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Publication numberUS20040031534 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/458,896
Publication dateFeb 19, 2004
Filing dateJun 11, 2003
Priority dateDec 5, 2001
Publication number10458896, 458896, US 2004/0031534 A1, US 2004/031534 A1, US 20040031534 A1, US 20040031534A1, US 2004031534 A1, US 2004031534A1, US-A1-20040031534, US-A1-2004031534, US2004/0031534A1, US2004/031534A1, US20040031534 A1, US20040031534A1, US2004031534 A1, US2004031534A1
InventorsLarry Schwartz
Original AssigneeSun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor covering from synthetic twisted yarns
US 20040031534 A1
Abstract
A woven article of furniture in the nature a floor covering is formed from a weave of woven polymer yarns which include twisted yarns for the weft and/or warp yarns. The floor covering is heat set to provide dimensional stability during the intended use of the floor covering.
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Claims(60)
1. A woven floor covering comprising a plurality of warp yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, a plurality of weft yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, at least one of said warp yarns or at least one of said weft yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length, said plurality of warp yarns and said plurality of weft yarns being woven together to form a weave therefrom, wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other along a portion of their outer surfaces.
2. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein each of said plurality of warp yarns comprise first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length.
3. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein each of said plurality of weft yarns comprise first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length.
4. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein each of said plurality of warp yarns comprise first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length and said plurality of weft yarns comprise third and fourth strands of polymer material twisted together over their length.
5. The floor covering of claim 4, wherein said first and second strands are adhered to each other and said third and fourth strands are adhered to each other.
6. The floor covering of claim 4, wherein at least one of said first, second, third and fourth strands differ from the other of said strands in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
7. The floor covering of claim 4, wherein said first and second strands are at least partially adhered to each other over their length along a portion of their outer surfaces and said third and fourth strands are at least partially adhered to each other over their length along a portion of their outer surfaces.
8. The floor covering of claim 4, wherein each of said first, second, third and fourth strands have a deformed outer surface.
9. The floor covering of claim 4, wherein each of said first, second, third and fourth strands have a non-uniform cross-section over their length.
10. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein said weave has a plurality of openings formed between said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns, said openings being of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
11. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein said weave is devoid of a backing member, whereby said weave is reversible.
12. The floor covering of claim 1, wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are uninterruptedly adhered to each other over their entire length.
13. A woven floor covering comprising a plurality of warp yarns each including a first and second strand of polymer material twisted together, said first and second strands each having a deformed outer surface, and a plurality of weft yarns each including a third and fourth strand of polymer material twisted together, said third and fourth strands each having a deformed outer surface, said plurality of warp yarns and said plurality of weft yarns woven together to form a weave devoid of a backing member, wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length along a portion of their outer surfaces, said weave having a plurality of openings formed between said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
14. The floor covering of claim 13, wherein said first and second strands are adhered to each other and said third and fourth strands are adhered to each other.
15. The floor covering of claim 13, wherein at least one of said first, second, third and fourth strands differ from the other of said strands in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
16. The floor covering of claim 13, wherein each of said first, second, third and fourth strands have a non-uniform cross-section over their length.
17. The floor covering of claim 13, wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are uninterruptedly adhered to each other over their entire length.
18. A method of making a woven floor covering, said method comprising weaving a plurality of weft yarns of polymer material and a plurality of warp yarns of polymer material to form a weave, at least one of said weft yarns or at least one of said warp yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length, and heating said weave to a sufficient temperature wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length.
19. The method of claim 18, at least partially adhering said first and second strands to each other over their length during said heating.
20. The method of claim 18, further including adhering said first and second strands to each other over their entire length at their outer surfaces during said heating.
21. The method of claim 18, wherein each of said plurality of warp yarns comprise first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length and said plurality of weft yarns comprise third and fourth strands of polymer material twisted together over their length.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein said first and second strands are at least partially adhered to each other over their length during said heating and wherein said third and fourth strands are at least partially adhered to each other over their length during said heating.
23. The method of claim 22, wherein said first, second, third and fourth strands are adhered contemporaneously with adhering said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns during said heating.
24. The method of claim 21, wherein at least one of said first, second, third and fourth strands differ from the other of said strands in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
25. The method of claim 21, wherein each of said first, second, third and fourth strands have a deformed outer surface.
26. The method of claim 21, wherein each of said first, second, third and fourth strands have a non-uniform cross-section over their length.
27. The method of claim 18, wherein said temperature is below the melting temperature of said polymer material.
28. The method of claim 18, wherein said weave is heated in an environment having a temperature of 200-375 F.
29. The method of claim 18, further including forming a plurality of openings between said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns, said openings being of sufficient size to allow passage of water therethrough.
30. The method of claim 21, wherein said first and second strands are adhered together and said third and fourth strands are adhered together by heating said strands prior to said weaving of said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns.
31. A method of making a woven floor covering, said method comprising forming a plurality of weft yarns by twisting together first and second strands of polymer material each having a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their entire length, forming a plurality of warp yarns by twisting together third and fourth strands of polymer material each having a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their length, weaving said plurality of weft and said plurality of warp yarns to form a weave therefrom, and heating said weave to a sufficient temperature wherein said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length.
32. The method of claim 31, wherein said first and second strands and said third and fourth strands are at least partially adhered contemporaneously with said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns during said heating.
33. The method of claim 31, wherein said weave is heated in an environment having a temperature of 200-375 F.
34. The method of claim 31, wherein said first and second strands are at least partially adhered together and said third and fourth strands are at least partially adhered together by heating said strand prior to said weaving of said plurality of said weft yarns and said warp yarns.
35. The method of claim 31, wherein at least one of said first, second third and fourth strands differ from the other of said strands in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
36. The method of claim 31, further including forming a plurality of openings between said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns, said openings being of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
37. The method of claim 31, further including attaching a binding material around the periphery of said weave.
38. The method of claim 31, wherein said heating is sufficient to cause said plurality of weft yarns and said plurality of warp yarns to integrally adhere to each other.
39. A floor covering made in accordance with the method of claim 18.
40. A floor covering made in accordance with the method of claim 31.
41. A woven floor covering comprising a plurality of yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, at least one of said yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together, said plurality of yarns being woven together to form a weave therefrom, wherein said plurality of yarns are adhered to each other at least intermittently along a portion of their outer surfaces.
42. The floor covering of claim 41, wherein said first and second strands are adhered to each other at least intermittently along a portion of their outer surfaces.
43. The floor covering of claim 41, wherein at least one of said first and second strands differ from the other of said strands in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
44. The floor covering of claim 41, wherein each of said yarns have a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their length.
45. The floor covering of claim 41, wherein said weave has a plurality of openings of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
46. The floor covering of claim 41, wherein said weave is devoid of a backing member, whereby said weave is reversible.
47. A method of making a woven floor covering, said method comprising weaving a plurality of yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface to form a weave, at least one of said yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together, and heating said weave to a sufficient temperature wherein said plurality of yarns are adhered to each other along a portion of their outer surfaces.
48. The method of claim 47, further including adhering said first and second strands to each other over their length contemporaneously during said heating.
49. The method of claim 47, wherein said temperature is below the melting temperature of said polymer material.
50. The method of claim 47, wherein said weave is heated in an environment having a temperature of 200-375 F.
51. The method of claim 47, wherein at least one of said yarns differ from another said yarns in at least of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and appearance.
52. The method of claim 47, wherein each of said yarns have a deformed outer surface.
53. The method of claim 47, wherein each of said yarns have a non-uniform cross-section over their length.
54. The method of claim 47, further including forming a plurality of openings between said plurality of yarns within said weave, said openings being of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
55. The method of claim 47, wherein said first and second strands are adhered together by heating said strands prior to said weaving.
56. The method of claim 47, wherein at least one of said first and second strands differ from the other of said strands in at least size, shape, surface, configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
57. The method of claim 47, wherein said first and second strands have a deformed outer surface.
58. The method of claim 47, further including attaching a binder about the perimeter of said weave.
59. The method of claim 47, wherein said yarns are adhered to each other intermittently over their outer surfaces.
60. A floor covering made in accordance with the method of claim 47.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/290,638, filed Nov. 8, 2002, which is a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/123,943, filed Apr. 17, 2002, which is a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/073,634, filed Feb. 11, 2002, which is a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/062,905, filed Jan. 31, 2002, entitled “Method of Making Furniture With Synthetic Woven Material” which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/336,819, filed Dec. 5, 2001; and a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. Pat. No. 10/158,629 filed May 30, 2002, entitled “Combination Weave Using Twisted And Non-Twisted Yarn,” all of the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates in general to the field of synthetic yarns and synthetic woven materials manufactured therefrom for use in the construction of various articles, and more particularly, to such articles and methods of stabilizing synthetic yarn of multiple filaments, such as twisted yarns, and of stabilizing woven synthetic yarn material using heat treatment during the manufacturing process.
  • [0003]
    Natural wicker has been used in the manufacture of furniture, baskets and other articles for many centuries. Natural wicker articles are manufactured from the twigs or branches of various plants that are first soaked in water in order to make them pliable, then woven to form into the article and finally allowed to dry. Furniture manufactured from wicker offers greater comfort than furniture manufactured from some other materials because of wicker's inherent compliancy. Further, wicker is light weight and reasonably strong, making it an important material in the manufacture of furniture.
  • [0004]
    The popularity of wicker articles has increased significantly. The casual, informal appearance of wicker has made it especially popular for use in furniture for enclosed porches and other informal settings in homes, hotels and other establishments. Natural wicker, however, has had limited use in the outdoor furniture market, including patio furniture, pool furniture and the like. This is because natural wicker softens and weakens when wet, and is more susceptible to rotting and mildew than many other natural and man-made furniture materials.
  • [0005]
    Woven wicker typically comprises a warp yarn, i.e., a yarn running straight through the woven material and providing support, and a weft yarn, i.e., a yarn used as filler that is woven around the warp yarn. Numerous styles of weave are used in the manufacture of wicker products. The various styles of weave result in a different look, feel, strength and weight of the finished woven product. In a simple weave pattern, the warp yarns are spaced apart and arranged parallel to each other. The weft yarns are woven over and under alternating warp yarns. Adjacent weft yarns pass on opposite sides of a given warp yarn. Variations of this pattern, such as passing the weft yarn over two adjacent warp yarns, are known in the art.
  • [0006]
    Polymer yarns have also been used to manufacture wicker-like products such as furniture. By way of example, a polymer yarn is known which is constructed as an elongated body, such as of indeterminate length, having a core surrounded by a polyvinylchloride (PVC) outer coating, for example, foamed PVC material which gives greater volume with less material. The outer coating may be formed of other synthetic materials such as polyamides, polyesters and the like. The yarn is typically made in a single step using a coextrusion process, as is known in the art. The inner core may include a single filament of polyester, or may include a plurality of polyester filaments bundled to form a single core. In addition, the core may be formed of other materials than polyester, monofilament or stranded, such as polyamides and the like. The core is designed to give the yarn greater mechanical strength over yarns formed only of polymer material.
  • [0007]
    The polymer yarn being constructed from foamed PVC material results in a lack of uniformity in the foaming of the PVC material during the extrusion process. This produces a yarn which lacks a uniform cylindrical appearance. Specifically, the outer surface of the yarn is deformed, such as by having undulations, mounds and/or depressed areas along the length of the yarn. The deformed shape of the outer surface of the yarn results in the yarn having a more natural look to that of real wicker. It is also known to provide the exterior surface of the polymer yarn with one or more random stripes of a contrasting color and/or one or more random grooves. The stripes and grooves can be continuous and/or intermittent along the exterior surface of the yarn. The yarn, however, can also have a more uniform cylindrical shape, as well as other shapes such as square, oval, triangular and the like. Polymer yarns as thus far described are known from U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,704,690; 5,845,970; and 6,179,382, as well as U.S. Design Pat. Nos. 395,171; and 409,001, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0008]
    As in the case of natural wicker, polymer yarns have been woven into a woven material which has been used in the manufacture of casual furniture suitable for the outdoor furniture market, including patio furniture, as well as for indoor use. Due to the nature of polymer yarns, it has been known to subject the woven material to a heat setting process prior to attaching the woven material to the frame forming the finished product. In this regard, a section of the woven material would be placed in an oven at an elevated temperature to cause the polymer material to soften whereby contiguous portions of the yarn would bond together stabilizing the shape of the woven material. The heat set woven material would be subsequently attached to the skeletal frame of a product to form, for example, a seat portion or a back rest portion of a furniture article.
  • [0009]
    Further, synthetic polymer yarns by virtue of their suitability for use in an outdoor environment have enjoyed success for various products. For example, synthetic yarns have been woven into rugs and floor mats typically intended for indoor use. These rugs generally include a binder along the rugs' edge, as well as a backing material. The combination of the binder and backing material provide dimensional stability to the rug. However, the backing material frequently renders the rug unsuitable for outdoor use. In this regard, in the case of rain, water will collect on top of the rug forming puddles. In addition, water will collect between the floor and the rugs' backing. This can create rotting and mildew of the underlying floor.
  • [0010]
    This problem has been partially solved by a floor mat formed by weaving twisted polymer yarn without the use of a backing material or binder. However, the individual strands forming the twisted yarn, as well as the woven rug itself, are not cohesively formed. As a result, the floor mat lacks dimensional stability, is flimsy in construction, as well as poorly maintaining its woven structure during use.
  • [0011]
    It is therefore desirable to provide improvements in synthetic yarns, in synthetic woven materials, and in manufacturing processes for various articles including the use of polymer yarns and woven material therefrom, and more particularly, to synthetic twisted yarns and woven material therefrom which are subject to heat during processing, which overcomes the disadvantages noted with respect to the aforementioned articles, and in particular, floor coverings.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0012]
    In one embodiment of the present invention there is described a woven floor covering comprising a plurality of warp yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, a plurality of weft yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, at least one of the warp yarns or at least one of the weft yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length, the plurality of warp yarns and the plurality of weft yarns being woven together to form a weave therefrom, wherein the plurality of weft yarns and the plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other along a portion of their outer surfaces.
  • [0013]
    In another embodiment of the present invention there is described a woven floor covering comprising a plurality of warp yarns each including a first and second strand of polymer material twisted together, the first and second strands each having a deformed outer surface, and a plurality of weft yarns each including a third and fourth strand of polymer material twisted together, the third and fourth strands each having a deformed outer surface, the plurality of warp yarns and the plurality of weft yarns woven together to form a weave devoid of a backing member, wherein the plurality of weft yarns and the plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length along a portion of their outer surfaces, the weave having a plurality of openings formed between the plurality of weft yarns and the plurality of warp yarns of sufficient size to allow the passage of water therethrough.
  • [0014]
    In another embodiment of the present invention there is described a method of making a woven floor covering, the method comprising weaving a plurality of weft yarns of polymer material and a plurality of warp yarns of polymer material to form a weave, at least one of the weft yarns or at least one of the warp yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together over their length, and heating the weave to a sufficient temperature wherein the plurality of weft yarns and the plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length.
  • [0015]
    In another embodiment of the present invention there is described a method of making a woven floor covering, the method comprising forming a plurality of weft yarns by twisting together first and second strands of polymer material each having a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their entire length, forming a plurality of warp yarns by twisting together third and fourth strands of polymer material each having a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their length, weaving the plurality of weft and the plurality of warp yarns to form a weave therefrom, and heating the weave to a sufficient temperature wherein the plurality of weft yarns and the plurality of warp yarns are at least partially adhered to each other over their length.
  • [0016]
    In another embodiment of the present invention there is described a a woven floor covering comprising a plurality of yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface, at least one of the yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together, the plurality of yarns being woven together to form a weave therefrom, wherein the plurality of yarns are adhered to each other at least intermittently along a portion of their outer surfaces.
  • [0017]
    In another embodiment of the present invention there is described a method of making a woven floor covering, the method comprising weaving a plurality of yarns of polymer material each having an outer surface to form a weave, at least one of the yarns comprising first and second strands of polymer material twisted together, and heating the weave to a sufficient temperature wherein the plurality of yarns are adhered to each other along a portion of their outer surfaces.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0018]
    The above description, as well as further objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be more fully understood with reference to the following detailed description of a method of making furniture with synthetic woven material, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 1 is top plan view of a portion of a heat set twisted polymer yarn constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic illustration showing the fabrication process of heat setting the twisted polymer yarn as shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a skeletal frame of an article of furniture;
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 4 is a top plan view of woven material constructed by weaving the polymer yarn as shown in FIG. 1 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an article of furniture in the nature of a chair to which there is attached the woven material as shown in FIG. 4 and components wrapped with the twisted polymer yarn as shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 6 depicts a process of twisting polymer yarn and heat setting the twisted polymer yarn;
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a polymer yarn constructed in accordance with one embodiment;
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 8 is a perspective view of woven material constructed by weaving a combination of twisted and non-twisted polymer yarns in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 9 is a perspective view of woven material constructed by weaving a combination of twisted and non-twisted polymer yarns in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; and
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 10 is a top plan view of woven material constructed by weaving polymer material forming a rug or mat therefrom.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0029]
    In describing the various embodiments and preferred embodiments of the subject matter illustrated and to be described with respect to the drawings, specific terminology will be resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalence which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar purpose.
  • [0030]
    Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals represent like elements, there is shown in FIG. 1 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention a twisted yarn of indeterminate length designated generally by reference numeral 100. The twisted yarn 100 is made of two strands or filaments 102, 104 of polymer material and maybe of the type and construction as described in the aforementioned patents which have been incorporated herein by reference, e.g., yarns having a deformed outer surface and a non-uniform cross-section over their entire length.
  • [0031]
    More specifically, as shown in FIG. 7, the strands or filaments 102, 104 are constructed as an elongated body, such as of indeterminate length having an elongated core 30 surrounded by a polymer layer such as a PVC outer layer 50, for example, foamed PVC material which gives greater volume with less material. However, it is to be understood that the outer layer 50 may be formed of other synthetic materials if desired such as polyamides, polyesters and the like. The strands or filaments 102, 104 may be made in a single step using a coextrusion process as is known in the art. The inner core 30 may include a single filament of polyester, or may include a plurality of polyester filaments bundled to form a single core. In addition, the inner core 30 may be formed of other materials than polyester, monofilament or stranded, such as polyamides and the like. It is also contemplated that the inner core 30 can be formed as a metal core such as an aluminum wire coated by the outer polymer layer 50. The core 30 is designated to give the strands or filaments 102, 104 greater mechanical strength. However, it is to be understood that the core forms no part of the present invention and may be eliminated if desired.
  • [0032]
    It is to be understood that other strands or filaments 102, 104 of polymer material of a different construction or polymer material are also contemplated for use in producing a twisted yarn 100 or a weave of woven material therefrom in accordance with the present invention. Further, although the twisted yarn 100 has been illustrated as comprising two strands 102, 104, it is to be understood that the twisted yarn can be constructed from greater than two strands if so desired. In addition, it is not required that the strands 102, 104 be identical in size, shape, surface appearance, coloration, and/or surface configuration. For example, a twisted elongated yarn can be constructed from an elongated first yarn of polymer material twisted together with an elongated second yarn forming a composite yarn having a twisted shape. One of the first and second yarns may be different from the other one of the first and second yarns in at least one or more of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and/or surface appearance. The second elongated yarn may also be polymer material.
  • [0033]
    The twisted yarn may include an elongated third yarn twisted together with the first and second yarns, or any other number of additional yarns. The third yarn may be polymer material. The third yarn may be substantially similar to one of the first and second yarns in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. The third yarn may also be different from the first and second yarns in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. Further, one of the first and second yarns may be different from the other one of the first and second yarns in all of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance.
  • [0034]
    By way of further example, the twisted elongated yarn can be constructed from an elongated first yarn, an elongated second yarn and an elongated third yarn. The first, second and third yarns are twisted together to form a composite twisted yarn, wherein at least one of the yarns is polymer material. One of the first, second and third yarns is preferably different from at least one of the other two yarns in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. The first, second and third yarns may all be polymer material. Each of the first, second and third yarns may be different from each other in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. Each of the first, second and third yarns may also be different from each other in all of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. One of the first, second and third yarns may be a natural material, e.g., cotton. By use of various combinations of yarns of different sizes, twisted yarns and weaves using twisted yarns and non-twisted yarns can provide different textures, bulk and feel with less material.
  • [0035]
    Referring now to FIG. 2, there will be described a process of manufacturing a twisted yarn 100 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. As shown, there is provided a source 106 of a continuous length of a strand 102 of polymer material. A similar source 108 is provided for a continuous length of another strand 104 of polymer material. Generally, the sources 106, 108 will be in the nature of a spool of an indeterminate length of the strands 102, 104 of the polymer material.
  • [0036]
    In accordance with one embodiment, the individual strands 102, 104 are fed concurrently from the spools into an oven 110 for heating at least the outer surface of the strands to a predetermined temperature. In the case of PVC material, an oven temperature of up to about 270 F. has been found suitable for use in accordance with the present invention. The temperature of the oven 110 will take into consideration the type of the polymer material forming the strands 102, 104, as well as the linear rate in which the strands pass through the oven, for example, the residence time in the oven. Based upon the oven temperature and residence time of the strands 102, 104 within the oven 110, at least the outer surface of the strands will heat up to, but generally below, about their softening temperature. In the case of PVC material, a temperature of the outer surface of the strands 102, 104 in the range of 80-250 F. is contemplated. Lower oven temperatures with longer residence times and higher oven temperatures with shorter residence times are contemplated. It is preferable that the temperature of the strands 102, 104 do not reach their melting temperature where they would lose their general shape. However, a slight melting of the outer surface region of the strands 102, 104 is contemplated within the scope of the present invention. Although the invention has been described as heating both of the strands 102, 104, it is contemplated to heat only one of the strands. The other strand may be at room temperature or heated to a different temperature in a separate oven.
  • [0037]
    It can be appreciated that the temperature of the oven will vary according to the particular polymer material forming the strands 102, 104, as well as the residence time for the strands within the oven. For polymer material most suitable for use in accordance with the present invention, a temperature range of 200 to 375 F., and more preferably about 250 to 300 F. is contemplated. However, as the basis for determining the oven temperature and residence time have been described herein, it is to be understood that other temperatures can be selected for suitable use with any polymer material in which to form a twisted yarn from strands 102, 104.
  • [0038]
    As the heated strands 102, 104 exit the oven 110, they pass through a conventional filament twisting apparatus 112. The twisting apparatus 112 is operative for twisting the two strands 102, 104 together to form the twisted yarn 100 as best shown in FIG. 1. The twisting apparatus 112 may be of any suitable construction such as known in the rope art where continuous lengths of filaments are twisted together. During the twisting process, there is a degree of compression between the strands 102, 104 which, due to their heated temperature, results in the strands bonding together to generally form a single integral strand having a twisted configuration as shown in FIG. 1. The twisted strands are accordingly heat set to prevent or resist their unwinding during subsequent handling.
  • [0039]
    It is to be understood that it is not a requirement that the strands 102, 104 be bonded integral over their entire length, but rather, may have contiguous intermittent portions over their length which are joined together whereby the twisted yarn 100 is prevented from unraveling during the subsequent weaving process or handling. As to be described hereinafter, the heat setting of the twisted yarn may be delayed until further processing of a weave of woven material made therefrom.
  • [0040]
    The twisted yarn 100 may be subject to air cooling, or optionally, passed through a cooling device 114. The cooling device 114 may include a source of blowing ambient air, or air chilled to aid in bringing the twisted yarn 100 to room or ambient temperature. The resulting twisted yarn 100 is subsequently wound upon a spool 116. It is also contemplated that the twisting apparatus 112 may be positioned before the oven 110, as well as providing separate ovens 110 for each strand 102, 104 operating at the same or different temperature. Different process conditions are contemplated where the strands 102, 104 are of a different construction, composition or size.
  • [0041]
    The individual strands 102, 104 may be formed by hot extrusion of polymer material through a die. It is therefore contemplated that the strands 102, 104, while in a heated state after extrusion, may be twisted in the twisting apparatus 112, thereby eliminating the need for a separate oven 110. Depending upon the exit temperature of the strands 102, 104 from the extruder, the strands may be allowed to air cool or provided with a separate cooling device 114 for either or both of the strands prior to twisting.
  • [0042]
    In another embodiment as shown in FIG. 6, there is provided a filament twisting apparatus 112 and an oven 110 for heat setting the twisted yarn. As shown, polymer strands 102 and 104 are twisted at room temperature by the filament twisting apparatus 112 and the twisted composite yarn is then wound to a spool 115. The twisted composite yarn is then unwound from the spool 115 into the oven 110 for heat setting, preferably below the melting temperature of the yarn, more preferably at a yarn surface temperature of lower than about 260 F., and the most preferably lower than about 250 F., e.g., 80-250 F. The heat set twisted composite yarn is subject to air-cooling, or optionally, passed through a cooling device 114, and rewound to spool 116.
  • [0043]
    As thus far described, sufficiently heating one of the elongated strands 102, 104 of polymer material causes the strands upon twisting to at least partially adhere to one another to prevent their unraveling. The twisting process may occur either before or after the heating process. The heating may take place either in an oven 110 or as a result of the strands 102, 104 being formed by hot extrusion of the polymer material through a die. In either case, at least one of the strands 102, 104 has been heated to a predetermined temperature for at least partially adhering to the other strand upon cooling.
  • [0044]
    It is however generally known that polymer materials can possess shape memory characteristics. This shape retention characteristic is dependent upon the nature and temperature of the polymer material. It is contemplated that this property can be utilized to form a twisted polymer yarn without the need of heating at least one strand to an elevated temperature whereby the strands will adhere to each other. By way of example, by heating at least one, and preferably both of the strands 102, 104, to a temperature of between 100-200 F. prior to twisting, the heated strands upon cooling will essentially maintain their twisted configuration.
  • [0045]
    It is also contemplated that the slight heating of at least one strand will allow the strand to relax so as to twist with an additional strand, and retain its twisted shape upon cooling. The heating will provide the strand with a sufficient heat set to retain its shape. In accordance with this embodiment, it is not a requirement of the present invention that the strands 102, 104 be adhered to each other along a portion of their length such as by heating at least one of the strands to higher temperatures such as their softening temperature or above where the two strands are integrally bonded or joined together. The heat setting of the twisted yarn in accordance with this embodiment will be sufficient to prevent the strands 102, 104 from unraveling during the weaving process. However, the two strands 102, 104 can be stripped from each other by opening the twist and separating the two strands if desired. This is generally considered not possible when the strands are adhered to each other in accordance with the prior embodiment.
  • [0046]
    The strands 102, 104 may be heated prior to or after the twisting operation. In addition, the strands 102, 104 may be heated in one or more ovens to the same or different temperatures. In addition, the strands 102, 104 may be heated as a result of their hot extrusion from an extrusion die during their formation thereby eliminating the need for an oven.
  • [0047]
    It is also contemplated that spools 106, 108 of the source yarn may be placed in an oven to preheat the strands 102, 104 to the desired temperature prior to twisting. It is also contemplated that heating may be provided by placing the twisting apparatus 112 in an oven or arrange suitable heaters around the twisting apparatus.
  • [0048]
    In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention, it is not a requirement that the twisted yarn be heat set, as previously described, prior to being woven into a desired weave. As previously described, the twisted yarn 100 generally includes at least two strands 102, 104 of polymer material which are twisted together. However, it is also contemplated that a single strand of polymer material may be twisted about its longitudinal axis, for example, to form a spiral shaped strand simulating a twisted yarn.
  • [0049]
    The twisted yarn 100 or single strands of twisted yarn can be woven into various weaves to form woven material such as shown in FIGS. 4, 8 and 9. The woven material and the individual strands 102, 104 which form the twisted yarn 100 can be simultaneously heat set using the heat setting conditions and procedures as previously described. Thus, the individual strands 102, 104 may be twisted together to form a twisted yarn 100 without heating, subsequently woven into a woven material, and then, heat set simultaneously with heat setting of the woven material. This results in heat setting of the individual strands 102, 104, as well as heat setting of the twisted yarn 100 within the weave.
  • [0050]
    The woven material can be used in various applications such as the making of wicker style furniture as previously described. In addition, it is contemplated that the woven material can be used for other purposes, for example, forming rugs, fabric for drapes, cushions, lampshades, umbrellas, blinds, floor mats and the like. By virtue of the woven material being formed from polymer material, it is particularly suitable for use in outdoor applications or in areas of high humidity.
  • [0051]
    In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a product such as an article of furniture can be constructed from a frame having the product's shape and at least one panel attached thereto formed as a weave from a plurality of elongated members. The article may include, for example, chairs, tables, couches, stools, benches, rockers, lamps, trunks, umbrellas, etc. At least one of the members includes an elongated first yarn of polymer material twisted together with an elongated second yarn forming a composite yarn having a twisted shape. One of the first and second yarns may be different from the other one of the first and second yarns in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. The first and second yarns may be constructed as described in accordance with this application and the aforementioned patents.
  • [0052]
    In accordance with another embodiment, at least one panel is formed as a weave from a plurality of elongated members, at least one of the members includes an elongated first yarn, an elongated second yarn and an elongated third yarn. The first, second and third yarns are twisted together to form a composite twisted yarn, wherein at least one of the yarns is polymer material. One of the first, second and third yarns is different from at least one of the other two yarns in at least one of size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. The first, second and third yarns may be constructed as described in accordance with this application and the aforementioned patents.
  • [0053]
    There will now be described one embodiment of using the twisted yarn 100 in constructing an article of furniture such as a chair, by way of one example. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, a chair 120 can be produced from a rigid skeletal frame 118 which will be covered with a weave of woven material produced from the twisted yarn 100. The frame 118, by way of illustration only, provides an arm chair with a seat, a back rest, a pair of front legs, a pair of back legs and a pair of side arms. The seat 124 (see FIG. 5) is delineated by a connecting front member 126, a parallel spaced apart back member 128 and a pair of parallel spaced apart side members 130, 132. The front legs 134, 136 are constructed as parallel spaced apart vertical members joined to the free ends of the front member 126 and have outwardly turned extensions 137 providing the front legs with an L-shape. The front legs 134, 136 are arranged generally vertical to the floor as viewed from the front and side of the chair 120.
  • [0054]
    The back legs 138, 140 are constructed from an angular member attached to the free ends of the back member 128. The back legs 138, 140 have generally parallel spaced apart upper members 142 extending vertically from the back member 128 as viewed from the front and side and generally parallel spaced apart lower members 144. The lower members 144 are arranged at a rearwardly extending angle as viewed from the side and extend generally vertical from the back member 128 as viewed from the rear of the chair 120.
  • [0055]
    A generally U-shaped member 146 includes a center section 148 connected across the free ends of the upper members 142 of the back legs 138, 140 and a pair of curved spaced apart side arm members 150, 152 forming the side arms 154, 156 of the arm chair. The free ends of the side arm members 150, 152 are attached to the free ends of the extensions 137 of the respective front legs 134, 136. The side arm members 150, 152 are spaced apart wider at their mouth where they connect to the extensions 137 then where they form the center section 148. This arranges the side arms 154, 156 outwardly of the side members 130, 132. The upper members 142 of the back legs 138, 140, the back member 128 and center section 148 delineate the back 178 of the chair 120.
  • [0056]
    A secondary frame can be used to provide attachment support for the woven material utilized in covering the frame 118. Specifically, a generally U-shaped elongated rod 158 having a shape conforming substantially to the shape of the U-shaped member 146 is connected thereto in underlying relationship by means of a plurality of spaced apart ribs 160. Another secondary support frame is positioned between the front and back legs 134, 136, 138, 140 underlying the seat 124. This secondary frame is constructed from a front rod 162 connected between the front legs 134, 136, a back rod 164 connected between the back legs 138,140 and a pair of side rods 166, 168 arranged in parallel spaced apart relationship connected between the front rod 162 and back rod 164 inwardly of their terminal ends. An additional front rod 170 may be positioned between the front legs 134, 136 underlying front rod 162.
  • [0057]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, the frame 118 is covered by weaving the twisted yarn 100 into a woven material to form panels of woven material directly on the frame. A plurality of individual strands of the twisted yarn 100 are attached to various portions of the frame 118, for example, to the secondary frame as previously described. The individual strands of the twisted yarn 100,as they are attached to the frame 118,are directly woven into a predetermined weave pattern, for example, see FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 4, the weave pattern is a 44 pattern of weft and warp strands. However, the pattern may include any number of weft and warp strands of twisted yarn 100, for example, a 22, 55, 66, 1010, etc. In addition, it is not required that the woven material be symmetrical. In this regard, it is contemplated that the weave may comprise a 23, 35, 47, 25, 26, etc. weft and warp woven pattern. In addition, the twisted yarn 100 may be woven into integral designs. As such, the resulting panels of woven material, as shown in FIG. 4, are woven in situ directly on the frame 118.
  • [0058]
    It is also contemplated that the panels of woven material can be pre-weaved separately from the chair frame 118. In this regard, any weave pattern can be woven from the twisted yarn 100, and the woven panels subsequently attached to the frame 118. There are two heat setting processes contemplated pursuant to the present invention. One heat setting process concerns the heat setting of the twisted yarn 100 vis--vis the individual strands 102, 104 before, during or after the twisting process. The other heat setting process concerns heat setting a weave of woven polymer material, whereby the woven weft and warped yarns, either twisted or non-twisted yarns, are heat set to promote, for example, at least partial adhesion to each other thereby stabilizing the weave as a whole.
  • [0059]
    A weave of woven material such as, for example, as shown in FIG. 4 may be heat set prior to attaching the weave to the frame 118 of an article of furniture. The conditions of heat setting the woven material are contemplated to be similar to those employed for heat setting the twisted yarn 100. In this regard, the woven material can be placed in a continuous or batch over and heated to a sufficient temperature whereby the weft and warped yarns, as well as individual strands 102, 104 if a twisted yarn 100 is employed, are at least partially adhered to each other over at least intermittent portions thereof along their entire length. This heat setting process will simultaneously stabilize both the twisted yarn 100 when employed, as well as the entire woven material with respect to the weft and warped yarns. It is preferred that only a single heat setting process be performed on the woven material. In this regard, it is contemplated that multiple heat setting processes may result in the individual strands 102, 104 having a glazed over or shiny look which could distract from their wicker-style look.
  • [0060]
    Referring to FIG. 5, there is illustrated a chair 120 which has been fabricated by the in situ or separate weaving of the twisted yarn 100 into woven material which is attached to the frame 118. As shown, the chair 120 includes a seat portion 124, a front skirt portion 176, a back rest portion 178 and side portions 180. The front and back legs 134, 136, 138, 140 are wrapped with a continuous length of heat set twisted yarn 100. In this regard, the twisted yarn 100 is wrapped in a compact spiral around the length of each leg without weaving.
  • [0061]
    The twisted yarns have been described as being used as both the weft yarns and the warp yarns to form the woven portion, which is adhered to a frame 118 of a furniture article. As the twisted yarns generally have a non-smooth exterior surface by virtue of their twisted nature, their direct contact with a person's skin may be considered by some to be uncomfortable. It has therefore been found desirable in accordance with another embodiment to provide an improvement in the manufacture of woven portions from synthetic twisted yarns, which provide improved comfort to the user of the furniture article.
  • [0062]
    Referring to FIG. 8, the frame 118 in accordance with the disclosed embodiment is covered by weaving the twisted yarn 100 in combination with strands of non-twisted yarn into a woven material to form panels of woven material directly or indirectly on the frame as previously described. The non-twisted yarn can have any desired construction such as disclosed in the aforesaid patents, or as disclosed by strands 102, 104, or as may be known generally. A plurality of individual strands of twisted yarn 100, i.e., weft yarn, are attached to various portions of the frame 118, for example, to the secondary frame as previously described. The individual strands of the non-twisted yarn 101, i.e., warp yarn are woven with the twisted yarn 100, as they are attached to the frame 118 into a predetermined weave pattern. As shown in FIG. 8, the weave pattern is a 44 pattern of weft and warp strands. However, the pattern may include any number of weft and warp strands of twisted and non-twisted yarn 100, 101, for example, a 22, 55, 66, 1010, etc. In addition, it is not required that the woven material be symmetrical. In this regard, it is contemplated that the weave may comprise a 23, 35, 47, 25, 26, etc. weft and warp woven pattern. In addition, the twisted and non-twisted yarn 100, 101, may be woven into integral designs. As such, the resulting panels of woven material, as shown in FIG. 8, are woven in situ directly on the frame 118.
  • [0063]
    As the twisted yarn 100 is formed from at least two strands 102, 104 of polymer material, it is preferred that the diameter of the strands be smaller than the diameter of the non-twisted yarn 101. In the preferred embodiment, the overall diameter of the twisted yarn 100 will have a similar overall diameter to a single strand of the non-twisted yarn 101. This will result in a more uniform appearance to the woven portion. However, it is not a requirement that the diameter or shape of the twisted yarn 100 and non-twisted yarn 101 be the same. By providing variations in the size, shape, coloration and/or configuration of the twisted yarn 100 and non-twisted yarn 101, various aesthetic appearances can be achieved.
  • [0064]
    During the weaving process, the twisted yarn 100 constitutes the weft yarn, while the non-twisted yarn 101 constitutes the warp yarn. As shown in FIG. 8, the non-twisted yarn 101 is woven about the twisted yarn 100 as is known in the weaving art. This results in the exposed surface of the non-twisted yarn 101 being generally raised above the exposed surface of the twisted yarn 100. This provides a more comfortable surface portion for the woven material as the surface of the non-twisted yarn 101 is predominantly exposed for contact with the skin of an individual occupying the article of furniture.
  • [0065]
    Although in accordance with the thus far described embodiment, the woven material is formed in situ on the frame, it is contemplated that panels of pre-woven material may be adhered to the frame. It is therefore contemplated that portions of the article of furniture may be formed with woven material in situ, other portions by attaching panels of pre-woven material thereto, as well as variations thereof.
  • [0066]
    Referring to FIG. 9, there is disclosed another embodiment of a weave incorporating a twisted yarn 100 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. The weave as shown in FIG. 9 is a reverse combination weave from the weave as previously described with respect to FIG. 8. In this regard, the twisted yarn 100 forms the warped yarns, while the non-twisted yarn 101 forms the weft yarns. This reversal of the weft and warped yarns has been found to provide a number of benefits to the finished woven material. For example, during a machine weaving process, it has been found easier to insert weft yarns 101 which have a smoother outer surface than the twisted yarns 100. It has also been determined that using the twisted yarn 100 as the warped yarn minimizes or eliminated sagging of the woven material when suspended or stretched across a frame such as when heat setting in the case of making an article of furniture, in particular, a chair and the like. Not withstanding the foregoing, the present invention specifically encompasses the combination of twisted and non-twisted yarns as either weft or warped yarns.
  • [0067]
    In accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, the entire chair 120 is placed into an oven similar to oven 110 in order to heat set the attached woven material similar to that used in the production of the heat set twisted yarn. In the case of the chair 120, it is contemplated that the oven will be a batch oven, as opposed to a continuous oven 110 as described with respect to the manufacture of the twisted yarn 100. In this regard, the oven will typically be of sufficient size to hold a plurality of chairs 120. The chairs will remain in the oven at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined residence time to cause the twisted yarns or non-twisted yarns to reach a temperature up to but generally below about its softening temperature, whereby contiguous portions of the twisted yarn 100 may at least partially bond or fuse together within the weave, depending upon temperature, when the chair is removed from the oven and allowed to cool. The cooling process may take place either within the oven or outside the oven by being subjected to ambient air. In addition, it is also contemplated that a source of chilled air may be blown over the heated chairs 120 either in a confined housing or in an open area.
  • [0068]
    The temperature and residence time for the oven for heat setting the woven polymer material are similar to those as thus far described with respect to the twisted yarn. In addition, it is contemplated that the woven material can be formed from other than twisted yarn 100 as described. For example, individual filaments, as well as plural filaments which are untwisted can also be used in forming the woven material for adhering to the frame of the article of furniture which is to be ultimately heat set. It is further contemplated that strands of the twisted yarn 100 can also be woven with non-twisted strands to form woven material for forming portions of the article. Thus, it is to be understood, that various constructions of polymer filaments may be woven to form the woven material having various aesthetic appearances.
  • [0069]
    As previously described, it is contemplated that panels of pre-woven material may be adhered to the frame and subsequently heat set by placing the article of furniture in an oven as thus far described. It is therefore contemplated that portions of the article of furniture may be formed with woven material in situ, other portions by attaching panels of pre-woven material thereto, as well as variations thereof. In any event, the article of furniture will be placed in an oven to heat set the woven material including the polymer strands of twisted or non-twisted strands.
  • [0070]
    Referring now to FIG. 10, we will be describing the construction of a floor covering in the nature of a rug or mat, and generally designated by reference numeral 200. The floor covering 200 is formed as a weave from twisted yarn 100 as thus far described. For example, the twisted yarn 100 can be formed from any number of strands 102, 104, which strands may be the same or different as to size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance. Accordingly, any of the variations as heretofore described with respect to the strands 102, 104 and/or twisted yarn 100 may be incorporated into the floor covering 200. It is also contemplated that portions of the floor covering 200 may include non-twisted yarns in combination with twisted yarns 100, such as forming the wet yarns and warped yarns. It is further contemplated that the warped yarns may be twisted yarns and the wet yarns be non-twisted yarns, or the wet yarns being twisted yarns and the warped yarns being non-twisted yarns, as disclosed and described with respect to FIGS. 8 and 9.
  • [0071]
    A floor covering 200 such as a rug or mat can be woven into any desired pattern incorporating any number of twisted yarns 100 or non-twisted strands 102, 104, all of various size, shape, surface configuration, coloration and surface appearance as desirable to provide an aesthetically pleasing floor covering. By forming a portion of the floor covering 200 from twisted yarn 100, the twisted yarn provides a non-slip surface when being walked upon to enhance traction. The floor covering 200, by virtue of being constructed from synthetic material, is particularly suitable for outdoor use in wet environments. The floor covering 200 is constructed without a backing material. By eliminating the backing material, water and air can penetrate through the openings formed within the weave. This will allow for drainage and eliminate pooling of water on or under the floor covering 200 where the floor covering is used in an outdoor environment which is subject to rain. In addition, the construction facilitates washing of the floor covering using a hose and the like, whereby the water will penetrate through the weave and drain therefrom. The openings in the weave will also facilitate air drying. This construction of the floor covering 200 will prevent rotting or mildew from forming under the supporting floor. By way of example only, openings in the order of 0.1 to 1.5 mm is considered sufficient to allow for water passage and air circulation, although other sized openings smaller and larger than the foregoing range are contemplated. Generally, any opening or combination of openings sized to permit water drainage will be useful in forming floor coverings 200 pursuant to the present invention. The floor covering 200, by not being provided with a backing, is also reversible during use.
  • [0072]
    The floor covering 200 may be heat set during its manufacturing process as thus far described with respect to the twisted yarn 100 or woven material formed therefrom, such as in making an article of furniture as previously described. In this regard, the twisted yarn 100 may be heat set during the twisting process. The heat set twisted yarn 100 may then be woven to form the floor covering 200. Subsequently, the floor covering 200 can be heat set to stabilize the weft and warp yarns in the weave.
  • [0073]
    In the preferred embodiment, the twisted yarn 100 is not heat set during the twisting operation. Subsequent to forming the woven floor covering 200, the floor covering is subject to a single heat setting process. As previously described, in this regard, the weft and warp yarns will be at least partially, or fully, adhered to each other, as well as the individual strands forming the twisted yarn 100. The heat set floor covering 200 will maintain its shape during use without the need of secondary assistance. For example, it is not required that a frame be provided for the floor covering 200 as in the case of an article of furniture as previously described. However, if desired, a suitable frame may be used about which a panel of woven material can be affixed in forming the floor covering 200. In addition, it is not required that a binding as is conventional on rugs be provided around the edge of the floor covering 200. However, a binding 202 of synthetic or natural materials may be adhered, such as by stitching, gluing, thermal bonding and the like, around the perimeter of the floor covering 200 if so desired.
  • [0074]
    Although the invention herein has been described with reference to particular embodiments, it is to be understood that these embodiments are merely illustrative of the principles and application of the present invention. It is therefore to be understood that numerous modifications may be made to the illustrative embodiments and that other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification139/169
International ClassificationD03D49/40, D03D15/00, D02G3/24, D03D1/00, A47C7/02, D03D29/00, A47C5/02, D02G3/28
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/02, D03D15/0027, D03D1/0029, D02G3/24, D03D15/0083, D02G3/28, D10B2331/04, D10B2505/08, D10B2331/02, D10B2321/041, D10B2401/08, D03D29/00, A47C5/02, D03D1/00, D10B2503/04, D10B2101/20, D03D15/0077, D03D15/00, D03D15/02
European ClassificationD03D1/00C4, D03D15/00N, D03D15/00E, D03D15/00O, D03D15/02, D03D15/00, D03D29/00, D03D1/00, A47C5/02, A47C7/02, D02G3/24, D02G3/28
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 9, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: SUN ISLE CASUAL FURNITURE, LLC, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SCHWARTZ, LARRY;REEL/FRAME:014571/0581
Effective date: 20030930
Nov 2, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: SUN ISLE USA, LLC, FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ISLE CASUAL FURNITURE, LLC;REEL/FRAME:016967/0441
Effective date: 20051031
Owner name: SUN ISLE USA, LLC,FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ISLE CASUAL FURNITURE, LLC;REEL/FRAME:016967/0441
Effective date: 20051031
Jun 12, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: CASUAL LIVING WORLDWIDE, INC., KENTUCKY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ISLE USA, LLC;REEL/FRAME:019419/0342
Effective date: 20061103
Owner name: CASUAL LIVING WORLDWIDE, INC.,KENTUCKY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ISLE USA, LLC;REEL/FRAME:019419/0342
Effective date: 20061103