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Publication numberUS20040205914 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/417,496
Publication dateOct 21, 2004
Filing dateApr 17, 2003
Priority dateApr 17, 2003
Publication number10417496, 417496, US 2004/0205914 A1, US 2004/205914 A1, US 20040205914 A1, US 20040205914A1, US 2004205914 A1, US 2004205914A1, US-A1-20040205914, US-A1-2004205914, US2004/0205914A1, US2004/205914A1, US20040205914 A1, US20040205914A1, US2004205914 A1, US2004205914A1
InventorsJim Holden, Laura Blalock
Original AssigneeJim Holden, Blalock Laura E.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibratory brush
US 20040205914 A1
Abstract
A vibratory paint brush is disclosed for evenly spreading paint over a work surface. The source of oscillation is a motor housed within an anti-vibratory chamber. Brush heads of various shapes and sizes can be interchanged about an interchangeability system.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A vibratory brushing device comprising:
a head portion for delivering a brushing substance to a work surface;
a handle portion in communication with said head portion; and
a vibratory system to oscillate said head portion at a frequency such that delivery of the brushing substance to the work surface provides no more than minimal brushing substance splattering.
2. The vibratory brushing device of claim 1 further comprising an interchangeability system to releasably secure said head portion to said handle portion.
3. The vibratory brushing device of claim 1 further comprising an anti-vibratory system to dampen vibration of said handle portion during oscillation of said head portion by said vibratory system.
4. The vibratory brushing device of claim 1 further comprising a brushing substance diversion system to direct overflow brushing substance away from both said handle portion and said interchangeability system.
5. The vibratory brushing device of claim 1, wherein said vibratory system oscillates said head portion at a frequency of between 45 and 190 Hz.
6. The vibratory brushing device of claim 5, wherein said vibratory system is housed within said handle portion.
7. A vibrating paint brush comprising:
a head portion for delivering paint to a work surface;
a handle portion in communication with said head portion; and
a vibratory system to oscillate the head portion at a frequency of between 45 and 190 Hz.
8. The vibrating paint brush of claim 7 further comprising an interchangeability system to releasably secure said head portion to said handle portion.
9. The vibratory brushing device of claim 7 further comprising an anti-vibratory system to dampen vibration of said handle portion during oscillation of said head portion by said vibratory system.
10. The vibrating paint brush of claim 8, wherein said interchangeability system comprises:
an attachment mechanism of one of said handle portion and head portion; and
a receptor of the other of said handle portion and head portion, said receptor having at least one notch for receiving and releasably securing said attachment mechanism.
11. The vibrating paint brush of claim 8, wherein said vibrating system comprises a motor.
12. The vibrating paint brush of claim 9, wherein said anti-vibratory system comprises an insulating material substantially surrounding said vibratory system, said insulating material being substantially housed within said handle portion.
13. A vibrating paint brush comprising:
a head portion having bristles;
a handle portion in communication with said head portion;
a vibrating system; and
an interchangeability system including an attachment mechanism of one of said handle portion and head portion, and a receptor of the other of said handle portion and head portion.
14. The vibrating paint brush of claim 13, said receptor having at least one notch for receiving and releasably securing said attachment mechanism.
15. The vibrating paint brush of claim 13, wherein said head portion further comprises a brush portion attached to a ferrule portion, said ferrule portion in communication with said handle portion and having a lip, said lip diverting paint in a direction away from said receptor and attachment mechanism.
16. The vibrating paint brush of claim 13 further comprising an anti-vibratory system incorporating a suspension subsystem at least partially enclosing said vibratory system, which is connected to said handle portion, said suspension subsystem having a first and second end, and an extension rod at each said end for connecting said vibratory system to said handle portion.
17. The vibrating paint brush of claim 14, said interchangeability system including a roller system having a roller element rotationally affixed to one of said attachment mechanism and receptor, said roller element being received and releasably secured by the other of said attachment mechanism and receptor into a notch.
18. The vibrating paint brush of claim 14, said interchangeability system including a depressable arm system having a plurality of arms and at least one protrusion, said arms being received and releasably secured by one of said receptor and said attachment mechanism into a notch.
19. The vibrating paint brush of claim 17, said interchangeability system further comprising a receptor with an open end and a closed end, wherein at least one notch is located between said roller system and said closed end, and an attachment mechanism with more than one protrusion modified to pass over said roller system, said protrusions fitting securely into said notches when force is applied, and said handle portion being removably connected to said head portion when said protrusions are manipulated to fit over said roller system and into said notches.
20. The vibrating paint brush of claim 18, said depressable arm system further comprising a plurality of arms attached to said attachment mechanism positioned opposite of at least another arm, having a first end and a second end, each of said plurality of arms having at least one protrusion adjacent to or opposite said second end, said protrusions being repositionable by applying pressure to said second end, thereby removably connecting said handle portion to said head portion when said protrusions are manipulated to fit into said notch.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates generally to an improved brushing instrument, and more specifically to a vibrating paint brush that enables a user to more easily apply paint to a work surface.

DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

[0002] Painting trim work and uneven surfaces with any precision and accuracy is particularly difficult using conventional paint brushes. Conventional paint brushes require several passes over an uneven surface in order to uniformly cover the surface with an even coat of paint. Such repeated brushing causes excessive wear on the paint brush, and fatigue to the painter who must not only apply the paint to the surface, but also dip the brush into the paint source.

[0003] Some paint brushes used for painting rough surfaces such as trim have tapered ends and thin handles. While this geometry adds an element of control, multiple passes are still required to completely cover uneven surfaces, causing fatigue and difficulty maintaining a clean edge. Smooth application of paint on a rough surface is also difficult to obtain using electric paint brush applicators.

[0004] Some conventional electric applicators incorporate a built-in paint delivery system in an attempt to force the paint into uneven surfaces. Problems often arise, however, when the delivery tubes become clogged or kinked. The speed and rate of delivery also cannot be controlled, which contributes to uneven application and the wasting of paint. These electric systems are also expensive and very difficult to clean. In addition, due to design constraints associated with the paint delivery system, paint brush heads or pads are not readily interchangeable.

[0005] Other electric paint brush designs incorporate only a vibrating body to work the paint into uneven surfaces. However, high vibration of the brush can lead to excessive paint spattering due to a rough vibratory motion, or an uncontrolled, wavy line. On the other hand, a low vibration of the brush may have no beneficial effect at all, and may only contribute to an increase in the cost of the brush. Additionally, the vibration felt in the user's hand can cause fatigue and numbness.

[0006] Some vibrating brush designs incorporate a rotating motion, but this type of motion does not distribute the paint evenly, nor does it allow the paint to flow in a consistent manner from the base of the brush to the delivery point. Vibrating paint pads are equally unsuccessful in applying an even coat of paint over a rough surface. Since the pads have no extending bristles to penetrate into crevices, the user must apply pressure to the pad in addition to the vibration, causing fatigue, uneven distribution, and the wasting of paint.

[0007] Conventional vibrating brushes are either unitary structures with no interchangeable heads, or include interchangeable heads that are limited due to their deficient interchangeable mechanisms. The interchangeable embodiments become, in fact, unitary embodiments when paint seeps into cracks, gaps, or holes at the attachment site. This contributes to the cost of the brush and the difficulty of cleaning.

[0008] None of the known paint delivery devices, in a single apparatus, eliminate the problems of (a) uneven delivery of paint over a rough surface such as trim, (b) excessive fatigue to the user, (c) numbness or pain caused by vibration of the device, (d) expensive brush replacement, (e) difficult cleaning, and (f) complicated use. What is needed, therefore, is a vibrating paint brush device for painting an uneven surface which incorporates its own means of vibration at an optimal frequency for applying an optimal amount of paint with the desired amount of control, which device is comfortable for the user and inexpensive, easy to use, and easy to clean. Such a brush would not only improve the look of paint when it is applied to a surface, but it would also cut down clean-up and touch-up time and fatigue associated with painting rough surfaces.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The present invention relates to a vibratory paint brush that operates at a frequency for evenly spreading a brushing substance over a work surface. The frequency of vibration is such that paint is no more than minimally splattered from the brush. The brush is easy to use, inexpensive, easy to clean, and does not contribute significantly to fatigue of the user.

[0010] A motor preferably vibrates the brush. In a preferred embodiment, the motor producing the vibration is housed in an anti-vibratory chamber, which reduces the effects of the vibration on the hand of the user. Brush heads of various shapes and sizes can be interchanged about an adaptable clip. Alternatively, the paint brush head or heads incorporate a female-type attachment that fits over the male handle attachment using a squeeze-release or roller-actuated clasp.

[0011] Frequencies of vibration can be changed to different levels within an acceptable range to accommodate varying viscosities of the brushing substance (paint) and the paint brush bristle properties.

[0012] Therefore, an object of the present invention is to evenly spread paint over a work surface.

[0013] Another object of the present invention is to provide a paint applicator that is inexpensive and easy to use and clean.

[0014] Still another object of the present invention is to provide a paint applicator that does not contribute significantly to the fatigue of the user.

[0015] Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a paint applicator that has interchangeable heads that are easy to attach and do not allow significant paint seepage into the points of attachment.

[0016] Further novel features and other objects of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

[0017]FIG. 1 is a bottom view of the vibratory paint brush;

[0018]FIG. 2 is a frontal sectional view about the axis indicated in FIG. 1 of the present vibratory paint brush according to a preferred embodiment;

[0019]FIG. 3 is a frontal sectional view about the axis indicated in FIG. 1 of another embodiment of the vibratory paint brush;

[0020]FIG. 4 is a detailed elevation view of the interchangeability system of a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

[0021]FIG. 5 is a detailed elevation view of the interchangeability system according to another embodiment of the present invention; and

[0022]FIG. 6 is a detailed elevation view about the axis indicated in FIG. 1 of the handle portion and a suspension system of the device of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0023] The present invention is a device for evenly spreading a brushing substance, preferably paint, over a work surface. More particularly, the present invention is a vibratory paint brush that is easy to use, inexpensive, easy to clean, and does not contribute significantly to the fatigue of the user. Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals refer to like elements throughout the several views, exemplary embodiments of the present invention are described.

[0024] Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the vibratory brushing device 10 comprises a head portion 20 for delivering paint to a work surface, a handle portion 30, and a vibratory system 40. The head portion 20 is connected to the handle portion 30 with which to grip the device 10. The vibratory system 40 oscillates the head portion 20 at a frequency such that delivery of a brushing substance to the work surface provides no more than minimal paint splattering. Lines X and X′ demonstrate an axis about which the vibratory brushing device 10 is cut to reveal the sectional views of all of the Figures.

[0025] The head portion 20, as shown in FIG. 2, delivers paint or other material to a work surface. The head portion 20 of a preferred embodiment comprises bristles 22 held together at one end by a ferrule 24 or another binding means, which itself is releasably attached to a handle portion 30. Other suitable paint delivery means can constitute the head portion 20. For example, a foam brush or rag may be used. The bristles 22 can be synthetic or organic, and can be of a shape, size, angle, density, and pliability to deliver the brushing substance to the work surface.

[0026] One preferred embodiment of the head portion 20 uses a standard two-inch brush head portion 20 with angled, tapered bristles 22. This embodiment is specially suited to applying paint to trim work.

[0027] The handle portion 30 is attached to the head portion 20, either as a unitary construction or in a releasably secure fashion. The handle portion 30 can be conventional, or can incorporate, for example, finger indentations, power switches, speed setting devices, or electrical plugs.

[0028] The vibratory brushing device 10 further comprises a vibratory system 40, as shown in FIG. 2, in contact with either, or both, the head portion 20 and the handle portion 30. The vibratory system 40 oscillates the head portion 20 at a frequency such that delivery of paint to the work surface provides no more than minimal splattering, and at such a frequency that paint evenly spreads on the work surface without signs of brush strokes. The vibratory system 40 can be electronic, manual, wind-up, magnetic, or other means capable of providing a suitable vibration to the head portion 20. In a preferred embodiment, the vibratory system 40 comprises a motor 42 and is located on or in the handle portion 30.

[0029] The present invention 10 can further comprise an interchangeability system 50, as shown in detail in FIGS. 4 and 5, for releasably securing the head portion 20 to the handle portion 30. This enables a user to interchange many shapes and sizes of brushes while incurring minimal cost and inconvenience, since the user needs only one handle portion 30 in order to operate the vibratory brushing device 10 with a variety of head portions 20. The interchangeability system 50 can comprise a female-type receptor 52 located in the head portion 20. A male-type attachment mechanism 56 interacts with the receptor 52 to join the head portion 20 to the handle portion 30. It will be understood that a male-type attachment could be alternatively in the head portion 20, while the female-type receptor 52 is in the handle portion 30.

[0030] The interchangeability system 50 can include a roller system 60 to releasably lock the head portion 20 to the handle portion 30, or a depressable arm system 70. Both systems, 60, 70 utilize elements on both the head and handle portions 20, 30.

[0031] For example, if the interchangeability system 50 is the roller system 60, as shown in FIG. 5, the female-type receptor 52 will include at least one notch 58 and a roller element 62 to accommodate a protrusion 68 of the male-type attachment mechanism 56.

[0032] The receptor 52 preferably has an open end 64 and a closed end 66, where at least one notch 58 is located in proximity to the roller element 62. The female-type receptor 52 can also have protrusions 68 modified to pass over the roller element 62. The protrusion 68 fits securely into at least one notch 58 when force is applied. The handle portion 30 can be removably connected to the head portion 20 when the protrusion 68 is manipulated to fit over the roller element 62 and into at least one notch 58. It is advantageous for the receptor 52 to be located in the head portion 20 so that paint cannot easily flow into the inner mechanisms of the interchangeability system 50 and adhere the parts together.

[0033] The interchangeability system 50 can alternatively include a depressable arm system 70, as shown in detail in FIG. 4, to releasably secure portions 20, 30. The depressable arm system 70 can incorporate a plurality of arms 72 on the male-type attachment mechanism 56 that are received and releasably secured by female-type receptor 52 into at least one appropriately-shaped notch 58. The arms 72 have a first end 74, a second end 76, and at least one arm protrusion 78 adjacent to or opposite the second end 76. The arm protrusion 78 is repositionable by applying pressure to the second end 76. When the arm protrusion 78 is repositioned and manipulated to fit into at least one notch 58, the handle portion 30 can be removably connected to the head portion 20.

[0034] The device 10 can further comprise an anti-vibratory system 80, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6, to dampen the vibration of the handle portion 30 during oscillation of the head portion 20 by the vibratory system 40. The anti-vibratory system 80 can comprise an anti-vibratory lining 82 of foam rubber, or other material suitable for dampening vibrations. The anti-vibratory system 80 can further comprise an isolation chamber 84, as shown in FIG. 6, into which the vibratory system 40 can be housed, to further dampen the effect of the vibrations felt in the handle portion 30 by the user.

[0035] The present invention 10 can further comprise a paint diversion system 100, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, to direct overflow paint away from both the handle portion 30 and the interchangeability system 50. The paint diversion system 100 can be a diversionary outer lip 102 for the diversion of paint away from the interchangeability system 50.

[0036] The anti-vibratory system 80 can comprise a suspension subsystem 90, as shown in FIG. 6, to minimize the physical contact of the vibratory system 40 and the handle portion 30. The suspension subsystem 90 can at least partially enclose the vibratory system 40. The suspension subsystem 90 comprises a housing 92 that has a first end 94 and a second end 96, with extension rods 98 connected at the first end 94 and second end 96. The extension rods 98 are attached to the handle portion 30. The suspension subsystem 90 further reduces the amount of vibration felt in the handle portion 30 by the user by minimizing the amount of physical contact between the vibratory system 40 and the handle portion 30.

[0037]FIG. 2 shows a preferred embodiment of the vibratory brushing device 10 having a head portion 20, a handle portion 30, a vibratory system 40, and an interchangeability system 50. The head portion incorporates bristles 22 that are attached to ferrule 24.

[0038] The head portion 20 is connected to the interchangeability system 50, which in turn connects the head portion 20 to the handle portion 30. In one embodiment, the handle portion 30 has an outer shell 32 that is generally constructed of a rigid material such as plastic, metal, wood, or vulcanized rubber. In another embodiment, the handle portion 30 contains the vibratory system 40.

[0039] The vibratory system 40 comprises a motor 42, which is housed within a motor housing 44. The vibratory system 40 oscillates the head portion 20 at a frequency such that delivery of the paint to the work surface provides no more than minimal paint splattering or dripping. The motor housing 44 is surrounded by an anti-vibratory lining 82. In a preferred embodiment, the motor 42 is battery-driven and rechargeable. Additionally, the motor 42 is set to operate and provide oscillation of the head portion at frequencies between 45 and 190 Hz. This range reduces the amount of splattering of the brushing substance, yet provides a seamless, fully painted look to the work surface, without noticeable brush strokes. Preferably, the oscillation frequency will be between 65 and 175 Hz. This range works best with conventional household paints. Other ranges are acceptable for a thinner brushing substance, such as turpentine, or a thicker substance such as tar. Generally, higher frequencies generate less splattering for thinner substances and more pliable paint brush bristles, and lower frequencies can be tolerated by thicker substances. The ranges may be adjusted by a switch or dial to account for different viscosities or bristle composition.

[0040] The interchangeability system 50 of FIG. 2 includes the depressable arm system 70 shown in detail in FIG. 4, and comprises a female-type receptor 52 of the head portion 20 that is removably connected to a male-type attachment mechanism 56 of the handle portion 30. The female-type receptor 52 fits snugly with the male-type attachment mechanism 56 and works in conjunction with an outer lip 102 to divert downwardly-flowing paint away from the inside of the receptor 52.

[0041] The anti-vibratory system 80 of FIG. 2 comprises an anti-vibratory lining 82 and can be constructed of an anti-vibratory, or shock-absorbing, material such as foam rubber. This anti-vibratory lining 82 decreases the amount of vibration felt by the user, bringing the feel of the vibratory system 40 to a comfortable level, or one that reduces fatigue, pain, and numbness and simultaneously making the vibratory brushing device 10 lighter than conventional models.

[0042]FIG. 3 shows another embodiment of the vibratory brushing device 10 having a head portion 20, a handle portion 30, a vibratory system 40, and an interchangeability system 50. This embodiment of the interchangeability system 50 includes the roller system 60, shown in detail in FIG. 5, and is shown comprising a brush head portion 20 that is removably connected to the handle portion 30. Attachment mechanism 56 is fitted into female-type receptor 52, which comprises a roller system 60 having a roller element 62.

[0043] The female-type receptor 52 comprises roller system 60 including roller element 62 that fits snugly with male-type attachment mechanism 56. In the alternative, the roller element 62 of the roller system 60 can be attached to the male-type attachment mechanism 56 and can be received by the female-type receptor 52 in a similar fashion. This interchangeability system 50 provides for easy construction and attachment, and is ideal for a vibratory brushing device 10 in that it allows a user to use different sized head portions 20 with different types of bristles 22 while eliminating the need to buy a new handle portion 30 and vibratory system 40. The interchangeability system 50 can work in conjunction with a paint diversion system 100 having an outer lip 102 in order to further divert downwardly-flowing paint from the inside of the female-type receptor 52. This keeps paint from flowing into the inner mechanisms of the interchangeability system 50, further preventing fusion of the removable portions when the paint dries.

[0044]FIG. 4 details an embodiment of the interchangeability system 50 shown with a male-type attachment mechanism 56, having a depressable arm system 70 with protrusion 78, notch 58, arms 72, and feet 76 a. Protrusion 78 fits snugly into notch 58 of the receptor 52 when the arms 72 are depressed by applying horizontal pressure to the feet 76 a, and by applying vertical pressure to the entire male-type attachment mechanism 56. The notch 58 prevents the male-type attachment mechanism 56 from dislodging by blocking the protrusion 78 until the protrusion 78 is depressed to allow release of the male-type attachment mechanism 56.

[0045] The depressable arms 72 have a first end 74, a second end 76, and at least one protrusion 78 adjacent to or opposite the second end 76. The protrusion 78 is repositionable by applying pressure to the second end 76 at feet 76 a.

[0046] This embodiment of an interchangeability system 50 provides for easy construction and attachment, and is ideal for a vibratory brushing device 10 in that it allows a user to use different sized head portions 20 with different types of bristles 22 while eliminating the need to buy a new handle portion 30 and vibratory system 40. A female-type receptor 52 in communication with the head portion 20 also serves to allow paint to flow over the joints and away from the inner mechanisms of the interchangeability system 50, rather than into them, as can happen if the female-type attachment were in communication with the handle portion 30 directly. Additionally, the notch 58 together with the outer lip 102 and the feet 76 a also serve to further divert paint away from the receptor 52 to prevent paint from drying inside the receptor 52 and fusing the parts together.

[0047]FIG. 5 details another embodiment of the interchangeability system 50. This embodiment comprises male-type attachment mechanism 56 with a rounded protrusion 68 that fits snugly into a rounded notch 58 of the female-type receptor 52 after passing over roller system 60 when vertical pressure is applied to the male-type attachment mechanism 56. This pressure causes roller element 62 of the roller system 60 to turn and advance the male-type attachment mechanism 56 until its movement is blocked by the rounded notch 58 and it is securely in place. Additionally, the rounded notch 58 together with the outer lip 102 serve to divert paint away from the female-type receptor 52 and to prevent paint from drying inside the female-type receptor 52 and fusing the parts together.

[0048]FIG. 6 details an embodiment an anti-vibratory system 80 with a suspension subsystem 90. The Figure shows the handle portion 30, vibratory system 40, anti-vibratory system 80, and suspension subsystem 90. The handle portion 30 comprises an outer shell 32 which is generally constructed of a rigid material such as plastic, metal, wood, or vulcanized rubber. The handle portion 30 at least partially contains the vibratory system 40. The vibratory system 40 comprises the motor 42, and the vibration from the vibratory system 40 is suppressed by the anti-vibratory system 80. The anti-vibratory system 80 comprises an anti-vibratory lining 82, and can operate in conjunction with the suspension subsystem 90 to further reduce the amount of vibration felt by a user.

[0049] The suspension subsystem 90 comprises a housing 92 having extension rods 98 attached at first end 94 and second end 96 and extending through the handle portion 30 at the connection points 110. The suspension subsystem 90 is in close proximity to the motor 42 such that vibration is transmitted through the suspension subsystem 90. The housing 92 is surrounded by isolation chamber 84, which is enclosed by anti-vibratory lining 82, leaving the only contact points of the motor 42 and suspension subsystem 90 within the handle portion 30 or the anti-vibratory lining 82 at the connection points 110. The chamber 84 has minimal contact with the outer shell 32 or the anti-vibratory lining 82, which maximizes the reduction of vibration on the hand of a user.

[0050] Numerous characteristics and advantages have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of structure and function. The disclosure, however, is illustrative only, and changes can be made without departing from the principle of the invention. The scope of the invention, therefore, is to be determined only by the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8276538Nov 30, 2011Oct 2, 2012Depingo, LlcPainting apparatuses and methods
US8408157Mar 13, 2008Apr 2, 2013Depingo, LlcPainting apparatuses and methods
US8424483Oct 2, 2012Apr 23, 2013Depingo, LlcPainting apparatuses and methods
US20110061186 *Apr 10, 2009Mar 17, 2011Vilain Marcel Et FilsBrush
WO2009125022A2 *Apr 10, 2009Oct 15, 2009Vilain Marcel Et FilsBrush
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/22.1
International ClassificationA46B13/02, B44D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA46B2200/202, A46B13/02, B44D3/12
European ClassificationA46B13/02, B44D3/12