaacga tctcttatgc acagattcaa 1740 tattgcagca gatctagttg accaagcgag agataatgga ttattgggta ttattggaat 1800 ttttgtttgg attgggttca tggctacaag gcaactaata tggaacaaga actacaatgt 1860 gaagccacgt gagataagca aagcccaaga taggtttaca gatgatcttg agaatatgta 1920 cagaacttac ccacaatatc aggagatctt aagaatgata atgtctgctg ttggtcgggg 1980 aggtgaaggt gatgttggtc aacgcattcg tgatgagata ttagtaatcc agagaaataa 2040 tgactgcaaa ggtggaatga tggaggagtg gcaccagaaa ctgcacaaca atacaagccc 2100 agatgatgta gtgatctgcc aggccctact tgattatatc aagagtgatt ttgatactgg 2160 tgtttactgg gacaccttga aaaaaggtgg tataacaaaa gagcgtctat tgagctatga 2220 tcgaccgatt cattcagagc caaatttcag gagtgaacag aaagatagct tactccgtga 2280 cttgggcaat tatatgagaa gcctcaaggc agtgcattct ggtgctgatc ttgaatctgc 2340 tatagcaact tgcatgggat acaaatcaga gggtgaaggt ttcatggttg gtgttcagat 2400 taatccagtg aagggtttgc catctggatt tcctaaattg cttgaattta tacttgacca 2460 tgttgaggat aaatcagcaa gaccacttct tggagggtta ttggaggctc gagctgaact 2520 acaccctttg ctccttggct ctcctgaacg catgaaggat cttatctttt tagacattgc 2580 tcttgattct actttcagga cagcagtcga aagatcatat gaggagctca ataatgtaga 2640 accagagaaa attatgtact tcatcagtct tgtccttgaa aatcttgctt tatccaccga 2700 cgacaatgaa gatatcctat attgcttaaa gggatggaat caagccgtgg aaatggctaa 2760 acagaaaaac aaccaatggg ctctctatgc taaagcattt ctggacagaa ccagacttgc 2820 ccttgcaagc aagggagaac aatactataa tttgatgcag ccctcagctg aatatcttgg 2880 ctcgttactt aacattgacc aatgggcagt taatatcttt acagaagaaa ttattcgtgg 2940 tggatcagct gctaccctgt ctgctcttct gaatcggatt gatcctgttc ttaggaatgt 3000 tgcacagctt ggaagttggc aggttataag cccagttgaa gtatcaggtt acattgtagt 3060 ggttgatgaa ttgcttgctg ttcaaaacaa atcctatgat aaaccaacta tccttgtggc 3120 aaagagtgtc aagggagagg aagaaatacc agatggagtt gttggtgtta ttacacctga 3180 tatgccagat gttctctccc atgtatcagt ccgagcaagg aattgcaagg ttttatttgc 3240 aacatgcttt gatcctaaca ccttgtctga actccaagga catgatggga aagtgttttc 3300 cttcaaacct acttctgcag atatcaccta tagggagatt ccagagagtg aactgcaatc 3360 aggttctcta aatgcagaag ctggccaggc agtgccatct gtgtcattag tcaagaagaa 3420 gtttcttgga aaatatgcaa tatcagcaga agaattctct gaggaaatgg ttggggccaa 3480 gtctcgcaac gtagcatacc tcaaaggaaa agtaccctca tgggttggtg tccctacatc 3540 agttgcgatt ccatttggga cctttgagaa ggttttgtct gatgaaatca ataaggaagt 3600 cgcgcaaacc atacaaatgc tgaagggaaa acttgctcaa gatgatttta gtgctctagg 3660 cgaaatacgg aaaactgttc tcaatttaac tgctcctact caactgatca aggaactgaa 3720 ggagaagatg ctaggctctg gaatgccctg gcctggagat gaaggtgacc aacgttggga 3780 gcaagcatgg atggcaatta aaaaggtttg ggcgtcaaaa tggaatgaaa gagcatattt 3840 tagcactcgt aaggtgaagc ttgatcatga ctacctttcc atggctgtac ttgtacaaga 3900 aattgtcaat gcagactatg cctttgtcat tcatactact aacccatcat cgggagattc 3960 gtctgagata tatgctgaag tggtgaaagg gcttggagaa acacttgtag gagcctatcc 4020 tggtcgcgcc atgagctttg tatgtaagaa aaacgacctt gactctccca aggtactggg 4080 tttcccaagc aagccaattg gtgtcttcat aaagagatca atcatctttc gttcggattc 4140 caacggtgag gatttagaag ggtatgctgg agcaagactg tatgatagtg tccctatgga 4200 tgaggaagat gaagtcatag tcgactacaa caacggaccc ctcattacag atcagggatt 4260 ccaaaaatcc aacctcccga gcattgcacc ggctggtcat gccattgagg agctttatgg 4320 gtccccacag gatgttgagg gtgcagtgaa ggaagggaag ctatacgtag tacagacaag 4380 accacagatg taatctatat gtatatttta tagccaagtc aatcaggcaa tgttgtagag 4440 taagatatac gggccgtggg acatgtataa cacgttacgc cctttttttt attatttgct 4500 ttcatactca caatacacta atttataggg cttattttat cgccaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 4560 agaaaaaaaa aaaaaa 4576 18 1457 PRT Oryza sativa 18 Met Ser Gly Phe Ser Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Glu Arg Cys Ala Leu 1 5 10 15 Gly Leu Gly Val His Ala Arg Pro Ala Ser Pro Ser Pro Ala Leu Leu 20 25 30 Pro Pro Ala Ala Leu Arg Arg Gly Arg Arg Leu Pro Ala Ala Thr Thr 35 40 45 Thr Leu Ala Val Ser Arg Arg Ser Leu Leu Ala Pro Arg Ala Ile Ala 50 55 60 Ala Ser Thr Gly Arg Ala Ser Pro Gly Leu Val Gly Arg Phe Thr Leu 65 70 75 80 Asp Ala Asn Ser Glu Leu Lys Val Thr Leu Asn Pro Ala Pro Gln Gly 85 90 95 Ser Val Val Glu Ile Asn Leu Glu Ala Thr Asn Thr Ser Gly Ser Leu 100 105 110 Ile Leu His Trp Gly Ala Leu Arg Pro Asp Arg Gly Glu Trp Leu Leu 115 120 125 Pro Ser Arg Lys Pro Asp Gly Thr Thr Val Tyr Lys Asn Arg Ala Leu 130 135 140 Arg Thr Pro Phe Ile Lys Ser Gly Asp Asn Ser Thr Leu Lys Ile Glu 145 150 155 160 Ile Asp Asp Pro Ala Val Gln Ala Ile Glu Phe Leu Ile Phe Asp Glu 165 170 175 Ala Arg Asn Asn Trp Tyr Lys Asn Asn Gly Gln Asn Phe Gln Ile Gln 180 185 190 Leu Gln Ala Ser Gln Tyr Gln Gly Gln Gly Thr Ser Thr Ala Thr Ser 195 200 205 Ser Thr Val Val Pro Glu Asp Leu Val Gln Ile Gln Ser Tyr Leu Arg 210 215 220 Trp Glu Arg Lys Gly Lys Gln Ser Tyr Thr Pro Glu Gln Glu Lys Glu 225 230 235 240 Glu Tyr Glu Ala Ala Arg Thr Glu Leu Ile Glu Glu Leu Asn Lys Gly 245 250 255 Val Ser Leu Glu Lys Leu Arg Ala Lys Leu Thr Lys Thr Pro Glu Ala 260 265 270 Thr Asp Ser Asn Ala Pro Ala Ser Glu Ser Thr Val Thr Thr Lys Val 275 280 285 Pro Glu Glu Leu Val Gln Val Gln Ala Tyr Ile Arg Trp Glu Lys Ala 290 295 300 Gly Lys Pro Asn Tyr Ala Pro Glu Lys Gln Leu Val Glu Phe Glu Glu 305 310 315 320 Ala Arg Lys Glu Leu Gln Ser Glu Leu Asp Lys Gly Thr Ser Val Glu 325 330 335 Gln Leu Arg Asn Lys Ile Leu Lys Gly Asn Ile Glu Thr Lys Val Ser 340 345 350 Lys Gln Leu Lys Asp Lys Lys Tyr Phe Ser Val Glu Arg Ile Gln Arg 355 360 365 Lys Lys Arg Asp Ile Val Gln Leu Leu Lys Lys His Lys Pro Thr Val 370 375 380 Met Glu Ala Gln Val Glu Thr Pro Lys Gln Pro Thr Val Leu Asp Leu 385 390 395 400 Phe Thr Lys Ser Leu Gln Glu Gln Asp Asn Cys Glu Val Leu Ser Arg 405 410 415 Lys Leu Phe Lys Phe Gly Asp Lys Glu Ile Leu Gly Ile Thr Thr Val 420 425 430 Ala Leu Gly Lys Thr Lys Val His Leu Ala Thr Asn Tyr Met Glu Pro 435 440 445 Leu Ile Leu His Trp Ala Leu Ser Lys Glu Asn Gly Glu Trp Gln Ala 450 455 460 Pro Pro Ser Ser Ile Leu Pro Ser Gly Ser Ser Leu Leu Asp Lys Ala 465 470 475 480 Cys Glu Thr Ser Phe Ser Glu Tyr Glu Leu Asn Gly Leu His Cys Gln 485 490 495 Val Val Glu Ile Glu Leu Asp Asp Gly Gly Tyr Lys Arg Met Pro Phe 500 505 510 Val Leu Arg Ser Gly Glu Thr Trp Met Lys Asn Asn Gly Ser Asp Phe 515 520 525 Tyr Leu Asp Phe Ser Thr Lys Val Ala Lys Asn Thr Lys Asp Thr Gly 530 535 540 Asp Ala Gly Lys Gly Thr Ala Glu Ala Leu Leu Glu Arg Ile Ala Asp 545 550 555 560 Leu Glu Glu Asp Ala Gln Arg Ser Leu Met His Arg Phe Asn Ile Ala 565 570 575 Ala Asp Leu Val Asp Gln Ala Arg Asp Asn Gly Leu Leu Gly Ile Ile 580 585 590 Gly Ile Phe Val Trp Ile Gly Phe Met Ala Thr Arg Gln Leu Ile Trp 595 600 605 Asn Lys Asn Tyr Asn Val Lys Pro Arg Glu Ile Ser Lys Ala Gln Asp 610 615 620 Arg Phe Thr Asp Asp Leu Glu Asn Met Tyr Arg Thr Tyr Pro Gln Tyr 625 630 635 640 Gln Glu Ile Leu Arg Met Ile Met Ser Ala Val Gly Arg Gly Gly Glu 645 650 655 Gly Asp Val Gly Gln Arg Ile Arg Asp Glu Ile Leu Val Ile Gln Arg 660 665 670 Asn Asn Asp Cys Lys Gly Gly Met Met Glu Glu Trp His Gln Lys Leu 675 680 685 His Asn Asn Thr Ser Pro Asp Asp Val Val Ile Cys Gln Ala Leu Leu 690 695 700 Asp Tyr Ile Lys Ser Asp Phe Asp Thr Gly Val Tyr Trp Asp Thr Leu 705 710 715 720 Lys Lys Gly Gly Ile Thr Lys Glu Arg Leu Leu Ser Tyr Asp Arg Pro 725 730 735 Ile His Ser Glu Pro Asn Phe Arg Ser Glu Gln Lys Asp Ser Leu Leu 740 745 750 Arg Asp Leu Gly Asn Tyr Met Arg Ser Leu Lys Ala Val His Ser Gly 755 760 765 Ala Asp Leu Glu Ser Ala Ile Ala Thr Cys Met Gly Tyr Lys Ser Glu 770 775 780 Gly Glu Gly Phe Met Val Gly Val Gln Ile Asn Pro Val Lys Gly Leu 785 790 795 800 Pro Ser Gly Phe Pro Lys Leu Leu Glu Phe Ile Leu Asp His Val Glu 805 810 815 Asp Lys Ser Ala Arg Pro Leu Leu Gly Gly Leu Leu Glu Ala Arg Ala 820 825 830 Glu Leu His Pro Leu Leu Leu Gly Ser Pro Glu Arg Met Lys Asp Leu 835 840 845 Ile Phe Leu Asp Ile Ala Leu Asp Ser Thr Phe Arg Thr Ala Val Glu 850 855 860 Arg Ser Tyr Glu Glu Leu Asn Asn Val Glu Pro Glu Lys Ile Met Tyr 865 870 875 880 Phe Ile Ser Leu Val Leu Glu Asn Leu Ala Leu Ser Thr Asp Asp Asn 885 890 895 Glu Asp Ile Leu Tyr Cys Leu Lys Gly Trp Asn Gln Ala Val Glu Met 900 905 910 Ala Lys Gln Lys Asn Asn Gln Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ala Lys Ala Phe Leu 915 920 925 Asp Arg Thr Arg Leu Ala Leu Ala Ser Lys Gly Glu Gln Tyr Tyr Asn 930 935 940 Leu Met Gln Pro Ser Ala Glu Tyr Leu Gly Ser Leu Leu Asn Ile Asp 945 950 955 960 Gln Trp Ala Val Asn Ile Phe Thr Glu Glu Ile Ile Arg Gly Gly Ser 965 970 975 Ala Ala Thr Leu Ser Ala Leu Leu Asn Arg Ile Asp Pro Val Leu Arg 980 985 990 Asn Val Ala Gln Leu Gly Ser Trp Gln Val Ile Ser Pro Val Glu Val 995 1000 1005 Ser Gly Tyr Ile Val Val Val Asp Glu Leu Leu Ala Val Gln Asn Lys 1010 1015 1020 Ser Tyr Asp Lys Pro Thr Ile Leu Val Ala Lys Ser Val Lys Gly Glu 1025 1030 1035 1040 Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp Gly Val Val Gly Val Ile Thr Pro Asp Met Pro 1045 1050 1055 Asp Val Leu Ser His Val Ser Val Arg Ala Arg Asn Cys Lys Val Leu 1060 1065 1070 Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe Asp Pro Asn Thr Leu Ser Glu Leu Gln Gly His 1075 1080 1085 Asp Gly Lys Val Phe Ser Phe Lys Pro Thr Ser Ala Asp Ile Thr Tyr 1090 1095 1100 Arg Glu Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Leu Gln Ser Gly Ser Leu Asn Ala Glu 1105 1110 1115 1120 Ala Gly Gln Ala Val Pro Ser Val Ser Leu Val Lys Lys Lys Phe Leu 1125 1130 1135 Gly Lys Tyr Ala Ile Ser Ala Glu Glu Phe Ser Glu Glu Met Val Gly 1140 1145 1150 Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Val Ala Tyr Leu Lys Gly Lys Val Pro Ser Trp 1155 1160 1165 Val Gly Val Pro Thr Ser Val Ala Ile Pro Phe Gly Thr Phe Glu Lys 1170 1175 1180 Val Leu Ser Asp Glu Ile Asn Lys Glu Val Ala Gln Thr Ile Gln Met 1185 1190 1195 1200 Leu Lys Gly Lys Leu Ala Gln Asp Asp Phe Ser Ala Leu Gly Glu Ile 1205 1210 1215 Arg Lys Thr Val Leu Asn Leu Thr Ala Pro Thr Gln Leu Ile Lys Glu 1220 1225 1230 Leu Lys Glu Lys Met Leu Gly Ser Gly Met Pro Trp Pro Gly Asp Glu 1235 1240 1245 Gly Asp Gln Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Met Ala Ile Lys Lys Val Trp 1250 1255 1260 Ala Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr Arg Lys Val Lys 1265 1270 1275 1280 Leu Asp His Asp Tyr Leu Ser Met Ala Val Leu Val Gln Glu Ile Val 1285 1290 1295 Asn Ala Asp Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn Pro Ser Ser Gly 1300 1305 1310 Asp Ser Ser Glu Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly Leu Gly Glu Thr 1315 1320 1325 Leu Val Gly Ala Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala Met Ser Phe Val Cys Lys Lys 1330 1335 1340 Asn Asp Leu Asp Ser Pro Lys Val Leu Gly Phe Pro Ser Lys Pro Ile 1345 1350 1355 1360 Gly Val Phe Ile Lys Arg Ser Ile Ile Phe Arg Ser Asp Ser Asn Gly 1365 1370 1375 Glu Asp Leu Glu Gly Tyr Ala Gly Ala Arg Leu Tyr Asp Ser Val Pro 1380 1385 1390 Met Asp Glu Glu Asp Glu Val Ile Val Asp Tyr Asn Asn Gly Pro Leu 1395 1400 1405 Ile Thr Asp Gln Gly Phe Gln Lys Ser Asn Leu Pro Ser Ile Ala Pro 1410 1415 1420 Ala Gly His Ala Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr Gly Ser Pro Gln Asp Val Glu 1425 1430 1435 1440 Gly Ala Val Lys Glu Gly Lys Leu Tyr Val Val Gln Thr Arg Pro Gln 1445 1450 1455 Met 19 4745 DNA Glycine max 19 gcaccagcct ctccccattt tcacgtgatt cccaatctca cactcttctc acaccttcaa 60 ccgattcaac gcaacaaagt gataaagtgt ggatccggga agatgagcca gagtatcttc 120 caccagacgg tgctttgtca aacgcaaacg gttgcggagc atcaaagtaa ggttagttcc 180 ttggaggtga gtgcgaacaa aggaaagaag aacctctttt tggctcctac aaattttcgc 240 gggagcaggc tgtgtgtgag gaaacgcaaa ttaaccatgg gaaggcacca ccaccgccac 300 gttgacgctg ttccacgcgc tgttttaacc accaatctgg cttctgagct ttctgggaag 360 ttcaaccttg acggaaatat tgagttgcag attgctgtta gttcttcaga accaggagct 420 gcaagacaag tagattttaa ggtttcatat aatagtgagt ctctgctttt acattgggga 480 gttgtgcgtg atcagccagg gaagtgggtt cttccttctc gtcacccaga tggaactaaa 540 aattataaga gcagagctct tagaactcct tttgtgaaat ccgactcagg atctttcctt 600 aaaatagaaa ttgacgatcc tgctgcacaa gccattgagt tcctcatact tgatgaggct 660 aagaataagt ggtttaagaa taatggtgag aactttcaca tcaagttacc agtaaaaagc 720 aagctatctc aagaagtttc agttcctgaa gaccttgtac agattcaagc atatcttagg 780 tgggaacgaa agggtaagca gatgtacact ccagagcaag agaaggagga atatgaagca 840 gctcggaatg aactattgga ggaagtagcc aggggtactt ctgtgcgaga tctccatgca 900 aggttaacta agaaaactaa agctgccgaa gtaaaggagc cttctgtttc tgaaacaaag 960 accatccctg atgaacttgt acagattcaa gcttttatac gatgggaaaa agctgggaag 1020 cctaactact ctcgggaaca acaacttatg gaatttgagg aagcaagaaa agaattgtta 1080 gaagagcttg agaagggggc ttctctggat gcgatacgga agaagattgt caaaggagag 1140 atacaaacta aagttgccaa gcaattgaaa accaaaaaat actttcgtgc tgaaagaata 1200 cagaggaaaa agagagattt gatgcagctt atcaaccgaa atgttgcaca aaatatagtt 1260 gaacaagtta tagatgctcc aaaagccttg acagtaattg aacattatgc caatgcaagg 1320 gaagaatatg aaagtggtcc tgttttgaat aagacaatat acaagcttgg tgataattat 1380 cttctggtcc ttgttaccaa ggatgctggc aagattaagg ttcacctagc tacagactcg 1440 aaaaaacctt ttacacttca ctgggcctta tctagaacat ctgaagagtg gttggtacca 1500 cctgaaactg ctctgccccc tggatctgtt actatgaatg aggccgctga aacacctttc 1560 aaagctggtt cttcgtctca tccttcttat gaggtccagt ccttggatat agaggttgat 1620 gatgatactt ttaaaggaat accttttgtc attctgtcgg atggagaatg gataaagaac 1680 aatggatcaa atttttatat tgaatttggt gggaagaagc agaaacagaa ggattttggc 1740 aatggcaaag gtacagccaa gttcttgttg aataaaatag cagaaatgga aagtgaggca 1800 caaaagtcct tcatgcatcg atttaacatt gcatcagatt tgatagatga agccaaaaat 1860 gctggtcaac tgggtcttgc ggggattttg gtgtggatga gattcatggc tacaaggcag 1920 ctcatatgga acaaaaatta caatgtgaag ccacgtgaga taagtaaagc acaggatagg 1980 cttacagact tgctccaaga tgtttatgca aattatccac agtataggga aattgtgagg 2040 atgatcttgt ccactgttgg tcgtggaggt gaaggagatg tcggacagag gattcgggat 2100 gaaatccttg ttatccagag aaataatgat tgcaaaggtg gaatgatgga ggaatggcac 2160 cagaaattac acaataatac tagtcctgat gatgttgtaa tctgtcaggc actaattgat 2220 tatataaata gtgactttga tattggtgtt tactggaaag cattgaatga caatagaata 2280 acaaaagagc ggcttctgag ctatgaccgt gccatccatt ctgaaccaaa ttttaggaga 2340 gatcagaagg aaggtcttct gcgagatctg ggaaactaca tgaggacttt aaaggcagtt 2400 cattccggtg cagatcttga atctgctatt tcaaattgta tgggctacaa atctgagggt 2460 cagggcttca tggtaggggt gaagataaat ccagtgccgg gtttgcctac tggttttcca 2520 gaattacttg agtttgtcat ggaacacgtt gaagagaaga atgttgaacc acttcttgag 2580 gggttgcttg aggctcgtca ggaactccaa ccatcactca gtaaatccca aagtcgtctg 2640 aaagatctta tatttttgga tgttgccctt gattctacag ttagaacagc agtggaaagg 2700 agttatgagg aattaaacaa tgctggacct gagaaaataa tgtacttcat tagcttggtt 2760 cttgaaaatc tcgcactttc atcggatgac aatgaagatc ttatctactg tttgaaggga 2820 tgggatgttg ccttaagcat gtgcaagatt aaagatactc attgggcatt gtacgcaaaa 2880 tcagtccttg acagaacccg tcttgcacta acaaacaagg ctcatttata ccaggaaatt 2940 ctgcaaccat cggcagaata tcttggatca ctgcttggcg tggacaaatg ggccgtggaa 3000 atatttactg aagaaattat ccgtgctgga tctgctgctt ctttgtctac tcttctaaat 3060 cgactggatc ctgtgctccg aaagacagct catcttggaa gctggcaggt tattagtcca 3120 gttgaaactg ttggatatgt tgaggttgta gatgagttgc ttactgttca aaacaaatca 3180 tatgagcgac ctacaatttt gatagccaat agtgtgaaag gagaggaaga aattccagat 3240 ggtacagttg ctgtcctgac acctgatatg cctgatgtcc tatcccatgt ttctgtacga 3300 gcaagaaata gcaaggtgtg ttttgctaca tgctttgatc ccaatatcct ggctaacctc 3360 caagaatata aaggaaagct tttacgctta aagcctacat ctgctgatgt agtttatagt 3420 gaggtgaagg agggtgagtt tattgatgac aaatcaactc aactgaaaga tgttggttct 3480 gtgtcaccca tatctctggc cagaaagaag tttagtggta gatatgctgt ctcatctgaa 3540 gaattcactg gtgaaatggt tggagctaaa tctcgtaata tctcttattt aaaagggaaa 3600 gtagcttctt ggattggaat tcctacctca gttgccatac catttggagt ttttgaacat 3660 gttctttctg ataaaccaaa ccaggcagtg gctgagaggg tcaataattt gaaaaagaag 3720 ttaactgagg gagacttcag tgttctcaag gagattcgtg aaacagttct acagttgaat 3780 gcaccatccc agttggtaga ggagttgaaa actaaaatga agagttctgg aatgccgtgg 3840 ccgggtgatg aaggtgaaca acgatgggaa caagcttgga tagctataaa aaaggtgtgg 3900 ggctcaaagt ggaatgaaag agcatacttc agcacaagaa aagtgaaact cgaccacgaa 3960 tatctttcca tggcagtcct ggttcaggaa gtgataaatg ctgactatgc ttttgtcatc 4020 cacacaacta accctgcctc tggagattca tcggaaatat atgctgaggt ggtaaaggga 4080 cttggagaaa cactggttgg agcttatcct ggtcgtgctt tgagttttat ctgcaagaaa 4140 cgtgatttga actctcctca ggtcttgggt tatcctagca aacctgtcgg cctatttata 4200 agacagtcaa ttattttccg atctgattcc aatggtgaag atctagaagg ttatgctggt 4260 gcaggtcttt atgacagtgt gccaatggat gaagccgaga aggtggtgct tgattattca 4320 tcagacaaac tgatccttga tggtagtttt cgccagtcaa tcttgtccag cattgcccgt 4380 gcaggaaatg aaattgaaga gttgtatggc actcctcagg acattgaagg tgtcatcaag 4440 gatggcaaag tctatgttgt ccagaccaga ccacaaatgt aaacttgcat acccatgtct 4500 tctaagccac ctacctcaac tatgttcatc cccgagcaac acgtcgtttc aaacgtggcc 4560 gtggcagctt ctgtgagttc aagagtaacc cccggattac caaacatggc cttatagatt 4620 tattacatga tatattgaaa attaaggaat aagtgtataa aaacggaata ttgtaaatta 4680 agaaaaattt agacggtctt atatattctt tttccctact ataaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 4740 aaaaa 4745 20 1493 PRT Glycine max 20 Ala Pro Ala Ser Pro His Phe His Val Ile Pro Asn Leu Thr Leu Phe 1 5 10 15 Ser His Leu Gln Pro Ile Gln Arg Asn Lys Val Ile Lys Cys Gly Ser 20 25 30 Gly Lys Met Ser Gln Ser Ile Phe His Gln Thr Val Leu Cys Gln Thr 35 40 45 Gln Thr Val Ala Glu His Gln Ser Lys Val Ser Ser Leu Glu Val Ser 50 55 60 Ala Asn Lys Gly Lys Lys Asn Leu Phe Leu Ala Pro Thr Asn Phe Arg 65 70 75 80 Gly Ser Arg Leu Cys Val Arg Lys Arg Lys Leu Thr Met Gly Arg His 85 90 95 His His Arg His Val Asp Ala Val Pro Arg Ala Val Leu Thr Thr Asn 100 105 110 Leu Ala Ser Glu Leu Ser Gly Lys Phe Asn Leu Asp Gly Asn Ile Glu 115 120 125 Leu Gln Ile Ala Val Ser Ser Ser Glu Pro Gly Ala Ala Arg Gln Val 130 135 140 Asp Phe Lys Val Ser Tyr Asn Ser Glu Ser Leu Leu Leu His Trp Gly 145 150 155 160 Val Val Arg Asp Gln Pro Gly Lys Trp Val Leu Pro Ser Arg His Pro 165 170 175 Asp Gly Thr Lys Asn Tyr Lys Ser Arg Ala Leu Arg Thr Pro Phe Val 180 185 190 Lys Ser Asp Ser Gly Ser Phe Leu Lys Ile Glu Ile Asp Asp Pro Ala 195 200 205 Ala Gln Ala Ile Glu Phe Leu Ile Leu Asp Glu Ala Lys Asn Lys Trp 210 215 220 Phe Lys Asn Asn Gly Glu Asn Phe His Ile Lys Leu Pro Val Lys Ser 225 230 235 240 Lys Leu Ser Gln Glu Val Ser Val Pro Glu Asp Leu Val Gln Ile Gln 245 250 255 Ala Tyr Leu Arg Trp Glu Arg Lys Gly Lys Gln Met Tyr Thr Pro Glu 260 265 270 Gln Glu Lys Glu Glu Tyr Glu Ala Ala Arg Asn Glu Leu Leu Glu Glu 275 280 285 Val Ala Arg Gly Thr Ser Val Arg Asp Leu His Ala Arg Leu Thr Lys 290 295 300 Lys Thr Lys Ala Ala Glu Val Lys Glu Pro Ser Val Ser Glu Thr Lys 305 310 315 320 Thr Ile Pro Asp Glu Leu Val Gln Ile Gln Ala Phe Ile Arg Trp Glu 325 330 335 Lys Ala Gly Lys Pro Asn Tyr Ser Arg Glu Gln Gln Leu Met Glu Phe 340 345 350 Glu Glu Ala Arg Lys Glu Leu Leu Glu Glu Leu Glu Lys Gly Ala Ser 355 360 365 Leu Asp Ala Ile Arg Lys Lys Ile Val Lys Gly Glu Ile Gln Thr Lys 370 375 380 Val Ala Lys Gln Leu Lys Thr Lys Lys Tyr Phe Arg Ala Glu Arg Ile 385 390 395 400 Gln Arg Lys Lys Arg Asp Leu Met Gln Leu Ile Asn Arg Asn Val Ala 405 410 415 Gln Asn Ile Val Glu Gln Val Ile Asp Ala Pro Lys Ala Leu Thr Val 420 425 430 Ile Glu His Tyr Ala Asn Ala Arg Glu Glu Tyr Glu Ser Gly Pro Val 435 440 445 Leu Asn Lys Thr Ile Tyr Lys Leu Gly Asp Asn Tyr Leu Leu Val Leu 450 455 460 Val Thr Lys Asp Ala Gly Lys Ile Lys Val His Leu Ala Thr Asp Ser 465 470 475 480 Lys Lys Pro Phe Thr Leu His Trp Ala Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Glu Glu 485 490 495 Trp Leu Val Pro Pro Glu Thr Ala Leu Pro Pro Gly Ser Val Thr Met 500 505 510 Asn Glu Ala Ala Glu Thr Pro Phe Lys Ala Gly Ser Ser Ser His Pro 515 520 525 Ser Tyr Glu Val Gln Ser Leu Asp Ile Glu Val Asp Asp Asp Thr Phe 530 535 540 Lys Gly Ile Pro Phe Val Ile Leu Ser Asp Gly Glu Trp Ile Lys Asn 545 550 555 560 Asn Gly Ser Asn Phe Tyr Ile Glu Phe Gly Gly Lys Lys Gln Lys Gln 565 570 575 Lys Asp Phe Gly Asn Gly Lys Gly Thr Ala Lys Phe Leu Leu Asn Lys 580 585 590 Ile Ala Glu Met Glu Ser Glu Ala Gln Lys Ser Phe Met His Arg Phe 595 600 605 Asn Ile Ala Ser Asp Leu Ile Asp Glu Ala Lys Asn Ala Gly Gln Leu 610 615 620 Gly Leu Ala Gly Ile Leu Val Trp Met Arg Phe Met Ala Thr Arg Gln 625 630 635 640 Leu Ile Trp Asn Lys Asn Tyr Asn Val Lys Pro Arg Glu Ile Ser Lys 645 650 655 Ala Gln Asp Arg Leu Thr Asp Leu Leu Gln Asp Val Tyr Ala Asn Tyr 660 665 670 Pro Gln Tyr Arg Glu Ile Val Arg Met Ile Leu Ser Thr Val Gly Arg 675 680 685 Gly Gly Glu Gly Asp Val Gly Gln Arg Ile Arg Asp Glu Ile Leu Val 690 695 700 Ile Gln Arg Asn Asn Asp Cys Lys Gly Gly Met Met Glu Glu Trp His 705 710 715 720 Gln Lys Leu His Asn Asn Thr Ser Pro Asp Asp Val Val Ile Cys Gln 725 730 735 Ala Leu Ile Asp Tyr Ile Asn Ser Asp Phe Asp Ile Gly Val Tyr Trp 740 745 750 Lys Ala Leu Asn Asp Asn Arg Ile Thr Lys Glu Arg Leu Leu Ser Tyr 755 760 765 Asp Arg Ala Ile His Ser Glu Pro Asn Phe Arg Arg Asp Gln Lys Glu 770 775 780 Gly Leu Leu Arg Asp Leu Gly Asn Tyr Met Arg Thr Leu Lys Ala Val 785 790 795 800 His Ser Gly Ala Asp Leu Glu Ser Ala Ile Ser Asn Cys Met Gly Tyr 805 810 815 Lys Ser Glu Gly Gln Gly Phe Met Val Gly Val Lys Ile Asn Pro Val 820 825 830 Pro Gly Leu Pro Thr Gly Phe Pro Glu Leu Leu Glu Phe Val Met Glu 835 840 845 His Val Glu Glu Lys Asn Val Glu Pro Leu Leu Glu Gly Leu Leu Glu 850 855 860 Ala Arg Gln Glu Leu Gln Pro Ser Leu Ser Lys Ser Gln Ser Arg Leu 865 870 875 880 Lys Asp Leu Ile Phe Leu Asp Val Ala Leu Asp Ser Thr Val Arg Thr 885 890 895 Ala Val Glu Arg Ser Tyr Glu Glu Leu Asn Asn Ala Gly Pro Glu Lys 900 905 910 Ile Met Tyr Phe Ile Ser Leu Val Leu Glu Asn Leu Ala Leu Ser Ser 915 920 925 Asp Asp Asn Glu Asp Leu Ile Tyr Cys Leu Lys Gly Trp Asp Val Ala 930 935 940 Leu Ser Met Cys Lys Ile Lys Asp Thr His Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ala Lys 945 950 955 960 Ser Val Leu Asp Arg Thr Arg Leu Ala Leu Thr Asn Lys Ala His Leu 965 970 975 Tyr Gln Glu Ile Leu Gln Pro Ser Ala Glu Tyr Leu Gly Ser Leu Leu 980 985 990 Gly Val Asp Lys Trp Ala Val Glu Ile Phe Thr Glu Glu Ile Ile Arg 995 1000 1005 Ala Gly Ser Ala Ala Ser Leu Ser Thr Leu Leu Asn Arg Leu Asp Pro 1010 1015 1020 Val Leu Arg Lys Thr Ala His Leu Gly Ser Trp Gln Val Ile Ser Pro 1025 1030 1035 1040 Val Glu Thr Val Gly Tyr Val Glu Val Val Asp Glu Leu Leu Thr Val 1045 1050 1055 Gln Asn Lys Ser Tyr Glu Arg Pro Thr Ile Leu Ile Ala Asn Ser Val 1060 1065 1070 Lys Gly Glu Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp Gly Thr Val Ala Val Leu Thr Pro 1075 1080 1085 Asp Met Pro Asp Val Leu Ser His Val Ser Val Arg Ala Arg Asn Ser 1090 1095 1100 Lys Val Cys Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe Asp Pro Asn Ile Leu Ala Asn Leu 1105 1110 1115 1120 Gln Glu Tyr Lys Gly Lys Leu Leu Arg Leu Lys Pro Thr Ser Ala Asp 1125 1130 1135 Val Val Tyr Ser Glu Val Lys Glu Gly Glu Phe Ile Asp Asp Lys Ser 1140 1145 1150 Thr Gln Leu Lys Asp Val Gly Ser Val Ser Pro Ile Ser Leu Ala Arg 1155 1160 1165 Lys Lys Phe Ser Gly Arg Tyr Ala Val Ser Ser Glu Glu Phe Thr Gly 1170 1175 1180 Glu Met Val Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Ile Ser Tyr Leu Lys Gly Lys 1185 1190 1195 1200 Val Ala Ser Trp Ile Gly Ile Pro Thr Ser Val Ala Ile Pro Phe Gly 1205 1210 1215 Val Phe Glu His Val Leu Ser Asp Lys Pro Asn Gln Ala Val Ala Glu 1220 1225 1230 Arg Val Asn Asn Leu Lys Lys Lys Leu Thr Glu Gly Asp Phe Ser Val 1235 1240 1245 Leu Lys Glu Ile Arg Glu Thr Val Leu Gln Leu Asn Ala Pro Ser Gln 1250 1255 1260 Leu Val Glu Glu Leu Lys Thr Lys Met Lys Ser Ser Gly Met Pro Trp 1265 1270 1275 1280 Pro Gly Asp Glu Gly Glu Gln Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp Ile Ala Ile 1285 1290 1295 Lys Lys Val Trp Gly Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr Phe Ser Thr 1300 1305 1310 Arg Lys Val Lys Leu Asp His Glu Tyr Leu Ser Met Ala Val Leu Val 1315 1320 1325 Gln Glu Val Ile Asn Ala Asp Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His Thr Thr Asn 1330 1335 1340 Pro Ala Ser Gly Asp Ser Ser Glu Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val Val Lys Gly 1345 1350 1355 1360 Leu Gly Glu Thr Leu Val Gly Ala Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala Leu Ser Phe 1365 1370 1375 Ile Cys Lys Lys Arg Asp Leu Asn Ser Pro Gln Val Leu Gly Tyr Pro 1380 1385 1390 Ser Lys Pro Val Gly Leu Phe Ile Arg Gln Ser Ile Ile Phe Arg Ser 1395 1400 1405 Asp Ser Asn Gly Glu Asp Leu Glu Gly Tyr Ala Gly Ala Gly Leu Tyr 1410 1415 1420 Asp Ser Val Pro Met Asp Glu Ala Glu Lys Val Val Leu Asp Tyr Ser 1425 1430 1435 1440 Ser Asp Lys Leu Ile Leu Asp Gly Ser Phe Arg Gln Ser Ile Leu Ser 1445 1450 1455 Ser Ile Ala Arg Ala Gly Asn Glu Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr Gly Thr Pro 1460 1465 1470 Gln Asp Ile Glu Gly Val Ile Lys Asp Gly Lys Val Tyr Val Val Gln 1475 1480 1485 Thr Arg Pro Gln Met 1490 21 1464 PRT Solanum tuberosum 21 Met Ser Asn Ser Leu Gly Asn Asn Leu Leu Tyr Gln Gly Phe Leu Thr 1 5 10 15 Ser Thr Val Leu Glu His Lys Ser Arg Ile Ser Pro Pro Cys Val Gly 20 25 30 Gly Asn Ser Leu Phe Gln Gln Gln Val Ile Ser Lys Ser Pro Leu Ser 35 40 45 Thr Glu Phe Arg Gly Asn Arg Leu Lys Val Gln Lys Lys Lys Ile Pro 50 55 60 Met Glu Lys Lys Arg Ala Phe Ser Ser Ser Pro His Ala Val Leu Thr 65 70 75 80 Thr Asp Thr Ser Ser Glu Leu Ala Glu Lys Phe Ser Leu Gly Gly Asn 85 90 95 Ile Glu Leu Gln Val Asp Val Arg Pro Pro Thr Ser Gly Asp Val Ser 100 105 110 Phe Val Asp Phe Gln Val Thr Asn Gly Ser Asp Lys Leu Phe Leu His 115 120 125 Trp Gly Ala Val Lys Phe Gly Lys Glu Thr Trp Ser Leu Pro Asn Asp 130 135 140 Arg Pro Asp Gly Thr Lys Val Tyr Lys Asn Lys Ala Leu Arg Thr Pro 145 150 155 160 Phe Val Lys Ser Gly Ser Asn Ser Ile Leu Arg Leu Glu Ile Arg Asp 165 170 175 Thr Ala Ile Glu Ala Ile Glu Phe Leu Ile Tyr Asp Glu Ala His Asp 180 185 190 Lys Trp Ile Lys Asn Asn Gly Gly Asn Phe Arg Val Lys Leu Ser Arg 195 200 205 Lys Glu Ile Arg Gly Pro Asp Val Ser Val Pro Glu Glu Leu Val Gln 210 215 220 Ile Gln Ser Tyr Leu Arg Trp Glu Arg Lys Gly Lys Gln Asn Tyr Pro 225 230 235 240 Pro Glu Lys Glu Lys Glu Glu Tyr Glu Ala Ala Arg Thr Val Leu Gln 245 250 255 Glu Glu Ile Ala Arg Gly Ala Ser Ile Gln Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg Leu 260 265 270 Thr Lys Thr Asn Asp Lys Ser Gln Ser Lys Glu Glu Pro Leu His Val 275 280 285 Thr Lys Ser Asp Ile Pro Asp Asp Leu Ala Gln Ala Gln Ala Tyr Ile 290 295 300 Arg Trp Glu Lys Ala Gly Lys Pro Asn Tyr Pro Pro Glu Lys Gln Ile 305 310 315 320 Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Ala Arg Arg Glu Leu Gln Leu Glu Leu Glu Lys 325 330 335 Gly Ile Thr Leu Asp Glu Leu Arg Lys Thr Ile Thr Lys Gly Glu Ile 340 345 350 Lys Thr Lys Val Glu Lys His Leu Lys Arg Ser Ser Phe Ala Val Glu 355 360 365 Arg Ile Gln Arg Lys Lys Arg Asp Phe Gly His Leu Ile Asn Lys Tyr 370 375 380 Thr Ser Ser Pro Ala Val Gln Val Gln Lys Val Leu Glu Glu Pro Pro 385 390 395 400 Ala Leu Ser Lys Ile Lys Leu Tyr Ala Lys Glu Lys Glu Glu Gln Ile 405 410 415 Asp Asp Pro Ile Leu Asn Lys Lys Ile Phe Lys Val Asp Asp Gly Glu 420 425 430 Leu Leu Val Leu Val Ala Lys Ser Ser Gly Lys Thr Lys Val His Leu 435 440 445 Ala Thr Asp Leu Asn Gln Pro Ile Thr Leu His Trp Ala Leu Ser Lys 450 455 460 Ser Pro Gly Glu Trp Met Val Pro Pro Ser Ser Ile Leu Pro Pro Gly 465 470 475 480 Ser Ile Ile Leu Asp Lys Ala Ala Glu Thr Pro Phe Ser Ala Ser Ser 485 490 495 Ser Asp Gly Leu Thr Ser Lys Val Gln Ser Leu Asp Ile Val Ile Glu 500 505 510 Asp Gly Asn Phe Val Gly Met Pro Phe Val Leu Leu Ser Gly Glu Lys 515 520 525 Trp Ile Lys Asn Gln Gly Ser Asp Phe Tyr Val Gly Phe Ser Ala Ala 530 535 540 Ser Lys Leu Ala Leu Lys Ala Ala Gly Asp Gly Ser Gly Thr Ala Lys 545 550 555 560 Ser Leu Leu Asp Lys Ile Ala Asp Met Glu Ser Glu Ala Gln Lys Ser 565 570 575 Phe Met His Arg Phe Asn Ile Ala Ala Asp Leu Ile Glu Asp Ala Thr 580 585 590 Ser Ala Gly Glu Leu Gly Phe Ala Gly Ile Leu Val Trp Met Arg Phe 595 600 605 Met Ala Thr Arg Gln Leu Ile Trp Asn Lys Asn Tyr Asn Val Lys Pro 610 615 620 Arg Glu Ile Ser Lys Ala Gln Asp Arg Leu Thr Asp Leu Leu Gln Asn 625 630 635 640 Ala Phe Thr Ser His Pro Gln Tyr Arg Glu Ile Leu Arg Met Ile Met 645 650 655 Ser Thr Val Gly Arg Gly Gly Glu Gly Asp Val Gly Gln Arg Ile Arg 660 665 670 Asp Glu Ile Leu Val Ile Gln Arg Asn Asn Asp Cys Lys Gly Gly Met 675 680 685 Met Gln Glu Trp His Gln Lys Leu His Asn Asn Thr Ser Pro Asp Asp 690 695 700 Val Val Ile Cys Gln Ala Leu Ile Asp Tyr Ile Lys Ser Asp Phe Asp 705 710 715 720 Leu Gly Val Tyr Trp Lys Thr Leu Asn Glu Asn Gly Ile Thr Lys Glu 725 730 735 Arg Leu Leu Ser Tyr Asp Arg Ala Ile His Ser Glu Pro Asn Phe Arg 740 745 750 Gly Asp Gln Lys Gly Gly Leu Leu Arg Asp Leu Gly His Tyr Met Arg 755 760 765 Thr Leu Lys Ala Val His Ser Gly Ala Asp Leu Glu Ser Ala Ile Ala 770 775 780 Asn Cys Met Gly Tyr Lys Thr Glu Gly Glu Gly Phe Met Val Gly Val 785 790 795 800 Gln Ile Asn Pro Val Ser Gly Leu Pro Ser Gly Phe Gln Asp Leu Leu 805 810 815 His Phe Val Leu Asp His Val Glu Asp Lys Asn Val Glu Thr Leu Leu 820 825 830 Glu Arg Leu Leu Glu Ala Arg Glu Glu Leu Arg Pro Leu Leu Leu Lys 835 840 845 Pro Asn Asn Arg Leu Lys Asp Leu Leu Phe Leu Asp Ile Ala Leu Asp 850 855 860 Ser Thr Val Arg Thr Ala Val Glu Arg Gly Tyr Glu Glu Leu Asn Asn 865 870 875 880 Ala Asn Pro Glu Lys Ile Met Tyr Phe Ile Ser Leu Val Leu Glu Asn 885 890 895 Leu Ala Leu Ser Val Asp Asp Asn Glu Asp Leu Val Tyr Cys Leu Lys 900 905 910 Gly Trp Asn Gln Ala Leu Ser Met Ser Asn Gly Gly Asp Asn His Trp 915 920 925 Ala Leu Phe Ala Lys Ala Val Leu Asp Arg Thr Arg Leu Ala Leu Ala 930 935 940 Ser Lys Ala Glu Trp Tyr His His Leu Leu Gln Pro Ser Ala Glu Tyr 945 950 955 960 Leu Gly Ser Ile Leu Gly Val Asp Gln Trp Ala Leu Asn Ile Phe Thr 965 970 975 Glu Glu Ile Ile Arg Ala Gly Ser Ala Ala Ser Leu Ser Ser Leu Leu 980 985 990 Asn Arg Leu Asp Pro Val Leu Arg Lys Thr Ala Asn Leu Gly Ser Trp 995 1000 1005 Gln Ile Ile Ser Pro Val Glu Ala Val Gly Tyr Val Val Val Val Asp 1010 1015 1020 Glu Leu Leu Ser Val Gln Asn Glu Ile Tyr Glu Lys Pro Thr Ile Leu 1025 1030 1035 1040 Val Ala Lys Ser Val Lys Gly Glu Glu Glu Ile Pro Asp Gly Ala Val 1045 1050 1055 Ala Leu Ile Thr Pro Asp Met Pro Asp Val Leu Ser His Val Ser Val 1060 1065 1070 Arg Ala Arg Asn Gly Lys Val Cys Phe Ala Thr Cys Phe Asp Pro Asn 1075 1080 1085 Ile Leu Ala Asp Leu Gln Ala Lys Glu Gly Arg Ile Leu Leu Leu Lys 1090 1095 1100 Pro Thr Pro Ser Asp Ile Ile Tyr Ser Glu Val Asn Glu Ile Glu Leu 1105 1110 1115 1120 Gln Ser Ser Ser Asn Leu Val Glu Ala Glu Thr Ser Ala Thr Leu Arg 1125 1130 1135 Leu Val Lys Lys Gln Phe Gly Gly Cys Tyr Ala Ile Ser Ala Asp Glu 1140 1145 1150 Phe Thr Ser Glu Met Val Gly Ala Lys Ser Arg Asn Ile Ala Tyr Leu 1155 1160 1165 Lys Gly Lys Val Pro Ser Ser Val Gly Ile Pro Thr Ser Val Ala Leu 1170 1175 1180 Pro Phe Gly Val Phe Glu Lys Val Leu Ser Asp Asp Ile Asn Gln Gly 1185 1190 1195 1200 Val Ala Lys Glu Leu Gln Ile Leu Met Lys Lys Leu Ser Glu Gly Asp 1205 1210 1215 Phe Ser Ala Leu Gly Glu Ile Arg Thr Thr Val Leu Asp Leu Ser Ala 1220 1225 1230 Pro Ala Gln Leu Val Lys Glu Leu Lys Glu Lys Met Gln Gly Ser Gly 1235 1240 1245 Met Pro Trp Pro Gly Asp Glu Gly Pro Lys Arg Trp Glu Gln Ala Trp 1250 1255 1260 Met Ala Ile Lys Lys Val Trp Ala Ser Lys Trp Asn Glu Arg Ala Tyr 1265 1270 1275 1280 Phe Ser Thr Arg Lys Val Lys Leu Asp His Asp Tyr Leu Cys Met Ala 1285 1290 1295 Val Leu Val Gln Glu Ile Ile Asn Ala Asp Tyr Ala Phe Val Ile His 1300 1305 1310 Thr Thr Asn Pro Ser Ser Gly Asp Asp Ser Glu Ile Tyr Ala Glu Val 1315 1320 1325 Val Arg Gly Leu Gly Glu Thr Leu Val Gly Ala Tyr Pro Gly Arg Ala 1330 1335 1340 Leu Ser Phe Ile Cys Lys Lys Lys Asp Leu Asn Ser Pro Gln Val Leu 1345 1350 1355 1360 Gly Tyr Pro Ser Lys Pro Ile Gly Leu Phe Ile Lys Arg Ser Ile Ile 1365 1370 1375 Phe Arg Ser Asp Ser Asn Gly Glu Asp Leu Glu Gly Tyr Ala Gly Ala 1380 1385 1390 Gly Leu Tyr Asp Ser Val Pro Met Asp Glu Glu Glu Lys Val Val Ile 1395 1400 1405 Asp Tyr Ser Ser Asp Pro Leu Ile Thr Asp Gly Asn Phe Arg Gln Thr 1410 1415 1420 Ile Leu Ser Asn Ile Ala Arg Ala Gly His Ala Ile Glu Glu Leu Tyr 1425 1430 1435 1440 Gly Ser Pro Gln Asp Ile Glu Gly Val Val Arg Asp Gly Lys Ile Tyr 1445 1450 1455 Val Val Gln Thr Arg Pro Gln Met 1460

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7880057Jan 31, 2007Feb 1, 2011J.R. Simplot CompanyPrecise breeding—backbone integration markers
US8158414Sep 23, 2005Apr 17, 2012J.R. Simplot CompanyA construct, comprising an expression cassette for reducing gene expression in a plant; using a polynucleotide that is not operably linked to a promoter and a terminator but is instead operably linked to two convergently-oriented promoters
US8193412Jan 31, 2007Jun 5, 2012J.R. Simplot CompanyPrecise breeding—simultaneous silencing
US8273949Jun 25, 2004Sep 25, 2012J.R. Simplot CompanyPrecise breeding
US8674177Aug 31, 2012Mar 18, 2014J.R. Simplot CompanyPrecise breeding
Classifications
U.S. Classification435/6.18, 536/23.2, 435/468, 435/320.1, 435/196, 435/419, 435/69.1, 800/284
International ClassificationC12N15/54, C12N9/00, C12N15/82
Cooperative ClassificationC12N15/8245, C12N9/00
European ClassificationC12N9/00, C12N15/82C4B2