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Publication numberUS20040104530 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/307,605
Publication dateJun 3, 2004
Filing dateDec 2, 2002
Priority dateDec 2, 2002
Publication number10307605, 307605, US 2004/0104530 A1, US 2004/104530 A1, US 20040104530 A1, US 20040104530A1, US 2004104530 A1, US 2004104530A1, US-A1-20040104530, US-A1-2004104530, US2004/0104530A1, US2004/104530A1, US20040104530 A1, US20040104530A1, US2004104530 A1, US2004104530A1
InventorsLee Moe
Original AssigneeMoe Lee R.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game with time variables
US 20040104530 A1
Abstract
The present invention consists of a game which may be played in two distinct time phases of past and future. In one preferred embodiment, the game is begun in the past time frame and players may elect to purchase businesses and improve upon their business with the purchase of business facilities or stores in the past. However, when one player lands upon a “pier” space and meets the conditions required on the pier space, the player may enter into a path of contiguous spaces leading into the interior of the game board which intersect at a central space entitled the “temporal time” space, or a time portal wherein the entire game is transported into the future and all costs and expenses automatically increase for all players. Of course, a second player, upon arriving at the temporal time space, may elect to transport the game values back into the past tense. A player is forced to terminate play only when that player can no longer meet the player's expenses. The goal is to become the last remaining player who has accumulated the greatest wealth, including the value of businesses, property and cash over the game playing period.
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Claims(10)
What is claimed is:
1. A game apparatus used for game play by at least two of game players comprising a playing board including a continuous playing path or main path of a plurality of successive spaces substantially about the periphery of the playing board; at least one continuous playing path of a plurality of successive spaces leading into the center of the playing board comprising an interior path; a plurality of markers to indicate individual players of the game, a means of chance to indicate the movement of each marker along a number of spaces designated by the means of chance; certain of such spaces about the periphery of the board having indicia for business entities which may be bought or sold by the game players and is listed in at least one future higher and one lower value, and certain of which spaces about the periphery of the board contain indicia for entering into at least one interior path of the board.
2. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the higher values are designated as future values and the lower values are designated as past values.
3. The board game according to claim 2 wherein the game apparatus is also provided with a plurality of future business cards and a plurality of past business cards and the higher values are listed on the business cards for a future business and the lower values are listed on business cards for a past business.
4. The board game according to claim 3 wherein the business cards may also be provided with a loan value wherein a player may receive money when the player asks for a loan during game play.
5. The board game according to claim 1 wherein there is further provided an interior portion wherein the interior portion contains a plurality of cards which contain directions enabling the player to receive money, pay a debt or have their marker directed to a different space on the playing board.
6. The board game according to claim 2 which is further provided with at least two interior paths which intersect one another creating a time value space wherein when a player reaches the time value space a player may elect to direct play of the game between the future values and the past values.
7. The board game according to claim 1 wherein the game is further provided with a money accumulation space wherein when players are required to pay fees not designated elsewhere, all moneys accumulated are to be placed on or near the game board and they are paid to the next player landing on the money accumulation space.
8. The board game according to claim 1 wherein when a player landing on a business entity space elects not to purchase the business entity which the player lands upon, then the business entity space is placed up for bid with the highest bidding player being the winner.
9. The board game according to claim 1 wherein all players continue in game play until a player is forced to quit game play because they were unable to meet any financial obligations.
10. The board game according to claim 9 wherein all but one player has been forced to terminate their play of the game because all were unable to meet a financial obligation at some time during the game play.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to the field of board games, and more particularly one which involves buying and maintaining businesses, collecting salaries and fees and having these variables change depending upon whether the game is played in a past phase mode or a future phase mode.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Although there are numerous game board inventions in the prior art which relate to the areas of purchase and sale of real estate, and purchase and sale of a wide variety of commodities as well as tangible goods and intangible items, methods of increasing or decreasing cash flow and wealth accumulation during game play, there are none which deal with real estate, utilities and businesses with different prices in the past and in the future.
  • [0003]
    For example, U.S. Pat. No. 2,026,082 was issued to Charles Darrow, who was the creator of the original Monopoly game. However, this patented device is only played in one particular time frame. Another issued patent, U.S. Pat. No. 2,693,961 issued to G. Ripley, Jr. deals with a game variable of inflationary and deflationary time period. Still yet another issued patent for a game board is U.S. Pat. No. 2,976,044 issued to G. Corpening which is targeted toward developing good judgement and bad judgement, and has deserts, mountains, parks, rivers and lakes, etc. as terrain creating options and opportunities for improving judgement.
  • [0004]
    Yet another issued patent is U.S. Pat. No. 4,136,881 issued to R. Anspach for the game of “Choice” where the players can select variables of a competitive vs. a monopolistic economic environment to play the game in. Another board game is found in U.S. Pat. No. 4,189,153 issued to W. Zollinger for a game utilizing lottery cards increase wealth and credit cards to purchase real estate. Yet a completely different style of board game with different parameters and variables is used in a game of accumulating “good karma” in U.S. Pat. No. 4,359,226 to R. Neff.
  • [0005]
    Further board games with additional financial devices and wealth accumulation devices are shown in U.S. Pat. No. 4,382,602 issued to T. Cusick for a real estate trading game with two tracks, wherein the outer track is for accumulating prospective real estate listings and purchasers while the inner track is a “buyer's circuit” which contains completed listings. U.S. Pat. No. 4,648,601 issued to T. Carmichael discloses a game of “Oligopoly” which involves not only real estate areas, utilities, but it also includes business situations and banking. The game board itself contains different levels, ramps and a plurality of paths surrounding the periphery of the board. A game having a different style dealing with the accumulation and redistribution of wealth among players is found in U.S. Pat. No. 4,927,156 issued to J. Breslow for a game wherein the players play in two separate phases where the first phase only deals with the players purchasing the players and the players are not told at the time of purchase the intrinsic value of each piece of property and then during the second phase of game play, no properties are bought or sold but the players only make deals amongst themselves.
  • [0006]
    Another game that involves a transportation motif, and more particularly a railroad motif may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,024,445 for a board game including issues regarding delivery routes, destination stops, governmental regulations and business contingencies. A game which simulates the acquiring of employment, the receipt of paychecks, the paying of bills and the receiving or payment of benefit checks associated with the player being unemployed or disabled may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 4,936,589 issued to M. Sinclair.
  • [0007]
    Yet none of the above games incorporate a board game wherein the players can buy and sell business titles at any time, may accumulate wealth via payment of a salary by landing on a designated square on the board, may increase the value of their businesses by purchasing more business facilities or store locations, and most importantly, may completely alter the pace and style of the game by having a player landing on a specific square dedicated to changing the value of the business titles, business fees and other parameters of the game simply by flipping a designated card from past to future or vice versa.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    The present invention consists of a time phase dependent game wherein a game board is provided with the following spaces: a pay space for payday, a plurality of spaces with different businesses which can be purchased by the players with a price for “future cost” and a price for “past cost”, a plurality of “surprise” or “probability” spaces where a player must draw a “surprise” or “probability” card and then follow the instructions on the back, a “time out” or “t-space” space where a player must sit until a specific sequence of events occurs and cannot participate in normal game activities such as bidding, buying, selling, receiving, collection of fees, etc., four “pier” spaces for directing a player through a plurality of spaces set in paths through the center of the board which pier spaces can only be accessed upon payment of a fee or through accumulation of a “pier pass”; one “temporal trade time ship” space which is located in the center of the board at the intersection of four pier paths which allows the player to change the tense of the game from past to future or vice versa but only after turning in all stewardship cards that the player has acquired; a “3rd Street Mission” money space where all fees and payments not directed to the money exchange are accumulated until a player lands on that space; a “business title auction space” where an unowned and available business in the selected time setting is placed up for auction and the highest bidder is able to purchase that business, as well as other spaces which direct the players to pay tax (“temporal trade tax”) and spaces which direct players to draw a card (“stewardship spaces”) or pay or receive money from the exchange, or game bank.
  • [0009]
    The object of the game is to become the only player left in the game with the most wealth and economic power. The game board is prepared and then each player begins the game with one of the various denominations of money. For example, the play may begin with a $1000 bill, a $500 bill, a $100 bill, a $50 bill, a $20 bill, a $5 bill and a $1 bill for a total sum of $1,686. The game is initiated by starting in the past time phase on the space marked Friday, then the first player rolls two die and moves to the left around the board. The player may purchase any unowned business title in that time phase that the player lands on. If a player rolls doubles, then the player's turn continues until doubles are not rolled again. In one preferred embodiment of the game, a player receives $200 for rolling doubles twice, $300 for rolling doubles three times, $400 for rolling doubles four times, etc. until doubles are not rolled. A player owning a business may purchase facilities for the business at the cost value stated on the business card. When another player lands on an owned space, the landing player must pay the owner an amount of money directly related to the number of facilities operated by the business.
  • [0010]
    Unless otherwise specifically stated, when a player is directed to pay money as a result of a fine or fee, it is deposited on the “3rd Street Mission” space and the next player landing on this space collects any money found there, unless instructed otherwise by a draw card. If a player lands on a space that is available for purchase and that player does not wish to purchase that business or property, then that business will go up for immediate auction, with the highest bidder winning the auction and purchasing the property for the amount bid. One space is designated “Friday Payday” start and each time a player lands on or passes by this space, a designated amount of money is paid as “pay.”
  • [0011]
    In one preferred embodiment of the game, the game ends when all of the other players have “declared bankruptcy” and have run out of money and were unable to pay their debts. In a “time's up” game, a spinner is set by unanimous decision and the time given on the spinner is selected as the length of the game. In a “quick game” all the business titles are dealt out to all the players before game play begins, first dealing the past cards out, followed by the future cards. In yet an alternative preferred embodiment of the present inventive game, game play is initiated in the “future” time phase rather than the “past” time phase. A “future” time phase game may be combined with a “time's up” game, a “quick game,” or both.
  • OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION
  • [0012]
    Thus, it is one primary object of the present invention to provide a board game with at least two time phases where the game is initiated in one time phase with costs and fees assessed at one price level, but a player upon meeting certain criteria, may elect to change the time phase so that a different pricing and fee schedule is enacted during game play.
  • [0013]
    It is an additional primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having a plurality of businesses which players may purchase after landing on the appropriate square or purchasing the business after an auction has been held, so that players may accumulate additional wealth by taking in fees from other players for “use” of the business when landing on the owner's space.
  • [0014]
    It is yet a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having a plurality of spaces designated “surprise” or “probability” space wherein a player must draw a card and follow the instructions on the card.
  • [0015]
    An additional primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having a “t-space” or a “time out” space where when the player is sent to such a space the player must either pay a debit or sit out a turn of game play and cannot participate in any of the game's activities such as bidding, buying, selling, receiving or collections of fees, unless an “avoid t-space” card is used.
  • [0016]
    It is still a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having four “pier” spaces for directing a player through a plurality of spaces set in paths through the center of the board which intersect in a “temporal trade time ship space” where game play may be changed from a past phase tense to a future phase tense.
  • [0017]
    It is yet a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having four “pier” spaces for directing play through a plurality of spaces set in paths through the center of the board only after the player has paid a fee or has turned in a “pier pass” card which has been heretofore collected by the player as wherein the child version, the player proceeds for free.
  • [0018]
    Still an additional primary object of the present invention is to provide an entertaining board game having a “3rd Street Mission” or money space where all fees collected from players that are not payable to other players or to the money exchange will be collected on the “3rd Street Mission” money space such that a subsequent player landing on the space collects all the money which has accumulated there.
  • [0019]
    A further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having a “business title auction space” whereby when a player lands on this space the player selects from the available businesses and holds an auction for the space, with the highest bidding player purchasing the business for the highest bid.
  • [0020]
    Yet a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game having spaces where players must pay a debit or receive a benefit equal to a multiplier of the value shown on a die or dice which is thrown by the player.
  • [0021]
    And yet an additional primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game whereby when one player lands on an unowned business and does not purchase that business, the unowned business is then automatically auctioned up to the highest bidder.
  • [0022]
    Still a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game wherein each time a player lands on the “pay day” space, or passes by the “pay day” space, the player will accumulate an additional amount of wealth.
  • [0023]
    It is yet an additional primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game where a player's turn ends which that player cannot meet financial obligations and all of his businesses and left over money are returned to the “exchange” or game bank.
  • [0024]
    Yet a further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game where a variety of different methods may be utilized to determine the length of the game, including, but not limited to, an agreed upon length of the game, or by one player setting a spinner having denotations of hour lengths for the game.
  • [0025]
    A further primary object of the present invention to provide an entertaining board game which may begin in the “future” time phase, rather than a “past” time phase.
  • [0026]
    These and other objects and advantages of the present invention can be readily derived from the following detailed description of the drawings taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings present herein and should be considered as within the overall scope of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 1 is a top elevation view of an assembled 3-D game board.
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 2 is a top elevation view of the top window layer for a 3-D game board.
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 3 is a top elevation view of an intermediate layer for a 3-D game board.
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 4 is a top elevation view of a middle layer or rib support for a 3-D game board.
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 5 is a top elevation view of a game board for a children's game board.
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 6 is a top elevation view of the front and back of a business card both in the past and in the future.
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 7 is a top view of the back and the front sides of various $uprise cards used during game play.
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 8 is a top view of the back and the front sides of various Probability cards used during game play.
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 9 is a top view of sample play money used during game play.
  • [0036]
    [0036]FIG. 10 is a perspective view of players' game position markers, business store markers, for the past and future, and dice used during game play.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0037]
    Shown now in FIG. 1 is 3D game board 10 which is used to play a three dimension version of the present inventive board game. The 3D game board 10 is considered to be a deluxe version of the game, and the game may easily be made in a simplified two dimensional version of the game, without raised effects. Shown around the periphery of 3D game board 10 are plurality of spaces directing the play of the game. Business spaces 12 show various entities which are available for purchase at the beginning of the game. In this particular preferred embodiment of the present invention, there are three business spaces 12 on each of the four sides of the periphery of 3D game board 10. It should be noted that there is a “future cost” and a “past cost” denoted on each of the business title game board spaces 12. And, as the player progresses from the beginning space, start/payday space 26, the prices of the businesses go up as the game progresses, presumably due to the fact that players are or should be accumulating wealth as they progress in the game.
  • [0038]
    Also shown on 3D game board 10 are debit spaces 14 whereby the player when landing on such a space must throw both dice again and then pay a debit amounting to ten times the amount of the dice thrown or pay the stated tax amount. Further, on 3D game board 10 there are provided a plurality of steward spaces 16 wherein the player must determine if the space is owned, and then an amount of money is paid according to the number of “steward cards” held by another player. (See FIGS. 7 and 8). If no player holds any “steward cards”, then the player landing on a steward space 16 must draw either a “probability card” located in probability space 42, or the player may draw a “$urprise card” located in “$urprise” space 44.
  • [0039]
    Benefit spaces 24 are also provided about the periphery of 3D game board 10 wherein when a player lands on a benefit space 24, the player is allowed to roll both dice or one die again and then is paid ten times the amount of the face value of the die. Of course, the game is initiated at start/payday space 26, provided in one corner of 3D game board 10. However, whenever a player comes back around to this space, either by landing directly on start/payday space 26, or by passing over the space, the player is allowed to collect pay from a bank/exchange in a predetermined amount. In one preferred version of the present invention, the predetermined amount is $300 if the player passes over start/payday space 26, but it increases to $600 if the player lands directly on start/payday space 26.
  • [0040]
    Also shown on 3D game board 10 is “t-space” 32 or a “timeout” space whereby a player, when directed to land here either by a probability card or by a $urprise card or by another space on 3D game board 10, must remain out-of-play for one turn and cannot bid, buy, sell, trade any property or receive any fees or fines while the player is in “t-space” 32 or “timeout”. However, if a player is not directed to “t-space” 32, then the player landing upon this segment of the board is entitled to stay on the “just looking” space 34, which is provided directly adjacent the t-space 32, and has all the rights and privileges of any active player.
  • [0041]
    As the most interesting part of 3D game board 10, are provided four “pier” spaces 36 about the periphery of 3D game board 10 wherein, if a player lands on a pier space 36, the player may elect to travel one of a plurality of pier paths 38 into the center of game board 10. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, a player must either possess a “pier pass” to travel up along one of the pier paths 38, or the player must pay a $1,000 fee to the exchange for the privilege of traveling into the center of 3D game board 10. Along each of the pier paths 38 are found a plurality of segments whereby the play may be sent back to the path along the periphery of 3D game board 10, or the player may quickly advance to temporal time space 40, or the player may be assessed a fine or fee or the player may receive a monetary benefit, depending upon the space landed upon while on the pier path 38.
  • [0042]
    In any case, when the player either lands upon or passes over temporal time space 40, the player may elect to stop there and change the tense of time that the game is being played in. In a non-3D version of the game, a past/future card is simply flipped over. But in the 3D version of the game, a time slider bar is slid back and forth between past and future and it is located at time star 46 on 3D game board 10. Regardless, if a player decides to change the time phase of the game, in one preferred embodiment of the game, the player must turn in all stewardship cards held in the player's possession, and then the player proceeds to start/payday space 26 and receives $600 or double the normal amount of pay. However, if the player elects not to change the time phase of the game, then the player need not return any cards, and the player will still advance to start/payday space 26 and receive $600 pay.
  • [0043]
    When the time phase of the game is played, all of the business entity cards owned by all players must change also. That is, if the game was in the past and the play changes to future, then only future businesses may be bought and sold and only future businesses owned may be used to collect fees from other players landing on owned spaces. The past business title cards owned by players are no longer valid. Conversely, if the game was played in the future and the play changes to past, then only past businesses may be bought and sold and only past businesses may be used to collect fees from other players landing on owned spaces.
  • [0044]
    Also shown on 3D game board 10 is probability card space 42 wherein a plurality of probability cards are stacked for use by the players. Accordingly, another $urprise card space 44 is also provided so that $urprise cards may be stacked for use by the players. When the game play is initiated, both $urprise cards and Probability cards are shuffled and place on their respective spots for game play.
  • [0045]
    [0045]FIG. 2 shows an additional layer of 3D game board 10 which is intrinsic to creating a three dimensional game board. A 3D game board is actually created in layers and is considered to be a deluxe version of the basic game. The advantages of having a three dimensional version of the present invention is that the past and future business entity cards may be stored and then easily accessed when purchased by players in convenient see through slots 50. Further, a slider bar clear view aperture 52 is also provided for the past and future time phases of the game. In a two dimensional version of the game, a past and future card is simply flipped over as the time phase is changed by the players. However, in the three dimensional version, a slider bar can simply be moved back and forth to designate whether the game is being played in the past or future tense.
  • [0046]
    Also, in the three dimensional version, a game time selection wheel is provided which may be easily set by a player to determine the length of the game. On 3D game board 10 is provided in the middle layer an aperture 54 so that all players can easily view the length of time the game is intended to take.
  • [0047]
    [0047]FIG. 3 shows the 3D game board 10 partially assembled with middle rib support 60 and with the business spaces 12 showing therethrough. This view also shows game time selection wheel 58 showing therethrough, which has been previously set by a player to determine the length of the game. In a two dimensional version of the game, the time selection wheel could be provided separate from the playing board and would not be a built-in feature. Also shown in FIG. 3 is past/future slider bar 56 which may be easily slid back and forth by the players, depending upon the time phase that the game is being played in. Of course, in the two dimensional version of the game, a card which has past on the back of it and future on the front of it would be provided which the players could simply turn over as the game time phase changes, as determined by the players when reaching the temporal time phase space 40 located at the center of 3D game board 10.
  • [0048]
    [0048]FIG. 4 shows the outline for middle rib support 60, with a variety of slots and open spaces for the business spaces 12, past/future slider bar 56 and game time selection wheel 58 to show therethrough.
  • [0049]
    [0049]FIG. 5 shows a children's version of the 2D version of children's board game 100. This version is intended for children from approximately age 6 to age 11. This game is somewhat less complicated that the adult version in that there are fewer different spaces on the game board 100 and further, the denominations of money provided and taken as fees or paid as receipts are smaller and easier to calculate. Shown in this figure are a plurality of business spaces 112 shown about the periphery of children's board game 100. Also provided are pay-debt spaces 114 wherein a player, when landing on such a space must pay a fee shown. Also shown are benefit spaces 11 6 wherein if a player lands on such a space, benefits are received from the payment of money from the game bank or “exchange.” Additional spaces provided are $urprise spaces 120 wherein a player is directed to draw a $urprise card from the $urprise card stack space 144 shown in the middle of children's board game 100.
  • [0050]
    As in the adult version, the children's board game 100 has a start/payday space 126 wherein the game play is initiated from this space and the child/player is receives, in one preferred embodiment of the game, $7 if the player passes over the space, and $14 if the child actually lands on start/payday space 126. Also provided is a go to timeout space 128 whereby the child must proceed to go directly to a timeout space 132 where that child automatically pays a fee and ends that child's turn. An additional space found on children's board game 100 is 3rd Street Money Space 130 where, when fees are collected from players and not directed to be paid to another player or the bank/exchange, then the money paid is placed on 3rd Street Money Space 130 and the next child landing directly on this space is allowed to collect all money previously deposited there.
  • [0051]
    As in the adult version of the game, in one preferred embodiment of the present invention, four pier spaces 136 are provided about the periphery of children's board game 100, and when a child lands on one of these spaces, the child may elect to proceed along a pier path 138 to attempt to land upon, or pass by the temporal trade space 140 to change the time phase of game play from past to future or vice versa. It should be noted that in the child's version of the game that no money needs to be paid, nor does any special card need to be collected before the child can travel down one of the four pier paths 138 provided in order to change the time phase that the game is played in. However, as in the adult version of the game, there are provided a plurality of spaces or path segments along pier paths 138 whereby the child may either be advanced quickly to temporal time space 140, or the child may be sent directly back to the normal game path contained about the periphery of children's board game 100. In such a manner, a much simpler version of a time phase dependent board game may be played.
  • [0052]
    [0052]FIG. 6 shows the front and back sides of both a future business and a past business. As an example, a business past front 70 is shown for “critical mess multimedia”. On this card are shown the costs for purchasing the business title of $160, and the fees that are assessed other players when they land on this space, depending on the amount of facilities which have been previously purchased by the owner. Also provided are the costs for purchasing each facility, and if the owner needs to do so, then the owner may obtain a “remodeling loan” and take back case whenever case is needed. Of course, when a business is remodeled, it is closed, and the card must be flipped over by the owner and the owner will no longer receive any fees from other players when another player lands on the business space. However, when the owner pays back the loan, plus a modest loan remodeling fee, then business past back 72 card will be flipped over to business past front 70 and all other players landing on the space must pay the fees as shown.
  • [0053]
    It should be noted that as soon as the time phase of the game is changed from past to future, the costs for purchasing a business increases, as does the fees for purchasing an additional facility and the fees for other players landing on that business space increase accordingly. Although the business is the same, “critical mess multimedia”, the fees listed on business future front 74 are significantly higher than the fees for landing on business past front 70. Similarly, the amount secured for a remodeling loan for “critical mess multimedia” in the past, as shown on business past back 72, are significantly lower than the amount secured for a remodeling loan for the same business in the future, as shown on business future back 76.
  • [0054]
    [0054]FIG. 7 shows a $urprise card back 78, as it would be viewed on a typical game board. However, when a $urprise card is drawn by a player and turned over to $urprise card front 80, there are shown a variety of different possibilities for the player. The player may find a “steward” card that may be saved or traded. When the card is saved and a number of cards are collected by a single player, when another player lands upon a “steward” space of the same type, then the owner will collect a significantly higher fee, depending upon the number of cards held. $urprise cards can also direct a player to other spaces, or to directly pay a fee or collect a monetary benefit.
  • [0055]
    Similarly, FIG. 8 shows a Probability card back 82, as it would be viewed on a typical game board. However, when a Probability card is drawn by a player and turned over to Probability card front 84, there are shown a variety of different possibilities for the player. The player may find a “steward” card that may be saved or traded, as described above. Or, the player may obtain other cards needed for benefits in other game play, such as cards to “avoid t-space” or a time out, or cards to enable the player to proceed to the pier path without further payment of money. Probability cards can also direct a player to other spaces, or to directly pay a fee or collect a monetary benefit.
  • [0056]
    [0056]FIG. 9 shows a plurality of sample money 86 used in game play. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, when game play is initiated, a player receives one of the following denominations of play money: a $1000 bill, a $500 bill, a $100 bill, a $50 bill, a $20 bill, a $5 bill and a $1 bill for a total sum of $1,686.
  • [0057]
    [0057]FIG. 10 shows a plurality of the players' game position markers 88 that would represent each player in accordance with their current position on the game board. A sample of the past business facilities or store markers 90 are colored brown for easy recognition and future business facilities or store markers 92 are colored blue, representing the future. A player may accumulate a number of business facilities to increase the business fee potential. The game pieces 94 are used by the players during game play to determine the amount of payment or length of move to complete a player's turn.
  • [0058]
    Although in the foregoing detailed description the present invention has been described by reference to various specific embodiments, it is to be understood that modifications and alterations in the structure and arrangement of those embodiments other than those specifically set forth herein may be achieved by those skilled in the art and that such modifications and alterations are to be considered as within the overall scope of this invention. It should be noted specifically that the instant invention may be made into a virtual format, as in a video game for a home game player, or it may be made into a software game for a personal home computer, or it may even be made into an arcade game. Therefore, when the term “game board” is utilized in the present specification, it should be considered that the game board may be virtual in nature. All of these variations should be considered within the overall scope of the present invention.
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Referenced by
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US7857699Nov 1, 2006Dec 28, 2010IgtGaming system and method of operating a gaming system having a bonus participation bidding sequence
US7905777Mar 15, 2011IgtMethods and apparatus for auctioning an item via a gaming device
US8167709May 1, 2012IgtMethods and apparatus for auctioning an item via a gaming device
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US8512121Jul 2, 2012Aug 20, 2013IgtGaming system having multiple adjacently arranged gaming machines which each provide a component for a multi-component game
US8632394Mar 30, 2012Jan 21, 2014IgtMethods and apparatus for auctioning an item via a gaming device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/242
International ClassificationA63F3/04, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00072, A63F3/0497, A63F2003/00025
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6F, A63F3/04U