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Publication numberUS20040136859 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/750,755
Publication dateJul 15, 2004
Filing dateJan 5, 2004
Priority dateApr 12, 2000
Publication number10750755, 750755, US 2004/0136859 A1, US 2004/136859 A1, US 20040136859 A1, US 20040136859A1, US 2004136859 A1, US 2004136859A1, US-A1-20040136859, US-A1-2004136859, US2004/0136859A1, US2004/136859A1, US20040136859 A1, US20040136859A1, US2004136859 A1, US2004136859A1
InventorsJiin-Huey Chern Lin, Chien-Ping Ju, Wen-Wei Cheng, Dan Jae Lin, Chih-Min Lee
Original AssigneeCana Lab Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Titanium alloys having improved castability
US 20040136859 A1
Abstract
In order to improve castability of a titanium alloy, 0.01-5 wt %, preferably 0.1-3 wt %, of bismuth is introduced into the titanium alloy, based on the weight of bismuth and the titanium alloy. The titanium alloy is suitable for making a dental casting or a medical implant by casting.
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Claims(22)
What is claimed is:
1. A medical device made of a biocompatible titanium alloy composition having an improved castability comprising:
(a) about 0.01-5 wt % Bi based on the weight of the alloy composition;
(b) at least one alloy element selected from the group consisting of Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf; and
(c) the balance Ti.
2. The medical device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said alloy composition comprises 0.1-3 wt % Bi.
3. The medical device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said alloy composition further comprises at least one eutectoid beta stabilizing element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Si and Sn.
4. The medical device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said titanium alloy composition is substantially free from V.
5. The medical device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the titanium alloy composition is substantially free from Al.
6. The medical device as set forth in claim 2, wherein the titanium alloy composition consists essentially of Ti and Mo; Ti and Nb; Ti and Zr; Ti, Mo and Fe; Ti, Mo and Cr; Ti, Mo and Nb; Ti, Mo and Ta; Ti, Nb and Fe; Ti, Ta and Fe;
Ti, Nb and Zr; Ti, Al and Nb; Ti, Mo, Zr and Fe; or Ti, Mo, Hf and Fe, in addition to Bi.
7. The medical device as set forth in claim 1 which is a dental casting.
8. The medical device as set forth in claim 1 which is a medical implant.
9. A method for improving a castability of a titanium alloy comprising at least one alloy element selected from the group consisting of Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf, said method comprising introducing about 0.01-5 wt % Bi into said titanium alloy, based on the weight of Bi and said titanium alloy.
10. The method as set forth in claim 9, wherein 0.1-3 wt % Bi is introduced into said titanium alloy.
11. The method as set forth in claim 9, wherein said titanium alloy further comprises at least one eutectoid beta stabilizing element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Si and Sn.
12. The method as set forth in claim 9, wherein the titanium alloy is substantially free from V.
13. The method as set forth in claim 9, wherein the titanium alloy is substantially free from Al.
14. The method as set forth in claim 10, wherein said titanium alloy consists essentially of Ti and Mo; Ti and Nb; Ti and Zr; Ti, Mo and Fe; Ti, Mo and Cr; Ti, Mo and Nb; Ti, Mo and Ta; Ti, Nb and Fe; Ti, Ta and Fe; Ti, Nb and Zr; Ti, Al and Nb; Ti, Mo, Zr and Fe; or Ti, Mo, Hf and Fe.
15. A method of using a titanium alloy composition in making a medical device comprising casting a titanium alloy composition comprising
(a) about 0.01-5 wt % Bi based on the weight of the alloy composition;
(b) at least one alloy element selected from the group consisting of Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf; and
(c) the balance Ti.
16. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said alloy composition comprises 0.1-3 wt % Bi.
17. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said alloy composition further comprises at least one eutectoid beta stabilizing element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Si and Sn.
18. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said titanium alloy composition is substantially free from V.
19. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein the titanium alloy composition is substantially free from Al.
20. The method as set forth in claim 16, wherein the titanium alloy composition consists essentially of Ti and Mo; Ti and Nb; Ti and Zr; Ti, Mo and Fe; Ti, Mo and Cr; Ti, Mo and Nb; Ti, Mo and Ta; Ti, Nb and Fe; Ti, Ta and Fe;
Ti, Nb and Zr; Ti, Al and Nb; Ti, Mo, Zr and Fe; or Ti, Mo, Hf and Fe, in addition to Bi.
21. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said medical device is a dental casting.
22. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said medical device is a medical implant.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/179,310, filed Jun. 26, 2002, which is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/548,266, filed Apr. 12, 2000, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,572,815B 1. The above-listed U.S. Pat. No. 6,572,815B1 and application Ser. No. 10/179,310 are commonly assigned with the present invention and the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to a titanium alloy, and more particularly to a titanium alloy casting. The present invention provides a method to improve the castability of a titanium alloy, so that it is more suitable for use in making a dental casting and a medical implant.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Due to its lightweight, high strength-to-weight ratio, low elastic modulus, superior chemical corrosion resistance, and excellent mechanical properties at high temperature up to 550° C., titanium and its alloys have been widely used on aerospace, chemical, sports, and marine industries. Their superior biocompatibility also makes them ideal as the primary materials used in dental and osteological restorations or implants, such as artificial bone pins, bone plates, shoulders, elbows, hips, knees and other joints, and dental orthopraxy lines.
  • [0004]
    A number of methods for fabricating titanium and its alloys with a desired shape have been developed. Among these, precision casting is the most difficult. Precision casting has the advantage that the cast produced has a near net shape, which greatly decreases the titanium fabrication cost. Also, precision casting is particularly suitable for producing objects with a small volume, high size accuracy, and complicated shape, for example in dental and osteological fields. Moreover, titanium and its alloys could even be utilized in many other everyday products, if the difficulty in precision casting could be solved.
  • [0005]
    There are many factors that affect the process of the precision casting and the properties of castings. According to the research results issued by Luk et al., in Dent. Mater., 8, 89-99, 1992, the factors include alloy composition, alloy density, alloy surface tension, casting temperature, investment material type, mold temperature, casting machine type, casting surface area/volume ratio, and pouring angle. The castability test is the most frequently used method for assessing various titanium precision casting processes. Castability is the ability of a molten alloy to completely fill a mold space. Castability is a combination factor, and there is no international standard for assessing it today. Since castability is affected by many factors, researchers have designed various test methods in accordance with various cast patterns for assessing the castability. The cast patterns include spiral wax molds, fibrous nylon lines produced by injection molding (Howard et al., JDR, 59, 824-830, 1985), saucer-like molds, cylindrical molds, rectangle sheets, nylon mesh, and taper molds (Mueller et al., J. of Prosth. Den., 69, 367, Abstr. 2072, 1993). A wax mold of a simulated crown has also been designed (Bessing et al., Acta Odontology Scandinavian, 44, 165-172, 1986).
  • [0006]
    Titanium is inherently difficult to cast due to its high melting point and high reactivity. Its low density is another problem in casting. Therefore, the improvement of casting process is the main issue of titanium precision casting. The casting machines used at present utilize argon as the protective atmosphere to prevent high temperature reactions. Induction or arc is used as the heat source in order to shorten melting time as well as lessen high temperature reactivity. At present, in order to increase the pouring force and to avoid casting defect caused by poor flowability of the molten metal, the titanium casting machines can be roughly divided into the centrifugal casting type, the vacuum-pressure type, and the centrifugal-vacuum pressure mixed type (Yoshiaki, Conference Paper, 1-7, Australia, 1995).
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,572,815B1 discloses a technique to improve the castability of pure titanium by doping an alloying metal in an amount of 0.01 to 3 wt %, preferably 0.5 to 3 wt %, and more preferably about 1 wt %. Among various alloying metals used in this application bismuth is found the most promising element.
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat. No. 2,797,996 discloses titanium base alloys of high strength and ductility, and also of contamination resistance and high strength at elevated temperatures, which contain as essentially constituents titanium and tin, together with one or more additional metals selected from the groups comprising alpha promoters, beta promoters and compound formers. A large number of Ti—Sn base alloys were prepared in this patent, including ternary titanium alloys containing 1-5 wt % Bi. However, there is no teaching as to the improvement of castability or reducing surface tension of pure titanium or a titanium alloy.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,810,465 discloses a free-cutting Ti alloy. The basic alloy composition of this free-cutting Ti alloy essentially consists of at least one of S: 0.001-10%, Se: 0.001-10% and Te: 0.001-10%; REM: 0.01-10%; and one or both of Ca: 0.001-10% and B: 0.005-5%; and the balance substantially Ti. The Ti alloy includes one or more of Ti—S (Se, Te) compounds, Ca—S (Se, Te) compounds, REM-S (Se, Te) compounds and their complex compounds as inclusions to improve machinability. Some optional elements can be added to above basic composition. Also disclosed are methods of producing the above free-cutting Ti alloy and a specific Ti alloy which is a particularly suitable material for connecting rods. Bismuth up to 10% was suggested in this free-cutting Ti alloy. However, there is no teaching as to the improvement of castability or reducing surface tension of pure titanium or a titanium alloy.
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,176,762 discloses an age hardenable beta titanium alloy having exceptional high temperature strength properties in combination with an essential lack of combustibility. In its basic form the alloy contains chromium, vanadium and titanium the nominal composition of the basic alloy being defined by three points on the ternary titanium-vanadium-chromium phase diagram: Ti-22V-13Cr, Ti-22V-36Cr, and Ti-40V-13% Cr. The alloys of the invention are comprised of the beta phase under all the temperature conditions, have strengths much in excess of the prior art high strength alloys in combination with excellent creep properties, and are nonburning under conditions encountered in gas turbine engine compressor sections. Bismuth up to 1.5% was suggested in this age hardenable beta titanium alloy. However, there is no teaching as to the improvement of castability or reducing surface tension of pure titanium or a titanium alloy.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    A primary object of the present invention is to provide a medical device made of a titanium alloy having an improved castability.
  • [0012]
    Another object of the present invention is to provide a method of improving a castability of a titanium alloy.
  • [0013]
    A further object of the present invention is to provide a method of using a titanium alloy in making a medical device.
  • [0014]
    The present invention discloses a method for improving a castability of a titanium alloy comprising at least one alloy element selected from the group consisting of Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf, said method comprising introducing about 0.01-5 wt % Bi into said titanium alloy, preferably 0.1-3 wt % Bi, based on the weight of Bi and said titanium alloy.
  • [0015]
    Preferably, said titanium alloy further comprises at least one eutectoid beta stabilizing element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Si and Sn.
  • [0016]
    Preferably, the titanium alloy is substantially free from V.
  • [0017]
    Preferably, the titanium alloy is substantially free from Al.
  • [0018]
    Preferably, said titanium alloy consists essentially of Ti and Mo; Ti and Nb; Ti and Zr; Ti, Mo and Fe; Ti, Mo and Cr; Ti, Mo and Nb; Ti, Mo and Ta; Ti, Nb and Fe; Ti, Ta and Fe; Ti, Nb and Zr; Ti, Al and Nb; Ti, Mo, Zr and Fe; or Ti, Mo, Hf and Fe.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0019]
    The present invention will be described in detail with reference to the illustrated embodiments and the accompany drawings, in which:
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 1 is a schematic drawing showing the copper mold used for the castability test in the present invention;
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 2 shows the effect on castability by doping 1 wt %, 3 wt % and 5 wt % of bismuth to commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) and a Ti alloy containing 7.5 wt % Mo and the balance Ti (Ti-7.5Mo) according to the present invention;
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 3 shows the effect on castability by doping 1 wt %, 3 wt % and 5 wt % of bismuth to a Ti alloy containing 6 wt % Al, 4 wt % V and the balance Ti (Ti6Al4V) according to the present invention; and
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 4 shows the effect on castability by doping 1 wt % of bismuth to various titanium alloys according to the present invention, wherein the numerals before the elements in the Ti alloys represent the weight percentage thereof.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0024]
    The present invention provides a medical device made of a biocompatible titanium alloy composition having an improved castability comprising:
  • [0025]
    (a) about 0.01-5 wt % Bi, preferably 0.1-3 wt % Bi, based on the weight of the alloy composition;
  • [0026]
    (b) at least one alloy element selected from the group consisting of Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf; and
  • [0027]
    (c) the balance Ti.
  • [0028]
    The present invention also provides a method of using a titanium alloy composition in making a medical device comprising casting the above-mentioned biocompatible titanium alloy composition.
  • [0029]
    Preferably, said alloy composition further comprises at least one eutectoid beta stabilizing element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Si and Sn.
  • [0030]
    Preferably, said titanium alloy composition is substantially free from V.
  • [0031]
    Preferably, the titanium alloy composition is substantially free from Al.
  • [0032]
    Preferably, the titanium alloy composition consists essentially of Ti and Mo; Ti and Nb; Ti and Zr; Ti, Mo and Fe; Ti, Mo and Cr; Ti, Mo and Nb; Ti, Mo and Ta; Ti, Nb and Fe; Ti, Ta and Fe; Ti, Nb and Zr; Ti, Al and Nb; Ti, Mo, Zr and Fe; or Ti, Mo, Hf and Fe, in addition to Bi.
  • [0033]
    Preferably, the medical device is a dental casting.
  • [0034]
    Preferably, the medical device is a medical implant.
  • EXAMPLE 1 c.p. Ti and Ti—Mo alloys doped with 1 wt %, 3 wt % and 5 wt % of Bi
  • [0035]
    In this example 0, 1, 3 and 5 wt % of bismuth of 99.5% in purity were melted into a grade II commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) and Ti-7.5Mo alloy containing 7.5 wt % of Mo and the balance Ti by using a commercial arc-melting vacuum/pressure type casting system (Castmatic, Iwatani Corp., Japan). Appropriate amounts of c.p. Ti, molybdenum and bismuth were melted in a U-shaped copper hearth with a tungsten electrode. The melting chamber was first evacuated and purged with argon. An argon pressure of 1.8 kgf/cm2 was maintained during melting. After solidification/cooling in the same chamber in argon atmosphere, the thin oxidized layer of the ingot was removed by grinding and the ground surface was ultrasonically cleaned in alcohol. The ingot was re-melted three times to improve chemical homogeneity.
  • [0036]
    Prior to casting, the ingot was re-melted again in an open-based copper hearth under an argon pressure of 1.8 kgf/cm2. The molten alloy instantly dropped from the open-based copper hearth into a copper mold located in a second chamber at room temperature via a pouring gate because of the pressure difference between the two chambers. As shown in FIG. 1, the pouring gate 20 has an inlet of 20 mm diameter and an outlet of 10 mm diameter, and a thickness of 18 mm between the inlet and the outlet. The copper mold 10 has two parallel needle-shaped cavities of 1 mm×53 mm (diameter×length).
  • [0037]
    Cast lengths (a measure of castability) of undoped and Bi-doped c.p. Ti as well as Ti-7.5Mo alloy are compared in FIG. 2. As shown in the figure, when 1 or 3 wt % Bi was doped in c.p. Ti, the cast length increased by about 12%. When 5 wt % Bi was added, however, the castability value declined. This “up and down” phenomenon was observed in a more dramatic way in Ti-7.5Mo system. When 1 wt % Bi was doped in Ti-7.5Mo alloy, the cast length largely increased by 34%. Again, when larger amounts of bismuth were added, the castability values decreased.
  • [0038]
    According to the theory of Ragone et al. [RAGONE, D. V. ADAMS, C. M., and TAYLOR, H. F. (1956) Some Factors Affecting Fluidity of Metals. AFS Trans., 64, 640.], addition of an alloy element to a pure metal always lowers the fluidity (increasing viscosity) of the metal due to the formation of dendrites that causes resistance to fluid flow at the early stage of solidification. This factor might satisfactorily explain why the castability value decreased when a relatively large amount (3 or 5 wt %) of bismuth was added. However, the dendrite factor could not explain the increase in castability when only 1 wt % Bi was added.
  • EXAMPLE 2 Ti6Al4V Alloy Doped with 1 wt %, 3 wt % and 5 wt % of Bi
  • [0039]
    The procedures in Example 1 were repeated except that a commercially available Ti-6Al-4V alloy (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA) was used to replace c.p. Ti and Mo metals. The results are shown in FIG. 3.
  • [0040]
    From the measurement of casting lengths (a measure of castability, FIG. 3), it is interesting to note that the castability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy could be largely enhanced by almost 30% by the addition of 1 wt % Bi in the alloy, compared to that of undoped one. When a larger amount (3 or 5 wt %) of bismuth was added, however, the castability value of Ti-6Al-4V was not improved.
  • EXAMPLE 3 Castability of Some Commercial Ti Alloys with 1 wt % Bi Doped and without Bi Doped
  • [0041]
    The procedures for preparing the doped and undoped Ti-7.5Mo alloys in Example 1 were repeated to prepare Ti7.5Mo—Fe alloys with 1 wt % Bi doped and without Bi doped except that an additional metal Fe was added in an amount of 1, 3 and 5 wt %, separately.
  • [0042]
    The procedures for preparing the doped and undoped Ti-7.5Mo alloys in Example 1 were repeated to prepare Ti15Mo alloy with 1 wt % Bi doped and without Bi doped except that the amount of Mo added was 15 wt %.
  • [0043]
    The procedures in Example 1 were repeated except that commercially available alloys TMZF (12 wt % of Mo, 6 wt % of Zr, 2 wt % of Fe, and the balance Ti) (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA), Ti13Nb13Zr (13 wt % of Nb, 13 wt % of Zr and the balance Ti) (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA), Ti5Al2.5Fe (5 wt % of Al, 2.5 wt % of Fe and the balance Ti) (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA), Ti6Al7Nb (6 wt % of Al, 7 wt % of Nb and the balance Ti) (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA), and Ti7Mo7Hf1Fe (7 wt % of Mo, 7 wt % of Hf, 1 wt % of Fe and the balance Ti) (Titanium Industries, Parsippany, N.J., USA) were used to replace c.p. Ti and Mo metals. The results are shown in FIG. 4 together with the 1 wt % Bi doped and undoped c.p. Ti, Ti7.5Mo, Ti6Al4V alloys prepared in Examples 1 and 2.
  • [0044]
    From the measurement of casting lengths (a measure of castability, FIG. 4), it can be seen that the castability of Ti alloys enhanced by the addition of 1 wt % Bi in the alloy ranges from about 17% (Ti5Al2.5Fe) to about 115% (Ti7.5Mo5Fe), compared to that of undoped one, while the castability improvement for c.p. Ti by the addition of 1 wt % Bi is only about 12%.
  • [0045]
    More examples of titanium alloys were prepared and the castability thereof was evaluated following the procedures recited in Example 1. The results are show in the following Table 1 together with those of the alloys prepared in Examples 1 and 3.
    TABLE 1
    Improvement in castability (cast length) of Ti alloys
    due to the presence of Bi
    Ti alloy Cast length Improvement in
    composition (wt %) (mm) cast length (%)
    Ti—7.5Mo 11.5
    Ti—7.5Mo—1Bi 15.4 33.9
    Ti—7.5Mo—3Bi 13.6 18.3
    Ti—7.5Mo—5Bi 12.0  4.3
    Ti—7.5Mo—1Fe 7.3
    Ti—7.5Mo—1Fe—1Bi 13.1 79.5
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Fe 8.3
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Fe—0.1Bi 11.1 33.7
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Fe—0.5Bi 12.7 53.0
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Fe—1Bi 13.5 62.7
    Ti—7.5Mo—3Fe 6.9
    Ti—7.5Mo—3Fe—1Bi 12.6 82.6
    Ti—7.5Mo—5Fe 6.8
    Ti—7.5Mo—5Fe—1Bi 14.5 113.2 
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Cr 12.5
    Ti—7.5Mo—2Cr—1Bi 13.7  9.6
    Ti—15Mo 12.7
    Ti—15Mo—1Bi 16.2 27.6
    Ti—15Mo—3Bi 14.8 16.5
    Ti—15Mo—5Nb 12.9
    Ti—15Mo—5Nb—1Bi 15.4 19.4
    Ti—15Mo—5Ta 12.0
    Ti—15Mo—5Ta—1Bi 13.0  8.3
    Ti—15Mo—2Fe 8.2
    Ti—15Mo—2Fe—1Bi 9.8 19.5
    Ti—15Mo—2Cr 12.3
    Ti—15Mo—2Cr—1Bi 16.7 35.8
    Ti—20Mo 12.6
    Ti—20Mo—1Bi 15.7 24.6
    Ti—10Nb 10.8
    Ti—10Nb—1Bi 18.5 71.3
    Ti—25Nb 10.5
    Ti—25Nb—1Bi 14.7 40.0
    Ti—25Nb—2Fe 7.0
    Ti—25Nb—2Fe—1Bi 9.2 31.4
    Ti—25Ta—2Fe 7.2
    Ti—25Ta—2Fe—1Bi 8.4 16.7
    Ti—35Nb 8.0
    Ti—35Nb—1Bi 11.2 40.0
    Ti—12Mo—6Zr—2Fe 9.2
    Ti—12Mo—6Zr—2Fe—1Bi 11.1 20.7
    Ti—13Nb—13Zr 9.2
    Ti—13Nb—13Zr—1Bi 14.5 57.6
    Ti—5Al—2.5Fe 10.8
    Ti—5Al—2.5Fe—1Bi 12.6 16.7
    Ti—6Al—7Nb 14.1
    Ti—6Al—7Nb—1Bi 17.2 22.0
    Ti—7Mo—7Hf—1Fe 8.0
    Ti—7Mo—7Hf—1Fe—1Bi 10.5 31.2
    Ti—30Zr 13.2
    Ti—30Zr—1Bi 14.1  6.7
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US7771838Sep 29, 2005Aug 10, 2010Boston Scientific Neuromodulation CorporationHermetically bonding ceramic and titanium with a Ti-Pd braze interface
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US8329314 *Sep 29, 2005Dec 11, 2012Boston Scientific Neuromodulation CorporationHermetically bonding ceramic and titanium with a palladium braze
US9675730 *Mar 8, 2006Jun 13, 2017Waldemar Link Gmbh & Co. KgJoint prosthesis made from a titanium alloy
US20060225818 *Mar 8, 2006Oct 12, 2006Waldemar Link Gmbh & Co. KgProcess for casting a beta-titanium alloy
US20060235536 *Mar 8, 2006Oct 19, 2006Waldemar Link Gmbh & Co. KgJoint prosthesis made from a titanium alloy
US20070049418 *Aug 28, 2006Mar 1, 2007Jiin-Huey Chern LinMethod of making a golf club head from bismuth-containing titanium alloy and golf club head
US20070068647 *Mar 8, 2006Mar 29, 2007Waldemar Link Gmbh & Co. KgProcess for producing an implant from a titanium alloy, and corresponding implant
US20070224575 *May 4, 2005Sep 27, 2007Francis DierasUltrasonic Dental Tool
CN100594248CFeb 27, 2006Mar 17, 2010沃尔德马连接两合公司Method for casting titanium alloy
CN101886188A *Apr 8, 2010Nov 17, 2010厦门大学Beta titanium alloy and preparation method thereof
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CN103695711A *Jan 16, 2014Apr 2, 2014张霞High-strength titanium-aluminum-nickel alloy plate and preparation method thereof
CN105543555A *Dec 18, 2015May 4, 2016江苏常盛无纺设备有限公司High-yield carding machine
EP1695675A1 *Feb 25, 2005Aug 30, 2006Waldemar Link GmbH & Co. KGJoint prosthesis made of a titanium-molybdenum-alloy
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Classifications
U.S. Classification420/417, 420/418, 420/421
International ClassificationC22C14/00
Cooperative ClassificationC22C14/00
European ClassificationC22C14/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 5, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: CANA LAB CORPORATION, TAIWAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LIN, JIIN-HUEY CHERN;JU, CHIEN-PING;CHENG, WEN-WEI;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:014868/0374
Effective date: 20031218
Apr 26, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: MATTEL, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AUGBORNE, TROY;REEL/FRAME:015261/0109
Effective date: 20040421