Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20040173965 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/383,470
Publication dateSep 9, 2004
Filing dateMar 7, 2003
Priority dateMar 7, 2003
Also published asCA2518454A1, EP1603647A2, EP1603647A4, WO2004080552A2, WO2004080552A3
Publication number10383470, 383470, US 2004/0173965 A1, US 2004/173965 A1, US 20040173965 A1, US 20040173965A1, US 2004173965 A1, US 2004173965A1, US-A1-20040173965, US-A1-2004173965, US2004/0173965A1, US2004/173965A1, US20040173965 A1, US20040173965A1, US2004173965 A1, US2004173965A1
InventorsEdward Stanek
Original AssigneeEdward Stanek
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lottery game
US 20040173965 A1
Abstract
A lottery game having a first pool of numbers and a second pool of numbers. The lottery operator picks a predetermined number of selections out of the first pool and each player of the lottery game also picks out the same predetermined number of selections out of the first pool. The lottery operator picks two, or more, selections out of the second pool while each player is allowed to pick only one selection out of the second pool. The jackpot prize is won by matching all selections from the first pool and any of the lottery operator selections out of the second pool. By adjusting the number of selections in each pool, the prize structure of the novel lottery game increases the amount of money awarded to jackpot and lower range subordinate prizes and decreases the amount paid to intermediate range subordinate prizes.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(7)
I claim:
1. A lottery game operated by a lottery operator which sells chances to a plurality of players, comprising a first pool from which a player picks a predetermined number of selections and from which the lottery operator picks the same number of selections, and a second pool from which the player picks one selection and the lottery operator picks multiple selections.
2. A lottery game as defined in claim 1, wherein the lottery operator picks two selections.
3. A lottery game as defined in claim 1, further comprising a third pool from which a player picks a predetermined number of selections and from which the lottery operator picks the same number of selections.
4. A lottery game as defined in claim 1, further comprising a third pool from which the player picks one selection and the lottery operator picks multiple selections.
5. A lottery game operated by a lottery operator which sells chances to a plurality of players, comprising a first pool from which a player picks a predetermined number of selections and from which the lottery operator picks the same number of selections, and a second pool from which the player picks a predetermined number of selection and the lottery operator picks a number of selections that is greater than the predetermined number of selections made by the player from the second pool.
6. A lottery game, comprising a first lotto game in which a player picks a predetermined number of selections that matches the number of selections made by an operator of the game, and a second lotto game in which a player picks a single selection while the operator picks two or more selections.
7. A lottery game, comprising two lotto games in which prize money from the matches on the first game is reduced and prize money that is won by matching only the second game or by matching both games together is increased.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The invention relates generally to lottery games and, more specifically, to lotto games that have a first pool out of which a player draws the same number of options as the lottery operator and a second pool out of which the player draws a smaller number of options than the lottery operator.
  • [0003]
    2. Background of the Prior Art
  • [0004]
    Many different types of lottery games have been sold over the course of history in various jurisdictions. The “traditional” game has been sold for several hundred years. This game is based on the concept of a raffle. Generally, tickets are sold with unique numbers. The drawing mechanism is developed, often using balls, sometimes thousands of them, each with a unique number corresponding to a ticket. Other times individual digits for winning numbers are drawn from a series of machines. The drawings are held so that a large prize and subordinate prizes are paid according to the unique numbers drawn and delegated to a particular prize level. Sometimes subordinate prizes are paid for matching part but not all of the numbers as long as the digits being matched are a subset of the digits on the balls drawn in exact order.
  • [0005]
    Instant lottery tickets, also called scratch tickets, were invented in the second half of the 20th century. They utilize a secure printing medium with numbers or symbols covered by latex or some other material. The covering is scratched and players win prizes by adding up, lining up, or matching covered symbols. Various patents have been issued relative to the substrate, security precautions, symbol coverings, and play styles for these types of games. They now account for roughly half of lottery sales in North America.
  • [0006]
    Another type of lottery ticket is the pull-tab ticket. It utilizes layers of cardboard glued together, with one layer having a series of perforations to form tabs. As the tabs are pulled away from the ticket they reveal symbols underneath and matching various combinations of symbols leads to the winning of prizes.
  • [0007]
    The last category of lottery type games are generally referred to as lotto games and are based on the concept of picking numbers. These games usually involve players picking their own numbers or using a computer or some other mechanism to choose the numbers, in an attempt to match the numbers against those drawn by the lottery. The lotto concept was originally developed in Italy about 1580. It evolved from bets being placed on which candidates were chosen at random to serve in the senate. The betting was so popular among the citizenry that the incidence of the drawings was increased and the names of senators changed to numbers.
  • [0008]
    One of the most successful lotto type games in modern times is commonly known as pick 3. Players choose three digits from zero to nine. The lottery chooses three digits from zero to nine. If the player's numbers match the lottery's numbers in exact order, a top prize is won. Other betting variations can be made where a player chooses to mach the two front digits, the two back digits, the first and last digit, or some combination of the above. The game was typically run manually and illegally by crime networks for generations in large cities in the United States. State lotteries began to offer the game and computerized it so that it could be played efficiently on a daily basis. A similar game has been developed for matching four digits.
  • [0009]
    Another typical lotto game in the United States and much of the rest of the world involves establishing a field of numbers from one to X. A player chooses, say, six of these numbers. The lottery then draws six numbers and a top prize is won if all numbers match in any order. The odds of winning the top prize can be altered by making X a larger number. In doing so there will be fewer winners of the top prize, which allows lottery sellers to offer a large jackpot prize. The prize can further be enhanced if no winner is chosen in a particular drawing. The lottery is then able to bank part or all of the non-won prize money from a previous drawing and offer it as an incentive for sales in a subsequent drawing, by increasing the size of the jackpot. In typical lotto games of this nature, subordinate prizes are also awarded for the matching of five, four, or even three of the six numbers drawn in any order. A typical prize structure for a pick 6 out of 30 game is to pay the jackpot prize if all 6 matches are correct, the approximate average odds of which are 1:593,775; pay $100 if there are 5 matches, the approximate average odds of which are 1:4,124; pay $10 if there are 4 matches, the approximate average odds of which are 1:144; and provide a free play if there are 3 matches, the approximate average odds of which are 1:15. Of course, the allocation of prize money to be divided is subject to selection or design for each ticket sold.
  • [0010]
    Keno is a lottery game in which the house draws a number of balls, say, from a group or field of balls that is larger than the number of balls selected by a player, but any match between the balls selected by the player to the balls drawn by the house counts. Lotto games are actually a subset of keno games; in lotto games, the number of balls drawn by the house or lottery equals the number of balls picked by the player.
  • [0011]
    In contrast, higher prizes can be offered by establishing a matrix of different size. If a game is chosen where the goal is to match 6 of 49, then a typical prize structure may be to pay out $2,000,000 if there are 6 matches, having an approximate average number of prizes for each drawing of less than one; $65,816.40 if there are 5 matches and a match with a bonus number, having an approximate average numbers of prizes for each drawing of 8; $1,784.80 if there are 5 matches, having an approximate average numbers of prizes for each drawing of 236; $68.10 if there are 4 matches, having an approximate average numbers of prizes for each drawing of 11,857; and $10 if there are 3 matches, having an approximate average numbers of prizes for each drawing of 213,760. A variation of this game with smaller top prizes but better odds is a pick 5 game, a game involving matching five numbers by the player's choice in the drawing in any order. There is also a variation with seven numbers.
  • [0012]
    Another variation on this concept has emerged in the last decade, typically called “rolldown” in the United States. In a rolldown lotto game everything proceeds as in a typical pick six or pick five lotto game, as above, except that in the event that there is no jackpot winner, prize money that has not been won is allocated to smaller prizes rather than being banked to enhance subsequent jackpots. Therefore the lack of a jackpot winner provides money to enhance the size of the prizes for lower tier winners. A typical prize structure and relative occurrences for a pick 5 out of 55 rolldown game may be to pay the jackpot if all 5 numbers are matched, the probability of which is 1:3,478,761; pay $500 if 4 numbers are matched, the probability of which is 1:13,915; pay $10 if 3 numbers are matched, the probability of which is 1:284; and pay $1 if 2 numbers are matched, the probability of which is 1:18.
  • [0013]
    In some instances a bonus ball can be added to a lotto game to create a prize smaller than the jackpot prize but larger than any of the other prizes. So, for instance, in a pick six lotto game a player matches only five of the six numbers drawn by the lottery; however, the lottery has also drawn a seventh ball, the bonus ball, which if paired with any five of the six other numbers drawn by the lottery creates a prize intermediate between matching five and matching the six original balls drawn.
  • [0014]
    In the last decade a new high jackpot game was developed called PowerballŪ (Multi-State Lottery Association, West Des Moines, Iowa). It was emulated by the Big Game in the United States (now Mega Millions), by Powerball in Australia, and similar games introduced in other countries. Unlike lotto, where the player picks six balls from one to N drawn by the lottery, the player instead chooses five numbers from one to X, and one number from one to Y. The lottery then draws five numbers from one to X and one number from one to Y from separate drawing machines and prizes are awarded according to various matches. The PowerballŪ lottery game is a combination of two lotto games in one. Both games must be won to win the jackpot prize. It is also designed so that any player matching the single ball drawn from the one to Y device wins a prize. The concept has been extraordinarily successful. Table 1 lays out a prize structure applicable to a typical PowerballŪ lottery game.
    TABLE 1
    Prize Structure for a Double Lottery (5/49 + 1/42) Game - One Play for $1
    Number of Prize % of
    Odds Winners Prize Levels Prize Cost Sales
    Match 5 + 1 80,089,128.00 1 $46,762,840 23,381,420 29.1942
    Match 5 + 0 1,953,393.37 41 100,000 4,100,00 5.1193
    Match 4 + 1 364,041.49 220 5,000 1,100,000 1.3735
    Match 4 + 0 8,879.06 9,020 100 902,000 1.1262
    Match 3 + 1 8,466.08 9,460 100 946,000 1.1812
    Match 3 + 0 206.49 387,860 7 2,715,020 3.3900
    Match 2 + 1 604.72 132,440 7 927,080 1.1576
    Match 2 + 0 14.75 5,430,040 0 0.000
    Match 1 + 1 117.99 678,755 4 2,715,020 3.3900
    Match 1 + 0 2.878 27,828,955 0 0.0000
    Match 0 + 1 73.75 1,086,008 3 3,258,024 4.0680
    Match 0 + 0 180 44,526,328 0 0.0000
    Totals 1.00 80,089,128 40,044,564 50.0000
    Overall Odds: 34.76 2,303805
  • [0015]
    Although the player is still only picking six numbers, drawing them from two separate fields can greatly increase the odds of matching all numbers correctly while maintaining relatively good odds of low level matches. The number of different intermediate prize levels that can also be offered is greater than that available for a pick six lotto game because there are more possible combinations of matches that can be made by the two separate fields and two drawing mechanisms. For instance, in a pick six game the only possibilities of matches are to ultimately guess six, five, four, three, two, one and zero numbers; a total of seven choices. Therefore only seven prize levels can be offered. However, with the concept of the PowerballŪ lottery game, there are eleven possible matches.
  • [0016]
    A game in which the likelihood of winning the top prize and also increasing the amount of money available for paying subordinate prizes at the lower levels have interest to lottery operators. This game will be popular to players because a larger number of players will be subordinate prize winners, a factor that is known to increase subsequent sales. At the same time, there will be more highly publicized top prizes awarded, further generating player participation. A game of this type, given the same amount of ticket sales, will necessarily pay less money to intermediate and higher subordinate prizes, but these prizes do not have as much impact on player participation as the lower subordinate and top prize awards. A particular embodiment of this novel game is one in which there is a first pool of numbers from which a player and the lottery operator pick an equal number of selections and a second pool from which a player picks only one number whereas the lottery operator picks two numbers. The odds of winning from the first pool are unaffected, whereas the odds of picking a winning number from the second pool are doubled.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0017]
    The present invention is a lotto game in which selections are made from two pools of numbers. If the first pool is defined to have a total of X selections, the lottery operator picks x selections out of the first pool and a player also picks x selections out of the first pool. If the second pool is defined to have Y selections, a player picks one selection from the second pool while the operator picks two or more selections from the second pool. The odds of matching all x selections out of the first pool are unchanged from the known, single bonus selection game in which only one selection is made by the lottery operator from the second pool. However, the odds of a player matching a selection of the lottery operator from the second pool is the same multiple as the multiple number of selections from the second pool made by the lottery; i.e., if the lottery operator picks two selections from the second pool, the odds of a player matching one of the selections is twice that of the known bonus ball game. By increasing the number of selections in both pools and then making it easier to accomplish matches on drawings from the second pool by having the lottery operator make multiple selections, the practical effect is to move prize money from the matches on the first pool to prizes that are won on matching only the second pool or both pools together. The novel game allows continued funding for the top or jackpot prizes and enhanced smaller prizes at the expense of some of the intermediate range subordinate prizes. The intermediate range prizes that do not require matches from both pools have less money available which is balanced by the odds that make those prizes less likely to be won.
  • [0018]
    An object of the present invention is to provide a lotto game that increases the odds of winning top or jackpot prizes.
  • [0019]
    Another object of the present invention is to provide a lotto game that pays an increased percentage of prize money to lower range subordinate winners.
  • [0020]
    Another object of the present invention is to increase the odds of winning top or jackpot prizes and increasing the money awarded to lower range subordinate prizes at the expense of intermediate range prizes.
  • [0021]
    These and other objects of the invention will be appreciated by those skilled in the art upon a review and understanding of this specification and the appended claims.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0022]
    An example of a known two pool lottery game is the PowerballŪ lottery game. Unlike lotto, where the player picks six balls from one to N drawn by the lottery operator, the player instead chooses five numbers from one to X, and one number from one to Y. The lottery then draws five numbers from one to X and one number from one to Y from separate drawing machines and prizes are awarded according to various matches. The PowerballŪ lottery game is a combination of two lotto games in one. Both games must be won to win the jackpot prize. It is also designed so that any player matching the single ball drawn from the one to Y device wins a prize.
  • [0023]
    The lottery game of the present invention is a variation of this known two pool lottery game. In this game, the lottery operator and the players pick the same number of selections out of the first pool, but the lottery operator selects two or more numbers out of the second pool while the players are allowed to select only one number from second pool. For example, if the first pool has a total of X selections and the lottery operator picks x selections, then each player also picks x selections out of the first pool of X. The lottery operator may pick two selections out of the second pool of Y total selections whereas each player is allowed to pick only one selection of the second pool of Y selections. As in the known PowerballŪ lottery game, a player must match all selections from both pools to win the jackpot prize. The odds of a player winning a prize based only by matching numbers from the first pool remain unchanged, while the odds of winning any prize based on matching a number from the second pool are doubled. The numbers X, Y, and x are chosen by the lottery operator to create a game that has the desired prize structure. For example, in comparison to the known PowerballŪ lottery game, increasing X and Y, that is, the number of balls in both pools, and having the lottery operator pick two numbers from the second pool, effectively moves prize money from the matches on the first pool to prizes that are won on matching only the second pool or both pools together.
  • [0024]
    Table 2 is prize structure for a hypothetical lotto game of interest in which X is 61, Y is 51 and x is 5. Accordingly, this is a lottery game in which 5 numbers are picked from a first pool of 61 and each player picks one number from a second pool of 51 while the lottery operator picks 2 numbers from the second pool of 51. The tickets are sold for $2 each. Given a sellout of the game where each chance purchased is unique, the prizes paid are illustrated according to rules where the percentage of sales allocated to that prize is specified in the right hand column.
    TABLE 2
    Prize Structure
    5/61 + 1/2/51 Game; One Play for $2
    Number of Prize Levels Prize Prize %
    Odds Winners Cash Cost Of Sales
    Match 151,703,248.500000 1 $45,820,957 $45,820,957 14.8296% 
    5 + 1
    Match 5 6,191,969.326531 25 $1,000,000 $24,500,000 8.0750%
    Match 541,797.316071 280 $10,000 $2,800,000 0.9229%
    4 + 1
    Match 4 22,114.176166 6,860 $1,500 $10,290,000 3.3915%
    Match 9,850.860292 15,400 $100 $1,540,000 0.5076%
    3 + 1
    Match 3 402.075930 377,300 $21 $7,923,300 2.6114%
    Match 547.270016 277,200 $21 $5,821,200 1.9186%
    2 + 1
    Match 2 22.337552 6,791,400 $0 0.0000%
    Match 82.606795 1,836,450 $11 $20,200,950 6.6580%
    1 + 1
    Match 1 3.371706 44,993,025 $0 0.0000%
    Match 39.714805 3,819,816 $7 $26,738,712 8.8128%
    0 + 1
    Match 0 1.621012 93,585,492 $0 0.0000%
    Totals 1.000000 151,703,249 Total Prize $145,635,119 47.7274% 
    Cost:
    Prize Reserve $6,068,130 2.0000%
    Overall 23.953151 6,333,332 Return to $151,703,249 50.0000% 
    Odds: Lottery:
  • [0025]
    Table 3 is prize structure for a traditional two-pool lotto game in which both the lottery operator and the players pick one number out of a pool of 61 and 5 numbers out of a pool of 51. The tickets are sold for $2 each. Given a sellout of the game where each chance purchased is unique, the prizes paid are illustrated according to rules where the percentage of sales allocated to that prize is specified in the right hand column. The prize structure can be compared to that of the game of the present invention described in Table 2.
    TABLE 3
    Prize Structure
    5/51 + 1/61 Game; One Play for $2
    Number of Prize Levels Prize Prize %
    Odds Winners Cash Cost Of Sales
    Match 5 + 1 143,292,660.000000 1 24,543,407.00 24,543,407.00 8.5641%
    Match 5 + 0 2,388,211.000000 60 $1,000,000 $60,000,000 20.936%
    Match 4 + 1 623,011.565217 220 $10,000 $2,200,000 0.7677%
    Match 4 + 0 10,376.007241 13,810 $1,500 $20,715,000 7.2282%
    Match 3 + 1 13,844.701449 10,350 $100 $1,035,000 0.3611%
    Match 3 + 0 230.745024 621,000 $21 $13,041,000 4.5505%
    Match 2 + 1 943.956917 151,800 $21 $3,187,800 1.1123%
    Match 2 + 0 15.732615 9,108,000 $0 0.0000%
    Match 1 + 1 175.619892 815,925 $11 $8,975,175 3.1318%
    Match 1 + 0 2.926998 48,955,500 $0 0.0000%
    Match 0 + 1 104.535650 1,370,754 $7 $9,595,278 3.3481%
    Match 0 + 0 1.742261 82,245,240 $0 0.0000%
    Totals 1.000000 143,292,660 Total Prize Cost: $143,292,660 50.000%
    Overall 48.021616 2,983,920 Lottery Return: $143,292,660 50.000%
    Odds:
  • [0026]
    Table 4 is prize structure for a traditional two-pool lotto game in which both the lottery operator and the players pick one number out of a pool of 51 and 5 numbers out of a pool of 61. The tickets are sold for $2 each. Given a sellout of the game where each chance purchased is unique, the prizes paid are illustrated according to rules where the percentage of sales allocated to that prize is specified in the right hand column. The prize structure can be compared to that of the game of the present invention described in Table 2 and the prize structure of the related game described in Table 3.
    TABLE 4
    Prize Structure
    5/61 + 1/51 Game; One Play for $2
    Number of Prize Levels Prize Prize %
    Odds Winners Cash Cost Of Sales
    Match 5 + 1 303,406,497.000000 1 159,645,635.00 159,645,635.00 26.3089% 
    Match 5 + 0 6,068,129.940000 50 $1,000,000 $50,000,000 8.2398%
    Match 4 + 1 1,083,594.632143 220 $10,000 $2,200,000 0.3625%
    Match 4 + 0 21,579.409459 14,060 $1,500 $21,090,000 3.4755%
    Match 3 + 1 19,701.720584 15,400 $100 $1,540,000 0.2538%
    Match 3 + 0 394.034412 770,000 $21 $16,170,000 2.6647%
    Match 2 + 1 1,094.540032 277,200 $21 $5,821,200 0.9593%
    Match 2 + 0 21.890801 13,860,000 $0 0.0000%
    Match 1 + 1 165.213590 1,836,450 $11 $20,200,950 3.3290%
    Match 1 + 0 3.304272 91,822,500 $0 0.0000%
    Match 0 + 1 79.429610 3,819,816 $7 $26,738,712 4.4064%
    Match 0 + 0 1.588592 190,990,800 $0 0.0000%
    Totals 1.000000 303,406,497 Total Prize $303,406,497 50.0000% 
    Cost:
    Overall 45.061283 6,733,197 Lottery Return: $303,406,497 50.0000% 
    Odds:
  • [0027]
    While the specific examples described in this disclosure have a first pool of numbers out of which both the lottery and the players make the same number of picks out of the pool and a second pool where the player draws a smaller number of picks than the lottery owner (for example 5/61 and 1/2/51), the pools could be reversed so that there is an increased chance of matching the first pool and the lottery owner and players make the same number of picks out of the second pool (for example, 1/2/51 and 5/61). Further, while the specific examples have the lottery owner drawing two numbers out of a pool while the players draw only one, the lottery owner could alternatively pick three or more numbers and the players pick any number less than the number picked by the lottery owner (for example, 5/61 and 1/3/51 or 5/61 and 2/3/51). Another alternative game within the scope of this invention is a game that may be described as a keno-keno game which would provide for the lottery owner to make a larger number of picks than the players out of both pools (for example, 5/6/61 and 1/2/51). It is also within the scope of this invention to have more than two pools of numbers with one or more of the pools having the feature of having the lottery owner make more picks than the players (for example, 5/51 and 2/25 and 1/2/45).
  • [0028]
    The foregoing descriptions comprise illustrative embodiments of the present inventions. The foregoing embodiments and the methods described herein may vary based on the ability, experience, and preference of those skilled in the art. Merely listing the steps of the method in a certain order does not necessarily constitute any limitation on the order of the steps of the method. The foregoing description and drawings merely explain and illustrate the invention, and the invention is not limited thereto, except insofar as the claims are so limited. Those skilled in the art who have the disclosure before them will be able to make modifications and variations therein without departing from the scope of the invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5657991 *Jul 26, 1995Aug 19, 1997Media Drop-In Productions, Inc.Interactive bingo-like games and method of playing
US5979894 *Mar 2, 1998Nov 9, 1999Alexoff; CarlMulti price point on-line game and method of playing
US6364313 *Dec 27, 1999Apr 2, 2002Ernest W. MoodyMultiple play keno game with bonus feature
US6478677 *Nov 16, 1999Nov 12, 2002Ernest W. MoodyNumerical total keno game
US6497408 *Mar 20, 2000Dec 24, 2002Walker Digital, LlcSystem and method for conducting and playing a supplemental lottery game
US6572106 *Jun 4, 2001Jun 3, 2003Carl AlexoffMulti price point on-line game and method of playing
US6679495 *Nov 27, 2002Jan 20, 2004Marion EndelicatoGame of chance
US6702669 *Jun 11, 2002Mar 9, 2004Ernest W. MoodyNumerical total keno game
US6722978 *May 9, 2002Apr 20, 2004Las Vegas Gaming, Inc.Method of playing a linked numerical game of chance with a bonus and parlay wagering option
US6793219 *Oct 25, 2002Sep 21, 2004Trace Publishing CompanyAccumulation variation of lottery-style games of chance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6935948Jan 27, 2004Aug 30, 2005Integrated Group Assets, Inc.Multiple pricing shared single jackpot in a lottery
US7347776Jan 25, 2005Mar 25, 2008Integrated Group Assets, Inc.Lottery ticket providing for multiple games
US7635302 *Jun 25, 2004Dec 22, 2009Integrated Group Assets Inc.Multiple pricing in a lottery based on variable ratios
US7635303Jun 28, 2004Dec 22, 2009Integrated Group Assets Inc.Lottery ticket dispensing machine for multiple priced tickets based on variable ratios
US7635304Dec 22, 2009Integrated Group Assets Inc.Multiple levels of participation in a lottery jackpot
US7654529Feb 2, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US7662038Jan 6, 2006Feb 16, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Multi-matrix lottery
US7699314Jan 6, 2006Apr 20, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Lottery game utilizing nostalgic game themes
US7726652Oct 25, 2005Jun 1, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US7766740Oct 13, 2006Aug 3, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Methods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US7824257Jan 11, 2006Nov 2, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.On-line lottery game in which supplemental lottery-selected indicia are available for purchase
US7837117Mar 29, 2006Nov 23, 2010Scientific Games International, Inc.Embedded optical signatures in documents
US7874902Jan 25, 2011Scientific Games International. Inc.Computer-implemented simulated card game
US7874907Aug 23, 2005Jan 25, 2011Cadillac Jack, Inc.Devices and methods for feature ball bingo
US7878895Feb 1, 2011Scientific Games International, Inc.Methods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US7885851Feb 8, 2011Scientific Games International, Inc.Retailer optimization using market segmentation top quintile process
US8033905Oct 11, 2011Scientific Games International, Inc.Preprinted lottery tickets using a player activated electronic validation machine
US8056900Apr 19, 2010Nov 15, 2011Scientific Games International, Inc.Grid-based lottery game and associated system
US8109513Jun 1, 2010Feb 7, 2012Scientific Games International, Inc.Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US8118659Mar 10, 2008Feb 21, 2012Integrated Group Assets Inc.Instant online lottery ticket for a linear prize and a position specific prize
US8177136May 15, 2012Scientific Games International, Inc.Embedded optical signatures in documents
US8197325Jun 12, 2012Integrated Group Assets Inc.Method and apparatus for providing an instant lottery game and a supplemental game
US8216045Jul 10, 2012Integrated Group Assets Inc.Method and apparatus for providing a lottery
US8262453Feb 8, 2006Sep 11, 2012Scientific Games International, Inc.Combination lottery and raffle game
US8308162Dec 29, 2009Nov 13, 2012Scientific Games International, Inc.Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US8398484Mar 19, 2013Integrated Group Assets, Inc.Instant online lottery method and system
US8460080Jun 11, 2013Integrated Group Assets, Inc.Method and apparatus for an instant online lottery ticket
US8460081May 11, 2011Jun 11, 2013Scientific Games International, Inc.Grid-based multi-lottery game and associated method
US8647196Mar 7, 2013Feb 11, 2014Gaming Arts, LlcSystems and methods for playing a game of chance with selectable matrices
US8672738 *Sep 29, 2006Mar 18, 2014Scientific Games International, Inc.Lottery game having enhanced winnings
US8752838 *Jun 13, 2012Jun 17, 2014Mpbingo LlcVideo bingo game and method therefor
US8808080May 11, 2011Aug 19, 2014Scientific Games International, Inc.Grid-based lottery game and associated method
US9022851Mar 7, 2013May 5, 2015Gaming Arts, LlcSystems and methods for playing games of chance
US9067131Mar 7, 2013Jun 30, 2015Gaming Arts, LlcSystems and methods for playing a game of chance with bonus feature
US20050164767 *Jan 27, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wright Robert J.System and method of providing a guarantee in a lottery
US20050164768 *Jan 27, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wright Robert J.Multiple pricing shared single jackpot in a lottery
US20050164769 *Jun 28, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wright Robert J.Lottery ticket dispensing machine for multiple priced tickets based on variable ratios
US20050164770 *Nov 12, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wright Robert J.Virtual lottery
US20050165619 *Jun 25, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wright Robert J.Multiple pricing in a lottery based on variable ratios
US20050176490 *Jan 26, 2005Aug 11, 2005Robert WrightMultiple levels of participation in a lottery jackpot
US20050282611 *Jan 25, 2005Dec 22, 2005Wright Robert JLottery ticket providing for multiple games
US20060100008 *Dec 21, 2005May 11, 2006Integrated Group Assets, Inc.Instant online lottery method and system
US20060160597 *Feb 2, 2006Jul 20, 2006Wright Robert JSystem and method for providing a contest-based game
US20070066382 *Oct 13, 2006Mar 22, 2007Stephen PenriceMethods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US20070077982 *Sep 29, 2006Apr 5, 2007Bozeman Alan KLottery game having enhanced winnings with predefined threshold
US20070099689 *Oct 13, 2006May 3, 2007Stephen PenriceMethods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US20070112619 *Nov 17, 2006May 17, 2007John HurtRetailer optimization using market segmentation top quintile process
US20080254851 *Feb 20, 2008Oct 16, 2008Wright Robert JMethod and apparatus for an instant online lottery ticket
US20080254852 *Mar 10, 2008Oct 16, 2008Wright Robert JInstant online lottery ticket for a linear prize and a position specific prize
US20090011814 *Aug 23, 2005Jan 8, 2009Carlos LozanoDevices and Methods for Feature Ball Bingo
US20100062821 *Sep 8, 2008Mar 11, 2010Frick Michael DMethod and apparatus that control risk and uncertainty in a raffle
US20100062823 *Mar 11, 2010Frick Michael DMethod and apparatus that control risk and uncertainty in a frequency priced raffle
US20100062824 *Mar 11, 2010Frick Michael DMethod and apparatus that control risk and uncertainty in a variable priced promotional lottery game
US20100062825 *Oct 24, 2008Mar 11, 2010Frick Michael DMethod and apparatus that control risk and uncertainty in a promotional lottery game with a hybrid prize structure
US20130053121 *Feb 28, 2013Gary WeingardtVideo bingo game and method therefor
US20140315615 *Apr 21, 2014Oct 23, 2014Gary WeingardtVideo bingo game and method therefor
EP1871496A2 *Feb 9, 2006Jan 2, 2008Scientific Games International, Inc.Combination lottery and raffle game
WO2006041626A2 *Sep 20, 2005Apr 20, 2006Scientific Games Royalty CorporationLottery game based on combining player selections
WO2006041626A3 *Sep 20, 2005Jul 27, 2006Scient Games Royalty CorpLottery game based on combining player selections
WO2009105132A1 *Oct 16, 2008Aug 27, 2009Integrated Group Assets Inc.Instant online lottery ticket for a linear prize and a position specific prize
WO2010027367A1 *Sep 8, 2008Mar 11, 2010Integrated Group Assets Inc.Method and apparatus that control risk and uncertainty in a raffle
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/269
International ClassificationA63F3/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0605
European ClassificationA63F3/06A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 22, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: MULTI-STATE LOTTERY ASSOCIATION, IOWA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:STANEK, EDWARD J.;REEL/FRAME:015932/0839
Effective date: 20050216
Oct 12, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: IOWA LOTTERY AUTHORITY, IOWA
Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE THE ASSIGNEE "IOWA LOTTERY AUTHORITY" SHOULD BE ADDED PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 015932 FRAME 0839;ASSIGNOR:STANEK, DR. EDWARD J.;REEL/FRAME:016636/0765
Effective date: 20050216
Owner name: MULTI-STATE LOTTERY ASSOCIATION, IOWA
Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE THE ASSIGNEE "IOWA LOTTERY AUTHORITY" SHOULD BE ADDED PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 015932 FRAME 0839;ASSIGNOR:STANEK, DR. EDWARD J.;REEL/FRAME:016636/0765
Effective date: 20050216