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Publication numberUS20040227291 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/436,554
Publication dateNov 18, 2004
Filing dateMay 14, 2003
Priority dateMay 14, 2003
Publication number10436554, 436554, US 2004/0227291 A1, US 2004/227291 A1, US 20040227291 A1, US 20040227291A1, US 2004227291 A1, US 2004227291A1, US-A1-20040227291, US-A1-2004227291, US2004/0227291A1, US2004/227291A1, US20040227291 A1, US20040227291A1, US2004227291 A1, US2004227291A1
InventorsJohn Van Rhyn
Original AssigneeVan Rhyn John Martin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of randomly selecting a playing card for a casino table game
US 20040227291 A1
Abstract
A casino card game played with a standard deck of cards on a standard gaming table that has imprinted on it a sequential display of the available ranks of the deck. The object is to obtain a randomly selected playing card fairly and securely. The cut card is used to randomly select the starting point on the sequential display. The top cards of the deck are exposed and placed on the sequential display in ascending order beginning with the starting point until one of the exposed cards agrees or matches the rank on the sequential display. The card making the match is the card used for determining winners and losers.
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Claims(1)
I claim:
1. A method of randomly selecting a playing card for a casino game from a standard fifty-two card deck of cards in steps of:
utilizing a tabletop layout that has on it an imprint of a sequential display of the available card ranks in the deck;
shuffling and obtaining a cut card to determine the random starting point of play on the sequential display and
successively dealing cards face up and placing them next to the sequential display in ascending order until a card is dealt that makes a match in rank with the sequential display and
that card making the match is designated as the randomly selected playing card.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    Not Applicable
  • REFERENCE TO A SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX
  • [0003]
    Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    The present invention relates generally to a method of playing a casino game and more specifically, to a method and apparatus for achieving an accurate randomly selected playing card, quickly, economically and in a secure fashion for determining the winners and losers.
  • [0005]
    Modern casinos face many challenges to maintain customer appeal, profitable games and security thereof. Higher costs of labor and operating expenses have put a strain on the existing table games. They usually have very low house advantages or earning power and are labor intensive. Additionally, the costs associated with ensuring that the games are operated honestly and fairly have become quite significant.
  • [0006]
    For example, the game of Roulette is played on a large table with an extensive layout, yet only seats five to six players. It requires a roulette wheel and bowl mechanism finely machined to a zero tolerance. This assembly must be monitored very closely to make sure that it is always spinning freely and level. The wheel usually has thirty-seven or thirty-eight slots on it. This creates a large number of different wagering propositions, which in turn are intimidating to the average player. Security-wise, a full table requires either two dealers or a supervisor and a dealer to monitor both the ball dropping into the wheel and the betting layout to deter selection manipulation and/or past-posting of a winning wager. In constant play, there will be about t2 twenty to thirty numbers selected per hour.
  • [0007]
    A Dice game servicing about a dozen players also requires a large table, three dealers, two table supervisors and an area supervisor. Two precision-made square dice are thrown by the player to determine winners and losers. These dice are zealously guarded and checked frequently to make sure that they haven't been tampered with as that could cost the casino dearly. A Dice table layout of betting both for and against the thirty-six different combinations also are intimidating to the average player.
  • [0008]
    A Blackjack table can service six to seven players with one dealer. Due to the nature of the game, there will be approximately sixty decisions per hour. With all of the publicity of using basic strategy, counting cards and optimum betting criteria, the average player has become very intimidated. They are reluctant to play the game in fear of not getting the best odds for their play or simply making a mistake.
  • [0009]
    Some new casino games such as Sic Bo, Pai Gow, Pai Gow Poker, Let It Ride, etc have surfaced over the years, but almost to a fault, are either intimidating or confusing or both.
  • [0010]
    The modern gambler is for the most part, not the old “break the bank at Monte Carlo” stereotype. Rather he has earmarked some funds for his entertainment and wants a more relaxed atmosphere. He wants the excitement of winning but won't be disappointed if he doesn't, as long as he had quality time in action at the game.
  • [0011]
    No matter what type of casino game is discussed, the common point of all of them is that they must be completely random at all times. Once that is achieved, payoffs can be adjusted to obtain the desired earning potential.
  • [0012]
    Wayne Smith in U.S. Pat. No. 6,264,200 states that dealing three cards off the top of the deck is a random event. While that might be true for the first time, two shuffles, two cuts and lo and behold, the same three cards are dealt again. And again. A very dangerous situation for the casino to be in. He also mentions that the dealer could continue dealing additional hands from the deck. True randomness is compromised by all of the previously played cards and gives the players intelligence of which wagers are more advantageous than others because of that. Case in point, just look at Blackjack.
  • [0013]
    Teofilo Gutierrez in Patent RE36,739 states that pairs of cards will be exposed until there is an unmatched pair. Then those cards will be wagered on as to which one will be matched up in subsequent deals. What if the first two cards made a pair and the second two cards were unmatched but one of them was the same as the first two cards. One match would be three times more likely than the other would, yet both would pay the same. Not a good position for the casino to be in. He also mentions that subsequent hands are played from the same deck. Again same as before, true randomness is compromised and gives the players an advantage.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    The object of the present invention is a method and apparatus that is exciting to the player, fast moving, and easy to understand. For the casino, the present invention provides an economical and safe way to generate random playing card outcomes for wagering purposes with many decisions per hour, thereby increasing their earning potential.
  • [0015]
    According to the first aspect of the invention, a card game is played on a standard Blackjack style table with a replacement cover that has imprinted on it, a semi-circle Sequence Bar located in front of the chip tray. This Sequence Bar contains the imprints of the individual ranks of the deck in play, equally spaced upon it. The cover also contains a common wagering area in the center of the table, accessible by all players. This enables the Dealer to monitor and protect the game from defalcation and/or errors.
  • [0016]
    According to the second aspect of the invention, the game is played with a standard fifty-two card deck of cards, but that is not necessary. The Cut card is exposed and used to determine the Starting Point. The Starting Point shall be the next rank or sequence on the Sequence Bar, thus ensuring that a match will be made, if not before, on the end.
  • [0017]
    Cards from the deck are exposed and placed next to the Sequence Bar in order until a Match is made, thereby ending the hand. With the random selection of the Starting Point giving each of the ranks in the deck equal opportunity to be the first match, coupled with the random match selection thereafter, we have created an ideal random event economically, quickly, and safely.
  • [0018]
    A game in accordance with the invention builds excitement as the cards are played and Matches are not made, each player holding out hope for their selections to win.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • [0019]
    The drawing is a plan view of a tabletop in accordance with the first aspect of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    The drawing shows a standard Blackjack type tabletop 10 with a chip tray 16 mounted on the back edge 12. The Dealer's position is along the back edge 12 and the Players' positions are along the front edge 14.
  • [0021]
    Imprinted on the tabletop 10 cover is the Sequence Bar 20 in a semi-circle arc approximately six inches in front of the chip tray 16 corners. The Sequence Bar 20 has one each of the card deck's ranks imprinted on it 22, equally spaced apart in ascending order, starting at the Dealer's left. During the course of the game, the Sequence Bar 20 shall be played as a continuous loop with the rank on the farthest left being the next rank after the rank on the farthest right.
  • [0022]
    A common Wagering Area 30 is centrally located on the table-top 10 adjacent to the Sequence Bar 20 allowing room on the table-top 10 between the front edge 14 and the Wagering Area 30 for the players' use.
  • [0023]
    While in this embodiment the game is played with one standard fifty-two card deck of cards, those of ordinary skill will appreciate that other decks having more or less cards utilizing the standard fifty-two card deck of cards as the base are also possible; i.e., eight each of ten ranks, etc. Other decks made up of symbols and/or designs; such as the twelve signs of the zodiac, are also possible. The important aspect of all of the decks is simply that there must be a sufficient variety of ranks and their duplicates to ensure a random selection using the invention.
  • [0024]
    After the Players have made their wagering selections, the Dealer shuffles the deck to start the round of play. The Dealer offers the shuffled deck to a Player for the Cut. In the event that none of the Players wish to cut the deck, the Dealer performs the Cut.
  • [0025]
    Once the Cut has been made, the Dealer exposes the Cut (bottom) card to all persons on the table. After viewing the Cut card, the Dealer declares the Starting Point. The Starting Point on the Sequence Bar 20 shall be the next rank above the Cut card. For example, if the Cut card is a six, the Starting Point shall be the seven, thereby ensuring that a match will be made, if not before, on the end.
  • [0026]
    After the Starting Point is determined, the Dealer will then expose the top card of the deck and place it next to the Starting Point rank. If the exposed card and the Starting Point are of the same rank, the Dealer declares a Match and this round of play ends. If the exposed card's rank does not match the Starting Point's rank, the Dealer will expose the next card from the deck and place it under the next rank in sequence on the Sequence Bar 20. If that card's rank does not match the newly selected rank on the Sequence Bar 20, the Dealer will continue to expose the top cards of the deck, placing them in ascending order on the Sequence Bar until he achieves a Match. As mentioned before, the Sequence Bar 20 shall be played as a continuous loop.
  • [0027]
    Once the Dealer achieves a Match, he declares a Match and this round of play ends. All losing wagers are collected and then the winning wagers will be paid according to payoffs printed on the Wagering Area 30 or elsewhere.
  • [0028]
    While the present invention has been described with respect to preferred embodiments thereof, those of ordinary skill in the art will understand that variations and modifications can be made within the scope and spirit of the invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5362064 *Sep 8, 1993Nov 8, 1994Richard LofinkModified baccarat
US5431407 *Sep 29, 1994Jul 11, 1995Hofberg; Renee B.Method of playing a casino card game
US5536016 *Sep 26, 1994Jul 16, 1996Mikohn Gaming CorporationProgressive system for a match number game and method therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8025565Jun 2, 2008Sep 27, 2011Cantor Index LimitedSystem and logic for establishing a wager for a game
US8105141Apr 3, 2006Jan 31, 2012Cantor Index LimitedSystem and method for adding a skill aspect to games of chance
US8342924Apr 14, 2010Jan 1, 2013Cantor Index LimitedSystem and method for providing enhanced services to a user of a gaming application
US8342946Jul 4, 2009Jan 1, 2013Bgc Partners, Inc.Computer graphics processing and display of selectable items
US8342966Oct 24, 2008Jan 1, 2013Cfph, LlcWager market creation and management
US8556691Jan 30, 2012Oct 15, 2013Cantor Gaming LimitedSystem and method for adding a skill aspect to games of chance
US8672751Jul 12, 2002Mar 18, 2014Cantor Index LimitedSystem and method for providing enhanced services to a user of a gaming application
US8734227Jan 18, 2006May 27, 2014Cantor Gaming LimitedMethod for establishing a wager for a game
US8821269Sep 12, 2012Sep 2, 2014Anthony StormWager market creation and management
US8858326Sep 12, 2012Oct 14, 2014Lee AmaitisComputer graphics processing and display of selectable items
US9005016Feb 9, 2011Apr 14, 2015Lee AmaitisWagering on event outcomes during the event
US9076305Sep 12, 2012Jul 7, 2015Lee AmaitisWagering on event outcomes during the event
US9111417Sep 14, 2012Aug 18, 2015Cantor Index LimitedSystem and method for providing enhanced services to a user of a gaming application
US20100001467 *Jun 25, 2009Jan 7, 2010Behrendsen Mark CMethods and Devices for Playing a Card Game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/274, 273/292, 273/303
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F1/06, A63F1/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/14, A63F3/00157, A63F1/067
European ClassificationA63F3/00A32