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Publication numberUS20040056517 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/251,368
Publication dateMar 25, 2004
Filing dateSep 20, 2002
Priority dateSep 20, 2002
Also published asWO2004026079A1
Publication number10251368, 251368, US 2004/0056517 A1, US 2004/056517 A1, US 20040056517 A1, US 20040056517A1, US 2004056517 A1, US 2004056517A1, US-A1-20040056517, US-A1-2004056517, US2004/0056517A1, US2004/056517A1, US20040056517 A1, US20040056517A1, US2004056517 A1, US2004056517A1
InventorsSam Farber, Clay Burns, Scott Henderson, Przemyslaw Poland, Kenneth Ling
Original AssigneeSam Farber, Clay Burns, Scott Henderson, Poland Przemyslaw Godycki, Kenneth Ling
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable folding chair
US 20040056517 A1
Abstract
A portable folding chair features a seat and a back that are joined in a hinged or pivoting fashion. A pair of front legs and a pair of rear legs are pivotally attached to the bottom of the seat. A track featuring elongated slots is also attached to the bottom of the seat. Front and rear leg braces are pivotally attached to the front and rear legs, respectively. The leg braces slide within the elongated slots of the track. The track is equipped with locking mechanisms so that the leg braces may be locked in the track with the legs in the open position. The back of the chair is equipped with a tab portion that forms a handle and extends down below the seat and engages a pair of angle bars that are included in the rear leg brace so that the back of the chair is secured in an open position. The legs may be folded against the bottom of the seat and the back rotated so that the legs and track are enclosed between the seat and back in a clamshell fashion. The closed chair may then be conveniently carried by the handle.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A folding chair comprising:
a. a seat having a bottom;
b. a back joined to the seat in a pivoting fashion;
c. a pair of front legs pivotally attached to the bottom of the seat;
d. a pair of rear legs pivotally attached to the bottom of the seat;
whereby said chair may be placed in an open configuration so that an individual may sit thereon and folded into a closed configuration where the front and rear legs of the chair are pivoted so as to lay adjacent to the seat bottom and the back is pivoted so as to be positioned adjacent to the legs so that the legs are enclosed between the bottom of the seat and the back.
2. The folding chair of claim 1 wherein the front legs are pivotally attached near the front edge of the seat and the rear legs are pivotally attached near the rear edge of the seat.
3. The folding chair of claim 1 wherein the seat and back are formed from molded plastic.
4. The folding chair of claim 3 wherein ribs are formed on the bottom of the seat.
5. The folding chair of claim 1 wherein each of the front and rear legs are further secured to the bottom of the seat by leg braces.
6. The folding chair of claim 5 wherein the leg braces include a front leg brace that is pivotally connected between the front legs and a rear leg brace that is pivotally connected between the rear legs.
7. The folding chair of claim 6 further comprising a track attached to the bottom of the chair, said track having an elongated slot formed therein, said slot having a front edge and a rear edge and receiving the front and rear leg braces in a sliding fashion.
8. The folding chair of claim 7 wherein said front and rear leg braces are U-shaped with a center portion of each positioned within the elongated slot of the track.
9. The folding chair of claim 7 further comprising a front locking device positioned adjacent to the front edge of the elongated slot and a rear locking device positioned adjacent to the rear edge of the elongated slot, each of said locking devices including:
i) a spring;
ii) a release lever linked to the spring;
iii) a locking wedge linked to the spring, said spring urging said locking wedge in a direction so that one of said leg braces is secured between the locking wedge and one of the edges of the elongated slot and said locking wedge releasing the leg brace when the release lever is moved against the resistance of the spring.
10. The folding chair of claim 9 wherein the springs for the front and rear locking devices is a single leaf spring.
11. The folding chair of claim 10 wherein the leaf spring is secured between the track and the bottom of the seat.
12. The folding chair of claim 11 further comprising a boss molded on the bottom of the seat and wherein said track and leaf spring are secured to the bottom of the seat via the boss.
13. The folding chair of claim 6 wherein the rear leg brace includes an angle bar and said back includes a tab portion that pivots to a position beneath the seat bottom, said tab portion engaging the angle bar when the chair is in the open configuration so that the back of the chair is restrained from rotating towards the seat bottom.
14. The folding chair of claim 13 wherein the angle bar is L-shaped.
15. The folding chair of claim 13 wherein the tab portion includes an opening so that a handle is formed which may be gripped by an individual so that the chair may be carried by the handle when folded into the closed configuration.
16. The folding chair of claim 1 wherein proximal portions of the front legs are joined by a front cross member and proximal portions of the rear legs are joined by a rear cross member, said front and rear cross members secured to the bottom of the seat in a pivoting fashion.
17. The folding chair of claim 16 further comprising front and rear cosmetic panels, said front cross member positioned between the front cosmetic panel and the bottom of the seat and said rear cross member positioned between the rear cosmetic panel and the bottom of the seat.
18. The folding chair of claim 16 wherein the seat and back of the chair are pivotally connected by the rear joining portion.
19. A folding chair comprising:
a. a seat having a bottom;
b. a back pivotally connected to the seat and movable through an angle of over 180 between an open position where the back forms an approximately 90 angle with the seat and a closed position where the back is generally parallel with and facing the bottom of the seat; and
c. a pair of front legs and a pair of rear legs, each of the legs pivotally mounted to the bottom of the seat so as to be foldable between an open position where they form an approximately 90 angle with the seat and a closed position where they lay between the seat and back when the back is in the closed position.
20. The folding chair of claim 19 wherein said back includes a tab portion that pivots beneath the seat bottom when the back is in the open position and further comprising:
a. a track having an elongated slot attached to the bottom of the seat;
b. a rear leg brace joining the rear pair of legs together, said rear leg brace slidably received in the elongated slot of the track;
c. an angle bar attached to the rear leg brace, said angle bar engaging the tab portion of the back when the pair of rear legs and back are in their open positions so that the back is prevented from rotating towards its closed position.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates generally to folding chairs and, more particularly, to a chair that may be folded into a portable configuration that is easily stored and carried.
  • [0002]
    Foldable chairs for intermittent use in homes and apartments are popular and necessary as they meet the need for adequate comfortable seating when the dwelling is occupied by more than the usual number of people, and are easily stowed away in a closet or other hidden area when not required. Also, individuals engaging in leisure activities, such as concerts festivals, camping, fishing or the like, frequently desire seating in settings remote from localities where traditional chairs are available. Though often sitting on the ground or sidewalk on blankets or pillows, such individuals often desire to sit on chairs for added comfort. As a result, the prior art is filled with folding chairs having a variety of designs.
  • [0003]
    One of the most common types of folding chairs, often called a “lawn chair” or a “beach chair,” features a framework formed from aluminum tubing that is pivotally connected so as to fold and unfold between transport/storage and use configurations. Rectangular pieces or strips of fabric that form the seat and back of the chair are riveted or otherwise secured to the aluminum tubing framework. Variations where other types of framework members are substituted for the aluminum tubing, such as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. Des. 417,561 to Liu, also exist. Such chairs often feature armrests which are typically a structural necessity and desired by most people for comfort. Some individuals, particularly those of large girth, however, may find the armrests constraining so that the chair is difficult to sit in and get in or out of.
  • [0004]
    While designs for folding chairs featuring a fabric and framework construction without armrests do exist, as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 6,106,056 to Wegner, such chairs still suffer from other disadvantages due to the inclusion of fabric in their construction. These disadvantages include wear or tearing of the fabric seat and/or back requiring that the chair either be repaired or discarded. In addition, the fabric back and/or seat of the chair may not provide the occupant with sufficient support. As a result, the chair may be uncomfortable.
  • [0005]
    As an alternative to chairs featuring a fabric and framework construction, several designs exist for folding chairs having a rigid seat and back. Examples of such chairs are illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 6,099,073 to Bruschi and U.S. Pat. No. Des. 461,968 to Adams et al. As with the chairs described above, such chairs fold and unfold between transport/storage and use configurations.
  • [0006]
    A problem shared by all the above prior art chairs, however, is the bulk or thickness of the chair in the folded transport or storage position. More specifically, the chairs may have seats which fold adjacent to or abutting the legs and/or have front and back legs which fold against one another such that the thickness of the folded chair equals the combined thickness of both the front and rear legs, and/or the thickness of the legs and the seat. In addition, the lengths or heights of the folded chairs make them unwieldy and limits storage options. Carrying of the chairs is further complicated in that they typically lack a handle for gripping. Furthermore, folding such chairs can be an awkward exercise.
  • [0007]
    Prior art designs which combine a folding chair with a carry case do exist. An early example may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 1,231,386 to Kuczabowski wherein a rigid seat back is fastened by a hinge to a rigid, box-like seat portion. Legs formed from wire and armrests are attached in a pivoting fashion to the bottom of the seat portion and the sides of the seat back, respectively. The seat back, armrests and legs fold so as to lay against the box-like seat portion. The folded chair may then be carried by a handle secured to the side of the seat portion. While somewhat more compact than the above chairs, the chair of the Kuczabowski '386 patent would still be quite thick and could easily unfold. In addition, the folded chair features a number of protrusions which could catch on clothes or other objects as the chair is carried. This could cause both damage to the chair and clothing or other property damage.
  • [0008]
    Another early folding chair and carry case design is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 1,493,467 to Butt et al. The Butt et al. '467 patent shows a folding chair featuring a rigid seat with legs formed from metallic tubing attached in a hinged-fashion to the bottom. A backrest, having a framework also constructed from metallic tubing, is attached in a hinged fashion to the top of the seat. When the chair is in the unfolded, use configuration, a fabric covering featuring a pocket is positioned over the framework to complete the backrest. The legs of the chair pivot so that they lay against the bottom of the rigid seat and the framework of the seatback folds down to rest on top of the rigid seat. Prior to folding the backrest framework, the fabric covering is removed therefrom and folded to form a fabric carrying bag. The folded chair may then be slid into the fabric carrying bag which features handles for carrying. While this arrangement is compact, the fabric carry bag may suffer from wear rather quickly and require replacement. In addition, it is somewhat difficult to fold the fabric carry bag and insert the folded chair.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,145,716 to Caicedo illustrates a combination backpack and folding chair. The chair features seat and seatback portions, each constructed from an aluminum tubing framework to which fabric is attached. The rear of the seat portion framework is joined to the bottom of the seatback portion framework in a hinged fashion so that the seat portion may be pivoted 270 from a use position to a folded position. A fabric backpack is attached to the back of the seatback portion so that it is sandwiched between the fabric of the seat and seatback portions when the chair is in the folded configuration. The folded chair and backpack may be carried upon the back of an individual. While quite compact and useful for hiking, the chair of the Caicedo does not feature full-sized legs so that the occupant has to sit very close to the ground with his or her legs extended or knees raised. In addition, due to the fabric and framework construction, the chair suffers from the wear considerations described above.
  • [0010]
    Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a portable folding chair that is durable, stable and comfortable.
  • [0011]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a portable folding chair that is lightweight, compact and easy to store and carry.
  • [0012]
    It is another object of the present invention to provide a chair that is relatively free of protrusions and attractive when in the folded configuration.
  • [0013]
    It is still another object of the present invention to provide a portable chair that is easy to fold and unfold.
  • [0014]
    It is still another object of the present invention to provide a chair that is cost effective to produce.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0015]
    The present invention is directed to a portable folding chair having a seat and a back that are joined in a pivoting fashion. A pair of front legs are pivotally attached to the bottom of the seat near its front edge and a pair of rear legs are pivotally attached to the seat bottom near its rear edge. The chair may be unfolded into an open configuration so that an individual may sit thereon. The chair may also be folded into a closed configuration where the front and rear legs of the chair are pivoted so as to lay adjacent to the seat bottom and the back is pivoted so as to be positioned adjacent to the legs so that the legs are enclosed between the bottom of the seat and the back. As such, the seat and back of the chair join together to form a clamshell with the legs inside.
  • [0016]
    A U-shaped front leg brace is pivotally attached between the front legs and a U-shaped rear leg brace is pivotally attached between the rear legs. A track is attached to the bottom of the seat and has a pair of runners with elongated slots formed therein that receive the front and rear leg braces in a sliding fashion. A leaf spring is mounted between the track and the bottom of the seat. A front locking device is positioned adjacent to the front edge of the elongated slot and a rear locking device positioned adjacent to the rear edge of the elongated slot. The locking devices are mounted on opposite ends of the leaf spring and each includes release levers as well as a pair of locking wedges. The spring urges the locking wedges away from the seat bottom so that front and rear leg braces are secured between the locking wedges and the front and rear edges of the elongated slots, respectively. The locking wedges release the leg braces when the release levers of the locking devices are pressed towards the seat bottom.
  • [0017]
    The chair back includes a tab portion that pivots to a position beneath the seat bottom so that it is engaged by the angle bars when the chair is in the open configuration. As a result, the back of the chair is restrained from rotating towards the seat bottom. The tab portion includes an opening which may be gripped by an individual so that a handle is formed by which the chair may be carried when folded into the closed configuration.
  • [0018]
    The following detailed description of embodiments of the invention, taken in conjunction with the appended claims and accompanying drawings, provide a more complete understanding of the nature and scope of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 1 is a top rear perspective view of an embodiment of the portable folding chair of the present invention in the unfolded or open configuration;
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 2 is a bottom front perspective view of the chair of FIG. 1;
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of the rear locking device of the chair of FIGS. 1 and 2;
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view of the engaging angle bars and tab portion of the back of the chair of FIGS. 1 and 2;
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 5A-5C are top plan, side elevation and bottom plan views, respectively, of the chair of FIG. 1 in the folded or closed configuration;
  • [0024]
    FIGS. 6A-6E are perspective views of the chair of FIGS. 1-5C illustrating the opening or unfolding of the chair.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0025]
    An embodiment of the portable folding chair of the present invention is indicated in general at 10 in FIG. 1. The chair features a seat 12 and a back 14. The seat and back preferably are formed from molded plastic for strength and durability. Alternative materials, such as wood, could be used to form the seat and/or back instead. The seat is supported upon a surface by a pair of front legs 16 a and 16 b and a pair of rear legs 18 a and 18 b. The legs preferably are constructed of metallic tubing such as, for example, steel or aluminum and, as illustrated in FIG. 2, are mounted to the bottom 22 of the seat 12. The bottom 22 of the seat 12 has a number of ribs 24 formed thereon to improve the strength and rigidity of the seat.
  • [0026]
    As illustrated in FIG. 2, front legs 16 a and 16 b are connected to the bottom of the seat in a hinged fashion. More specifically, legs 16 a and 16 b are joined by their proximal portions 26 a and 26 b, respectively, by a cross member or joining portion (not shown), also preferably constructed of metallic tubing. Indeed, leg 16 a and 16 b and the horizontal joining portion may be constructed from a single, continuous piece of metallic tubing featuring the appropriate bends. A cosmetic front panel 28 positioned adjacent to the front edge 32 of the seat cooperates with the bottom 22 of the seat to form a passage through which the horizontal joining portion connected to legs 16 a and 16 b passes. The passage is sized so that the joining portion may pivot therein.
  • [0027]
    The rear legs 18 a and 18 b are also joined by a horizontal joining portion or cross member, indicated at 33 in FIG. 2. The horizontal joining portion 33 passes between cosmetic rear panels 35 a and 35 b and the bottom of the seat so that, similar to the front legs, the rear legs are secured to the chair in a pivoting fashion. The cosmetic rear panels and rear horizontal joining portion are mounted near the rear edge of the seat, indicated at 37 in FIG. 1.
  • [0028]
    A track, indicated in general at 40 in FIGS. 2 and 3, has a generally U-shaped cross section and is preferably constructed from metal. The track features a horizontal base 42 from which vertical runners 44 a and 44 b extend. As best illustrated in FIG. 3, each runner 44 a and 44 b of the track 40 features an elongated slot, illustrated at 45 a and 45 b.
  • [0029]
    As illustrated in FIG. 2, the bottom 22 of the seat 12 has a number of bosses 47 molded thereon. The track 40 is secured by its base 42 to the bottom 22 of the seat 12 with a number of screws that engage the bosses, as illustrated with screw 46 and boss 47 in FIG. 2. A leaf spring, indicated at 50 in FIG. 3, extends nearly the entire length of track 40 and is sandwiched between the track 40 and the bosses formed on the bottom 22 of seat 12 so that there is spacing between the leaf spring and the bottom of the seat. As will be explained below, the leaf spring, which is preferably constructed from a strip of metal, is used by the locking mechanisms that secure the chair legs in the open or unfolded configuration.
  • [0030]
    As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, both the front and rear legs are provided with U-shaped front and rear leg braces indicated at 52 and 54, respectively. The front leg brace 52 is connected to the front legs near their proximal portions 26 a and 26 b in a pivoting fashion by fasteners 56 a and 56 b, which preferably are rivets. The front leg brace 52 is also received within the elongated slots formed in the runners 44 a and 44 b of the track 40.
  • [0031]
    Similarly, the rear leg brace 54 is pivotally connected to the proximal portions of the rear legs, indicated at 58 a and 58 b, respectively, by fasteners 62 a and 62 b, which also preferably are rivets. Rear leg brace 54 also resides in the elongated slots of the runners 44 a and 44 b of track 40. As illustrated in FIG. 2, when the chair is in the open position, the rear leg brace 54 is positioned at the rear edges 64 a and 64 b of the elongated slots 45 a and 45 b (FIG. 3) while the front leg brace 52 is positioned at the front edges 66 a and 66 b of the elongated slots.
  • [0032]
    The rear leg brace is secured in the position illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, that is, with the chair in the open or unfolded configuration, by the rear locking device indicated in general at 70 in FIG. 3. The rear locking device 70 is secured by fasteners 71 and 73 to the rear end of the leaf spring 50 that is positioned between the base 42 of track 40 and the bottom of the seat. The fasteners 71 and 73 may be rivets, screws, bolts or some other type of fastener or fastening method including soldering or welding. Alternatively, the leaf spring 50 and rear locking device 70 may be integrally formed from a single piece of material. The rear locking device includes release levers 72 a and 72 b and a pair of vertically extending lock wedges 74 a and 74 b. The leaf spring urges the rear locking device 70 towards the position illustrated in FIG. 3.
  • [0033]
    When the release levers 72 a and 72 b of rear locking device 70 are pushed towards the bottom of the seat, the lock wedges 74 a and 74 b retract so that the rear leg brace 54 is free to travel within elongated slots 45 a and 45 b of track 40 towards the front of edge of the chair (illustrated at 32 in FIG. 2). As a result, the rear legs may be folded towards the bottom of the chair in the direction indicated by arrow 78 in FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • [0034]
    A front locking device, indicated at 80 in FIG. 2, is a mirror-image of the rear locking device 70 and is secured to the front end of the leaf spring 50, that is, the end of the leaf spring opposite the end upon which rear locking device 70 is positioned. Front locking device 80 operates in the same fashion as rear locking device 70 so as to lock the front legs in the open or unfolded configuration illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. When the release levers of the front locking device are pressed towards the bottom of the seat, the front leg brace 52 is free to move in the elongated slots of the track towards the rear of the chair (37 in FIG. 1). As a result, the front legs fold towards the bottom of the chair in the direction of arrow 82 in FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • [0035]
    As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the back 14 of the chair includes a tab portion 84 having an opening 86 so that a handle is formed. As will be explained below, the opening provides a gripping area so that the chair may be easily carried by an individual when the chair is in the folded or closed configuration. As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the tab portion 84 of the back extends down slightly below the bottom of the seat 12 when the chair is in the open or unfolded configuration. The joining portion 33 of FIG. 2 that joins rear legs 18 a and 18 b passes through the tab portion 84 of the back so that the chair back 14 pivots with regard to the chair seat 12 about the rear horizontal joining portion 33.
  • [0036]
    As shown in FIG. 2, a pair of L-shaped angle bars 88 a and 88 b are secured to the rear leg brace 54. As best illustrated in FIG. 4, the angle bars 88 a and 88 b engage the tab portion 84 of the back of the chair when the chair is in the open or unfolded configuration. As a result, the back is supported/braced when an occupant leans against the chair back. It should be noted that, as opposed to the construction illustrated in the figures, the angle bars 88 a and 88 b may instead be integrally or continuously formed with the rear leg brace 54 so as to take on an appearance similar to that of a goal post, that is, the portions of the rear leg brace 54 between the ends of the angle bars 88 a and 88 b could be eliminated.
  • [0037]
    The chair is folded or closed by folding the rear legs in the direction of arrow 78 of FIGS. 1 and 2 after either release lever 72 a or 72 b (FIG. 3) of the rear locking device 70 is pressed. Similarly, the front legs are folded in the direction of arrow 82 in FIGS. 1 and 2 after either release lever of front locking device 80 is pressed. As a result, the front and rear legs lay flat against the bottom 22 of the seat 12, as illustrated in FIG. 6B. With the angle bars 88 a and 88 b of FIGS. 2 and 4 moved away from the tab portion 84 of chair back 14, the back is free to be rotated approximately 265 from the open or unfolded position indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2, in the direction of arrow 92 in FIGS. 1 and 2, to the closed or folded position illustrated in FIG. 5C.
  • [0038]
    As a result of folding the legs and back of the chair, the chair is in the closed or folded configuration illustrated in FIGS. 5A-5C. The seat 12 and back 14 of the chair thus form a clamshell arrangement with the folding legs, track and locking mechanisms secured inside. The chair may be secured in the closed configuration by a number of latching arrangements including, but not limited to, a magnetic catch, VELCRO or interference fitting components (such as dimples) molded into the chair back and seat.
  • [0039]
    As is clear from FIGS. 5A-5C, the chair in the folded or closed configuration has a compact size, a smooth and aesthetically pleasing appearance and may be conveniently carried in the same manner as a briefcase or other piece of luggage having a handle. This also permits the chair to be easily stored in small space such as, for example, the trunk of a car or closet. The handle further allows the folded chair to be stored in a hanging fashion. FIG. 5B illustrates the minimal thickness of the closed or folded chair. FIGS. 5A and 5B show the smooth shape of the seat 12, which makes the chair comfortable to sit in. FIG. 5C illustrates how the cosmetic front panel 28 and the cosmetic rear panels 35 a and 35 b enhance the smoothness of the exterior surface of the folded or closed chair and also illustrate how the front and rear legs of the chair are enclosed and protected against damage by the clamshell formed by the chair seat and back.
  • [0040]
    As illustrated by FIG. 5B, the shape of the folded chair also facilitates stacking of multiple folding chairs when each are placed in a horizontal orientation and piled on top of one another. As a result, multiple chairs may be efficiently stored in a stacked configuration. Various dimples or other engagement features may optionally be molded or otherwise added to the exposed top and bottom surfaces of the folded chair to further facilitate stacking.
  • [0041]
    [0041]FIGS. 6A through 6E illustrate how the chair is opened or unfolded so as to be returned to the configuration illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. More specifically, the chair, initially in the position illustrated in FIG. 6A, is flipped or rotated 180 and the chair back 14 is lifted away from the seat 12. The back is rotated approximately 265 to the position illustrated in FIGS. 6B and 6C. As a result, the bottom of the seat 12 and the folded front and rear legs are exposed.
  • [0042]
    The rear legs 18 a and 18 b are next opened or unfolded until they arrive in the position illustrated in FIG. 6D. Due to the shape of locking wedges 74 a and 74 b (FIG. 3) of the locking device, the rear leg brace 54 travels through the elongated slots of track 40 until locking into the position illustrated in FIG. 3. In other words, the rearward traveling leg brace forces the rear locking device 70 (FIG. 3) down as it travels over the locking wedges 74 a and 74 b. As illustrated in FIG. 6E, the front legs 16 a and 16 b are finally opened or unfolded until being locking into such a position by the similar interaction between the front leg brace 52 and the front locking mechanism 80.
  • [0043]
    As a result, the chair of the present invention is easily reconfigured between an open or unfolded configuration, where it accommodates an occupant in a stable and comfortable fashion, and a folded or closed configuration where it presents a trim, compact appearance and may be easily carried and stored.
  • [0044]
    While the preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention, the scope of which is defined by the appended claims.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7431795Jul 29, 2004Oct 7, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Cluster tool and method for process integration in manufacture of a gate structure of a field effect transistor
US7497514 *Jul 24, 2006Mar 3, 2009Ramkoh, Inc.Portable sports bench
US8096621Jun 12, 2009Jan 17, 2012Milsco Manufacturing CompanyVehicle seat assembly
US8573454Sep 20, 2010Nov 5, 2013Rafael Alberto Talavera TolentinoCombination backpack and seating apparatus
US8875840 *Aug 20, 2012Nov 4, 2014Erin Marie ChanclerCollapsible stool
US20070102976 *Jul 24, 2006May 10, 2007Ramkoh, Inc.Portable sports bench
US20070296178 *Jul 13, 2005Dec 27, 2007Michael MarkwaldWheelchair Frame
US20090315383 *Jun 12, 2009Dec 24, 2009Milsco ManufacturingVehicle Seat Assembly
US20130048428 *Feb 28, 2013Erin Marie ChanclerCollapsible Stool
US20150137571 *Nov 18, 2014May 21, 2015Tachi-S Co., Ltd.Seat
WO2006010710A1 *Jul 13, 2005Feb 2, 2006Interco Ges Fuer Die Planung UWheelchair frame
WO2012038836A2 *Sep 16, 2011Mar 29, 2012Tolentino Rafael Alberto TalaveraCombination backpack and seating apparatus
WO2013124346A1 *Feb 21, 2013Aug 29, 2013Winkel GeorgSeating furniture
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/17
International ClassificationA47C4/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47C4/20
European ClassificationA47C4/20
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 16, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: WILTON INDUSTRIES, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:FARBER, SAM;BURNS, CLAY;HENDERSON, SCOTT;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:013581/0886;SIGNING DATES FROM 20021112 TO 20021125