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Publication numberUS20040154071 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/352,438
Publication dateAug 12, 2004
Filing dateJan 29, 2003
Priority dateJan 29, 2003
Publication number10352438, 352438, US 2004/0154071 A1, US 2004/154071 A1, US 20040154071 A1, US 20040154071A1, US 2004154071 A1, US 2004154071A1, US-A1-20040154071, US-A1-2004154071, US2004/0154071A1, US2004/154071A1, US20040154071 A1, US20040154071A1, US2004154071 A1, US2004154071A1
InventorsLeslie Frahm
Original AssigneeFrahm Leslie Alan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-lethal exoskeleton weapon
US 20040154071 A1
Abstract
An improved electrical stun weapon for the temporary immobilization of a living being, in which the power source, electronics package, trigger mechanism and discharge contacts are securely contained within an insulated glove worn on the human hand. The stun weapon employs a simple and durable triggering mechanism allowing it to be armed and ready for use while permitting its user to engage a combatant or handle a detainee with both hands free. The stun weapon comprises a widened discharge gap and variable power settings providing improved stun effectiveness and improved control over the stun application.
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Claims(13)
Having disclosed one possible preferred embodiment of the invention, it being understood that the scope of the protection hereof may not limit such disclosure, I claim:
1. A device to be worn by the user for applying an electric shock to a living being, said device comprising:
an electrically non-conductive glove with finger members; and
two insulating layers of rubber encapsulating all electrical components within the glove; and
a self-contained, power source, arming switch and high-voltage producing means; and
a trigger contact means; and
a discharge contact means.
2. The device of claim 1 wherein said glove further comprises at least one said trigger contact means embedded within and externally exposed on at least one said finger member and electrically coupled to the negative side of said power source.
3. The device of claim 1 wherein said glove further comprises at least one said discharge contact means embedded within and externally exposed on at least one said finger member and electrically coupled to the ground output side of said high-voltage producing means.
4. The device of claim 1 wherein said glove further comprises a second said trigger contact means embedded within and externally exposed on an adjacent said finger member to first said trigger contact means and electrically coupled to negative input side of said high-voltage producing means for selectively energizing said high voltage producing means.
5. The device of claim 1 wherein said glove further comprises a second said discharge contact means embedded within and externally exposed on a non-adjacent said finger member to first said discharge contact means, electrically coupled to the hot output side of said high-voltage producing means, for variably increasing the effective discharge gap distance between the two said discharge contact means as the said finger members are variably spread apart by the user.
6. The device of claim 1 wherein the positive output side of said power source is electrically coupled to the input side of said arming switch which further comprises an integral variable resistor means for applying variable voltage levels from said power source electrically coupled to the positive input side of said high-voltage producing means, thus producing variable output voltage levels from said high-voltage producing means.
7. The device of claim 6 wherein the device can be armed and ready for use by moving said arming switch to the desired power on level.
8. The device of claim 6 wherein the device being armed by said arming switch is visibly indicated as being armed by the energizing of a blinking light emitting diode electrically coupled between said power source and said arming switch.
9. The device of claim 1 wherein electrical drain on said power source only occurs when said trigger contact means are touched together completing an electrical circuit between said power source and said high-voltage producing means.
10. The device of claim 1 wherein said high-voltage producing means is capable of producing a menacing discharge display of electricity between said discharge contact means when the device is armed and triggered by said trigger contact means with said discharge contact means in close proximity to one another and not in contact with any matter other than the atmosphere.
11. The device of claim 1 wherein the embodiment of said power source, arming switch, high-voltage producing means, trigger contact means and discharge contact means within said electrically non-conductive glove allows its user to engage a combatant or handle a detainee or prisoner with both hands free or to freely manipulate other objects.
12. A method for the triggering of a device to be worn by the user for applying an electric shock to a living being, said device comprising:
an electrically non-conductive glove with finger members; and
two insulating layers of rubber encapsulating all electrical components within the glove; and
a self-contained, power source, arming switch and high-voltage producing means; and
a trigger contact means; and
a discharge contact means; and
said method comprising the steps of:
(a) touching or gripping a living being with the device wherein said discharge contact means are physically touching the living being;
(b) crossing of the user's middle finger member over and down on top of the user's index finger member, thereby bringing together the first said trigger contact means embedded within and externally exposed on the bottom side tip of the middle finger member and the second said trigger contact means embedded within and externally exposed on the top side tip of the index finger member completing an electrical circuit between said power source and said high-voltage producing means thereby permitting high voltage to flow from said discharge contacts means into the living being;
(c) Un-crossing of the user's middle and index finger members and optionally removing the device from contact with the living being.
13. A device to be worn by the user for applying an electric shock to a living being, said device comprising:
I. an electrically non-conductive glove including;
(a) four finger members and one thumb member;
(b) trigger contact means embedded within and externally exposed on the middle and index finger members;
(c) discharge contact means embedded within and externally exposed on the thumb and small finger members;
(d) a power source;
(e) a high-voltage producing means;
(f) two insulating layers of rubber encapsulating all electrical components within the glove, protecting the user from electrical shock;
II. An electronics package including;
(a) a power source;
(b) a high-voltage producing means comprised of an electronic circuit for the generation of medium level oscillating voltage of low amperage for supply to a voltage multiplying transformer;
(c) an arming switch with variable resistor for connecting the power source to the high-voltage producing means and varying its voltage level.
(d) a Light Emitting Diode for visual indication of an armed state.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSERED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX

[0003] Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] 1. Field of the Invention

[0005] This invention relates to a class of weapons for immobilization and capture referred to as “stun guns” and more specifically to a subclass of weapons having a pair of electrically opposed conductors between which a current is generated to disable a human or animal target when the conductors are energized and intentionally placed in contact with said target.

[0006] 2. Description of Prior Art

[0007] In general, electrical shock devices or electrical stun weapons for use in non-lethal applications are well known and have been in manufacture for over 20 years. These weapons generate their electrical shock with circuits similar to those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,253,132, titled “Power Supply For Weapon For Immobilization And Capture” issued to Cover in February, 1981.

[0008] Lesser-known adaptations in the form of “exoskeleton” or wearable devices have been patented but not commercialized, to the best of the applicant's knowledge, due to impracticalities in design or the limited available technology of the day. Examples of these include, U.S. Pat. No. 1,915,721 issued to Diaz in March, 1932; U.S. Pat. No. 4,242,715 issued to Laird in December, 1980 ('715 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 4,370,696 issued to Darrell in January, 1983 for “Electrified Glove” ('696 patent); U.S. Pat. No. 4,485,426 issued to Kerls in November, 1984 ('426 patent), and U.S. Pat. No. 5,282,481 issued to Ziemer in February, 1994 ('481 patent).

[0009] While the device in the '696 patent may function as described, it contains two technical flaws which render it impractical for use in hand-to-hand combat. The circuit package designated as number 13 is described as externally attached to a glove by means of Velcro. This form of attachment material, also known as “hook and loop”, was designed to provide easy attachment and removal of an object. This would be highly undesirable in a combat scenario, likely leading to the deliberate or accidental separation of the circuit package from the user's glove rendering the weapon ineffective. Further, the device of '696 patent lacks a convenient triggering mechanism. Only an On/Off switch is described limiting its usefulness by requiring the user to consciously turn on the device during hand-to-hand combat.

[0010] Another example of such wearable devices is disclosed in the '481 patent as strap-on unit allowing for an alternate embodiment of the device to be mounted on a glove with insulated fingers and a separate activation switch mounted on the powering unit. While this device may also function as described, it too contains technical flaws that limit its effectiveness during an attack. For instance, the lower housing unit encompassing shock probes designated as number 10 and the triggering mechanism require the user to make a fist and punch the attacker before the device can deliver the electrical shock. This may be effective while boxing, however it would be more likely capable of delivering an incapacitating stun to the user as opposed to the attacker.

[0011] All of the aforementioned patents contain technical flaws in one or more areas. For instance, the use of mace or pepper sprays, an electrically conductive liquid, in conjunction with any electrical stun weapon could present the danger of shock to the user of the device. The '426 patent depicts an embodiment within a glove but makes no mention as to how the arrangement would insulate the user from being shocked by the device's potential delivered at contact points P1 and P2 of FIG. 7. Additionally, prior developments in conventional “stun gun” technology have shown that increasing the gap between the discharge contacts to as much as 7 inches delivers a more effective stun to a larger muscle area. The '426, '481, '696 and '715 patents all have relatively small discharge contact gaps and further completely lack a convenient trigger mechanism as compared to the improved design described in the present invention.

[0012] The increase of terrorism and civil unrest in the world has prompted military and government leaders to seek new less-lethal or non-lethal weapons technologies as an alternative to weapons of deadly force. Examples of this need are numerous and include, the need to protect airline pilots while en-route, law enforcement officers in riot or domestic violence scenarios, the US Army's Soldier of the Future program and DARPA's Exoskeletons for Human Performance Augmentation program. Excessive force litigation against Law Enforcement agencies has increased presenting the need for alternative methods for immobilization and capture without physically harming the arrestee. Civilian assaults are also on the rise which presents the need for a lower powered, albeit effective, version of a stun device for use in numerous applications including, people walking to their cars from work or shopping centers, joggers, delivery personnel in dangerous areas and security personnel. Reaction time combined with the freedom of full dexterity in both hands in fast paced, high stress combative scenarios is key to successful suspect apprehension, prisoner compliance, threat deterrence and hand to hand combat outcomes. The aforementioned issues and requirements present a true need for a substantially improved and practical electrical stun weapon as described in the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION OBJECT OF THE INVENTION

[0013] An object of the present invention is to provide an improved electrical stun weapon in which the power source, electronics package, trigger and discharge contacts are securely contained within an insulated glove.

[0014] Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved, simple and durable triggering mechanism.

[0015] Still another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical stun weapon that is armed and ready for use without draining power from the power source allowing its user to engage a combatant or handle a detainee or prisoner with both hands free or freely manipulate other objects such as a firearm.

[0016] Still another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical stun weapon comprising a wider gap between the discharge contacts.

[0017] Another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical stun weapon that incorporates a variable power setting control.

[0018] Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical stun weapon that includes a blinking Light Emitting Diode indicating an armed state.

[0019] Still another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical stun weapon capable of producing a menacing electrical discharge display.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0020]FIG. 1 is a bottom view of a preferred embodiment of the invention revealing the electronics package, discharge contacts and first trigger contact on the middle finger.

[0021]FIG. 2 is a top view of a preferred embodiment of the invention revealing the voltage-multiplying transformer, second trigger contact on the index finger and glove zipper.

[0022]FIG. 3 is a view of the invention shown in contact with the arm muscles of a combatant.

[0023]FIG. 4 is a view of the invention shown in use as a visual deterrent.

[0024]FIG. 5 is a diagram depicting the major electrical components and their relation to one another.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0025] The electrical stun weapon in the accompanying figures depicts one possible embodiment, power source and electronics package, which does not limit other possible embodiments, power sources or electronic configurations. The electronic circuit is conventional in respect to similar circuits of the prior art and is therefore not described in detail. The physical placement of the electronics package and the voltage-multiplying transformer are considered to be part of the embodiment of the present invention.

[0026] The electrical stun weapon 10 depicted in FIG. 1 of the present invention is embodied in an insulated glove portion 11 and gauntlet portion 11 a comprised of a material such as Kevlar, Spectra, Neoprene, Synthetic Leather or other electrically non-conductive exterior shell as appropriate for its application. Contained within the glove and gauntlet shell are Latex or similar rubber insulating layers 12 and 13 encapsulating all electrical components and connecting wires, and a final cotton interior liner 14 to wick away moisture and provide user comfort. A zippered pocket 11 b on the underside gauntlet portion of the glove provides an enclosure for the electronics package 15 comprised of a durable electrically non-conductive material such as Polycarbonate plastic. The electronics package houses the power source 16, a dry cell battery, the master on/off switch with variable power control 17, a blinking light emitting diode (LED) 18, which serves as a power-on indicator, and the electrical stun circuitry 19. Opening the zippered pocket provides access to the master on/off switch and allows for battery replacement via battery compartment cover 15 a.

[0027] Referring to FIGS. 1 and 5, moving the master on/off switch 17 to its on position completes a circuit from the positive side of the battery through the LED to the negative side of the battery causing the LED to begin blinking, indicating an armed state. The master on/off switch contains an integral slide potentiometer that varies the low-level voltage, depending on its position, delivered to the positive input side of the electrical stun circuitry from the positive side of the battery. Trigger wire 20 connects the negative side of the battery to the secondary trigger contact 30 embedded within and extruding through the top exterior tip of the glove's index finger. Trigger wire 21 connects the negative input side of the electrical stun circuitry to the primary trigger contact 31 embedded within and extruding through the bottom exterior tip of the glove's middle finger. The circuit between the negative side of the battery and the negative input side of the electrical stun circuitry is completed when the user simply crosses their middle finger over and down on top of the index finger bringing the two trigger contacts together. This novel triggering method energizes the input side of the electrical stun circuitry providing a rapid on/off pulsing current of medium-level voltage to be present on connecting wires 22 and 23 of the output side of the electrical stun circuitry.

[0028]FIG. 2 depicts the electrical stun weapon 10 in a top view of the glove portion 11 and gauntlet portion 11 a. An access zipper 11 c is sewn within an elastic border 11 d, which is in turn sewn within the top of the glove portion extending through and evenly dissecting the top gauntlet portion of the glove. When this zipper is open, the user's hand can be easily inserted or removed. When the zipper is closed, the glove is secured to the user's hand by drawing the gauntlet portion in around the wrist. The elastic allows for varying wrist sizes and provides user comfort. Connecting wires 22 and 23 wrap around from the bottom wrist portion of the glove to the top forehand location supplying medium-level voltage to the input side of the voltage-multiplying transformer 24 as a result of the aforementioned triggering event. High-level voltage produced on the output side of the voltage-multiplying transformer is conducted via discharge wires 26 and 25 to discharge contacts 32 and 33 respectively. Discharge contact 32 is embedded within and extrudes through the bottom exterior tip of the glove's small finger and discharge contact 33 is embedded within and extrudes through the bottom exterior tip of the glove's thumb.

[0029]FIG. 3 depicts the present invention in use. When the user is holding or gripping the target 40, a prisoner, arrestee or combatant, and the electrical stun weapon is triggered, the high-level pulsing voltage is transferred into the target's muscles and local nervous system with an incapacitating result. The gap between the discharge contacts 32 and 33 may be varied from narrow to as wide as the natural spread of the user's hand allowing for various types of stun application. For instance, a wider gap will spread the electrical discharge over a wider muscle region resulting in a much more effective stun application than possible with conventional stun weapons of the prior art. A narrow gap combined with a quick touch to the body of an unruly individual could encourage directive compliance without actually applying a full stun. The electrical stun weapon may also be used as a deterrence to frighten an assailant as depicted in FIG. 4, by positioning the user's fingers in a gripping position, similar to holding a baseball, and triggering the device. In this case the thumb and small finger's tips are within close proximity of each other causing a menacing discharge of electricity 41 to arc between discharge contacts 32 and 33. This alone, in some scenarios, may be adequate enough to deter attack or derive compliance without an actual stun application. The electrical stun weapon can only be energized by the user deliberately crossing their middle and index fingers and therefore can be safely left in an “armed state” and ready for use. The overall size and thickness of the glove portion is similar to a typical duty officer's glove thus allowing the user to manipulate objects or operate a firearm unimpeded. The top side of the glove and gauntlet may also contain numerous vent holes for improved user comfort.

[0030] The electrical stun weapon described in the preferred embodiment may also serve as a convenient platform for the inclusion or attachment of additional devices. Possibilities include, a high-intensity LED flashlight and strobe light incorporated on the exterior top side of the glove in front of the voltage-multiplying transformer. A wireless personal digital assistant/communication device combination could be mounted on the top gauntlet portion of the glove hinging over the zipper.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7221552Mar 23, 2006May 22, 2007Brown David CWearable shield and self-defense device
US7931648Nov 1, 2006Apr 26, 2011Schneider Andrew ISurgical glove system
US7951145Jan 19, 2006May 31, 2011Schneider Andrew ISurgical glove system
US8154844May 8, 2008Apr 10, 2012Armstar, Inc.Wearable shield and self-defense device including multiple integrated components
US8182479Apr 6, 2011May 22, 2012Schneider Andrew ISurgical glove system
US8449541Apr 19, 2012May 28, 2013Andrew I. SchneiderSurgical glove system
US20090316326 *Jul 11, 2008Dec 24, 2009Chiles Bryan DSystems And Methods For Demotivating Using A Drape
US20120243141 *Mar 24, 2011Sep 27, 2012Robert Martin SchweitzerT.o.u.c.h.
US20140022688 *Jul 18, 2013Jan 23, 2014Hands Down Technology, LlcStun gun and method of use
US20140033388 *Aug 8, 2012Feb 6, 2014Matthew Aaron SonnerBallistic combat glove
WO2013181154A1 *May 28, 2013Dec 5, 2013Cooper Stephen BradleyWearable personal protection device with safety mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/160
International ClassificationA41D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/0024, F41H13/0018
European ClassificationA41D19/00H, F41H13/00D2