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Publication numberUS20040142404 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/470,957
PCT numberPCT/AU2002/000088
Publication dateJul 22, 2004
Filing dateJan 30, 2002
Priority dateJan 30, 2001
Also published asCA2436610A1, US7795206, US20070032411, WO2002060927A1
Publication number10470957, 470957, PCT/2002/88, PCT/AU/2/000088, PCT/AU/2/00088, PCT/AU/2002/000088, PCT/AU/2002/00088, PCT/AU2/000088, PCT/AU2/00088, PCT/AU2000088, PCT/AU200088, PCT/AU2002/000088, PCT/AU2002/00088, PCT/AU2002000088, PCT/AU200200088, US 2004/0142404 A1, US 2004/142404 A1, US 20040142404 A1, US 20040142404A1, US 2004142404 A1, US 2004142404A1, US-A1-20040142404, US-A1-2004142404, US2004/0142404A1, US2004/142404A1, US20040142404 A1, US20040142404A1, US2004142404 A1, US2004142404A1
InventorsAndrew Wilks, Julie Atkin, Emmanuelle Fantino
Original AssigneeWilks Andrew Frederick, Julie Atkin, Emmanuelle Fantino
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protein kinase signalling
US 20040142404 A1
Abstract
The present invention provides a method of selecting or designing a compound for the ability to regulate JAK activity. The method comprises assessing the ability of the compound to modulate the interaction of the pseudo-substrate loop (PSL) with the kinase like domaain (KLD) of JAK. In addition the present invention provides compounds which inhibit JAK and methods of treatment of JAK-associated disease states.
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Claims(27)
1. A method of selecting or designing a compound for the ability to regulate JAK activity, the method comprising assessing the ability of the compound to modulate the interaction of the pseudo-substrate loop (PSL) with the kinase like domain (KLD) of JAK.
2. A method of selecting, or designing, a compound which regulates JAK activity, the method comprising
(i) selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least one ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 667-679, 711-726 and 757-765 of human JAK2 and corresponding regions of JAK family members; and
(ii) testing the compound for the ability to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KLD.
3. A method as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 in which the method comprises selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least one ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2 and corresponding regions of JAK family members.
4. A method as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 in which the method comprises selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least two ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2 and corresponding regions of JAK family members.
5. A method as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 in which the method comprises selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least three selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2 and corresponding regions of JAK family members.
6. A method as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 in which the method comprises selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least four ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2 and corresponding regions of JAK family members.
7. A compound which interacts with the PSL or the KLD such as to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KLD such that the activity of the JAK is reduced when compared to that of the JAK in the absence of the compound.
8. A compound as claimed in claim 7 in which the compound binds to the substrate-binding cleft of the KLD such as to interfere with or prevent the binding of the PSL to the KLD.
9. A compound as claimed in claim 7 or claim 8 in which the compound has a conformation and polarity such that it binds to at least ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 667-679, 711-726 and 757-765 of human JAK2.
10. A compound as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 9 in which the compound binds to at least one ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 723-724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.
11. A compound as claimed in any one of claims 7, to 9 in which the compound binds to at least two ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 723-724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.
12. A compound as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 9 in which the compound binds to at least three ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 723-724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.
13. A compound as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 9 in which the compound binds to at least four ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 723-724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.
14. A compound as claimed in any one claims 7 to 13 in which the compound is comprised at least in part of amino acids.
15. A compound as claimed in claim 14 in which the amino acids are derived from the sequence of the PSL.
16. A compound as claimed in claim 14 or claim 15 in which the compound is a peptide.
17. A compound as claimed in claim 16 in which the peptide is cyclic.
18. A therapeutic composition comprising an compound as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 17.
19. A compound which regulates JAK, the compound having the same or similar physico-chemical properties to a peptide comprising following amino acid sequence:
X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8
in which:
X1 is any amino acid, preferably proline or glycine;
X2 is any amino acid, preferably alanine, valine, leucine or isoleucine;
X3 is any amino acid, preferably glutamate or aspartate;
X4 is phenylalanine or tyrosine, preferably phenylalanine;
X5 is leucine or methionine or isoleucine;
X6 is arginine or lysine;
X7 is methionine or leucine or isoleucine, preferably methionine;
X8 is isoleucine or leucine or methionine, preferably isoleucine.
20. A compound as claimed in claim 19 in which the compound has the same or similar physico-chemical properties to the peptide PAEFMRMI.
21. A compound as claimed in claim 19 or 20 in which the compound is a peptide comprising the following amino acid sequence:
X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8
in which X1 is any amino acid, preferably proline or glycine;
X2 is any amino acid, preferably alanine, valine, leucine or isoleucine;
X3 is any amino acid, preferably glutamate or aspartate;
X4 is phenylalanine or tyrosine, preferably phenylalanine;
X5 is leucine or methionine or isoleucine;
X6 is arginine or lysine;
X7 is methionine or leucine or isoleucine, preferably methionine;
X8 is isoleucine or leucine or methionine, preferably isoleucine.
22. A compound as claimed in any one of claims 19 to 21 in which the compound is the peptide PAEFMRMI.
23. A compound obtained by the method of any one of claims 1 to 6.
24. A method of treating a subject suffering from a JAK-associated disease state, the method comprising administering to the subject a compound as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 23.
25. A method as claimed in claim 24 in which the JAK-associated disease stateis selected from the group consisting of Asthma, Eczema, Food Allergy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease, Leukaemia, Lymphoma, Cutaneous Inflammation, Immune Suppression By Solid Tumour and Prostate Cancer.
26. The use of a compound as claimed in any of claims 7 to 23 in the preparation of a medicament for the treatment of a JAK-associated disease state.
27. A method of designing or selecting a compound which modulates JAK activity, the method comprising subjecting a compound obtained by a method as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 6 to biological screens and assessing the ability of the compound to modulate JAK activity.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to the field of regulators of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases. More particularly, the present invention relates to assays and screens for chemical entities which regulate the activity of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases. The invention further relates to the use of these chemical entities in therapeutic situations where the regulation of a protein tyrosine kinase, in particular a member of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases is indicated.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Since the immune system is central to the protection of an individual from an external biological threat, diseases of the immune system are therefore a consequence of one or a combination of three problems with the immune system.

[0003] Underproduction or suppression of the immune system (e.g. AIDS or SIDS);

[0004] Overproduction of cells of the immune system (e.g Leukemia or Lymphoma);

[0005] Overproduction of the effects of the immune system (e.g.

[0006] Inflammation);

[0007] Inappropriate activation of the effects of the immune system (e.g. allergy).

[0008] Treatments of diseases of the immune system are therefore aimed at either the augmentation of immune response or the suppression of inappropriate responses. Since cytokines play a pivotal role in the regulation of the immune system, they are appropriately considered to be key targets for therapeutic intervention in immune pathologies. Similarly, the intracellular signal transduction pathways that are regulated by cytokines are potential points of therapeutic intervention in diseases that involve overproduction of cytokine signalling. The JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a central role in the cytokine dependent regulation of the proliferation and end function of several important cell types of the immune system. As such they represent excellent, well-validated targets for the purpose of drug discovery; the notion being that potent and specific inhibitors of each of the four JAK family members will provide a means of inhibiting the action of those cytokines that drive immune pathologies, such as asthma (e.g. IL-13; JAK1, JAK2), and leukemia/lymphoma (e.g. IL-2: JAK1 and JAK3). Furthermore, certain types of cancer such as prostate cancer develop autocrine production of certain cytokines as a selectable mechanism of developing growth and/or metastatic potential. An example of this is cancer of the prostate, where IL-6 is produced by and stimulates the growth of prostate cancer cell lines such as TSU and TC3 (Spiotto M T, and Chung T D, 2000). Interestingly, levels of IL-6 are elevated in sera of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

[0009] A great deal of literature covers the area of cytokine signalling. The present inventors have focussed on the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in the direct connection of cytokine receptor to target genes (such as cell cycle regulators (e.g. p21) and anti-apoptosis genes (such as Bcl-XL)).

[0010] The JAK/STAT Pathway

[0011] The delineation of a particularly elegant signal transduction pathway downstream of the non-protein tyrosine kinase cytokine receptors has recently been achieved. In this pathway the key components are: (i) A cytokine receptor chain (or chains) such as the Interleukin-4 receptor or the Interferon γ receptor; (ii) a member (or members) of the JAK family of PTKs; (iii) a member(s) of the STAT family of transcription factors, and (iv) a sequence specific DNA element to which the activated STAT will bind.

[0012] The general principles of the JAK/STAT pathway are shown below, for the IFNγ receptor, an example of the class II cytokine receptors. Although the same basic mechanism is initiated by each family of cytokine receptors, there remain discrepancies in detail which are at present unresolved, although they presumably define the specificity of the cellular response to particular cytokines.

[0013] A review of the JAK/STAT literature offers strong support to the notion that this pathway is important for the recruitment and marshalling of the host immune response to environmental insults, such as viral and bacterial infection. This is well exemplified in Table 1 and Table 2. Information accumulated from gene knock-out experiments have underlined the importance of members of the JAK family to the intracellular signalling triggered by a number of important immune regulatory cytokines (Table 7). The therapeutic possibilities stemming from inhibiting (or enhancing) the JAK/STAT pathway are thus largely in the sphere of immune modulation, and as such are likely to be promising drugs for the treatment of a range of pathologies in this area. In addition to the diseases listed in Tables 1 and 2, inhibitors of JAKs could be used as immunosuppresive agents for organ transplants and autoimmune diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disorders, Alzheimer's disease and other autoimmune diseases. Additionally, treatment of cancers such as prostate cancer by JAK inhibitors is indicated.

TABLE 1
Cell Types
Disease Type Involved Characteristics
Atopy
Allergic Asthma (Mast Cells T-cell activation of B-cells
Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) (Eosinophils followed by IgE mediated
Allergic Rhinitis (T-Cells activation of resident Mast
(B-Cells cells and Eosinophils
Cell Mediated
Hypersensitivity
Allergic Contact (T-cells T-cell hypersensitivity
Dermatitis
Hypersensitivity (B-cells
Pneumonitis
Rheumatic Diseases
Systemic Lupus
Erythematosus (SLE)
Rheumatoid Arthritis (Monocytes Cytokine Production
Juvenile Arthritis (Macrophages (e.g. TNF, IL-1, CSF-1,
Sjögren's Syndrome (Neutrophils GM-CSF)
Scleroderma (Mast Cells T-cell Activation
Polymyositis (Eosinophils JAK/STAT activation
Ankylosing Spondylitis (T-Cells
Psoriatic Arthritis (B-Cells
Viral Diseases
Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) Lymphocytes JAK/STAT Activation
Hepatitis B Hepatocytes JAK/STAT Activation
Hepatitis C Hepatocytes JAK/STAT Inhibition
HIV Lymphocytes JAK/STAT Activation
HTLV 1 Lymphocytes JAK/STAT Activation
Varicella-Zoster Fibroblasts JAK/STAT Inhibition
Virus (VZV)
Human Papilloma Epithelial cells JAK/STAT Inhibition
Virus (HPV)
Cancer
Leukemia Leucocytes (Cytokine production
Lymphoma Lymphocytes (JAK/STAT Activation

[0014] There are many different types of protein kinase. Each type has the ability to add a phosphate group to an amino acid in a target protein. The phosphate is provided by hydrolyzing ATP to ADP. Typically, a protein kinase has an ATP-binding site and a catalytic domain that can bind a portion of the substrate protein. The JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a central role in the cytokine dependent regulation of the proliferation and end function of several important cell types of the immune system.

[0015] The JAK family of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PFKs) represent excellent drug discovery targets for the following reasons:

[0016] They are proven key players in the cellular response to a number of important cytokines (from gene Knock-out and biochemical studies);

[0017] Whilst each of the JAK family members are relatively widely expressed, their PTK activity is activated only at sites where cytokine levels are relatively high, i.e. at a local site of inflammation;

[0018] They are enzymes permitting effective inhibition of signal amplification and facilitating drug design;

[0019] Therapeutic applications in which inhibitors of particular JAK kinases may be useful are outlined in Table 2 below:

TABLE 2
Diseases Potentially Treatable By JAK-Based Drug Therapies
JAK family Strength
Target Disease Cytokine member of Association
Asthma IL-4 & IL-9 JAK1 & JAK3 +++
IL-13 JAK1 & JAK2 +++
IL-5 JAK2 +++
Eczema IL-4 JAK1 & JAK3 +++
IFN-α JAK1 & JAK2 +++
Food Allergy IL-4 JAK1 & JAK3 +++
Inflammatory Bowel IL-4 JAK1 & JAK3 +++
Disease & Crohn's
Disease
Leukaemia And (IL-2) JAK3, JAK1 & +++
Lymphoma JAK2
Cutaneous Inflammation GM-CSF & JAK1 & JAK2 +++
IL-6
Immune Suppression By IL-10 JAK1 & TYK2 +++
Solid Tumour
Multiple Myeloma IL-6 JAK1, JAK2 & +++
Tyk2
Prostate Cancer IL-6 JAK1, JAK2 & +++
Tyk2

[0020]

TABLE 3
A list of Cytokines that use the JAK/STAT pathway for Signalling
CYTOKINE JAK1 JAK2 JAK3 TYK2
IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL15 (IL-13) + (+) + (+)
IL-13 + + (+)
IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF +
IL-6, IL-11, OSM, CNTF, LIF + + +
IL-12 + +
Leptin +
GH, PRL, Epo, Tpo +
IFNα, IFNβ, IL-10 + +
IFNγ + +

[0021] A direct comparison of the four mammalian JAK family members revealed the presence of seven highly conserved domains (Harpur et al, 1992). In seeking a nomenclature for the highly conserved domains characteristic of this family of PTKs, the classification used herein was guided by the approach of Pawson and co-workers (Sadovski et al, 1986) in their treatment of the SRC homology (SH) domains. The domains have been enumerated accordingly with most C-terminal homology domain designated JAK Homology domain 1 (JH1). The next domain N-terminal to JH1 is the kinase-related domain, designated here as the JH2 domain. Because of its overall similarity to other kinase domains it is also known as the Kinase-Like Domain or KLD. Each domain is then enumerated up to the JH7 located at the N-terminus (FIG. 1 shows a schematic representation of this nomenclature). The high degree of conservation of these JAK homology (JH) domains suggests that they are each likely to play an important role in the cellular processes in which these proteins operate. However, the boundaries of the JAK homology domains are arbitrary, and may or may not define functional domains. Nonetheless, their delineation is a useful device to aid the consideration of the overall structural similarity of this class of proteins.

The PTK Domain

[0022] The feature most characteristic of the JAK family of PTKs is the possession of two kinase-related domains (JH1 and JH2/KLD) (Wilks et al, 1991). The putative PTK domain of JAK1 (JH1) contains highly conserved motifs typical of PTK domains, including the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 1022 located 11 residues C-terminal to sub-domain VII that is considered diagnostic of membership of the tyrosine-specific class of protein kinases. Alignment of the human JAK1 PTK domain (255 amino acids), with other members of the PTK class of proteins revealed homology with other functional PTKs (for example, 28% identity with c-fes (Wilks and Kurban, 1988) and 37% homology to TRK (Kozma et al, 1988). The JH1 domains of each of the JAK family members possess a interesting idiosyncrasy within the highly conserved sub-domain VIII motif (residues 1015 to 1027 in JAK2, SEQ. ID NO 1) that is believed to lie close to the active site, and define substrate specificity. The phenylalanine and tyrosine residues flanking the conserved tryptophan in this motif are unique to the JAK family of PTKs (see Table 4). Aside from this element, the JH1 domains of each of the members of the JAK family are typical PTK domains.

TABLE 4
Motif VIII of the JAK family of PTKs
bears a conserved tyrosine
Motif VIII
JAX1 DSPVFWYAPECLI (SEQ. ID NO 2)
JAK2 ESPIFWYAPESLT (SEQ. ID NO 3)
Tyk2 DSPVFWYAPECLK (SEQ. ID NO 4)
JAK3 QSPIFWYAPESLS (SEQ. ID NO 5)
EGF-R KVPIKWMALESIL (SEQ. ID NO 6)
c-SRC KFPIKWTAPEAAL (SEQ. ID NO 7)

The Kinase-Like Domain (KLD or JH2 Domain)

[0023] Based upon cladograms generated using programmes such as Pile Up, the second kinase-like domain (KM or JH2 Domain) is clearly ancestrally related to the broader family of kinase domains, by virtue of the presence of most of the key kinase motifs defined by Hanks, Quinn and Hunter (Hanks et al, 1988; Hanks & Quinn 1991). However, in order to distinguish the KLD domain motifs from the PTK domain motifs, they have been assigned a subscript a, (eg. Ia, IIa, IIIa etc) with respect to their similarity to the sub-domains described by Hanks and co-workers (Hanks et al, 1988).

[0024] The overall sequence similarity of this domain to the kinase domains of both the PTK and serine/threonine kinase families implies that this region of the protein might also function as a protein kinase. There are, however, significant differences in the sequences of key motifs within this domain which suggest that the catalytic activity of the I(L domain may be something other than serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation or indeed may not be kinase related. For example, comparison of sub-domain VIa of the KLD domain with sub-domain VI of members of the PTK and Serine/Threonine families shows the replacement of a conserved acidic amino acid (aspartic acid) with a neutral amino acid (asparagine). For example,

TABLE 5
Motif VIb of the KLD of the JAK family
of PTK1 bears a conserved
Asparagine residue.
Motif VIb
JAK1 (KLD) VHGNVCTKNLL (SEQ. ID NO 8)
JAK2 (KLD) IHGNVCAKNIL (SEQ. ID NO 9)
Tyk2 (KLD) VHGNVCGRNIL (SEQ. ID NO 10)
JAK3 (KLD) PNGNVSARKVL (SEQ. ID NO 11)
JAK1 (JH1) VHRDLAARNVL (SEQ. ID NO 12)
EGF-R VHRDLAARNVL (SEQ. ID NO 13)
cAMPkα IYRDLKPENLL (SEQ. ID NO 14)

[0025] Further, while there is conservation of subdomain VIIa with respect to the equivalent motif in the other kinase families, the normally invariant D-F-G sequence of the PTK and serine/threonine families (motif VII) is replaced by the sequence D-P-G in motif VIIa of the JH2/KLD domain. The conservation of the precise sequence of subdomain VI in the protein kinase sub-families appears to correlate with the substrate specificity of the kinase, and thus it is possible that this domain within the members of the JAK family of PTKs, may exhibit a substrate specificity other than that previously observed for other protein kinases.

[0026] A further sequence anomaly that may suggest a substrate variation lies within the putative ATP-binding site in the kinase-related domain (sub-domain Ia). This domain consists of the absolutely conserved -GXGXXG- in all PTKs described to date. However, in all known JAK family members, sub-domain Ia is replaced with -GXGXXT-. This glycine motif has now been defined as the ATP-binding site, with the first two glycine residues thought to bend around the nucleotide with the third glycine residue forming part of this loop. Substitution of the small side chain of glycine with the slightly larger threonine residue may disrupt the ATP-specific recognition, and confer some other substrate recognition. A viral mutation of the third glycine residue to a lysine in v-SRC abolishes the transformation and catalytic activity of this oncogene (Verdaane and Varmus 1994). It is also noteworthy, that this glycine interacts sterically with the conserved phenylalanine and glycine of the sub-domain VII motif Asp-Phe-Gly in the catalytic domain of the Insulin Receptor (Hubbard et al, 1994). This conformation is involved in maintaining an open structure between the two lobes of the catalytic domain, and perhaps the altered glycine to threonine and phenylalanine to proline in KLD suggests an alternate structural requirement.

[0027] Certain other subtle differences exist in the normally consistent spacing between key motifs in KLD as compared with a PTK domain. For example, the spacing between both components of the ATP-binding site (Ia and IIa) is different for JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and Tyk2 when compared with the broader protein kinase family. In JAK1 this spacing contains an extra 7 amino acids, JAK2 and JAK3 an extra 3 amino acids, and Tyk, an extra 21 amino acids. Moreover, for JAK1, JAK2, Tyk2 and JAK3, the spacing between sub-domains VIa and VIIa in this region is also longer. Conversely, the distance between sub-domains VIIa and IXa in JAK1, Tyk2 and JAK3 is seven amino acids shorter that the corresponding region in the JH1 domain. It is worth noting that this sub-domain in the PTK domain contains the putative autophosphorylation tyrosine residue, while in each JAK family member, this tyrosine is not present in the KLD domain. The overall structure of this domain may be expected to be somewhat different from the catalytic domains of other members of the PTK and threonine/serine kinase families.

Regulation of the PTK Activity of JAK Kinases

[0028] Role of the KLD Domain

[0029] The tandem array of kinase domain and kinase-like domain is a defining feature of all members of the JAK family of PTKs. This fact, coupled with the high degree of conservation of the primary amino acid sequence of all members of this family, suggests that the role played by the KLD in the function of the JAK family of kinases is an important and evolutionarily conserved one. The presence of amino acid substitutions in key motifs within the KLD suggest that it is unlikely that this domain is a functional protein kinase. Indeed, attempts to demonstrate kinase activity form isolated purified KLD have so far proved to be impossible (Wilks et al, 1991) and it is often alternatively referred to as a pseudoidnase domain.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0030] The present inventors have developed a novel model of JAK kinase signalling. This model provides a number of target points at which a chemical entity may regulate JAK activity.

[0031] Accordingly, in a first aspect the present invention consists in a method of selecting or designing a compound for the ability to regulate JAK activity, the method comprising assessing the ability of the compound to modulate the interaction of the pseudo-substrate loop (PSL) with the kinase like domain (KID) of JAK.

[0032] In a second aspect the present invention consists in a method of selecting, or designing, a compound which regulates JAK activity, the method comprising

[0033] (i) selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least one ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 667-679, 711-726 and 757-765 of human JAK2; and

[0034] (ii) testing the compound for the ability to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KLD.

[0035] The numbering of residues is based on the sequence of KID of JAK 2. It will be understood there are corresponding regions in each of the other JAK kinase. The reference to these residues is therefore intended to define the regions of the JAK kinase with which the compound interacts.

[0036] In a third aspect the present invention consists in a compound which interacts with the PSL or the KLD such as to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KID such that the activity of the JAK is reduced when compared to that of the JAK in the absence of the compound.

[0037] In a fourth aspect the present invention consists in a therapeutic composition comprising an agent which inhibits the ability of PSL to bind to the KLD of JAK.

[0038] In a preferred embodiment of the fourth aspect the agent is the compound of the third aspect of the present invention.

[0039] In a fifth aspect the present invention consists in a compound which regulates JAK, the compound having the same or similar physico-chemical properties to a peptide comprising following amino acid sequence:

X1-X2-X3-X4-X5 -X6-X7-X8

[0040] in which X1 is any amino acid, preferably proline or glycine;

[0041] X2 is any amino acid, preferably alanine, valine, leucine or isoleucine;

[0042] X3 is any amino acid, preferably glutamate or aspartate;

[0043] X4 is phenylalanine or tyrosine, preferably phenylalanine;

[0044] X5 is leucine or methionine or isoleucine;

[0045] X6 is arginine or lysine;

[0046] X7 is methionine or leucine or isoleucine, preferably methionine;

[0047] X8 is isoleucine or leucine or methionine, preferably isoleucine.

[0048] In a preferred embodiment the compound has the same or similar physico-chemical properties to a peptide having the amino acid sequence PAEFMRMI.

[0049] In a further preferred embodiment the compound is a peptide comprising the following amino acid sequence:

X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8

[0050] in which X1 to X8 are as defined above.

[0051] In yet another embodiment the compound is a peptide, the peptide having the amino acid sequence PAEFMRMI.

[0052] In a sixth aspect the present invention consists in a compound obtained by the method of the first or second aspect of the present invention.

[0053] In a seventh aspect the present invention consists in a ligand which specifically binds the compound of the third, fourth or sixth aspect of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

[0054]FIG. 1: Domain Structure of JAK family members.

[0055] The seven JAK homology domains (JH domains) are shown as shaded boxes. JH1 is the PTK domain, whilst JH2 is the kinase-like domain, that is characteristic of this class of PTKs. The drawing is approximately to scale.

[0056]FIG. 2: KLD-mediated Regulation of the PTK domain of members of the JAK family of PTKs

[0057] The model involves a two step triggering mechanism, involving a “priming” phase, (panel A), wherein the JAK is converted to a latent form (panel B), followed by a “triggering” phase, (panel C), wherein the latent kinase activity of the PTK domain of the JAK is unleashed, which is dependent upon the interaction of a given cytokine receptor with its cognate ligand.

[0058]FIG. 3

[0059] A. Kinase Domains Top View

[0060] Top views (i.e. looking from above the smaller lobe of the PTK domain) of three PTK domains (from HCK, Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor) for which the crystal structures have been determined, are shown. The molceular model of the JAK2 PTK domain is shown from the same angle. Noteworthy in this view of the JAK2 PTK domain is the large loop composed of the amino acids of the PSL.

[0061] B Kinase Domains Side View

[0062] Side views (i.e. looking from the right hand side of the PTK domain) of three PTK domains (from HCK, Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor) for which the crystal structures have been determined, are shown. The molecular model of the JAK2 PTK domain is shown from the same angle. Noteworthy in this view of the JAK2 PTK domain is the large loop composed of the amino acids of the PSL. The potential serine phosphorylation site in the PSL sequence has been highlighted.

[0063]FIG. 4. Model of the JAK2 KID showing surface features.

[0064] The alpha carbon chain of the ID is shown as a ribbon structure, and the light grey patch of amino acids rendered as spheres corresponds to those amino acids analogous to those responsible for the binding of substrate peptides in the insulin receptor.

[0065]FIG. 5. Ba/F3 cell assay

[0066] Inhibition of the growth of the IL-3 dependent growth of Ba;F3 cells has been brought about by the addition of a peptide derived from JAK2 PSL. PSLShort PAEFMRMI and PSLControl SPSKFRMPEAMIGND were added at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 1001 μM in phosphate buffered saline. Cell number after three days was measured by an MT assay.

[0067]FIG. 6. FP assay on KLD

[0068] a. Fluoresence polarization measurements (in triplicate) were taken in presence or absence of purified KLD at 30 seconds, 5 minutes, and 10 minutes following peptide (PSL-1) addition.

[0069] b. Fluoresence polarization measurements (in triplicate) were taken in presence or absence of purified KLD at 30 seconds, 5 minutes, 10 minutes and 20 minutes following peptide (PSL-1) addition. Competitor peptides PLC and PLD were added simultaneously with the fluoresceinated PSL-1 peptide.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0070] The present inventors have developed a novel model of JAK kinase signalling. This model provides a number of target points at which a chemical entity may regulate JAK activity.

[0071] The model developed by the present inventors involves a two step triggering mechanism, involving a “priming” or “cocking” phase, wherein the JAK is converted to a latent form, followed by a “triggering” phase, (wherein the latent kinase activity of the PTK domain of the JAK is unleashed), which is dependent upon the interaction of a given cytokine receptor with its cognate ligand. See FIG. 2 for details.

[0072] Phase 1: Priming

[0073] The JAK molecule is synthesized in an open conformation (FIG. 2 panel A), and is converted to a primed or cocked conformation, perhaps by the agency of a Ser/Thr kinase or phosphatase. This cocking mechanism may involve ATP, either as a co-factor for the putative Ser/Thr kinase- or phosphatase-dependent enzymes involved, or as a co-factor for binding into the ATP binding site of the KLD. The PSL of the PTK domain is loaded into its docking site in the KLD, whereupon the access of ATP to the PTK domain's ATP binding site is restricted. In this form the JAK PTK domain could be described as being inactive or latent. The PSL binds into the substrate-binding site of the kinase-like domain, indicating that the PSL may be a pseudo-substrate for a pseudo-kinase domain. The cocked JAK is loaded onto the cytokine receptor either immediately (as has been described for a number of cytokine receptors) or following cytokine stimulation of a given receptor (as has been described for Growth Hormone Receptor).

[0074] Phase 2: Triggering

[0075] Following ligand mediated binding to the cytokine receptor, the PSL is released from the KLD by a mechanism that may involve a additional kinase or phosphatase, thereby releasing the latent PTK activity in the JAK kinase domain. Ultimately the activated JAK is inactivated by binding of SOCS1 to a tyrosine in the PTK domain, and the molecule is targeted to the proteosome.

[0076] The model developed by the present inventors reveals a number of points at which a compound may interact to regulate the JAK activity. For example a compound may regulate JAK activity by interacting with the JAK at the level of the PTK domain; at the level of the loading of the PSL to the KLD (the cocking mechanism); by inhibiting the release of the PSL from the KLD (the triggering mechanism); or by causing the premature or inappropriate release of the PSL from the KLD.

[0077] Accordingly, in a first aspect the present invention consists in a method of selecting or designing a compound for the ability to regulate JAK activity, the method comprising assessing the ability of the compound to modulate the interaction of the pseudo-substrate loop (PSL) with the kinase like domain (KLD) of JAK.

[0078] In a second aspect the present invention consists in a method of selecting, or designing, a compound which regulates JAK activity, the method comprising

[0079] (i) selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least one ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 667-679, 711-726 and 757-765 of human JAK2; and

[0080] (ii) testing the compound for the ability to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KLD.

[0081] In a preferred embodiment of the second aspect, the method comprises selecting or designing a compound which has a conformation and polarity such that it interacts with at least one, preferably at least two, more preferably at least three and most preferably at least four ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.

[0082] The numbering of residues is based on the sequence of KLD of JAK 2. It will be understood there are corresponding regions in each of the other JAK kinases. The reference to these residues is therefore intended to define the regions of the JAK kinase with which the compound interacts.

[0083] As will be appreciated the method of selection or design may be conducted in a number of ways. Without limiting the general applicability of the present invention the following non-limiting examples of how the screening may be conducted are provided.

[0084] By computer modelling techniques the three dimensional structure of the PSL may be approximated. In combination with knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the PSL a compound may be designed which mimics the PSL or a region thereof in respect of physical characteristics such as shape, size, charge, polarity, etc. The compound would then be tested for its ability to bind/interact with KLD, for example by protein binding studies. Assuming that the compound demonstrated the ability to interact with KLD the compound would then be tested for biological activity in a cell based, or other in vitro, assay.

[0085] The ability of a compound to interfere with the interaction between the PSL and the KLD may also occur as a result of the compound binding to or altering the conformation of the PSL. Once again this ability can be screened for by protein binding studies.

[0086] Using the methods of the present invention the inventors have developed compounds which regulate JAK activity.

[0087] In a third aspect the present invention consists in a compound which interacts with the PSL or the KLD such as to interfere with the binding of the PSL with the KLD such that the activity of the JAK is reduced when compared to that of the JAK in the absence of the compound.

[0088] In a preferred embodiment of the third aspect, the compound binds to the substrate-binding cleft of the KLD such as to interfere with or prevent the binding of the PSL to the KLD.

[0089] In a further preferred embodiment of the third aspect, the compound has a conformation and polarity such that it binds to at least ligand selected from the group consisting of residues 667-679, 711-726 and 757-765 of human JAK2.

[0090] In a still further preferred embodiment of the third aspect, the compound binds to at least one, preferably at least two, more preferably at least three and most preferably at least four ligands selected from the group consisting of residues 673, 677, 711-715, 718, 723-724, 759 and 760 of human JAK2.

[0091] In another preferred embodiment the compound is composed at least in part of amino acids. It is preferred that the amino acids are derived from the sequence of the PSL. By “derived from” it is intended that the residues from the PSL which bind to the selected ligands in the compound are in the same spatial configuration as they are in the PSL. For example, the compound may comprise three residues from PSL where the residues are spaced apart by other amino acid residues or spacer groups such that the three residues are arranged spatially in the same conformation as in the PSL. As will be recognised this is analogous to the concept of conformational epitopes.

[0092] The amino acids may be D or L amino acids. Where the compound is a peptide it is preferred that the peptide is cyclic.

[0093] In a fourth aspect the present invention consists in a therapeutic composition comprising an agent which inhibits the ability of PSL to bind to the KLD of JAK.

[0094] In a preferred embodiment of the fourth aspect the agent is the compound of the third aspect of the present invention.

[0095] In a fifth aspect the present invention consists in a compound which regulates JAK, the compound having the same or similar physico-chemical properties to a peptide comprising following amino acid sequence:

X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8

[0096] in which X1 is any amino acid, preferably proline or glycine;

[0097] X2 is any amino acid, preferably alanine, valine, leucine or isoleucine;

[0098] X3 is any amino acid, preferably glutamate or aspartate;

[0099] X4 is phenylalanine or tyrosine, preferably phenylalanine;

[0100] X5 is leucine or methionine or isoleucine;

[0101] X6 is arginine or lysine;

[0102] X7 is methionine or leucine or isoleucine, preferably methionine;

[0103] X8 is isoleucine or leucine or methionine, preferably isoleucine.

[0104] In a preferred embodiment the compound has the same or similar physico-chemical properties to a peptide having the amino acid sequence PAEFMRMI.

[0105] In a further preferred embodiment the compound is a peptide comprising the following amino acid sequence:

X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8

[0106] in which X1 to X8 are as defined above.

[0107] In yet another embodiment the compound is a peptide, the peptide having the amino acid sequence PAEFMRMI.

[0108] In a sixth aspect the present invention consists in a compound obtained by the method of the first or second aspect of the present invention.

[0109] In a seventh aspect the present invention consists in a ligand which specifically binds the compound of the third, fourth or sixth aspect of the present invention.

[0110] As will be readily understood by persons skilled in this field the methods of the present invention provide a rational method for designing and selecting compounds which interact with JAK. In the majority of cases these compounds will require further development in order to increase activity. Such further development is routine in this field and will be assisted by the information and screening methods provided in this application. It is intended that in particular embodiments the methods of the present invention includes such further developmental steps.

[0111] Accordingly, in another aspect the present invention consists in a method of designing or selecting a compound which modulates JAK activity, the method comprising subjecting a compound obtained by a method according to any one of the previous aspects of the present invention to biological screens and assessing the ability of the compound to modulate JAK activity.

[0112] In a further aspect the present invention consists in a method of treating a subject suffering from a JAK-associated disease state, the method comprising administering to the subject a compound of the present invention.

[0113] It is preferred that the JAK-associated disease state is selected from the group consisting of Asthma, Eczema, Food Allergy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease, Leukaemia, Lymphoma, Cutaneous Inflammation, Immune Suppression By Solid Tumour and Prostate Cancer.

[0114] As used herein the term “JAK”, “JAK kinase” or “JAK family” refers to protein tyrosine kinases which possess the characterizing features of JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK as described herein.

[0115] As used herein the term “JAK-associated disease state” refers to those disorders which result from aberrant JAK activity, and/or which are alleviated by inhibition of one or more of these enzymes.

[0116] Throughout this specification the word “comprise”, or variations such as “comprises” or “comprising”, will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated element, integer or step, or group of elements, integers or steps, but not the exclusion of any other element, integer or step, or group of elements, integers or steps.

[0117] All publications mentioned in this specification are herein incorporated by reference.

[0118] Any discussion of documents, acts, materials, devices, articles or the like which has been included in the present specification is solely for the purpose of providing a context for the present invention. It is not to be taken as an admission that any or all of these matters form part of the prior art base or were common general knowledge in the field relevant to the present invention as it existed in Australia before the priority date of each claim of this application.

[0119] In order that the nature of the present invention may be more clearly understood preferred forms thereof will now be described with references to the following non-limiting examples.

A Model for the Priming and Activation of the JAK Family of PTKS

[0120] Modelling the JH1 Domain

[0121] No crystal structure of a JAK family kinase domain has so far been produced. However, the kinase domains of a number of protein tyrosine kinases and serine/threonine kinases have been crystalized (e.g Hubbard et al, 1994; Overduin M, et al (1992); Schindler, et al, 2000; inter alia) Using the coordinate of JAK structures it has been possible to generate a model of the human JAK2 kinase domain.

[0122] Using PsiBlast (sequence similarity search), ProCeryon and GeneThreader (both threading algorithms) the protein structure database (PDB) was searched for the template most similar to the human Jak2 kinase domain. The FGF receptor kinase, insulin and SRC receptor kinase were found to be the most similar sequences available. In particular the FGFR Kinase (FGFRK) was found to have a sequence identity greater 30-35%, which is high enough to create reliable models.

[0123] The sequence alignments show a sequence id (similarity) between FGFRK and Jak2K of 35% (46%). The region between 1050-1071 of human JAK2 (SEQ ID NO 1) is a long loop insert, which could not be aligned properly with any loops in the templates. The conformation and structure of this insert therefore could not be predicted reliably. This insert, however, did not interact with the ATP binding site and should not influence the reliability of the model in the vicinity of the ATP binding site.

[0124] Structural Conservation

[0125] The templates were overlaid to investigate the structural conservation of the N- and C-terminal domains of the kinase fold. While the overall fold appeared well conserved, there were some larger deviations, in particular in loop regions and the orientation of the N- and C-terminal regions. The structure of the ATP binding site was well conserved, however, smaller deviations in ligand orientations and side chain conformations can be observed.

[0126] Homology Modelling

[0127] JAK2 Protein Tyrosine Kinase Domain

[0128] Homology models were created based on the sequence alignments using Andrej Sali's Modeller program, however, initially, only the AGW FGFRK was used as template because of the above mentioned deviations in the kinase fold. Although AGW contains an inhibitor, the ligand was not modeled at this point. The AGW inhibitor shows a rather different binding mode to other more ATP-like analogues and we did not want to bias the binding site for a particular class of inhibitors too much. Homology models and sequences alignments were iteratively refined during the modelling process in 6 steps. In each step 200 models were created (based on the particular alignment) and evaluated. The sequence alignment was modified according to the evaluation. In a last step, using the sequence alignment (Table 6), a model with an ATP analogue based on the AGW and SRC templates were created. All together, 1400 models were created with Modeller and evaluated. It should be noted here that the conformation of the loop residue number 1050-1071 was extremely difficult to predict given the lack of a template in this area and the length of the loop.

[0129] Model Evaluation

[0130] Models were evaluated using the internal Modeller energy and the ProsaII and Profiles3D evaluation procedures of six final models were selected (3 based on AGW alone, 3 based on AGW and SRC) in order to show the range of possible side chain and backbone modifications. Models based only on AGW show a better quality (average ProsaII score: −8.14) than the models created with two templates (average score −7.73), but both classes of models seem to result in reasonable protein structures. As expected the overall structure and fold is very similar in all models, however, uncertainties are observed in side conformations.

[0131] The Pseudosubstrate Loop

[0132] Whilst the JAK2 kinase domain appeared to conform in most respects to the structures of other PTKs, the loop structure located between amino acids 1050-1071 did not resemble any feature observed in any other kinase. Nonetheless, this loop was a highly conserved feature of the JAK family of PTKs (Table 7 & FIG. 3) and it most likely plays an important role in the function of the JAK kinase family.

TABLE 6
           *        20          *        40         *         60           *       8
AGW :------SEYELPEDPRWELPRDRLVLGKPLGEGCFGQV-VLAEAIGLDKDKPNRVTKVAVKMLKSDATEKDLSDLISEM :
IR3 :SSVFVP--------DEWEVSREKITLLRELGQGSFGMVYEGNARDIIK---GEAETRVAVKTVNESASLRERIEFLNEA :
FGIA :---------ELPEDPRWELPRDRLVLGKPLG-----QV-VLAEAIGL----PNRVTKVAVKMLKSDATEDLSDLISEM :
SRC :--------------DAWEIPRESLRLEVKLGQGCFGEV-WMGTW--------NGTTRVAIKTLKP-GTM-SPEAFLQEA :
j1h :------KNQPTEVDP-THFEKRFLKRIRDLGEGHFGKV-ELCRYDPEDN----TGEQVAVKSLKPESGGNHIADLKKEI :
j2h :------SGAFEDRDP-TQFEERHLKFLQQLGKGNFGSV-EMCRYDPLQD---NTGEVVAVKKL-QHSTEEHLRDFEREI :
j3h :------AQLYACQDP-TIFEERHLKYISQLGKGNFGSV-ELCRYDPLAH---NTGALVAVKQL-QHSGPDQQRDFQREI :
                       6     LG g fg V                   VA6K 6             E
0          *       100         *       120         *       140         *       1
AGW :EMMKMIGKHKNIINLLGA--CTQDG--PLYVIVEYASKGNLREYLQ---------ARRPPGLEYCYNPSHNPEEQLSSK
IR3 :SVMK-GFTCHHVVRLLGV---VSKGQPTL-VVMELMAHGDLKSYLR---------SLRPE------AENNPGRPPPTLQ
FGIA :EMMKMIGKHKNIINLLGA--CTQDG--PLVIVEYASKGNLREYLQ---------ARRPP--------------QLSSK
SRC :QVMK-KLRHEKLVQLYAV--V-SEE--PIYIVTEYMSKGSLLDFL-------------KGET----------GKYLRLP
j1h :EILR-NLYHENIVKYKGI--CTEDGGNGIKLIMEFLPSGSLKEYLP---------KNKNKIN---------------LK
j2h :EILK-SLQHDNIVKYKGV--CYSAGRRNLKLIMEYLPYGSLRDYLQ---------KHKERID---------------HI
j3h :QILK-ALHSDFIVKYRGV--SYGPGRPELRLVMEYLPSGCLRDFLQ---------RHRARLD---------------AS
 1664        66   g       g   6 66 E    G L  5L
60         *       180         *       200         *       220         *
AGW :DLVSCAYQVARGMEYLASKKCIHRDLAARNVLVTEDNVMKIADFGLAR-DIHHIDYYKKTTNGRLPVKWMAPEALFDRI
IR3 :EMIQMAAEIADGMAYLNAKKFVHRDLAARNCMVAHDFTVKIGDFGMTRDIETD----RKGGKGLLPVRWMAPESLKDGV
FGIA :DLVSCAYQVARGMEYLASKKCIHRDLAARNVLVTEDNVMKIADFGLA--DIHHIDYYKKT-NGRLPVKWMAPEALFDRI
SRC :QLVDMAAQIASGMAYVERMNYVHRDLRAANILVGENLVCKVADFGLARLI--EDNEYTARQGAKFPIKWTAPEAALYGR
j1h :QQLKYAVQICKGMDYLGSRQYVHRDLAARNVLVESEHQVKIGDFGLTKAIETDKEYYTVKDDRDSPVFWYAPECLMQSK
j2h :KLLQYTSQICKGMEYLGTKRYIHRDLATRNILVENENRVKIGDFGLTKVLPQDKEYYKVKEPGESPIFWYAPESLTESK
j3h :RLLLYSSQICKGMEYLGSRRCVHRDLAARNILVESEAHVKIADFGLAKLLPLDKDYYVVREPGQSPIFWYAPESLSDNI
  6    26  GM Y6     6HRDLaarN 6V      K6 DFG6         y        P6 W APE 1
 240         *       260         *       280         *       300         *
AGW :YTHQSDVWSFGVLLWEIFT-------------------------LGGSPYPGVPVEELFKLLKEGHRMDKPSNCTNEL
IR3 :FTTSSDMWSFGVVLWE-------------------------ITSLAEQPYQGLSNEQVLKFVMDGGYLDQPDNCPERV
FGIA :YTHQSDVWSFGVLLWEIFT-------------------------LGGSPYPGVPVEELFKLLKEGHRMDKPSNCTNEL
SRC :FTIKSDVWSFGILLTELTT-------------------------KGRVPYPGMVNREVLDQVERGYRMPCPPECPESL
j1h :FYIASDVWSFGVTLHELLTYCDSDSSPM-ALFLKMIG-PTHG----------QMTVTRLVNTLVNTLKEGKRLPCPPNCPDEV
j2h :FSVASDVWSFGVVLYELFTYIEKSKSPP-AEFMRMIGNDKQG----------QMIVFHYLIELLKNNGRLPRPDGCPDEI
j3h :FSRQSDVWSFGVVLYELFTYCDKSCSPS-AEFLRMMGCERD----------VALCRLLELLEEGQRLPAPPACPAEV
 5   SD6WSFG6 L E  t                                      6   6  g r6  P  C   6
 320         *       340          *       360         *
AGW :YMMMRDCWHAVPSQRPTFKQLVEDLDRIVALT----------------------- SEQ ID NO 21
IR3 :TDLMRMCWQFNPKMRPTFLEIVNLLKDDLHPSFPEVSFFHSEENK-GDYMNM--- SEQ ID NO 22
FGIA :YMMMRDCWHAVPSQRPTFKQLVEDLDRIVALTS---------------------- SEQ ID NO 23
SRC :HDLMCQCWRKEPEERPTFEYLQAFLEDYF-------------------------- SEQ ID NO 24
j1h :YQLMRKCWEFQPSNRTSFQNLIEGFEALLK------------------------- SEQ ID NO 25
j2h :YMIMTECWNNNVNQRPSFRDLALRVDQIRDNMAG--------------------- SEQ ID NO 26
j3h :HELMKLCWAPSPQDRPSFSALGPQLDMLWSGSRG--------------------- SEQ ID NO 27
  6M  CQ   p  Rp3F  6

[0133]

TABLE 7
Kinase Motif IX      Pseudosubstrate Loop              Kinase Motif X
HumSRC SDVWSFGILLTELTT---KGRVPYPG-----------------MVNREVLDQVERGYRMPCPPECPESL SEQ ID NO 28
HumFGFR SDVWSFGVLLWEIFT---LGGSPYPG-----------------VPVEELFKLLKEGHRMDKPSNCTNEL SEQ ID NO 29
HumJAK1 SDVWSFGVTLHELLTYCDSDSSPMALFLMIGPTH----GQMTVTRLVNTLKE--GKRLPCPPNCPDEV SEQ ID NO 30
HumJAK2 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYIEKSKSPPAEFMRMIGNDK----QGMIVFHLIELLKNN--GRLPRPDGCPDEI SEQ ID NO 31
HumJAK3 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYCDKSCSPSAEFLRMMGCER---DVPALC-RLLELLEE--GORLPAPPACPAEV SEQ ID NO 32
HumTYK2 SDVWSFGVTLYELLTHCDSSQSPPTKFLELIGIA----QGQMTVLRLTELLER--GERLPRPD SEQ ID NO 33
MusJAK1 SDVWSFGVTLHELLTYCDSDFSPMALFLKMIGPT----HGQMTVTRLVKTLKEG SEQ ID NO 34
MusJAX2 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYIEKSKSPPVEFMRMIGND---KQGQMIVFHLIELLKS--NGRLPRPEGCPDEIYV SEQ ID NO 35
MusJAK3 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYCDKSCSPSAEFLRMMGPE-----------------------REGPPLCRLLELLA SEQ ID NO 36
RatJAK2 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYIEKSKSPPVEFMRMIGND---KQGQMIVFHLIELLKNNGRLPRPEGCPDEIYV SEQ ID NO 37
RatJAK3 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYSDKSCSPSTEFLRMIGPE---REGSPLCHLLELLAE----GRRLPPPS SEQ ID NO 38
PigJAK1 SDVWSFGVTLHELLTYCDSDSSPMALFLKMIGPT----HGQMTVTRLVNTLKEGKR SEQ ID NO 39
PigJAX2 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTYIEKSKSPPAEFMRMIGND---KQGQMIVFHLIELLKNNGRLPRPDGCPDEIYI SEQ ID NO 40
GGJAK1 SDVWSFGVTLYELLTYCDSESSPMTEFLKMIGPT----QGQMTVARLVRVLQEEKRLPR SEQ ID NO 41
PuffJAK1 SDVWSFGVTLYELITYCDSSKSPMTCFLDMIGWT----QGQMTVMRLVKLL SEQ ID NO 42
PuffJAK2 SDVWSFGVVLYELFTHSSRNSSPPTVFMSMMGND---KQGQLIVYHLIELLKSGSRLPQPLDC SEQ ID NO 43
PuffJAK3 SDVWSFGVVLYELFSYCDINSNPKRLYMQQIGHN---VQTPSISLHLANILKSNWRLPAPPDCPAKV SEQ ID NO 44
PuffTYK2 SDVWSFGVTLTEILTHCDPKQSPRKKFEEMLEPKSLINQVPLIELLEKKMRLPC SEQ ID NO 45
CCJAK1 SDVWSFGVTMYELLTYCDISCSPMSVFL-MIGPT----HGQMTVTRLVKVLEE SEQ ID NO 46
CCJAK3 SDIWSFGIVLHELFSYCDISRNPQKIVYPEDRKL----CPEVRPWLSIFLIFSKDNWR SEQ ID NO 47
ZDJAK1 SDVWSFGVTMYELLTYCDASCSPMSVFLKLIGPT----HGQMTVTRLV SEQ ID NO 48
ZDJAK2a SDVWSFGVLYELFTYSEKSCSPPAVFMEQMGED---KQGQMIVYHLIDLLKR SEQ ID NO 49
ZDJAK2b SDVWSFGVLYELFTYSDKLCSPPTVFLSMVGGD---KQGQTIVYHLIDLLKR SEQ ID NO 50
Hopscotch SDVWSYGVTLFEMFSRGEEPNLVPIQTSQEDFLN--RLQSGERLNRPA SEQ ID NO 51
Peptides used: PAEFMRMI PSLShort SEQ ID NO 15
SPSKFRMPEAMIGND PSLControl SEQ ID NO 16

[0134] Three properties of this loop suggest what the function of this loop might be. Firstly, the level of conservation within the family (see Table 7) suggested that it might play a role in a process that only the JAKs participate. Secondly, its location in the three dimensional model of JAK2 is directly below the ATP binding site (see FIG. 3), a feature which was important in formulating the present inventors' hypothesis. Finally, the most highly conserved amino acids with the loop indicate a glutamate adjacent to a phenylalanine residue at the centre of the loop, which could act as a pseudosubstrate loop (PSL) as outlined below.

[0135] JAK2 Kinase-Like Domain

[0136] Using PsiBlast (sequence similarity search) and the protein structure database (PDB) was searched for the template most similar to the Jak2 kinase like domain. The ABL and the SRC receptor kinase were found to be the most similar sequences available. In particular the SRC kinase was found to have a sequence identity of about 23%, which is enough to create a model. Sequences of a number of the related kinase domains JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, IGF, FGF, SRC, ABL were aligned manually after an initial alignment with the ClustaIX program. The “Composer” homology modelling program (Tripos) was used to create a three-dimensional structure of the kinase-like domain. The structure was refined using molecular dynamics simulation and simulated annealing in conjunction with the Tripos suite of programs. The Whatcheck program was used to evaluate the quality of the created models during various stages of the refinement process. FIG. 4 shows a representation of the molecular model of the human JAK2 KLD, with the residues corresponding to the putative substrate binding site (by comparison with the location of the substrate-binding site of the insulin receptor PTK domain, derived from the co-crystal of the PTK domain and its substrate {Hubbard et al, 1994} shown in green).

[0137] The Model

[0138] Any model that describes the activation of the JAK family of PTKs must account for the fact that the alteration or mutation of the primary sequence of the JAK KLD can have either an inhibitory effect or a stimulatory effect, depending upon what one is measuring (e.g. kinase activity or cytokine mediated JAK activation, for example). The JAK family of kinases is proposed to have a two step triggering mechanism, involving a “priming” or “cocking” phase, wherein the JAK is converted to a latent form, followed by a “triggering” phase, (wherein the latent kinase activity of the PTK domain of the JAK is unleashed), which is dependent upon the interaction of a given cytokine receptor with its cognate ligand. See FIG. 2 for details.

[0139] Phase 1: Priming

[0140] The JAK molecule is synthesized in an open conformation (FIG. 2 panel B), and is converted to a primed or cocked conformation, perhaps by the agency of a Ser/Thr kinase or phosphatase. This cocking mechanism may involve ATP, either as a co-factor for the putative Ser/Thr kinase- or phosphatase-dependent enzymes involved, or as a co-factor for binding into the ATP binding site of the KLD. The PSL of the PTK domain is loaded into its docking site in the KLD, whereupon the access of ATP to the PTK domain's ATP binding site is restricted. In this form the JAK PTK domain could be described as being inactive or latent. The PSL may or may not bind into the substrate-binding site of the kinase like domain, indicating that the PSL may be a pseudo-substrate for a pseudo-kinase domain. The cocked JAK is loaded onto the cytokine receptor either immediately (as has been described for a number of cytokine receptors) or following cytokine stimulation of a given receptor (as has been described for Growth Hormone Receptor).

[0141] Phase 2: Triggering

[0142] Following ligand mediated binding to the cytokine receptor, the PSL is released from the KLD by a mechanism that may (or may not) involve a additional kinase or phosphatase, thereby releasing the latent PTK activity in the JAK kinase domain. Ultimately the activated JAK is inactivated by binding of SOCS1 to a tyrosine in the PTK domain, and the molecule is targeted to the proteosome.

[0143] Conclusions

[0144] This model suggests a number of possible sites of action that a potential JAK inhibitor might act to inhibit the cytokine dependent signal; namely, at the level of the PTK domain; at the level of the loading of the PSL to the KLD (the cocking mechanism); by inhibiting the release of the PSL from the KLD (the triggering mechanism); or by causing the premature or inappropriate release of the PSL from the KLD.

Experimental Results

[0145] Peptides from the JAK Kinase Loop are Inhibitory for IL3 Signalling

[0146] Following the generation of an alignment of the kinase domains of all of the available members of the JAK family of PTKs with the kinase domains of human c-SRC and the human FGF-receptor (Table 6 see above) revealed the presence of a JAK-family specific loop (the putative pseudo-substrate loop or PSL) between Hanks motifs IX and X. Alignment of the PSLs present in the JAKs demonstrated that the loop structures contained conserved elements, the consensus of which was:

X—X—S—P-p-X—X—F-L/M-R/K-M-I-G-p-X—X—

[0147] In particular the serine/proline pair (predicted to be a site of serine phosphorylation, with a high score (0.994) using NetPhos 2.0 (Blom et al, 1999)), suggested itself as a possible site of regulation.

[0148] Two peptides were constructed based upon the PSL sequence. These were:

PSLshort PAEFMRMI SEQ ID NO 15
PSLcontrol SPSKFRMPEAMIGND SEQ ID NO 16

[0149] These peptides were tested for biological activity by means of a proliferation assay using the murine growth factor dependent hematopoietic cell line Ba/F3. On the basis of our hypothesis of the role of how the PSL region might work, we reasoned that if these peptides were to supplant the PSL from the KLD of JAK2, then the JAK PTK activity would thereby either become unregulated, resulting in a IL-3 independent growth phenotype, or the normal IL-3 dependent growth of these cells would be inhibited. The data presented in FIG. 5 demonstrated that the PSLshort peptide was able to inhibit growth of wild-type Ba/F3 cells grown upon EL-3, whereas they were unable to inhibit the growth of Ba/F3 cells transformed to factor independence by ectopic expression of an oncogeneic form of JAK2, wherein the PTK domain of JAK2 was fused to the pointed (PNT) domain of the TEL gene product. The PSLshort peptide was therefore capable of inhibiting cells supported by the IL-3 dependent JAK/STAT pathway (i.e. using the full-length JAK2 protein) but was unable to inhibit cells supported by the expression of the TEL/JAK2 fusion (containing only the PTK domain of JAK2). We hypothesize that the activity of the PSLshort peptide was dependent upon the presence of the JAK2 KLD, and conclude that its mode of action is by displacement of the PSL of JAK2 from the JAK2 KLD, resulting in unprimed JAK2 molecules that cannot be triggered by IL-3.

[0150] Demonstration of Binding of Peptides from the PSL to Purified Preparations of the KLD.

[0151] Our observations that small peptides derived from the PSL were able to inhibit the IL-3 mediated proliferation of Ba/F3 cells, suggested that the PSLshort inhibited the normal cycle of priming and triggering of the JAK2 molecule by displacing the PSL of JAK2 from its binding site in the KLD. In order to demonstrate this directly we generated highly purified (>95%) KLD of JAK2 and synthesised two fluorescenated peptides covering the PSL of JAK2, and attempted to demonstrate binding of the peptide by the KLD. The two peptides are outlined below:

[0152] PSL-1 Fluorescein-A-Y—I-E-K—S—K—S—P—P-A-E-F-M-(SEQ ID NO 17)

[0153] Fluorescence Polarization (FP), also known as Fluorescence Anisotropy (FA), is a means of measurement of peptide protein binding (Checovich et al, 1995). A measurement of FP is a function of a particular fluorescenated molecule's rotational relaxation time, and is empirically a measurement of the time it takes the molecule to rotate through an angle of 68.5°. The Rotational relaxation time is related to viscosity (ƒ), absolute temperature (T), molecular volume (V) and the gas constant (R), according to the formula: FP value Rotational relaxation time = 3 η V RT

[0154] Therefore, when temperature and viscosity are both held constant the FP value is directly related to molecular volume (i.e. to molecular size). Thus a small fluoresceinated molecule such as a peptide, will have a lower FP than a larger protein such as an antibody. Binding of a smaller fluoresceinated peptide to a larger non-fluoresceinated protein will result in the appropriation of a higher FP value by the peptide. Thus binding of a peptide to a receptor can be measured by following the FP value of a fluoresceinated peptide in the presence or absence of the putative binding protein for that peptide.

[0155] The binding of the PSL to the JAK2 KLD was tested by means of an FP assay as follows. 2 pg of the peptide PSL-1 was incubated in the presence of approximately 2.5 μg of highly purified KLD. Following a brief incubation at room temperature, a series of FP measurements were taken using a BMG PolarStar. Comparisons of FP values in the presence and absence of KLD were compared over time. These data appear in FIG. 6.

[0156] Assays for the Measurement of the Inhibition for the Function of the JAK, PSL and KLD

[0157] Cell-Based Assays

[0158] Proliferation Assays

[0159] The model that we have developed for the allosteric regulation of the protein tyrosine kinase domain of members of the JAK family by their respective KLDs suggests a number of methods by which cell-based assays and screens for inhibitors of this regulation might be brought about. In particular it would be possible to establish cell based assays by means of the use of cytokine dependent pathway screens. One example of this would be the use of a cytokine-dependent cell line such as Ba/F3 and/or FDCP-1. Each of these cell lines requires the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway by a cytokine such as interleukin-3 (IL-3) and/or GMCSF. In the case of Ba/F3, the triggering of the release of the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of the JAK2 molecule depends on the activation of the IL3 receptor by IL-3. In turn, the priming of the JAK2 molecule by means of the docking of the PSL into the binding site of the KLD is required. Therefore, in the presence of an inhibitor of this binding, IL-3 would not be able to release the kinase activity of JAK2, since the priming step would not have taken place. Inhibitors of the binding of the PSL into the KLD would therefore be potential inhibitors of any cytokine that worked through the JAK kinases, a list of these cytokines appears below in Table 7. An example of this type of assay is shown in FIG. 5, where inhibition of the growth of the IL-3 dependent growth of Ba/F3s has been brought about by the addition of a peptide derived from the JAK2 PSL. In these experiments this peptide is able to inhibit the growth of Ba/F3 cells at a concentration of 50 μM.

[0160] Any cell line that is dependent for its continued growth and proliferation upon the presence of a cytokine has the potential for screening for inhibitors of the binding of the PSL to the KLD.

[0161] Gene Expression Assays.

[0162] The JAK/STAT pathway is responsible for the regulation of many cytokine dependent genes. Examples of such genes would include BClXL and MHC Class II genes. The generation of cell lines in which the expression of an indicator gene, such as β-galactosidase or a selectable marker, such as the gene for Neomycin resistance (NeoR), is regulated by an inducible promoter element is a common method by which studies of gene regulation have been undertaken. Cell lines in which indicator genes such as these were regulated by a cytokine regulated GAS element therefore offers the potential to screen for compounds which modulate this regulation, such as inhibitors of the interaction of the PSL with the JAK KLD.

[0163] In Vitro Assays Using Purified Proteins and/or Peptides.

[0164] Assays Measuring the Binding of the PTK Domain with the KLD

[0165] We have postulated that the PTK domain is regulated by its binding or otherwise with the KLD. Therefore, by measuring the enzymatic activity of the PTK domain in the presence of the KLD, an indirect measure of the binding of the PSL to the KLD can be obtained. This can be done in a standard ELISA or Fluorescence Polarisation assay, such as those that have been described elsewhere. The presence of an inhibitor of the binding of the PSL to the KLD would be revealed by an increase in PTK activity.

[0166] Assays Measuring the Binding of Portions of the PSL with Portions of the KLD

[0167] Binding of the PSL to purified KLD could be established as a sensitive high-throughput screen for inhibitors of the interaction between the PSL and the KLD. Any means by which the binding of one protein or peptide to another could be used. Two examples of this approach would be the use of a fluorescenated or radioactively-labeled peptide representing the PSL coupled with its binding to purified KLD.

[0168] The use of a fluorescence labeled peptide should allow the development of a fluorescence-based assay such as a fluorescence polarisation assay or a FRET assay. In either of these cases, the binding of the PSL to the KLD could be determined in a 96, 384 or 1536 well format as the induction of fluorescence polarisation or FRET. Therefore, inhibitors that prevent the binding of the PSL to the KLD could be detected as a consequence of reduction in this signal. An example of this type of approach in shown in FIG. 6. wherein purified KLD and a fluorescent peptide representing the PSL are combined in a 96 well plate format with the result that fluorescence polarisation is induced as a consequence of the binding of their mutual association.

[0169] An alternative strategy would be to use a filter-binding assay using radio-labeled peptide and purified KLD in this case high throughput format screen could easily be established.

Methods Cloning of JAK2 Kinase-Like Domain (KLD)

[0170] RNA was prepared from γ-IFN stimulated U937 cells. cDNA (20 μ) was prepared using Superscript kit (Gibco). Using an oligo dT primer provided in the kit was used to prepare the mRNA. RT-PCR was performed using the Kinase-like domain specific primers,

HJ2KLF GCG CGC GAA TTC ACC TAT CCT CAT ATT (SEQ ID NO 19)
HJ2KLDRE GCG CGC GAA TTC ATC AGA AAT GAA GAT (SEQ ID NO 20)

[0171] and standard PCR conditions. PCR products were gel-purified from a 1% TAE agarose gel using Gibco Gel Extraction kit.

[0172] PCR products were digested using EcoR1 for 2 hr at 37° C. and then gel purified as above.

[0173] The Invitrogen bacterial expression vector pBAD/gIII (2.5 μg) was digested with EcoRI for 2 hr at 37° C. and then treated with Calf Intestinal Phosphatase for 1 hr at 37° C. After the addition of 2 μl 0.5M EDTA at 70° C. for 10 mins, the vector was applied to a PCR purification column and eluted in 50 μl TE. Vector was ligated to 10 μl PCR product using T4 ligase at 14° C. overnight. The ligation mix was transformed into competent One Shot E. Coli. (Invitrogen).

[0174] (Sequencing of the construct (pBKLD) was performed using Big Dye Termination Kit (Perkin Elmer) with the primers KLDF, J2KLSEQ1 and J2KLSEQ2.

Expression of Kinase-Like Domain in E. coli

[0175] Recombinant E. coli bearing pBKLD were induced for 4 hours with Serakinase at a final concentration of 0.2% as described in the pBAD Protocols book (Invitrogen). Periplasmic Cellular fractions were prepared as recommended in the Invitrogen pBAD Protocols book Shock Solutions #1 and #2 were then pooled, protease inhibitors added and the KLD domain purified as outlined below.

[0176] Dot Blotting using anti-C-Term His Antibody (Invitrogen) was then performed to confirm the presence of expressed KLD domain.

[0177] Assays

[0178] Cell Based Assay

[0179] The murine hematopoietic cell line Ba/F3 was grown in the presence of IL-3. Peptides (PSLShort PAEFMRMI and PSLControl SPSKFRMPEAMIGND) were added at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 100 μM in phosphate buffered saline. Cell number after three days was measured by an MTT assay.

[0180] KLD Binding Assay

[0181] For fluoresence polarisation assays 1-5 μg of purified KLD was incubated in 50 mM HEPES, pH 7.5, 12.5 mM NaCl, 1 mM MgCl2, in the presence or absence of 1 mM ATP. Peptide JL1 (FITC-βAla-YIEKSKSPPAEFM-NH2) was added to a concentration of 1 nM and non-fluoresceinated peptide competitors JLC and JLD were added at 10 or 100 fold molar excess. Fluorescence polarisation was measured using a BMG Polarstar.

[0182] It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that numerous variations and/or modifications may be made to the invention as shown in the specific embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as broadly described. The present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive.

References

[0183] Blom, N., Gammeltoft, S., and Brunak, S. (1999) Sequence- and Structure-Based Prediction of Eukaryotic Protein Phosphorylation Sites. Journal of Molecular Biology 294 1351-1362

[0184] Checovich, W. J., Bolger, R. E. and Burke, T. (1995) Fluorescence Polarisation—A new tool for cell and molecular biology. Nature 375 254-265

[0185] Sadowsld H B, Stone J C, Pawson T. (1986) A noncatalytic domain conserved among cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinases modifies the kinase function and transforming activity of Fujinami sarcoma virus P130gag-fps . Mol Cell Biol 6 4396-408.

[0186] Hanks S K, Quinn A M, Hunter T. (1988) The protein kinase family: conserved features and deduced phylogeny of the catalytic domains. Science 241 42-52.

[0187] Hanks S K, Quinn A M. (1991) Protein kinase catalytic domain sequence database: identification of conserved features of primary structure and classification of family members. Methods Enzymol. 200 38-62

[0188] Harpur A G, Andres A C, Ziemiecki A, Aston R. R. and Wilks, A. F., (1992) JAK2, a third member of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases. Oncogene; 7 1347-53.

[0189] Kozma S C, Redmond S M S, Xiao-Chang F, et al. (1988) Activation of the receptor kinase domain of the trk oncogene by recombination with two different cellular sequences. EMBO 7 147-54.

[0190] Hubbard S R, Wei L, Ellis L, et al. (1994) Crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of the human insulin receptor. Nature 372 746-54.

[0191] Overduin M, Rios C B, Mayer B J, et al. (1992) Three-dimensional solution structure of the src homology domain of c-abl. Cell 70 697-704.

[0192] Schindler T, Bornmann W, Pellicena P, Miller W T, Clarkson B, Kuriyan J (2000) Structural mechanism for STI-571 inhibition of abelson tyrosine kinase. Science 289 1938-42

[0193] Verderame M F, Varmus H E. (1994) Highly conserved amino acids in the SH2 and catalytic domains of v-src are altered in naturally occurring, transformation-defective alleles. Oncogene 9 175-82.

[0194] Wilkis A F, Harpur A G, Kurban R R, Ralph S J, Zurcher G, Ziemiecki A. (1991) Two novel protein-tyrosine kinases, each with a second phosphotransferase-related catalytic domain, define a new class of protein kinase. Mol Cell Biol. 11 2057-65.

[0195] Wilks A F, Kurban R R. (1988) Isolation and structural analysis of murine c-fes cDNA clones. Oncogene 3 289-94.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification435/15, 435/325, 703/11, 435/69.1, 530/388.26, 435/320.1
International ClassificationA61P35/00, C12N9/12, C07K14/71, A61K38/00, A61P37/00, A61P11/06, C12Q1/48
Cooperative ClassificationC07K14/71, C12Q1/485, C12N9/1205, G01N2333/9121, G01N2500/00, A61K38/00
European ClassificationC12N9/12C, C07K14/71, C12Q1/48B
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