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Publication numberUS20040039095 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/643,612
Publication dateFeb 26, 2004
Filing dateAug 19, 2003
Priority dateMar 22, 1999
Also published asUS7160945, US7705084, US20070093579
Publication number10643612, 643612, US 2004/0039095 A1, US 2004/039095 A1, US 20040039095 A1, US 20040039095A1, US 2004039095 A1, US 2004039095A1, US-A1-20040039095, US-A1-2004039095, US2004/0039095A1, US2004/039095A1, US20040039095 A1, US20040039095A1, US2004039095 A1, US2004039095A1
InventorsMichael Van de Mark, Nantana Jiratumnukul
Original AssigneeThe Curators Of The University Of Missouri
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water borne film-forming compositions
US 20040039095 A1
Abstract
The present invention provides a film_forming composition comprising a particulate polymer or emulsified liquid pre-polymer, water and a coalescent aid comprising an ester having the formula RCOOX wherein R and X are independently hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, and at least one of R and X contain at least two unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. The coalescent aid helps lower the minimum film formation temperature of low glass transition temperature coatings and high glass transition temperature coatings and allows optimum film formation at ambient temperatures. The coalescent aid of this coating composition is not volatile like conventional coalescent aids by rather remains part of the film and air oxidizes to cure the film. This coating composition also exhibits properties of adhesion and gloss superior to that of coating compositions containing conventional coalescent aids. Additionally, this coalescent aid can be made from natural or synthetic oils.
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Claims(38)
What is claimed is:
1. A film-forming composition comprising a continuous aqueous phase and a dispersed phase, the dispersed phase comprising (i) a particulate polymer or emulsified liquid prepolymer, and (ii) a coalescent aid comprising an ester having the formula RCOOX wherein R and X are independently hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl and at least one of R and X comprises at least two unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds.
2. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein R and X independently comprise about 1 to about 30 carbon atoms.
3. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein R and X independently comprise about 1 to about 30 carbon atoms and, in combination, contain no more than about 35 carbon atoms.
4. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein R and X each contain an unsaturated carbon-carbon bond.
5. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein R comprises at least two unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds in conjugation.
6. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein R or X is substituted hydrocarbyl and the hydrocarbyl substituent is selected from the group consisting of ketones, esters, alcohols, amides, halogens, urea, urethane, and nitrile substituents.
7. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is prepared by the transesterification reaction between a fatty acid and a glycol.
8. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is an ester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil, canola oil, or linseed oil.
9. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is an ethylene glycol monoester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil.
10. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is an diethylene glycol monoester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil.
11. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is a propylene glycol monoester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil.
12. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is a dipropylene glycol monoester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil.
13. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is a methyl ester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil.
14. The film-forming composition of claim 7 wherein the fatty acid is a fatty acid derived from soybean oil.
15. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 50% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
16. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 4% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
17. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the continuous aqueous phase constitutes at least about 20 wt. % of the film-forming composition.
18. The film-forming composition of claim 17 wherein the ester is an ester derived from a fatty acid of soybean oil, canola oil, or linseed oil.
19. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the dispersed or continuous aqueous phase further comprises an additive selected from the group consisting of wetting aids, dispersants, thickeners, defoaming agents, biocides, algicides, ultra-violet inhibitors, flow agents, levelling agents, reology modifiers, freeze thaw stabilizing agents, pH modifiers, flash rust inhibitors, and biocides.
20. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids and the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture.
21. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil obtained from a plant or animal and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 25 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
22. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil obtained from a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 25 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
23. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil obtained from a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 50 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
24. The film-forming composition of claim 23 wherein the film-forming composition contains at least about 20 wt. % water.
25. The film-forming composition of claim 23 wherein the film-forming composition contains at least about 20 wt. % water, at least about 10 wt. % particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer, and the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 50% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
26. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the film-forming composition contains at least about 20 wt. % water, at least about 10 wt. % particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer, and the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 50% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
27. The film-forming composition of claim 26 wherein at least 95 wt. % of the ester is dissolved in the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
28. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein at least 95 wt. % of the ester is dissolved in the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
29. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein the continuous aqueous phase contains less than about 10 wt. % organic solvent.
30. The film-forming composition of claim 1 wherein at least 95 wt. % of the ester is dissolved in the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer and the continuous aqueous phase contains less than about 10 wt. % organic solvent.
31. The film-forming composition of claim 30 wherein the film-forming composition contains at least about 20 wt. % water, at least about 10 wt. % particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer, and the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 50% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
32. The film-forming composition of claim 31 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil found in a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 50 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
33. The film-forming composition of claim 30 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil found in a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 50 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
34. A film-forming composition comprising at least about 10 wt. % of a continuous aqueous phase and a dispersed phase, the dispersed phase comprising (i) a particulate polymer or emulsified liquid prepolymer, and (ii) a coalescent aid comprising an ester derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil found in a plant or animal, the ester having the formula RCOOX wherein R and X are independently hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl and at least one of R and X comprises at least two unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds.
35. The film-forming composition of claim 34 wherein at least 95 wt. % of the ester is dissolved in the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer and the continuous aqueous phase contains less than about 10 wt. % organic solvent, based upon the weight of the continuous phase.
36. The film-forming composition of claim 35 wherein the film-forming composition contains at least about 20 wt. % water, at least about 10 wt. % particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer, and the weight of the ester is about 0.1% to about 50% of the weight of the particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer.
37. The film-forming composition of claim 35 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil found in a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 50 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
38. The film-forming composition of claim 34 wherein the film-forming composition comprises a mixture of coalescent aids, the ester comprises at least about 5 wt. % of the mixture, the ester is derived from a fatty acid contained in an oil found in a plant or animal, and the unsaturated fatty acid comprises at least about 50 wt. % of the fatty acid content of the oil.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 09/532,839, filed Mar. 21, 2000, which claims priority from application Ser. No. 60/125,446, filed Mar. 22, 1999, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention generally relates to water borne film-forming compositions containing a polyunsaturated ester as a coalescent aid.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Aqueous dispersions of particulate polymer or emulsified liquid pre-polymers for use as paints, sealants, caulks, adhesives or other coatings are well-known, widely-used articles of commerce. The effectiveness of the dispersion in forming a film after the polymer dispersion has been deposited upon a surface depends upon the glass transition temperature of the dispersed polymer and the temperature at which the film is allowed to dry. See, for example, Conn et al., U.S. Pat. No. 2,795,564 and Emmons et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,131,580.

[0004] Coalescent aids have been used in such aqueous dispersions to soften, i.e., plasticize, the particulate polymers and facilitate the formation of a continuous film with optimum film properties once the water has evaporated. In addition to increasing the ease of film formation, the coalescent aid also promotes subsequent improvements in film properties by coalescing the particulate polymers and liquid pre-polymers and forming an integral film at ambient temperatures. Without the coalescent aid, the films may crack and fail to adhere to the substrate surface when dry.

[0005] Coalescent aids are particularly helpful in assisting the formation of particulate polymer films possessing a high glass transition temperature, that is, the temperature which defines how easily the particles of the polymer diffuse at the temperature at which the film-forming composition is applied. The presence of coalescent aids in a particulate polymer film having a high glass transition temperature allows optimum film formation at ambient temperatures.

[0006] Various alcohol esters and ether alcohols have been proposed for use as coalescent aids. For example, in U.S. Pat. No. 4,131,580 Emmons et al. disclose water-based coating compositions based on vinyl addition polymers of monoethylenically unsaturated monomers which comprise dicyclopentenyl acrylate and/or dicyclopentenyl methacrylate as a coalescent aid. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,141,868, Emmons et al. suggest certain ester-ether compounds be used instead. Two of the more widely used coalescent aids are ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EB, Union Carbide) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3 pentanediol monobutyrate (TEXANOL®, Eastman Kodak). While EB and TEXANOL® are useful in facilitating film formation of particulate polymer coatings with high glass transition temperatures and are even useful in facilitating film formation of particulate polymer coatings with low glass transition temperatures if they are being applied at a temperature that is lower than ambient temperature, they are relatively volatile and, as a result, are currently classified as VOCs (volatile organic compounds).

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] Among the objects of the invention is a coalescent aid for use in a water-borne film forming composition wherein the coalescent aid is not classified as a volatile organic compound, but which, nevertheless, (i) exhibits favorable adhesion and gloss relative to water borne film-forming compositions containing conventional coalescent aids, (ii) exhibits favorable minimum film formation temperature of low glass transition temperature films and high glass transition temperature films and (iii) allows optimum film formation at ambient temperatures.

[0008] Briefly, therefore, the present invention provides a film-forming composition comprising a continuous aqueous phase and a dispersed phase. The dispersed phase comprises (i) a particulate polymer or emulsified liquid prepolymer, and (ii) a coalescent aid comprising an ester having the formula RCOOX wherein R and X are independently hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl and at least one of R and X comprises at least two unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Other objects of the invention will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009]FIG. 1 is the MFFT (C) plot for FLEXBOND 325 as a function of % coalescent aids;

[0010]FIG. 2 is the MFFT (C) plot for UCAR 379 as a function of % coalescent aids;

[0011]FIG. 3 is the MFFT (C) plot for ACRONAL A846 as a function of % coalescent aids;

[0012]FIG. 4 is the MFFT (C) plot for UCAR 430 as a function of % coalescent aids;

[0013]FIG. 6 is the MFFT plot for UCAR 430 as a function of coalescent aids;

[0014]FIG. 7 is the MFFT plot for UCAR 430 as a function of coalescent aids;

[0015]FIG. 8 is the MFFT plot for ACRONAL A846 as a function of coalescent aids; and

[0016]FIG. 9 is the MFFT plot for ACRONAL A846 as a function of coalescent aids.

[0017] In FIGS. 1-4 and 6-9, X1, X2, X3, X4, EB, EB_X and EB+X have the following meanings:

[0018] X1=Ethylene glycol soy oil ester,

[0019] X2=Propylene glycol soy oil ester,

[0020] X3=Diethylene glycol soy oil ester,

[0021] X4=Dipropylene glycol soy oil ester,

[0022] EB=Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether,

[0023] EB_X=derivatives and EB mixture 50:50, and

[0024] EB+X=derivatives and EB mixture 50:50.

[0025] FIGS. 1-4 and 6-9 are plots of minimum film formation temperature as a function of % coalescent aid;

[0026]FIG. 5 is a plot of the evaporation rate of coalescent aid as a function of time;

[0027]FIG. 10 is a plot of coating resistance and charge transfer resistance as a function of dry time;

[0028]FIG. 11 is a plot of coating capacitance and associated double layer capacitance as a function of dry time;

[0029] FIGS. 12-19 are infrared spectra of soybean oil and various coalescent aids;

[0030] FIGS. 20-27 are 1H-NMR spectra of soybean oil and various coalescent aids; and

[0031] FIGS. 28-32 are 13C-NMR spectra of soybean oil and various coalescent aids.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0032] The water-borne film-forming compositions of the present invention generally contain a continuous aqueous phase and a dispersed film-forming phase. In general, they may be formulated to function as a paint, sealant, caulk, adhesive or other coating. Thus, these film-forming compositions may have a wide range of viscosities, e.g., from about 50 to about 10,000 centipoise; paints, sealants and similar coatings typically have a viscosity from about 50 to about 10,000 centipoise, caulks typically have a viscosity from about 5,000 to about 50,000 centipoise, and adhesives typically have a viscosity from about 50 to about 50,000 centipoise. In addition, adhesives are formulated for cohesive strength as well as good contact with the substrate upon which the film-forming composition is deposited.

[0033] The continuous aqueous phase generally comprises at least about 10 wt % water with the amount of water depending upon the application. For example, paints, sealants and similar coating compositions will generally have at least about 10 wt % water and typically will contain about 20 wt % to about 80 wt % water with differing amounts being used for textured, high gloss, semi-gloss, flat, etc. coatings. Caulks will generally have at least about 10 wt % water and typically will contain about 10 wt % to about 25 wt % water with differing amounts being used for different caulk applications. Adhesives will generally range from about 10 wt % to about 80 wt % water and typically will contain about 40 wt % to about 60 wt % water with differing amounts being used for different adhesive applications.

[0034] The continuous aqueous phase may optionally include one or more water-soluble organic solvents, i.e., substituted hydrocarbon solvents. For example, modest amounts of ethylene glycol (e.g., 3-5 wt. %) or another glycol may be included for freeze-thaw protection. In general, however, the proportion of water-soluble organic solvents is preferably minimized; that is, the continuous aqueous phase preferably contains less than about 20 wt. % organic solvent, more preferably less than about 10 wt. % organic solvent, and still more preferably less than about 5 wt. % organic solvent, based upon the weight of the continuous aqueous phase and exclusive of any amount which may be present in a micelle or other dispersed phase or material.

[0035] The dispersed phase comprises a (i) particulate polymer or an emulsified liquid pre-polymer, (ii) a coalescent aid and, optionally, (iii) one or more additives. In general, the dispersed phase constitutes no more than about 90 wt % with the amount of dispersed phase depending upon the application. For example, paints, sealants and similar coating compositions will generally have no more than about 90 wt % dispersed phase and typically will contain about 20 wt % to about 80 wt % dispersed phase with differing amounts being used for textured, high gloss, semi-gloss, flat, etc. coatings. Caulks will generally have no more than about 90 wt % dispersed phase and typically will contain about 75 wt % to about 90 wt % dispersed phase with differing amounts being used for different caulk applications. Adhesives will generally range from about 20 wt % to about 90 wt % dispersed phase and typically will contain about 40 wt % to about 60 wt % dispersed phase with differing amounts being used for different adhesive applications.

[0036] In general, the particulate polymer or emulsified liquid pre-polymer is insoluble in the aqueous phase and is otherwise suitable for use in water borne film-forming compositions. Because the particulate polymer or emulsified liquid pre-polymer is the component which coalesces to form the desired film, the film-forming composition preferably comprises at least about 10 wt. %, more preferably at least about 15 wt. %, and depending for some applications at least about 20 wt. % of a coalescible particulate polymer or emulsified liquid pre-polymer.

[0037] Preferred particulate polymers are generally high molecular weight (e.g, greater than about 60,000 for latex), crosslinkable, polymer particles. For example, they may be either of the addition type, in particular a polymer or copolymer of one or more α,β-ethylenically unsaturated monomers, or of the condensation type, for example, a polyester or a polyamide. Suitable particulate polymers of the addition type include the polymerization and copolymerization products of styrene, vinyl acetate, vinyl toluene, vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, butadiene, vinyl hydrocarbons, acrylonitrile, acrylates, and methacrylate containing monomers. Suitable condensation type particulate polymers include epoxy, urethane, hydrocarbon, silicone, nitrocellulose, polyester, and alkyd polymers. Preferred particulate polymers include acrylate, methacrylate, styrene and vinyl acetate. Examples of preferred particulate polymers include the polymerizates or copolymerizates of one or more of the following: alkyl acrylates such as ethyl acrylate, butyl acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, as well as other alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, styrene and vinyl acetate.

[0038] In general, smaller particulate polymers are more readily coalesced than larger particulate polymers. Accordingly, preferred particulate polymers generally have a size of about 3 micrometers or less. For example, for latex resins, approximately 90 wt. % of the latex particles will have a size less than about 0.2 micrometers.

[0039] Preferred emulsified liquid pre-polymers include alkyds, epoxies, nitrocellulose, and urethanes.

[0040] The coalescent aid of the present invention preferably comprises an ester having the formula

RCOOX

[0041] wherein

[0042] R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl,

[0043] X is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, and

[0044] at least one of R and X contains two or more aliphatic unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds (hereinafter “polyunsaturated”).

[0045] Preferably, R contains about 1 to about 30 carbon atoms, more preferably about 9 to about 25 carbon atoms, and still more preferably about 15 to about 23 carbon atoms, X contains about 1 to about 30 carbon atoms, more preferably about 1 to about 18 carbon atoms, and still more preferably about 1 to about 6 atoms, and R and X in combination contain no more than about 35 carbon atoms, and more preferably, R and X, in combination, contain no more than about 30 carbon atoms. In addition, at least one of R and X preferably contains a conjugated double or triple carbon-carbon bond (i.e., two or more carbon-carbon double or triple bonds which alternate with carbon-carbon single bonds). For example, the unsaturation may take the form of two conjugated double bonds, a conjugated double bond and triple bond or two conjugated triple bonds.

[0046] While the carbon-carbon polyunsaturation may be provided in R or X, it is generally preferred that it be provided at the tail of the ester, i.e., in R. Thus, R is preferably hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl possessing at least two aliphatic unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds, more preferably in conjugation, with R preferably comprising about 5 to about 25 carbon, more preferably about 9 to about 25 carbon atoms, and still more preferably about 11 to about 23 carbon atoms. If R is substituted hydrocarbyl, it is preferably substituted with ketone, amide, ester, alcohol, urea, urethane, nitrile functionalities; silyl and amine functionalities are preferably avoided and alcohols are preferably avoided if the number of carbon atoms is less than about 10.

[0047] Optionally, the head of the ester, i.e., X, may be polyunsaturated instead of the tail of the ester. In this instance, X is preferably hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl possessing at least two aliphatic unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds, more preferably in conjugation with X preferably comprising about 5 to about 30 carbon, more preferably about 5 to about 25 carbon atoms, and still more preferably about 5 to about 24 carbon atoms.

[0048] If R is polyunsaturated, X may optionally contain one or more degrees of carbon-carbon unsaturation. Stated another way, X may be hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl optionally possessing one or more degrees of carbon-carbon unsaturation. As with R, X may optionally contain at least 2 degrees of carbon-carbon unsaturation with the 2 degrees of carbon-carbon unsaturation optionally being in conjugation. In one embodiment of the present invention, for example, X is X′—OH wherein X′ is a hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl radical comprising about 1 to about 8 carbon atoms. Preferably, X′ comprises about 2 to about 6 carbon atoms and, in one embodiment X′ possesses at least one degree of unsaturation. If X or X′ is substituted hydrocarbyl, it is preferably substituted with ketone, amide, ester, alcohol, urea, urethane, nitrile functionalities; silyl and amine functionalities are preferably avoided.

[0049] The polyunsaturated ester of the present invention is preferably sufficiently involatile to avoid categorization as a Volatile Organic Compound by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. In one embodiment of the present invention, the coalescent aid is a single ester. In another embodiment of the present invention, the coalescent aid comprises a mixture of esters with at least one of the esters being a polyunsaturate. In a third embodiment, the coalescent aid comprises a polyunsaturated ester with a conventional coalescent aid such as ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EB, Union Carbide) or 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3 pentanediol monobutyrate (TEXANOL®, Eastman Kodak). Where composition(s) other than polyunsaturated esters are also used as a coalescent aid, it is generally preferred that the polyunsaturated ester comprise at least about 5 wt. %, more preferably at least about 10 wt. %, still more preferably at least about 25 wt. %, still more preferably at least about 50 wt. %, and still more preferably at least about 75 wt. %, based upon the total combined weights of the compositions used as coalescent aids.

[0050] The polyunsaturated ester of the present invention may be derived from a natural, genetically engineered or synthetic material such as an oil, fat, lecithin or petroleum product. In a preferred embodiment, the coalescent aid comprises a polyunsaturated ester derived from an oil of plant or animal origin (including oils obtained from genetically engineered species), such as canola, linseed, soybean, or another naturally occurring oil such as one identified in Table I. Examples of preferred polyunsaturated esters include methyl ester, ethylene glycol monoester, diethylene glycol monoester, propylene glycol monoester, and dipropylene glycol monoester derived from the fatty acids of these oils.

TABLE I
VEGETABLE OIL AVERAGE FATTY ACID AS PERCENT OF TOTAL FATTY ACID
Number of Carbon Atoms * 6 10 12 14 16 18 18 18 18 16 18 22 20-22 20-24
Number of Double Bonds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 1 1 1 ** 3
Castor 85 1.0 2.0 2.0 5.0 90.0
Corn 124 13.0 4.0 29.0 54.0
Cottonseed 107 22.0 2.0 21.0 54.0
Crambe 94 3.0 2.0 18.0 10.0 5.0 56.0 3.0 2.0
Linseed 185 6.0 4.0 20.0 17.0 53.0
Mustard 120 2.0 24.0 20.0 6.0 43.0 5.0
Olive 80 8.0 2.0 82.0 8.0
Oiticica1 150 7.0 6.0 5.0
Peanut 90 7.0 6.0 60.0 22.0 5.0
Rapeseed 101 2.0 2.0 16.0 16.0 8.0 45.0 6.0 4.0
Rice Bran 102 17.0 1.0 47.0 35.0
Safflower 141 6.0 2.0 13.0 79.0
Sardine, Pilchard 190 14.0 3.0 10.0 15.0 12.0 41.0
Sesame 110 9.0 4.0 46.0 41.0
Soybean 130 8.0 6.0 28.0 50.0 8.0
Sunflower 139 6.0 2.0 26.0 66.0
Tung (Regular)2 165 4.0 1.0 5.0 8.0
Tung (African)3 160 4.0 1.0 9.0 15.0
Walnut (English) 150 9.0 1.0 16.0 60.0 13.0

[0051] The fatty acid ester glycols may be prepared by transesterification reactions between various glycols and fatty acids from soybean and other oils of plant or animal origin in the presence of a catalyst. Suitable catalysts include bases such as lithium hydroxide, tin oxides, tin catalysts, and calcium oxide with the reaction temperature generally being about 100 to about 200° C. In a preferred embodiment, the glycol used in the reaction is ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol or dipropylene glycol with the reaction being carried out with about 6 moles of glycol per mole of soybean oil in the presence of a basic catalyst at a temperature of about 190° C. under nitrogen atmosphere. After reaction, the excess glycol is extracted with water several times. The soy oil ester is extracted with ethyl ether and dried, for example, with magnesium sulfate. Then the ethyl ether is distilled off. The reaction equation is given below.

[0052] where R is unsaturated hydrocarbon chain having 17 carbons

[0053] R′ is a group of the formula

—C2H4—for ethylene glycol

—C3H6—for propylene glycol

—C2H4O—C2H4—for diethylene glycol

—C3H6O—C3H6—for dipropylene glycol

[0054] The amount of coalescent aid needed to assist in film formation depends on the viscosity of the film-forming composition, the temperature at which the composition is being applied, the glass transition temperature of the film-former, and the minimum film formation temperature of the film-former. In general, the amount of coalescent will be proportional to the amount and type of resin used with ratios in the range of about 0.1 wt % to about 50 wt. % (based upon the weight of the dry resin), typically in the 1 wt. % to about 4 wt. % range (based upon the weight of the dry resin).

[0055] Any coalescent aid which remains in the film will act as a plasticizer, keeping the glass transition temperature low unless it has polyunsaturation which will allow it to be air oxidized and oligomerized which results in the coalescent aid becoming more of a resin and less of a plasticizer. Thus, the glass transition temperature is in part recovered. In general, the greater degree of unsaturation of the coalescent aid the more glass transition temperature recovery can be expected. Where a mixture of materials are used as the coalescent aid, therefore, it is generally preferred that the polyunsaturated acid(s) comprise at least about 5 wt. %, more preferably at least about 25 wt. %, still more preferably at least about 40 wt. % and still more preferably at least about 50 wt. % of the coalescent aid.

[0056] Trace amounts of the polyunsaturated ester coalescent aid of the present invention may be dissolved in the continuous aqueous phase; that is, preferably less than about 10 wt. %, more preferably less than 5 wt. %, still more preferably less than 1 wt. %, and for some embodiments still more preferably less than about 0.5 wt. % of the polyunsaturated ester is dissolved in the continuous aqueous phase, based upon the weight of the continuous aqueous phase. The predominant proportion of the polyunsaturated ester coalescent aid is thus preferably dissolved in the dispersed particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer. Preferably at least 80 wt. %, more preferably at least 90 wt. %, more preferably at least 95 wt. %, and still more preferably at least 99 wt. % of the polyunsaturated ester coalescent aid is dissolved in the dispersed particulate polymer or liquid pre-polymer. Depending upon the type and amount of surfactants included in the film-forming composition, a relatively small fraction of the polyunsaturated ester coalescent aid may additionally be emulsified in the continuous aqueous phase and found in micelles along with surfactant.

[0057] The film-forming composition of the present invention may also contain various conventional additives which may be in the dispersed and/or continuous phases. Such additives include thickening agents such as carboxymethylcellulose sold by Aquilon under the trade designation NATRASOL 250 and thickeners sold under the trade designation M-P-A 1075 by Rheox, pH modifiers such as ammonium hydroxide and N,N-dimethyl ethanolamine, defoaming agents such as mineral oil or silicone oils, wetting agents such as a nonionic surfactant sold by AKZO under the trade designation INTERWET 43 and a nonionic surfactant sold by Rohm & Haas under the trade designation Triton X100, algicides such as organotin compounds and tetrachloroisophthalonitrile, fungicides such as tributyl tin oxide, and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate, dispersants such as lecithin and an anionic dispersant sold under the trade designation BUSPERSE 39 by Buckman, ultraviolet inhibitors such as a benztriazol UV inhibitor sold under the trade designation TINUVIN 328 by Ciba-Geigy and a hindered amine UV inhibitor sold under the trade designation by TINUVIN 123 by Ciba-Geigy, flow and leveling agents such as a polyacrylate sold under the trade designation BYK 354 by BYK-Chemie and a polysiloxane copolymer sold under the trade designation BYK 310 by BYK-Chemie, flash rust inhibitors such as an inhibitor sold under the trade designation RAYBO 63 by Raybo or a barium metaborate rust inhibitor sold under the trade designation BUSAN 11 M1 by Buckman, and freeze/thaw inhibitors such as ethylene glycol. Additional additives include driers such as cobalt driers carboxylate salts (0.0 to 0.15 wt. % Co based on the coalescent aid) and manganese driers carboxylate salts (0.0 to 0.15 wt. % based on the coalescent aid), accelerators such as 1,10-phenanthroline (0 to 0.2 % based on the coalescent aid) and 2,2-bipyridine (0 to 0.2 % based on the coalescent aid), and anti-skinning agents such as butanone oxime (0−1 lb/100 gal formulation). When present and depending upon the application for the film-forming composition, these additives will generally not constitute more than about 10 wt. % of the film-forming composition and will typically constitute about 3 wt. % to about 10 wt. % of the film-forming composition.

[0058] The film-forming composition is formed by conventional methods used to prepare paints, adhesives, except that the polyunsaturated ester of the present invention is substituted, at least in part, for a conventional coalescent aid. The resulting film-forming composition can easily be applied conventionally using a brush, roller, or like means and requires no unusual methods of drying to form the desired film. Thus, films formed from the composition of the present invention may be dried under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the film-forming composition may be applied to a variety of materials.

[0059] Definitions

[0060] As used herein, the term “hydrocarbyl” shall mean a radical consisting exclusively of carbon and hydrogen. The hydrocarbyl may be branched or unbranched, saturated or unsaturated. Suitable hydrocarbyl moieties include alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, and aryl moieties. They also include alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, and aryl moieties substituted with other saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbyl moieties such as alkaryl, alkenaryl and alkynaryl. Preferably, the hydrocarbyl does not include an aryl moiety and except as otherwise indicated herein, the hydrocarbyl moieties preferably comprises up to about 25 carbon atoms.

[0061] The aryl moieties described herein contain from 6 to 20 carbon atoms and include phenyl. They may be hydrocarbyl substituted with the various substituents defined herein. Phenyl is the more preferred aryl.

[0062] The term “substituted hydrocarbyl” shall mean a hydrocarbyl radical wherein at least one hydrogen atom has been substituted with an atom other than hydrogen or carbon, including moieties in which a carbon chain atom is substituted with a hetero atom such as nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, phosphorous, boron, sulfur, or a halogen atom. These substituents include hydroxy; lower alkoxy such as methoxy, ethoxy, butoxy; halogen such as chloro or fluoro; ethers; esters; heteroaryl such as furyl or thienyl; alkanoxy; acyl; acyloxy; nitro; amino; and amido. In general, however, amines and silyl radicals are preferably excluded.

[0063] The acyl moieties and the acyloxy moieties described herein contain hydrocarbyl, substituted hydrocarbyl or heteroaryl moieties. In general, they have the formulas —C(O)G and —OC(O)G, respectively, wherein G is substituted or unsubstituted hydrocarbyl, hydrocarbyloxy, hydrocarbylamino, hydrocarbylthio or heteroaryl.

[0064] This invention will be further illustrated by the following Examples although it will be understood that these Examples are included merely for purposes of illustration and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

EXAMPLES

[0065] Test Procedures

[0066] The following test procedures were used to generate the data reported in the examples below:

[0067] Minimum Film Formation Temperature Measurement

[0068] The method used for measuring MFFT followed ASTM Method D2354-68. Minimum film formation temperatures for ten different coalescent aid formulated latexes were measured. Four replicate measurements were performed for the same latex and were then averaged.

[0069] Blocking Resistance Testing

[0070] The procedure employed to evaluate block resistance followed ASTM Method D4946-89. A 6 mil thick film of latex was drawn down on a Leneta chart and dried for 7 days at room temperature. The dried films were cut into squares ˜1.5×1.5 inch2 and the squares were placed together with face to face contacted each other. The face-to-face specimens were placed in a 35° C. oven on the flat aluminum tray. A 1000 kg weight on a No. 8 stopper were placed on the specimens to yield a pressure of about 1.8 psi (127 g/cm2). After exactly 30 min, the stopper and weight were removed. The sample was allowed to cool for 30 min at room temperature before determining the block resistance according to the following scale:

10 no tack
9 trace tack
8 very slight tack
7 very slight to slight tack
6 slight tack
5 moderate tack
4 very tacky, no seal
3  5-25% seal
2 25-50% seal
1 50-75% seal
0 75-100% seal

[0071] Adhesion Testing

[0072] The method used to for determining adhesion followed ASTM Method D3359-92a. A 6 mil wet film thickness of latex was drawn down on an aluminum panel and dried for 7 days at room temperature. After drying, an area was selected that was free of blemishes and minor surface imperfections. Eleven cuts in each direction, orthogonal, were made through the film to the substrate in one steady motion using sufficient pressure on the cutting tool to have the cutting edge reach the substrate. Make all cuts about ¾ inch (20 mm). Place the center of the tape over the grid and in the area of the grid smooth into place by a finger. To ensure good contact with the film, rub the tape firmly with the eraser. The opacity change of the tape was a useful indication of when good contact has been made. Within 90 sec of application, remove the tape by seizing the free end and rapidly pull back upon itself at an angle of approximately 1800. Inspect the grid area for removal of coating from the substrate. Rate the adhesion in accordance with the following scale:

[0073] 5B The edges of the cuts are completely smooth; none of the squares of the lattice is detached.

[0074] 4B Small flakes of the coating are detached at intersections; less than 5% of the area is affected.

[0075] 3B Small flakes of the coating are detached along edges and at intersections of cuts. The area affected is 5-15% of the lattice.

[0076] 2B The coating has flaked along the edges and on parts of the squares.

[0077] The area affected is 15-35% of the lattice.

[0078] 1B The coating has flaked along the edges of cuts in large ribbon and whole squares have detached. The area affected is 35-65% of the lattice.

[0079] 0B Flaking and detachment worse than grade 1B.

[0080] Freeze-Thaw and Thermal Stability

[0081] Three, 500 grams cans of paint had been prepared for each system being investigated. One was for freeze-thaw stability test, one for thermal stability test and the other one for control. The control samples were stored at room temperature.

[0082] For thermal stability testing, paint cans were put in oven at 50° C. for 17 hours, then was taken out to cool at room temperature for 7 hours. This is a cycles of testing. Repeat testing for at least 5 cycles and observed a physical appearance of paints in cans. Gloss and hiding power were measured and compared with those from control.

[0083] For freeze-thaw stability testing, one cycle composes of 17 hours of freezing in a refrigerator at −8° C. and 7 hours of thawing at room temperature. At least 5 cycles had been taken. The physical appearance of paints were observed. Gloss and hiding power were measured and compared with those from control.

[0084] Gloss and Hiding Power

[0085] Each paint formulation was drawn down onto a Lenetta chart with film thickness of 3 mils, and let dry at room temperature for two days before gloss (@60°) and hiding power measurement would be taken by glossmeter and color computer, respectively.

[0086] Scrub Resistance Testing

[0087] Each paint formulation was drawn down onto a plastic panel with 6 mil draw down bar and let dry at room temperature for 7 days before testing. The testing including scrub media preparation was by the method described in ASTM D 2486-89.

[0088] Pencil Hardness Testing

[0089] The method used for determining hardness followed ASTM Method D3363-92a. A 6 mil thickness film of latex was drawn down on an aluminum panel and dried for 7 days at room temperature. After drying, an area was selected that was free of blemishes and minor surface imperfections. The pencils was prepared by polishing the tip of the pencil in circular motion to get a sharp edge. The panel was placed on a firm horizontal surface. The pencil was held firmly against the film at a 45° angle (point away from operator) and pushed away from the operator in a ¼ in stroke. The pencil number that does not cut into or gauge the paint film was reported.

[0090] Evaporation Rate

[0091] Three samples of each coalescent aid was weighed into aluminum pans. All test samples were kept at room temperature. The percentage of weight loss of each coalescent aid was measured as a function of time.

[0092] Surface Tension

[0093] Surface tension was determined by the ring method tensiometer according to ASTM D 1331-89.

[0094] Hydrophilic Lipophilic Balance

[0095] Hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) values were calculated from Equation propynyl 1 based on ethylene oxide moiety in the molecule. HLB = % wt . of ethylene oxide in the molecule 5 Equation 1

[0096] Solubility Parameters

[0097] Solubility parameter values were calculated according to the Hansen Method from the Handbook of Solubility Parameters.

[0098] Density

[0099] Density was determined according to ASTM D-1475.

[0100]13C NMR Spectra

[0101]13C NMR spectra were determined without solvent added at room temperature in 5-mm inner-diameter tubes.

[0102]1H NMR Spectra

[0103]1H NMR spectra were operated with neat liquid reaction products.

Example 1

[0104] Coalescent efficiency using a low Tg latex polymer with various soybean oil esters.

[0105] Master batch formulation for MFFT testing of vinyl acetate latex, FLEXBOND 325, and vinyl acrylic latex, UCAR 379G is given in the Table below.

Formulation for studying MFFT for low Tg latex polymers
formulation solid content
lb. gal. lb. gal.
H2O 286.35 34.38 0.00 0.00
PG 43.20 4.99 0.00 0.00
X-102 1.98 0.22 1.98 0.22
RM825 1.82 0.21 0.46 0.05
WET260 0.87 0.10 0.87 0.10
AMP95 1.98 0.25 0.00 0.00
low Tg resins 430.22 47.54 236.62 24.44
DREWPLUS 493 2.38 0.32 0.36 0.13
H2O 99.88 11.99 0.00 0.00
Total 868.69 100.00 240.29 24.94
wt/gal 8.69
% sol/wt 27.66
% sol/vol. 24.94

[0106] To 50 grams portion of master batch was added the coalescent aids at the following levels: 0.25 g (0.5%); 0.375 g (0.75%); 0.5 g (1.0%). The samples were equilibrated for 48 hours prior to determination of the minimum film formation temperature using a MFFT BAR-90 (Rhopoint Instrumentation Ltd, England).

[0107] As illustrated by FIG. 1, all new soy oil glycol ester coalescent aids of this invention show a potential in lowering the minimum film formation temperature of latex polymer, FLEXBOND 325 similar to commercial coalescent aids TEXANOL® and EB.

[0108] As shown in FIG. 2, all new soy oil glycol ester coalescent aids of this invention show a capability in lowering the minimum film formation temperature of latex polymer, UCAR 379G, better than the commercial coalescent aid TEXANOL®, and also give a similar trend to the commercial coalescent aid EB.

Example 2

[0109] Coalescent efficiency using a high Tg latex polymer with various soybean oil glycol esters.

[0110] Master batch formulation for MFFT testing of high Tg acrylic latex, ACRONAL A846, is given in the Table below.

Formulation for studying MFFT for ACRONAL A846
formulation solid content
lb. gal. lb. gal.
H2O 278.29 33.41 0.00 0.00
PG 42.40 4.90 0.00 0.00
X-102 5.09 0.57 5.09 0.57
RM825 3.85 0.44 0.96 0.10
WET kl245 7.71 0.89 7.71 0.89
AMP95 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Acronal486 418.60 47.84 209.30 22.82
DREWPLUS 2.16 0.29 0.32 0.12
H2O 97.13 11.66 0.00 0.00
Total 855.23 100.00 223.38 24.50
wt/gal 8.55
% sol/wt 26.12
% sol/vol. 24.50

[0111] To 50 grams portion of master batch was added the coalescent aids at the following levels: 0.25 g (0.5%); 0.375 g (0.75%); 0.5 g (1.0%). The samples were equilibrated for 48 hours prior to determination of the minimum film formation temperature using a MFFT BAR-90 (Rhopoint Instrumentation Ltd, England).

[0112] As illustrated by FIG. 3, all new soy oil glycol ester coalescent aids of this invention show a capability in lowering the minimum film formation temperature of high Tg acrylic latex polymer, ACRONAL A846, better than the commercial coalescent aid EB, and also give a similar trend to the commercial coalescent aid TEXANOL® at every level of coalescent aids added.

[0113] Master batch formulation for MFFT testing of high Tg polystyrene/polymethyl methacrylate latex, UCAR 430, is given in the Table below.

Formulation for studying MFFT for UCAR 430
formulation solid content
lb. gal. lb. gal.
H2O 288.56 34.64 0.00 0.00
PG 43.96 5.08 0.00 0.00
X-102 5.28 0.59 5.28 0.59
RM825 4.00 0.46 1.00 0.10
WET kl245 7.99 0.92 7.99 0.92
AMP95 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
UCAR430 434.03 49.89 195.31 21.23
DREWPLUS 2.24 0.30 0.34 0.12
H2O 67.62 8.12 0.00 0.00
Total 853.68 100.00 209.92 22.97
wt/gal 8.54
% sol/wt 24.59
% sol/vol. 22.97

[0114] To 50 gram portion of master batch was added the coalescent aids at the following levels: 0.25 g (0.5%); 0.375 g (0.75%); 0.5 g (1.0%). The samples were equilibrated for 48 hours prior to determination of the minimum film formation temperature using a MFFT BAR-90 (Rhopoint Instrumentation Ltd, England).

[0115] As shown in FIG. 4, all new soy oil glycol ester coalescent aids of this invention show a capability in lowering the minimum film formation temperature of high Tg PS/PMMA latex polymer, UCAR 430, better than the commercial coalescent aid EB, and also give a similar trend to the commercial coalescent aid TEXANOL® at every level of coalescent aids added.

Example3

[0116] Physical properties of paint formulations with a low Tg latex polymer with ethylene glycol soybean oil esters and TEXANOL®.

[0117] Semigloss and flat paint formulations of low Tg , vinyl acetate latex, FLEXBOND 325, have been prepared for physical testing. The formulations with TEXANOL® are given in the Tables below.

GLOSS PAINT/FLEXBOND325/TEXANOL ®
formulation
lb. gal
H2O 50.58 52.58
PG 58.28 6.74
X-102 2.01 0.22
RM825 15.70 1.80
TAMOL850 8.29 0.84
WET260 4.51 0.52
AMP95 3.62 0.46
TP-900 224.91 6.75
ATOMITE 73.46 3.25
FXBD325 582.93 64.06
TEXANOL ® 18.92 2.39
DREWPLUS 1.91 0.26
H2O 55.19 6.62
Total 1100.30 100.00
wt/gal 11.00
% sol/wt 57.46
% sol/vol. 44.39
% PVC 22.55

[0118]

FLAT PAINT/FLEXBOND325/TEXANOL ®
formulation
lb. gal
H2O 141.83 17.03
PG 43.31 5.01
X-102 2.17 0.24
RM825 20.77 2.39
TAMOL850 18.08 1.83
WET260 4.85 0.56
AMP95 2.17 0.28
TP-900 241.98 7.27
ATOMITE 194.88 8.63
FXBD325 433.07 47.59
TEXANOL ® 14.07 1.78
DREWPLUS 2.06 0.27
H2O 59.37 7.13
Total 1178.61 100.00
wt/gal 11.79
% sol/wt 58.80
% sol/vol. 42.22
% PVC 37.66

[0119] The formulations with ethylene glycol derivative soybean oil glycol esters are given in the Tables below.

GLOSS PAINT/FLEXBOND325/SYNTHETIC
COALESCENT AID
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 77.67 9.32
PG 56.05 6.48
X-102 1.84 0.20
RM825 17.42 2.00
TAMOL850 7.97 0.81
WET260 4.34 0.50
AMP95 4.24 0.54
TP-900 216.28 6.49
ATOMITE 70.64 3.13
FXBD325 560.56 61.60
EG-DERIV(X1) 18.19 2.30
DREWPLUS 1.84 0.25
H2O 53.07 6.37
Total 1090.09 100.00
wt/gal 10.90
% sol/wt 55.81
% sol/vol. 42.73
% PVC 22.52

[0120]

FLAT PAINT/FLEXBOND325/SYNTHETIC
COALESCENT AID
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 142.58 17.12
PG 43.53 5.03
X-102 2.18 0.24
RM825 15.96 1.83
TAMOL850 18.18 1.84
WET260 4.88 0.56
AMP95 2.18 0.28
TP-900 243.25 7.30
ATOMITE 195.91 8.68
FXBD325 435.34 47.84
EG-DERIV (X1) 14.15 1.79
DREWPLUS 2.37 0.32
H2O 59.69 7.17
Total 1180.18 100.00
wt/gal 11.80
% sol/wt 58.93
% sol/vol. 42.33
% PVC 37.76

[0121] Semigloss and flat paint formulations of low Tg vinyl acrylic latex, UCAR 379G, have been prepared for physical testing. The formulations with TEXANOL® are given in the Tables below.

GLOSS PAINT/UCAR379G/TEXANOL ®
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 37.19 4.47
PG 72.80 8.42
X-102 2.01 0.22
RM825 17.08 1.96
TAMOL850 7.89 0.80
WET260 4.53 0.52
AMP95 1.41 0.18
0.00
TP-900 226.02 6.79
ATOMITE 74.15 3.29
0.00
UCAR379 587.51 64.92
TEXANOL ® 33.45 4.23
DREWPLUS 1.93 0.26
H2O 32.88 3.95
Total 1098.86 100.00
wt/gal 10.99
% sol/wt 57.95
% sol/vol. 44.91
% PVC 22.43

[0122]

FLAT PAINT/UCAR379G/TEXANOL ®
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 132.28 15.88
PG 54.86 6.34
X-102 2.21 0.25
RM825 17.19 1.98
TAMOL850 18.47 1.87
WET260 4.98 0.58
AMP95 1.11 0.14
0.00
TP-900 248.28 7.46
ATOMITE 199.08 8.82
0.00
UCAR379 442.41 48.89
TEXANOL ® 25.22 3.19
DREWPLUS 2.12 0.28
H2O 36.12 4.34
Total 1184.33 100.00
wt/gal 11.84
% sol/wt 59.78
% sol/vol. 43.19
% PVC 37.68

[0123] The formulations with ethylene glycol soybean oil esters are given in the Tables below

GLOSS PAINT/UCAR379G/SYNTHETIC COALESCENT AID
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 82.21 9.87
PG 68.37 7.90
X-102 1.89 0.21
RM825 18.91 2.17
TAMOL850 7.94 0.80
WET260 4.48 0.52
AMP95 1.32 0.17
0.00
TP-900 212.27 6.37
ATOMITE 69.63 3.09
0.00
UCAR379 551.76 60.97
EG DERIV (X1) 31.41 3.98
DREWPLUS 1.82 0.24
H2O 30.88 3.71
Total 1082.90 100.00
wt/gal 10.83
% sol/wt 55.33
% sol/vol. 42.29
% PVC 22.37

[0124]

FLAT PAINT/UCAR379G/SYNTHETIC COALESCENT
AID
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 133.08 15.98
PG 55.19 6.38
X-102 2.23 0.25
RM825 11.57 1.33
TAMOL850 19.14 1.93
WET260 5.01 0.58
AMP95 1.11 0.14
0.00
TP-900 249.77 7.50
ATOMITE 200.28 8.87
0.00
UCAR379 445.07 49.18
EG DERIV (X1) 25.37 3.21
DREWPLUS 2.14 0.29
H2O 36.34 4.36
Total 1186.29 100.00
Wt/gal 11.86
% sol/wt 59.94
% sol/vol. 43.32
% PVC 37.80

[0125] Results

[0126] The physical property testing results are shown in the Table below.

FREEZE-THAW STABILITY AND THERMAL
STABILITY TESTING
Viscosity Hiding physical
(cps) power gloss @ 60° appearance
gloss/ucar/
TEXANOL ®
Control 1785 94.4 20.7/17 no settling
Oven 1985 94.0 17.7/14.3 no settling
Freezer 1775 94.8 20.5/17.4 no settling
gloss/flexbond/
TEXANOL ®
Control 1735 95.2 26.7/24.2 no settling
Oven 1715 94.4 25.3/21.4 no settling
Freezer 1570 95.4 27.8/24.2 no settling
flat/ucar/
TEXANOL ®
Control 1345 95.8  3.6/3.4 no settling
oven 1375 94.9  3.4/3.3 no settling
freezer 1260 95.0  3.5/3.3 no settling
flat/flexbond/
TEXANOL ®
control 1965 94.2  4.5/4.9 no settling
oven 1885 93.8  4.2/4.6 no settling
freezer 1505 94.3  4.6/4.8 no settling
gloss/ucar/synthetic
coalescent aid
Control 2005 93.9 21.0/17.7 no settling
oven 1610 92.7 18.8/16.4 no settling
freezer 2235 93.7 21.1/18.4 no settling
gloss/flexbond/
synthetic coalescent
aid
control 1170 95.3 26.8/23.6 no settling
oven 1170 94.4 25.3/20.7 no settling
freezer 1120 95.1 26.8/22.6 no settling
flat/ucar/synthetic
coalescent aid
control 1985 94.9  5.1/4.3 no settling
oven 2135 94.1  4.7/4.0 no settling
freezer 1870 93.9  4.8/4.2 no settling
flat/flexbond/
synthetic coalescent
aid
control 1580 94.2  5.4/5.2 no settling
oven 1540 93.8  4.7/4.8 no settling
freezer 1390 94.7  5.4/5.3 no settling

[0127] The incorporation of ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid in paint formulations with low Tg latex polymers exhibited thermal stability and freeze-thaw stability similar to commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). There was no settling in all paint formulations. The gloss and hiding power were stable in all paint formulation after freeze-thaw and heat-cool for at least 5 cycles.

SCRUB RESISTANCE TESTING RESULTS
Scrub resistant(cycles)
gloss/ucar/TEXANOL ® >3000
gloss/flexbond/TEXANOL ® >3000
flat/ucar/TEXANOL ® >3000
flat/flexbond/TEXANOL ® >3000
gloss/ucar/synthetic coalescent aid >3000
gloss/flexbond/synthetic coalescent aid >3000
flat/ucar/synthetic coalescent aid >3000
flat/flexbond/synthetic coalescent aid >3000

[0128] The scrub resistance of paint formulations formulated with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid showed an excellent scrub resistance similar to paint formulations with commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both of low Tg latex polymers used in this invention gave the same result in scrub resistance.

BLOCKING RESISTANCE TESTING RESULTS
Blocking
resistant rating Performance
SEMIGLOSS
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® 2.0 25-50% seal
Flexbond325 + Methyl Ester 3.0-4.0 Poor-fair
Flexbond325 + EG-derivative 6.0-7.0 Good-very good
Ucar379g + TEXANOL ® 3.0-4.0 Poor-fair
Ucar379g + Methyl Ester 3.0 Poor
Ucar379g + EG-derivative 5.0 Fair
FLAT
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® 7.0 Good-very good
Flexbond325 + Methyl Ester 5.0-6.0 Fair-good
Flexbond325 + EG-derivative 6.0 Good
Ucar379g + TEXANOL ® 7.0-8.0 Good-very good
Ucar379g + Methyl Ester 6.0-7.0 Good
Ucar379g + EG-derivative 4.0-5.0 Fair

[0129] Semigloss paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid showed better blocking resistance than paint formulation with comparative coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Flat paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid showed poorer blocking resistance than paint formulation with comparative coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both low Tg latex polymers used in this invention provided the same trend of blocking resistance performance.

PENCIL HARDNESS TEST RESULTS
Hardness rating
GLOSS
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® 5B
Flexbond325 + X1 5B-6B
ucar379g + TEXANOL ® 6B
ucar379g + X1 OVER 6B
FLAT
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® 4B
Flexbond325 + X1 4B-5B
ucar379g + TEXANOL ® 5B-6B
ucar319g + X1 6B

[0130] Hardness of film from paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid was lower in hardness than the film from paint formulated with the commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both of low Tg latex polymers used in this invention provided less hardness with the new coalescent aid.

ADHESION TEST RESULTS
Surface of cross-cut area from which
flaking has occurred
on scratched panel with epoxy primer
GLOSS
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® >65% >65%
Flexbond325 + me-ester >65% >65%
Flexbond325 + X1 >65% >65%
Ucar379g + TEXANOL ® >65% >65%
Ucar379g + Me-ester >65% >65%
ucar379g + X1 >65% >65%
FLAT
Flexbond325 + TEXANOL ® >65% >65%
Flexbond325 + me-ester >65% >65%
Flexbond325 + X1 >65% >65%
Ucar379g + TEXANOL ® >65% >65%
Ucar379g + Me-ester >65% >65%
Ucar379g + X1 >65% >65%

[0131] The semigloss and flat paint formulation, with both low Tg latex polymers and ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid, exhibited poor performance in adhesion of paint film both on scratched aluminum panel and on epoxy-primed aluminum panel. The same poor performance occurred with commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak).

Example 4

[0132] Physical properties of paint formulations with a high Tg latex polymer with ethylene glycol soybean oil esters and TEXANOL®. Only the ethylene glycol soy oil ester derivative has been incorporated into a paint formulation for physical testing relative to the commercial coalescent aids, TEXANOL® (a commercial coalescent aid), and EB.

[0133] Semigloss paint formulation of high Tg acrylic latex, ACRONAL A846, has been prepared for physical testing. The formulations with TEXANOL® are given in the Table below.

ACRONAL846/TEXANOL ®
Formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 75.18 9.03
PG 63.05 7.29
X-102 6.57 0.73
RM825 16.05 1.84
TAMOL850 2.41 0.24
WET KL245 12.81 1.48
AMP95 0.14 0.02
TP-900 169.75 5.10
ATOMITE 98.76 4.38
ACRONAL A846 540.11 61.73
TEXANOL ® 27.07 3.43
DREWPLUS L493 5.25 0.70
H2O 33.64 4.04
Total 1050.79 100.00
wt/gal 10.51
% sol/wt 53.62
% sol/vol. 41.88
% PVC 22.62

[0134] The formulations with ethylene glycol soybean oil esters are given in the Table below.

ACRONAL846/EG
Formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 75.57 9.07
PG 63.38 7.33
X-102 6.61 0.74
RM825 11.48 1.32
TAMOL850 2.42 0.24
WET KL245 12.87 1.49
AMP95 0.14 0.02
TP-900 170.63 5.12
ATOMITE 99.27 4.40
ACRONAL A846 542.91 62.05
EG-derivative 27.21 3.46
DREWPLUS L493 5.27 0.70
H2O 33.82 4.06
Total 1051.58 100.00
wt/gal 10.52
% sol/wt 56.34
% sol/vol. 45.44
% PVC 20.95

[0135] Semigloss paint formulation of high Tg PS/PMMA latex, UCAR 430, has been prepared for physical testing. The formulations with ethylene glycol soybean oil esters or TEXANOL® are given in the Tables below.

UCAR430/TEXANOL ®
Formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal.
H2O 79.51 9.55
PG 55.69 6.44
X-102 6.71 0.75
RM825 22.32 2.57
TAMOL850 3.05 0.31
WET KL245 9.67 1.12
AMP95 0.28 0.04
TP-900 162.60 4.88
ATOMITE 89.43 3.96
UCAR430 548.78 63.08
TEXANOL ® 36.99 4.68
DREWPLUS L493 2.56 0.34
H2O 19.11 2.29
1036.70 100.00
wt/gal 10.37
% sol/wt 50.38
% sol/vol. 38.62
% PVC 22.90

[0136]

UCAR430/EG
formulation (by weight) formulation (by volume)
lb. gal
H2O 80.01 9.61
PG 56.04 6.48
X-102 6.75 0.75
RM825 17.51 2.01
TAMOL850 3.07 0.31
WET KL245 9.74 1.13
AMP95 0.29 0.04
TP-900 163.62 4.91
ATOMITE 89.99 3.99
UCAR430 552.22 63.47
EG-derivative 37.22 4.74
DREWPLUS L493 1.96 0.26
H2O 19.23 2.31
1037.64 100.00
wt/gal 10.38
% sol/wt 54.10
% sol/vol. 43.44
% PVC 20.49

[0137] Results

[0138] The physical property testing results are shown in Table below.

FREEZE-THAW AND THERMAL STABILITIES
Semigloss high hiding physical
Tg latex power gloss @ 60° appearance
Ucar 430 + TEXANOL ®
Control 92 26.6/21.1 no settling
Oven 90 21.0/17.0 no settling
Freezer 91.5 26.6/21.2 no settling
Ucar 430 + EG-derivative
Control 93 33.9/25.9 no settling
Oven 92 33.1/24.2 no settling
Freezer 93 33.0/26.6 no settling
Acronal A846 + TEXANOL ®
Control 94 29.5/23.3 no settling
Oven 95 31.2/24.8 no settling
Freezer 94 29.1/28.4 no settling
Acronal A846 + EG-derivative
Control 94 34.6/26.1 no settling
Oven 95 35.3/18.7 no settling
Freezer 95 34.8/24.5 no settling

[0139] From the results, the incorporation of ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid in paint formulations with high Tg latex polymers showed thermal stability and freeze-thaw stability similar to commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). There was no settling in all paint formulations. The gloss and hiding power were stable in all paint formulation after freeze-thaw and heat-cool for at least 5 cycles. Paint formulation with the new coalescent aid manifested the improvement in gloss relatively to conventional coalescent aid incorporated formulation.

SCRUB RESISTANCE TESTING RESULTS
Semigloss paint Scrub resistance (cycles)
Acronal A846 + TEXANOL ® 748
Acronal A846 + Methyl Ester 782
Acronal A846 + EG-derivative 995
Ucar 430 + TEXANOL ® 687
Ucar 430 + Methyl Ester 755
Ucar 430 + EG-derivative 783

[0140] The scrub resistance of paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid show better scrub resistance than paint formulation with commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both of high Tg latex polymers used in this invention gave the same trend in scrub resistance.

BLOCKING RESISTANCE TESTING RESULTS
Blocking resistance
rating Performance
Acronal A846 + TEXANOL ® 5.0-6.0 Fair-good
Acronal A846 + Methyl Ester 5.0-6.0 Fair-good
Acronal A846 + EG-derivative 6.0-7.0 Good-very good
Ucar 430 + TEXANOL ® 8.0 Very good
Ucar 430 + Methyl Ester 8.0 Very good
Ucar 430 + EG-derivative 9.0 Excellent

[0141] Paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid showed better blocking resistance than paint formulation with the commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both of high Tg latex polymers used in this invention provided good blocking resistance.

PENCIL HARDNESS TEST RESULTS
Semigloss paint Hardness rating
Acronal A846 + TEXANOL ® 2B
Acronal A846 + Methyl Ester 2B
Acronal A846 + EG-derivative 3B
Ucar 430 + TEXANOL ® 4B
Ucar 430 + Methyl Ester 4B
Ucar 430 + EG-derivative 5B

[0142] Hardness of film from paint formulation with ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid was lower than hardness of film from paint formulation with the commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak). Both of high Tg latex polymers used in this invention provided less hardness.

ADHESION TEST
Surface
of cross-cut area from which flaking
Semigloss high Tg latex has occurred (with epoxy primer)
Acronal A846 + TEXANOL ® >65%
Acronal A846 + Methyl Ester >65%
Acronal A846 + EG-derivative >65%
Ucar 430 + TEXANOL ® >65%
Ucar 430 + Methyl Ester >65%
Ucar 430 + EG-derivative >65%

[0143] Paint formulation with both high Tg latex polymers and ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a coalescent aid, exhibited poor performance in adhesion of paint film on epoxy-primed aluminum panel. The same poor performance occurred with the commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak).

Example 5

[0144] Evaporation rate of new glycol derivative soy oil ester relatively to conventional coalescent aids, TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak) and Ethylene glycol n-Butyl ether (Union Carbide).

[0145] Weighed three replicas of each coalescent aid into aluminum pans. Keep all aluminum pans with coalescent at room temperature. The percentage of weight loss of each coalescent aid was measured.

[0146] The evaporation rate of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and methyl ester derivatives as well as TEXANOL® (Eastman Kodak) and Ethylene glycol n-Butyl ether (EB, Union Carbide) are shown below in FIG. 5.

[0147] The evaporation rates of glycol derivative and methyl soy oil ester are lower than comparative coalescent aids (TEXANOL® and EB). Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether is water-soluble coalescent aid and evaporate from the film and is therefore a VOC. TEXANOL®, water-insoluble coalescent aid could gradually evaporate from the film while it is aging. The new soy oil glycol ester in this invention does not show a loss in weight. This means new soy oil glycol ester would become a part of coating film, and does not give off VOCs. The data indicates a slight but real increase in weight after 2 days consistent with a drying oil reacting slowly with air to cure.

[0148] MFFT Measurement with the Incorporation of Glycol Palmitate, Oleate and Linoleate.

[0149] Ethylene glycol derivatives of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were added to coatings formulated with high Tg resin (Ucar 430 and Acronal A846) at levels of 0.5%, 0.75% and 1.0% by weight. The formulations were equilibrated for two days before taking MFFT measurement.

[0150] The MFFT results are shown in FIGS. 6-9.

[0151] UCAR 430

[0152] The results from the MFFT measurements of high Tg resin (UCAR 430, PS/PMMA) formulation are shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. As FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate, it was found that glycol fatty acid ester and glycol soy oil ester could lower the minimum film formation temperature better than ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EB). This may be due to the slow evaporation rates of the glycol fatty acid ester and glycol soy oil ester relative to ethylene glycol monobutyl ether. Thus the coalescent new aids may stay in the system long enough to function in lowering the minimum film formation temperature. As shown in FIG. 7, all glycol soy oil esters could reduce the minimum film formation temperature in the same fashion as commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL®.

[0153] Some of glycol fatty acid esters, i.e. methyl soyate, ethylene glycol oleate and ethylene glycol linoleate, could lower the minimum film formation temperature better than TEXANOL®. Methyl soyate ester could lower the MFFT the best.

[0154] ACRONAL A846

[0155] The MFFT results of high Tg resin (ACRONAL A846, pure acrylic resin) formulation, it was found that all glycol fatty acid ester and glycol soy oil esters could lower the minimum film formation temperature better than ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EB). They also could reduce the minimum film formation temperature in the same manner as commercial coalescent aid, TEXANOL®. None of them could lower the minimum film formation temperature better than TEXANOL® except ethylene glycol soy oil ester at concentration of 1.0% by weight.

Example 6

[0156] AC Impedence measurements were taken to obtain the trend of the coating capacitance and coating resistance values as a function of dry time to express the film formation of latex coating as a function of dry time. In addition, the measurements with various coalescent aid formulations would also impact the effect of coalescent aid in latex film formation.

[0157] AC Impedence measurements were taken on 0.5% EB as a function of dry time, 0.5% TEXANOL® as a function of dry time, and 0.5% ethylene glycol soy oil ester as a function of dry time. A two-time constant equivalent circuit model, as a hypothetical equivalent circuit for the coated aluminum system, was used to correlate the Bolt and Nyquist result plots from the AC Impedence measurements. The coating resistance, coating capacitance, charge transfer resistance, and associated double layer capacitance obtained were plotted as a function of dry time.

[0158] As FIG. 10 illustrates, the coating resistance increased as a function of dry time until approximately 8 hours dry time, then it leveled off. For the charge transfer resistance, there was a slight increase in the resistance which was not significant. This was because there was no corrosion taking place.

[0159] The coating capacitance plot (shown in FIG. 11) exhibited a decreasing trend as a function of dry time until approximately 8 hours then the capacitance was constant. This trend can be explained by the phenomenon that at shorter drying periods, the coating film was not completely coalesced, and there remained pores and the diffusion of electrolyte solution through the film could take place which resulted in the increase in film capacitance. For the longer drying periods the film was more coalesced and less diffusion took place. Therefore, the resistance of film is higher and the capacitance was lower as a function of longer dry periods.

[0160] As FIGS. 10 and 11 illustrate, the AC Impedance measurements showed an increase in coating resistance and a decrease in coating capacitance as well as the formulation with the conventional coalescent aid, TEXANOL®. This supported the contention that sobean oil coalescent aid effected latex film formation as well as TEXANOL®.

Example 7

[0161] Various IR and NMR spectra were taken of glycol soybean oil ester derivatives, methyl soybean oil derivatives, and ethylene glycol fatty acid derivatives.

[0162] IR-Spectra

[0163] Infrared spectra of soybean oil and soybean oil ester derivatives are shown in FIGS. 12-19. FIG. 12 shows the IR spectrum of soybean oil. FIGS. 13-17 show the IR spectra of the soybean oil ester derivatives of ethylene glycol (FIG. 13), propylene glycol (FIG. 14), diethylene glycol (FIG. 15), dipropylene glycol (FIG. 16) and the methyl soybean oil ester derivative (FIG. 17). FIG. 18 shows the IR spectrum of the ethylene glycol oleate ester derivative and FIG. 19 shows the IR spectrum of the ethylene glycol linoleate ester derivative.

[0164]1H-NMR Data

[0165]1H-NMR spectra were obtained for soybean oil and soybean oil ester derivatives. FIG. 20 shows the 1H-NMR spectrum of soybean oil. FIGS. 21-25 show the 1H-NMR spectra of the soybean oil ester derivatives of ethylene glycol (FIG. 21), propylene glycol (FIG. 22), diethylene glycol (FIG. 23), dipropylene glycol (FIG. 24) and the methyl soybean oil ester derivative (FIG. 25). The 1H-NMR spectrum of the ethylene glycol oleate ester derivative is shown in FIG. 26, and FIG. 27 shows the 1H-NMR spectrum of the ethylene glycol linoleate ester derivative.

[0166]13C-NMR Data

[0167]13C-NMR DATA spectra were obtained for soybean oil and soybean oil ester derivatives. FIG. 28 shows the 13C-NMR DATA spectrum of soybean oil. FIGS. 29-32 show the 13C-NMR DATA spectra of the soybean oil ester derivatives of ethylene glycol (FIG. 29), propylene glycol (FIG. 30), diethylene glycol (FIG. 31), and dipropylene glycol (FIG. 32).

Example 8

[0168] Physical properties such as solubility parameters, Hydrophilic Lipophilic Balance values (HLB values), density, and surface tension were measured of various soybean oil esters, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EB), and TEXANOL®. The soybean oil esters included ethylene glycol soybean oil derivative, diethylene glycol soybean oil derivative, propylene glycol soybean oil derivative, dipropylene glycol soybean oil derivative, and methyl ester soybean oil derivative.

Soy oil derivative esters
EGa DEGb PGc DPGd MEe EBf TEXANOL ®g
Properties
Density 0.94 0.93 0.91 0.91 0.87
(g/cm3)
HLB 2.7 4.8 3.4 5.9 N/A 14.9 N/A
Interfacial 36.2 36.1 33.3 35.7 30.1 27.4 28.9
tension
(dyne/cm)
Solubility
Para-
meters
δtotal 18.6 18.2 18.0 17.6 17.9 20.7 19.3
(J/cm3)1/2
δd 16.2 15.8 15.7 15.4 17.2 15.9 15.6
(J/cm3)1/2
δp 2.03 2.04 1.88 1.85 1.50 4.9 3.07
(J/cm3)1/2
δh 8.8 8.7 8.5 8.3 4.6 12.3 10.9
(J/cm3)1/2

[0169] From the solubility parameters shown in the table above, it was found that the total solubility parameter of EB is greater than TEXANOL® and the glycol soybean oil derivatives. In addition, the polar solubility parameter (δp) and hydrogen bonding solubility parameter (δh) decreased in the order of EB>TEXANOL®>glycol soybean oil derivatives. Therefore, EB would be able to be miscible with water better than TEXANOL® and glycol soybean oil derivatives.

[0170] The solubility parameter of a polymer, the polystyrene methyl methacrylate copolymer (PS-MMA, UCAR 430) was considered. The solubility parameter of PS-MMA is 18.2 (J/cm3)½ as stated in J. Brandrup and E. H. Immergut, Polymer Handbook, 2nd ed., Wiley-lnterscience, New York, p 519 (1989). It was found that the solubility parameter of glycol soy oil esters and TEXANOL® were close to that of polystyrene rather than EB. Ideally for hydrophobic coalescent aids, a solubility parameter match will produce a better coalescent aid. As a result, TEXANOL® and glycol soybean oil derivatives should coalesce the polystyrene methyl methacrylate copolymer (UCAR 430) better than EB.

[0171] Higher HLB values correspond with greater miscibility with water. In the above table the HLB value of EB was greater than that of glycol soybean oil derivatives. This corresponded with the solubility parameter of EB. Therefore, EB would be miscible with water better than glycol soybean oil derivatives.

[0172] The value of the interfacial tension is a measure of the dissimilarity of the two types of molecules facing each other across the interface. The smaller the interfacial tension, the more similar in nature the two molecules are, and the greater the interaction between the molecules. In the table above the interfacial tension of EB was 27.4 dyne/cm which was less than those of TEXANOL® and glycol soybean oil esters. Therefore, EB would be miscible with water better than TEXANOL® and glycol soybean oil esters.

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US6924333 *Dec 20, 2002Aug 2, 2005Archer-Daniels-Midland CompanyMixture of fatty acid, thickener, surfactant and dispersion; waterbased paints
US7071248 *Jan 21, 2003Jul 4, 2006Ashland Licensing And Intellectual Property, LlcCastor oil and triglycerides used with polyisocyanate resins; construction panels, laminate composites
US7271210 *Jan 18, 2005Sep 18, 2007Archer-Daniels-Midland CompanyStabilized ester compositions and their use in film-forming compositions
US7348378Jul 2, 2004Mar 25, 20083M Innovative Properties CompanyFormed by combining a vinyl acetate polymer, an alkali swellable thickener, an alkali material, and water; adhesive composition has a stringing length of 9 cm or less and a phase lag of 45 degrees or less; improved dispensability
US7560507Jan 29, 2007Jul 14, 20093M Innovative Properties CompanyFormed by combining a vinyl acetate polymer, an alkali swellable thickener, an alkali material, and water; adhesive composition has a stringing length of 9 cm or less and a phase lag of 45 degrees or less; improved dispensability
US7619032Dec 12, 2006Nov 17, 2009Rohm And Haas CompanyAqueous polymer dispersions with high unsaturated flow promoter content
US7629399Feb 15, 2005Dec 8, 2009Archer-Daniels-Midland CompanyThickening systems comprised of xanthan gum and unsaturated fatty esters; volatile organic compound free; nonpolluting waterbased latex paints
US7812079May 27, 2004Oct 12, 2010Valspar Sourcing, Inc.Coating compositions containing low VOC compounds
US7875664 *Jul 23, 2007Jan 25, 2011Archer Daniels Midland CompanyStabilized ester compositions and their use in film-forming compositions
US7906571Oct 28, 2008Mar 15, 2011Archer Daniels Midland CompanyWaterborne film-forming compositions containing reactive surfactants and/or humectants
US8110624Aug 24, 2010Feb 7, 2012The Valspar CorporationCoating compositions containing low VOC compounds
EP2133376A1Jun 11, 2009Dec 16, 2009Rohm and Haas CompanyAqueous Compositions Comprising A Blend of Emulsion Vinyl Copolymer and Polyurethane Dispersion
Classifications
U.S. Classification524/315
International ClassificationC09D7/06
Cooperative ClassificationC09D7/06, C08K5/10
European ClassificationC08K5/10, C09D7/06