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Publication numberUS20040018881 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/206,813
Publication dateJan 29, 2004
Filing dateJul 27, 2002
Priority dateJul 27, 2002
Also published asUS20050221900
Publication number10206813, 206813, US 2004/0018881 A1, US 2004/018881 A1, US 20040018881 A1, US 20040018881A1, US 2004018881 A1, US 2004018881A1, US-A1-20040018881, US-A1-2004018881, US2004/0018881A1, US2004/018881A1, US20040018881 A1, US20040018881A1, US2004018881 A1, US2004018881A1
InventorsKevin Hall
Original AssigneeKevin Hall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Special effects device
US 20040018881 A1
Abstract
A special effects device is disclosed having a transparent, flexible, static-cling backing for removable attachment to glass or other smooth surfaces, a shatter object attached to the backing, and a shatter pattern imprinted on the backing. When attached to a surface such as glass or plastic, the device gives the visual effect of the shatter object having broken and partially penetrated the surface. A message, logo, or other alphanumeric identification can be imprinted on the shatter object for advertising purposes.
Images(12)
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Claims(32)
I claim:
1. A special effects device comprising:
a flexible static cling (PCV) backing; and
a shatter object attached to the backing.
2. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the backing is made of static cling vinyl known as PCV.
3. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object is a fractional portion of a normally whole object specifically machined, sanded, filled, and in some cases, coated for appropriate preparation to the backing.
4. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the backing is made of a transparent PCV material that has no adhesives or requires any tools for its application to flat surfaces such as glass.
5. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object has a substantially flat base achieved either through cutting and sanding, or through cutting, sanding, application of a primer for surface tension translation, and a circular tin for better material adhesion.
6. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, further comprising: a specific adhesive produced by 3M for use between the shatter object surfaces and the unique nature of the PCV backing for attaching the attachment surface of the shatter object to the backing.
7. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the backing is irregular in specific shape due to custom designed die molds made specifically for this product to create the enhanced illusionary effect of shatter object in the surface.
8. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, further comprising a shatter pattern imprinted on the backing.
9. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter pattern is comprised of a plurality of lines.
10. A special effects device in accordance with claim 9, wherein the lines are printed in white with a UV vinyl link or other specialty ink such as glow in the dark type inks.
11. A special effects device in accordance with claim 10, wherein the shatter pattern is comprised of a plurality of lines decreasing in density at increasing radial distances from the center of the backing derived from photographs of actual shattered glass.
12. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object is comprised of a fractional portion of a sports object, such as a baseball, golf ball, hockey puck, softball, tennis ball, or other sports object.
13. A special effects device in accordance with claim 12, wherein the shatter object is machined by cutting, sanding and preparing the surface for adhesion, which may include injection of rigid high density polyurethane foam and/or the coating of such surfaces with an activator to modify the surface tension of the object.
14. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object is comprised of a fractional portion of a beverage container or other type of containers.
15. A special effects device in accordance with claim 14, wherein the shatter object is injected with a rigid high density polyurethane foam and then machined by cutting, sanding, and preparing the surface for adhesion.
16. A special effects device in accordance with claim 15, wherein the shatter object requires the form to be custom dyed to match another object such as cola, beer, foam, or other colors associated with the shatter object.
17. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object is comprised of a non-sports object such as a rock, brick, hammer, tools, auto parts, computer components, outdoor equipment.
18. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the shatter object is comprised of a fractional portion representation of a normally living thing.
19. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the interior of the shatter object is filled with a rigid high density polyurethane foam.
20. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, further comprising an imprinting on the shatter object.
21. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, further comprising an imprinting on the backing.
22. A special effects device in accordance with claim 1, further comprising a plastic-coated transfer sheet for display of the attachment of the special effects device.
23. A special effects device in accordance with claim 22, wherein the mounting sheet has a dark-colored surface.
24. A method of advertising, comprising the steps of:
imprinting a promotional message on the shatter object of a special effects device;
and attaching the special effects device onto a display surface.
25. A method of advertising, comprising the steps of:
imprinting a promotional message on the backing attached to the shatter object of a special effects device; and attaching the special effects device onto a display surface.
26. A method of manufacturing a special effects device, comprising the steps of:
portioning a normally whole object via filling with foam, cutting, sanding, and surface preparation to create a shatter object;
preparing some surfaces, specifically foam or low surface tension objects, with a specialty application of glues, enamels, and other circular tins;
adhering the shatter object to a PCV flexible backing to form a special effects device; and
attaching the special effects device onto a display surface.
27. The method of manufacturing a special effects device of claim 26, further comprising the step of imprinting a message or image on the backing.
28. The method of manufacturing a special effects device of claim 26, wherein the step of “attaching” further comprises the step of attaching a specialty adhesive tape designed to interface PCV to the base of the shatter object.
29. The method of manufacturing a special effects device of claim 24, further comprising the step of imprinting a shatter pattern on the backing wherein the shatter pattern is derived from photographs of actual shattered glass; and the shatter pattern is printed in a wide UV vinyl ink or in other specialty inks such as glow-in-the-dark inks.
30. The method of manufacturing a special effects device of claim 26, further comprising the steps of dying foam to meet shatter object color needs; injecting or filling a hollow shatter object with a rigid high density polyurethane foam; allowing the foam to harden; sanding the hardened foam to form a substantially flat base; and final preparation of the foam with glues or enamels and circular tins to create an adhesible surface.
31. The method of manufacturing a special effects device of claim 26, further comprising the step of die-cutting the backing in irregular patterns from the vinyl sheets.
32. A method of displaying a special effect, comprising the steps of:
removably attaching a special effects device having a shatter object attached to a flexible backing onto a blister coated card;
sealing the special effects device to the card utilizing a blister seal covering custom designed with specific molds to fit the shatter objects.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    None
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Technical Field
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to special effects devices, and more particularly to special effects designed to give the visual effect of a selected shatter object having broken and partially penetrated a surface such as glass. A message, logo, or other alphanumeric identification can be imprinted on the shatter object for promotional or advertising purposes.
  • [0004]
    2. Description Of Related Art
  • [0005]
    None
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION
  • [0006]
    Special effects can be used for both personal and commercial purposes. For example, special effects of all sorts are a common component of movie and theater productions. Various special effects devices are also commonly used by individuals for entertainment, amusement, and celebratory purposes. On the personal level, people frequently incorporate the use of special effects devices during the celebration of Halloween, to perform magic tricks, or when playing a practical joke on another person. As another example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,358,488 issued to Dunklin discloses a perforated polymer laminate sheet for attachment to the inside of a vehicle window. The outermost surface of the laminate includes artwork such that when viewed by an outside observer, simulates the appearance of a three-dimensional object such as a mechanical window Louver. In commercial use, special effects devices are often used to market products. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,023,870 issued to McGarrah, discloses a system for displaying information interior to a vending machine, including a plurality of removably adhered graphical sheets adhered by static cling to a clear display panel for advertising and other promotional purposes.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    A primary advantage of the present invention is that it creates a non-destructive visual effect of a shatter object having broken and partially penetrated a surface such as glass. Another advantage of the present invention is that it permits the application of a wide variety of shatter objects to achieve different desired effects. Another advantage of the present invention is that it can be used as a novel means to promote goods, services, charities or other organizations such as schools. Another advantage of the present invention is that it doesn't require the use of adhesives or other materials in order to apply it to surfaces for novelty or advertising purposes. Another advantage of the present invention is that it can be applied and removed by hand, without the need for any tools. Another advantage is that the shatter objects can be actual sports objects, such as a real golfball or baseball, when machined. Another advantage of the object is that the printed shatter image often utilized on the backing is an actual pattern of glass breaking, translated to print via digital photograph. Another advantage of
  • [0008]
    the invention is that the backing is die cut in irregular shapes, as opposed to a perfect circular cut, so as to further disguise the novelty's visibility and enhance the perception of the
  • [0009]
    special effect of the shatter object having impacted and partially penetrated the glass. Other advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following descriptions, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein, by way of illustration and example, an embodiment of the present invention is disclosed.
  • [0010]
    In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, a backing made from a static cling vinyl material is provided. The static cling (PCV 8 mil) material is printed with an ultraviolet vinyl ink, cured in UV dryers, and then die-cut with specific design and molds unique to this invention. The die-cut molds create the non-uniform pattern of the static cling material. A shatter object is prepared by cutting, sanding, in some cases applying an enamel to raise the surface tension of some objects in preparation for the shatter object adhesive. Once the preparation of the shatter object is complete is adhesively attached to the backing (no adhesion material is used on the surface of the backing for application to the glass) using a specially sized die-cut adhesive readily available from 3M corporation. The die-cut size of the adhesion material is made from molds specifically designed for this invention. In a preferred embodiment, the backing is irregular in exact form, though generally circular in a broad nature. In another preferred embodiment, a shatter pattern is graphically imprinted on the backing. In another preferred embodiment, the imprinted shatter pattern is comprised of white lines printed with white UV vinyl ink or a glow-in-the-dark ink. In another preferred embodiment, the imprinted shatter pattern is comprised of a fracture-like pattern with lines decreasing in density at increasing radial distances from the center and derived in its visible look from digital images specifically photographed from breaking glass with a shatter object and then graphically translating the patterns to printing processes. In a preferred embodiment, the shatter object is comprised of a fractional portion of a sports object, such as a baseball, golf ball, hockey puck, softball, soccer ball, football, tennis ball, basketball, sporting clay, or other sports object. In another preferred embodiment, a rigid high density polyurethane foam is injected via a heated two part injection system to fill the interior of an otherwise hollow shatter object. In another preferred embodiment, the foam is custom dyed with pigments to create a specific color so as when visible to the eye to compliment or enhance the shatter object appearance.
  • [0011]
    In another preferred embodiment, die cut circular tins are used as an intermediary fixation surface between the shatter object and the backing. In another preferred embodiment, a message, logo, redeemable coupon, or other alphanumeric identification is graphically imprinted on the shatter object or on to the cling backing. In another preferred embodiment, the special effects device is attached to a smooth, plastic-coated mounting sheet for retail sale. In another preferred embodiment, the mounting sheet is a dark color, such as black. In another preferred embodiment the sheet is attached to a blister coated retail card and then sealed with blister seal coverings. In another preferred embodiments, the blister seal coverings are made from molds custom designed and made specifically to fit the shatter object invention.
  • [0012]
    In a less preferred embodiment, the backing is removably adhered to a surface by a tacky adhesive.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)
  • [0013]
    The drawings constitute a part of this specification and include exemplary embodiments to the invention, which may be embodied in various forms. It is to be understood that in some instances, various aspects of the invention may be shown exaggerated, enlarged, or otherwise spatially modified to facilitate an understanding of the invention.
  • [0014]
    A reference to and brief description of each Figure in the drawing(s) as set forth in 37 CFR 1.74.
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 1 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the special effects device according to the principles of the invention, in which the shatter object is a baseball.
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 2 is a side view of the preferred embodiment of the special effects device shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 3 is a back view of the preferred embodiment of the special effects device shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2.
  • [0018]
    [0018]FIG. 4 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of the special effects device according to the principles of the invention, in which the shatter object is a golf ball.
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 5 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of the special effects device according to the principles of the invention, in which the shatter object is a soccer ball.
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 6 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of the special effects device according to the principles of the invention, in which the shatter object is a tennis ball.
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 7 is a back view of the preferred embodiment of the special effects device shown in FIG. 6.
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 8 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of the special effects device according to the principles of the invention, in which the shatter object is a beer can.
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 9 is a front view of another preferred embodiment according to the principles of the invention, in which a special effects device is adhered to a side window of an automobile.
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 10 is a front view of another preferred embodiment according to the principles of the invention, in which a special effects device is adhered to the front window of an automobile.
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 11 is a front view of another preferred embodiment according to the principles of the invention, in which a special effects device is adhered to the rear window of an automobile.
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 12 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention in which special effects devices are shown in a manufacturing stage. The actual die-cut edge composing the outer edge of the special effects design is shown in FIG. A-1.
  • [0027]
    FIG. A-1 is a front view of the preferred embodiment according to the principles of the invention, in which the outer die-cut edge of the special effects device has an irregular shape surrounding the printed backing as shown in FIG. A-1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0028]
    The following description is presented to enable any person skilled in the art to make and use the invention, and is provided in the context of a particular application and its requirements. Various modifications to the disclosed embodiments will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the general principles defined herein may be applied to other embodiments and applications without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Thus, the present invention is not intended to be limited to the embodiments shown, but is to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principles and features disclosed herein.
  • [0029]
    FIG. A-1 is the front view of how each special effects device in FIGS. 1 thru 12 are die-cut. While FIGS. 1-12 show a perfect circle encapsulating the design, this FIG. A-1 is the actual die-cut outline that will be utilized in the making of the product. At any point that backing 12 is referred to in the Figures, it is fully assumed in this description that the actual die-cut edge of the backing will be this irregular shape shown in FIG. A-1.
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 1 is a front view of the present invention. In this view, the special effects device 10 is shown generally. A backing 12 is attached to a shatter object 14, by an adhesive 16 (not seen in this view). In the preferred embodiment, adhesive 16 is a custom die-cut circle of double sided adhesive tape of the type commonly available from 3M but specifically designed to work in chemical conjunction with the backing's plasticizer elements. In a preferred embodiment, shatter object 14 is a selected sports object, such as a baseball, golf ball, hockey puck, softball, tennis ball, soccer ball, football, or other shatter object 14. In another preferred embodiment, shatter object 14 is any non-sports object such as a rock, beer can, plastic soda bottle, hammer handle, potted plant, a hand, the rear end of a bird, cat, brick, fishing lure, or other modifiable and adhesivable products. It is readily seen by one of ordinary skill in the art that shatter object can be any object for which it is desired to create the special effects of the object having partially penetrated a display surface such as glass. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, shatter object 14 is a portion of a baseball. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, backing 12 is made from a transparent, static cling vinyl material (8 mil PCV). In another preferred embodiment, backing 12 is irregular in shape as depicted in FIG. A-1 but generally circular in nature. In another preferred embodiment, a shatter pattern 18 comprised of at least one line 20, is imprinted on backing 12. In another preferred embodiment, lines 20 are printed in an UV vinyl white ink or some other available ink. Test of various colors resulted in the selection of white as a preferred color for replication of actual fractures in glass surfaces. In another preferred embodiment, a plurality of lines 20 form a fracture-like pattern in decreasing density at increasing radial distances from the center of shatter object 14. Digital photographs from actual
  • [0031]
    glass shattering upon impact of an object and studies of fractured glass surfaces resulted in the selection of line 20 concentrations in decreasing density at increasing radial distances from center as a preferred replication of actual fractures in glass surfaces.
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 2 is a side view of the preferred embodiment of the special effects device shown in FIG. 1. As best seen in FIG. 2, in the preferred embodiment, shatter object 14 is a fractional portion of a whole object. In another preferred embodiment, shatter object 14 is comprised of approximately one-half of a whole object, though some objects might be used at slightly less or more than one-half of its original form. As best seen in FIG. 2, in the preferred embodiment, shatter object 14 is modified to include a substantially flat base 22, thereby defining a substantially flat section of the fractional portion. Base 22 can be attached to backing 12 with a thin layered adhesive 16 as currently embodied in a readily available product from 3M.
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 3 is a back view of the special effects device 10 of FIG. 1. In this view, it can be seen that base 22 is readily formed when sectioning solid shatter object 14, such as a baseball, softball, hockey puck, or golf ball. In some instances, a flat circular piece of tin may be placed on the flat surface to act as an intermediary, particularly in the case where a foam is the basis for the flat surface of the shatter object.
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 4 is a front view of special effects device 10 in which shatter object 14 is a sectioned golf ball. FIG. 5 is a front view of special effects 15 device 10 in which shatter object 14 is a sectioned soccer ball. In this instance, the soccer ball is a four and one-half inch leather replica of a real soccer ball, filled with foam, having a tin intermediary and applied then to the backing.
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 6 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of special effects device 10, in which shatter object 14 is a tennis ball. FIG. 7 is a back view of shatter object 14 of FIG. 6, having a natural hollow interior 24. In this embodiment, a rigid high density polyurethane foam 26 is injected via a two part electric pump injection system fill hollow interior 24 of shatter object 14. When foam 26 hardens, it is cut and sanded to provide substantially flat base 22 for attachment of hollow shatter object 14 to backing 12 with adhesive 16 and an intermediary circular tin. In a preferred embodiment, a 2.2 pound high density rigid polyurethane foam 26 is used to fill hollow interior 24. In a less preferred embodiment, a polystyrene foam may be cut and used inside the object. Other shatter objects 14 having hollow interior 24 include devices such as basketballs, soccer balls, footballs, and other non-sports objects such as beer cans, plastic soda and drink bottles, and hollow containers such as tobacco cans, coffee cans, and other containers having open space within their bodies. For example, FIG. 8 is a front view of another preferred embodiment of special effects device 10, in which shatter object 14 is a beer can. In a preferred embodiment such as a clear plastic soda bottle, the polyurethane foam was custom dyed prior to injection so as to match the soda color of a national branded drink Dr Pepper. In this embodiment, the foam was visible when applied as an advertising piece so it required to have the visual appearance of the brand's soda.
  • [0036]
    Referring back to FIG. 1, in another preferred embodiment, an image 10 is imprinted on shatter object 14. Examples of image 10 include, but are not limited to, a message 46, a logo 34, a redeemable coupon 36, or other graphic or alphanumeric identification, including such things as college, professional, or amateur sports team logos, company brand logos, event logos, or other types of graphical representations. In another preferred embodiment, an image 44 is imprinted on backing 12. Examples of image 44 also include, but are not limited to, a message 46, a logo 48, or other graphic or alphanumeric identification, including such things as college, professional, or amateur sports team logos, company brand logos, event logos, or other types of graphical representations. In another preferred embodiment, special effects device 10 is attached to a smooth, plastic-coated carrying sheet 40 for retail sale. In another preferred embodiment, the carrier sheet is a dark-colored surface, particularly black, 42. In another preferred embodiment, the carrier sheet with shatter object is then placed onto a blister-coated card and sealed with a plastic blister seal covering that has been specifically molded to fit the shatter object.
  • [0037]
    In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a method of displaying special effect is disclosed, comprising the step of removably attaching special effects device 10 having shatter object 14 attached to a flexible backing 12, onto a display surface 50. This is best seen in FIGS. 9, 10, and 11, in which special effects device 10 is to a side window of an automobile, the front window of an automobile, and the rear window of an automobile, respectively.
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 12 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention in which special effects devices are shown in a manufacturing stage. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, vinyl sheet 60 is provided in a roll attached to a mounting sheet 62. In the preferred embodiment mounting sheet is colored black. Vinyl sheet 60 and mounting sheet 62 are cross cut into a sheet 63 that can be easily handled. Vinyl sheet 60 is kiss-cut to provide cutouts 64 to form the perimeter of backing 12 with the shape of the cut-out being described in FIG. A-1. Shatter pattern 18 and backing image 44 are
  • [0039]
    printed onto vinyl sheet 60 of sheet 63. Sheet 63 is then divided into display pages 66, each display page 66 having one shatter pattern 18. The residual vinyl 68 is then removed. The shatter image is then placed onto a blister card and covered with a plastic blister seal made specifically to fit over the shatter object and then sealed with a sealing machine and then readied for retail.
  • [0040]
    Operation of the Invention
  • [0041]
    In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, special effects device 10 is preferably marketed or otherwise distributed attached to mounting sheet 40 having a dark-colored surface 42. Dark-colored surface 42 allows ready observation by contrast to white lines 20 of shatter pattern 18. Backing 12 adheres to mounting sheet 40 via static cling. Special effects device 10 is easily removable from mounting sheet 40 by peeling backing 12 from mounting sheet 40. Special effects device 10 can then be placed on a generally smooth display surface 50 such as a windshield, office windows, glass doors, or otherwise smooth surfaces to achieve the illusion of the shattered object 14 having fractured or partially penetrated the various display surfaces 50.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4358488 *Jan 9, 1981Nov 9, 1982Larry Eugene ReevesSimulated vehicle louvre applique
US4621441 *Jan 23, 1985Nov 11, 1986Keith R. WagnerPersonalized shoe emblem signature
US4757626 *Oct 9, 1986Jul 19, 1988Stephen WeinreichDisplay apparatus
US4941276 *Mar 20, 1989Jul 17, 1990Kanner Donald RMarketing display device
US5970638 *Feb 23, 1998Oct 26, 1999Henley; Lorinda B.Sealed ornament
US6023870 *Nov 8, 1996Feb 15, 2000Pepsico Inc.Vendor with changeable graphics and method therefor
US6023872 *Aug 4, 1997Feb 15, 2000Falkenstein, Sr.; Albert J.Promotional banner having raised, three-dimensional areas
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7799366Apr 12, 2006Sep 21, 2010Rehabilitation Institute Of ChicagoMethod for creating covers for prosthetic devices and other dynamic supporting members
US20060229755 *Apr 12, 2006Oct 12, 2006Rehabilitation Institute Of ChicagoMethod for creating covers for prosthetic devices and other dynamic supporting members
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/72
International ClassificationG09F19/12, A63J5/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09F19/12
European ClassificationG09F19/12