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Publication numberUS20040118053 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/607,776
Publication dateJun 24, 2004
Filing dateJun 27, 2003
Priority dateNov 9, 2000
Publication number10607776, 607776, US 2004/0118053 A1, US 2004/118053 A1, US 20040118053 A1, US 20040118053A1, US 2004118053 A1, US 2004118053A1, US-A1-20040118053, US-A1-2004118053, US2004/0118053A1, US2004/118053A1, US20040118053 A1, US20040118053A1, US2004118053 A1, US2004118053A1
InventorsNorman Huppert
Original AssigneeHuppert Norman K.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Truss anchoring assembly for buildings
US 20040118053 A1
Abstract
A gusset anchoring assembly for anchoring the roof frame of a building to its foundation, such as a concrete slab and having a lower rod affixed to the foundation and an upper extension rod disposed adjacent the truss of the roof frame. A modified U-shaped bracket hangs from the gusset and is secured thereto by mechanical fasteners. The upper end of the extension rod is secured to a horizontal ledge formed on the bracket.
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Claims(5)
What is claimed is:
1. A truss anchoring assembly for anchoring a truss to a building support foundation comprising
rod means having a lower end arranged to be secured to the support foundation,
said rod means forming an elongated extension extending from the building support foundation to an upper attachment end,
bracket means being affixed to said upper attachment end,
said bracket means having an upper wall forming a downwardly disposed surface for contacting a truss,
securement means for securing the bracket means to the truss, and
said bracket means includes a plurality of walls arranged generally a right angle to each other, one of said wails of said bracket means includes a securement ledge, said upper end of the said extension rod being secured to said securement ledge at a position offset from the truss in space relationship.
2. A truss anchoring assembly for anchoring a truss to a building support foundation comprising
rod means having a lower end arranged to be secured to the support foundation,
said rod means forming an elongated extension extending from the building support foundation to an upper threaded end,
bracket means being affixed to said upper attachment end,
said bracket means having an upper wall forming a downwardly disposed surface for contacting a truss, and a pair of sidewalls to contact the truss,
securement means for securing the bracket means to the truss, and
said securement means includes a member having a threaded hole for receiving said threaded upper end for securement, said threaded hole being offset from the truss.
3. The truss anchoring assembly according to claim 2 wherein said member is block attached to one of said sidewalls.
4. The truss anchoring assembly according to claim 3 wherein said block is angularly oriented on said sidewall to correspond to the predetermined slope of the truss.
5. A connection bracket for a truss anchoring assembly through a vertical rod having a threaded upper end comprising
an U-shaped bracket having a base and a pair of parallel opposed side walls extending perpendicularly to said base,
a block affixed to the exterior wall at least one of said side walls, and
said block having a threaded hole for receiving the threaded upper end of the vertical rod.
Description

[0001] This application is a continuation in part of parent application Ser. No. 09/1773,899 filed Jan. 31, 2001 and claims benefit of the filing date of my provisional application, Ser. No. 60/247,149 filed Nov. 9, 2000.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates in general to buildings and more particularly, to a truss anchoring assembly for buildings to anchor the roof assembly against the impact of winds,

[0004] 2. Summary of the Prior Art

[0005] High winds from hurricanes, tornadoes, and storms can have a severe damaging affect on homes, garages, factories, and other buildings. One common result of the impact of high winds against the sidewalls of a building is the uplifting of the roof frame from the building. The replacement of the entire roof structure requires expensive repair and increases the time of the unavailability of use of the damaged building. In addition, the displacement of the roof structure weakens the rigidity of the sidewalls often causing them to collapse compounding overall damage.

[0006] Strong winds from a hurricane and the like normally impact the sidewall of a building at an angle, often parallel to the ground, and are directed upward against the typical overhang of the roof The upward rising wind pressure creates forces which overcome the integrity of the connection of the roof frame to the lower building framing components because of which the roof structure breaks away to cause severe damage to the building. Such excess damage results because present roof trusses are only anchored to the upper structure sidewalls and beams through bolts, nails, and the like. Such connecting elements are not anchored to the foundation and are insufficient in securing the roof structure. In many buildings the sills beneath the sidewall are secured to reinforcing rods which are anchored, for example, in a concrete slab. In the past typical reinforcing rods embedded in concrete are only used to anchor the lower building frame. None of the prior art techniques directly connect the roof structure to the building slab independently of the sidewalls or use the slab or other foundation components as a direct anchor for the roof frame. Accordingly, in addition it is desirable to provide a truss securement assembly by which the roof trusses are independently anchored to the building foundation as well as being secured to the building frame as is conventional.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] It is, therefore, an objective of the invention to provide a new technique and assembly to secure roof truss reinforcement assembly for buildings. The invention provides independent anchoring of the roof assembly including trusses and rafters to the foundation, such as a concrete slab, columns, and the like on which houses, garages, factories, warehouses, sheds, and other structures are commonly secured and supported. The truss reinforcement assembly of the invention greatly increases the resistance of the roof structure to the uplifting forces of wind so as to prevent separation of the roof frame and potential collapse of the sidewalls of the building. Although roof plywood components may be displaced under high winds, the invention is effective in insuring that the overall structure remains intact in the presence of much higher wind forces than possible by prior art techniques of roof securement.

[0008] The invention herein employs rod means, which extends from conventional J-bolts rods, such as J-bolts, embedded and anchored to a concrete slab and the like. A unique bracket of the application secures the rod to the structure of roof assembly or upper portion of building, such as to the roof trusses or rafters. The invention provides an inexpensive and easy to install reinforcement of a building against the damaging effects of high winds.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009]FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with parts in section, of truss anchoring assembly for buildings of the invention;

[0010]FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the truss attachment bracket of the truss anchoring assembly of FIG. 1;

[0011]FIG. 3 is the opposite end elevational view of the truss attachment bracket of FIG. 2; and

[0012]FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the truss attachment bracket of FIG. 2.

[0013]FIG. 5 is partial side elevational view of a second embodiment of the truss attachment assembly of the invention;

[0014]FIG. 6 is an elevational view of the second embodiment of the truss attachment bracket of the invention;

[0015]FIG. 7 is the opposite elevational view of the second embodiment of the truss attachment bracket of the invention;

[0016]FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the second embodiment of the truss attachment bracket of the invention;

[0017]FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of a plurality of truss anchoring assemblies being anchored to roof assembly;

[0018]FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of truss anchoring assembly for anchoring a horizontally disposed truss.

[0019]FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of a connecting bracket of the invention;

[0020]FIG. 12 is a bottom plan view of the connecting bracket of FIG. 11; and

[0021]FIG. 13 is an end elevational view of the connecting bracket of FIG. 11.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0022] Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated the truss anchoring assembly for forming an anchored vertical extension for buildings of the invention, generally designated by reference numeral 2. Although one truss reinforcement assembly 2 is shown in FIG. 1, it is contemplated that a plurality of truss reinforcement assemblies 2 will be present in a building dependent on desired strength characteristics. The locations of securement of the assembly 2 may be adjacent corners, at each or some sloped or horizontal trusses of a roof frame, and at midpoint locations along the sidewalls and other locations as needed. In FIG. 1, the truss reinforcement assembly 2 is shown being affixed to a conventional rebar rod 4 embedded in a conventional manner in a concrete slab 6 or other concrete structure. The upper end 4′ of the rebar rod 4, commonly called a J-bolt, has a threaded portion 4 b. The rebar rod 4 normally anchors the lower sill 8 of a building, such as a house, garage, factory, warehouse, shed, barn, and the like. As is known rebar rod 4 may have bulging rings 4 a along its length and a threaded upper end 4 b.

[0023] The truss reinforcement assembly 2 includes an elongated vertical extension rebar rod 10 having a circular cross-sectional configuration and having a construction similar to rebar rod 4. As is typical, rebar rod 10 also includes enlarged rings 10′ along its length. Although rod 10 is shown as a rebar rod, it is within the scope of the invention to use threaded rods, smooth rods, or other elongated connecting elements when desired in accordance with invention. The rod 10 includes a lower threaded portion 12 which is attached to the threaded portion 4b of rod 4 by a coupling nut 14 of a conventional design having opposite internal threads at each end. The rod 10 is arranged to extend upward and terminate with a threaded upper attachment end 16 adjacent to roof truss 20 or rafter.

[0024] As shown in FIGS. 1-4, a securement bracket 22 secures the threaded end 16 of rod 10 to the truss 20. The bracket 22 is formed from a metal or suitable material and has a flat vertical wall 24 in the form of a plate which hangs from truss 20. A flat wall forming securement ledge 26 is welded or otherwise affixed to plate 24. A gusset 28 is secured to plate 24 and to the lower face of ledge 26 for reinforcement (FIGS. 1-3). The upper edge 30 of plate 24 is bent at a right angle to form a flat wall 32 which is sloped to form a truss contacting surface 32′. If the truss 20 or roof component is horizontally disposed, the upper wall 32 would then be generally parallel to the horizontal plane of the upper surface 26′ of ledge 26. A hole 40 is provided through the ledge 26 to receive the upper end of rod 10. The hole 40 is offset from the truss 20 so that the rod does not need to extend through a hole in the truss 40 in the prior art which weakens the strength of the truss itself.

[0025] A downwardly bent portion 34 extends generally at a right angle from wall 32 and forms a downwardly disposed flat rear attachment and support wall arranged generally parallel to plate 24. The front vertical plate 24, top wall 32, and rear wall 34 form a modified U-shape opening 36 to receive the truss 20 so generally corresponding to the cross-sectional shape of the truss 20 confronting the surfaces of that walls 24, 32, and 34 which are generally in contact or near contact with the two side faces and upper edge face of truss 20. As seen in FIGS. 2 to 4, bracket 22 is provided with a plurality of holes 38 a, 38 b, and 38 c respectively in plate 24, wall 32, and wall 34. The holes may receive nails or other mechanical fasteners (not shown) for securing the bracket 22 to the respective faces of truss 20.

[0026] As shown in FIGS. 5-8, there is illustrated a second embodiment of the bracket for securing the truss anchoring assembly, generally designation by reference numeral 22 a. The bracket 22 a performs in a similar manner to anchor a truss member as shown in FIGS. 1-4. The bracket 22 a secures the threaded end 16 a of rod 10 a to the truss 20 a. The bracket 22 a is formed from a metal or suitable material and has a vertical wall forming a plate 24 a which hangs from truss 20 a. A securement ledge 26 a is welded or otherwise affixed to plate 24 a. A pair of spaced triangular gussets 40′ are secured to the top of the ledge 26 a and to the front face of vertical plate 24 a for reinforcement (FIGS. 5, 6, and 7). The upper edge 30 a of plate 24 a is bent along an axis angular disposed with respect to ledge 24 a to form a sloped wall 32 a disposed at a right angle to plate 24 a. If the truss 20 or roof component is horizontally disposed, the upper edge 30 would then be generally parallel to the horizontal plane of the upper surfiace 26 a′ of ledge 26 such as shown in FIG. 9.

[0027] A downwardly bent rear portion 34 a extends from wall 32 a at a right angle and forms a downwardly disposed rear attachment wall which is parallel to plate 24 a. As seen in FIGS. 5-8, bracket 22 a is provided with a plurality of bolts receiving holes 42 respectively in ledge 26 a and wall 34 a. A plurality of holes 44 for receiving nails and the like are formed in vertical plate 24 a.

[0028] As seen in FIG. 9, the bracket 22 a (as well as previously described bracket 22) can be anchored to each or alternate ones of the plurality of trusses 20 a of a typical sloped roof structure 50 on both sides of the house 52 or other building. As similar to in FIG. 1, the bracket 22 a being mounted on truss 20 a is secured to the threaded upper end 16 a of rod 10 a. The bottom portion of rod 10 a is secured to rod 4 a′ which may have a J-shaped end (not shown) and other configuration which is embedded in a concrete slab 6 a.

[0029] The bracket 22 a (as well as bracket 22 shown in FIGS. 1-4) may be also be attached directly to an upper portion of all or selected trusses 20 a at any intermediate position such as near the hip 56 of the roof as shown in FIG. 9. In its intermediate position, it may be desired to extend the rod 10 a through an interior wall 58 a for practical aesthetic reasons. As further seen in FIG. 9, a modified bracket 22 b (to be described) having a horizontal upper edge 30 c, may also be affixed to an upper horizontal beam 60 and then a second extension rod 72 having threaded ends 72 a and 72 b can be connected to the threaded end 16 through a dual nut 74. A second bracket 20 a may be similarly attached to the upper threaded end 72 and to the upper portion of the truss 20 a through bracket 22 a.

[0030] Referring to FIG. 10, there is illustrated a modification of the truss anchoring assembly of the invention, generally designated by reference numeral 2 b. The truss anchoring assembly 2 b is used to anchor a horizontal truss and employs a truss attachment bracket 22 b. The bracket 22 b is a formed metal member having vertical plate 24 b, horizontal ledge 26 b, and a pair of triangular gussets 28 b (one of which is shown in FIG. 10) which are attached to vertical plate 24 b and horizontal ledge 26. An upper wall 32 b extends at a generally right angle to vertical wall 22 to form a truss contacting surface 32 b′ which is generally parallel to the top surface 26 b′ of ledge 26 as seen in FIG. 10. A rear wall 34 b extends downward from wall 32 b in parallel relationship to vertical plate 22 b. One or more nails 80 or other mechanical fastener may be driven through holes (not shown) through wall 32 b. A bolt assembly 82 having threaded bolt 82 a with washer 82 b extends through vertical wall 24 b and horizontal truss 20 b through holes (not shown). An aligned hole (not shown) in rear wall 34 b receives the end of threaded bolt 82 a. The end of threaded 82 a is secured by nut 82 c in conjunction with washer 82 d and lock washer 82 e. The foregoing fastening technique can also be used in connection with bracket 22 and 22 a as described with reference to FIGS. 1-9. As in the previous embodiments, the threaded end of 16 c of rod 10 c extends through a hole in ledge 26 b and is attached by nut 90 and locker washer 92. The lower end 12 b of rod 10 b is affixed to embedded rebar 4 b through extender coupling nut 14 b as in the previous embodiments. It is within the scope of the invention to employ any number of mechanical fasteners through walls 22, 32, and 34 into and/or through a sloped or horizontal truss as is needed.

[0031] Referring to FIGS. 11-13, there is illustrated a third embodiment of the connecting bracket, generally designated by reference numeral 100, for use in truss anchoring assembly of the invention. The connecting bracket 100 is intended to be attached to a truss (not shown) and receive the threaded end of a vertical rod, such as rod 10 as described in connection with the preceding embodiments.

[0032] The connecting bracket 100 is a metal U-shaped member that includes a pair of parallel sides 102 and a base 104. The connecting bracket 100 is inverted over the truss so that the base 104 contacts the upper surface of the truss while the two sides 102 contact the opposed side faces faces of the truss. Plurality of holes 106 a,b are provided through side walls 102 to receive mechanical fasteners, such as nails, to secure connecting bracket 100 to the truss. The holes 106 a are offset on wall 102 relative to opposed holes 106 b side by side and up and down that eight nails placed in the holes will not be in alignment and adequate securement is provided without having to drive the nails completely through the truss to prevent splitting of the truss.

[0033] A metal block 110 having six opposed is affixed to one of the sides 102. The block 110 is angularly oriented in accordance with the slope of truss so that the generally vertical securement rod (not shown) can be attached to threaded hole 112 provided through the block 110, which hole 112 is also in generally vertical alignment due to the angular orientation of the block 110 on the sidewall 102. The hole 112 is offset from the truss so that the vertical rod does not need to extend through the truss. The bracket 100 is arranged to support and secure a truss under high wind conditions in a similar manner as described in connection with the foregoing embodiments of FIGS. 1-10.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7484334Sep 28, 2005Feb 3, 2009Alfonso Oviedo-ReyesRoof anchoring kit and method
US7654042 *Feb 14, 2007Feb 2, 2010Daryl BrownCable tie down system
US7665257Dec 20, 2006Feb 23, 2010Posey Innovations, LlcWind resistant structure for buildings
US20130000235 *Jan 4, 2012Jan 3, 2013Espinosa Thomas MBuilding With Roof Trusses Directly Connected to the Fooundation.
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/23
International ClassificationE04B1/35, E04C3/02, E04B1/26, E04H9/14, E04B1/41
Cooperative ClassificationE04H9/14, E04B2001/3583, E04B1/2604, E04B1/4157, E04C2003/026, E04C3/02
European ClassificationE04C3/02, E04H9/14, E04B1/26B, E04B1/41E