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Publication numberUS20040228901 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/704,167
Publication dateNov 18, 2004
Filing dateNov 7, 2003
Priority dateSep 18, 2002
Also published asCA2499111A1, CA2505169A1, EP1562652A1, US7713303, US20040054414, US20050197707, WO2004026189A2, WO2004026189A3, WO2004045667A1
Publication number10704167, 704167, US 2004/0228901 A1, US 2004/228901 A1, US 20040228901 A1, US 20040228901A1, US 2004228901 A1, US 2004228901A1, US-A1-20040228901, US-A1-2004228901, US2004/0228901A1, US2004/228901A1, US20040228901 A1, US20040228901A1, US2004228901 A1, US2004228901A1
InventorsHai Trieu, Michael Sherman
Original AssigneeTrieu Hai H., Sherman Michael C.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collagen-based materials and methods for treating synovial joints
US 20040228901 A1
Abstract
A method of treating a synovial joint by injecting particles of collagen-based material into the joint. The particles may be dehydrated before implantation, and rehydrated after implantation, or they may be implanted in a “wet” state—such as a slurry or gel. Radiocontrast materials may be included to enhance imaging of the injected material. Other additives may include analgesics, antibiotics, proteoglycans, growth factors, and/or other cells effective to promote healing and/or proper joint function.
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Claims(40)
What is claimed is:
1. A method of treating a synovial joint, said method comprising surgically adding to a synovial joint a composition comprising particulate collagen-based material.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein said surgically adding step comprises injecting particulate collagen-based material into a synovial joint.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 5 mm in size.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 3 mm in size.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm in size.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.25 mm to 1 mm in size.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is injected in a dehydrated state.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is injected in a non-dehydrated state.
9. The method of claim 8 wherein said collagen-based material is injected as a gel.
10. The method of claim 8 wherein said collagen-based material is injected as a solution or suspension.
11. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes a cross-linking agent to promote crosslinking of collagen molecules.
12. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes a radiocontrast media.
13. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes an analgesic.
14. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes an antibiotic.
15. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes polysaccharides.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein said polysaccharide is a proteoglycan.
17. The method of claim 15 wherein said polysaccharide is hyaluronic acid.
18. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes growth factors.
19. The method of claim 1 wherein said collagen-based material is provided as a formulation that additionally includes one or more other types of cells effective to promote healing, repair, regeneration and/or restoration of a synovial joint, and/or to facilitate proper joint function.
20. A method according to any of claims 2 through 19 wherein said synovial joint is a facet joint.
21. A synovial joint with a collagen-based material injected in the joint capsule.
22. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles of collagen-based material.
23. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 5 mm in size.
24. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 3 mm in size.
25. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm in size.
26. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises particles ranging from 0.25 mm to 1 mm in size.
27. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises collagen-based materials that have been reconstituted in the joint from dehydrated collagen-based materials.
28. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises collagen-based materials that were injected into the joint in a non-dehydrated state.
29. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises collagen-based materials that were injected into the joint as a gel.
30. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material comprises collagen-based materials that were injected into the joint as a solution or suspension.
31. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes a cross-linking agent to promote crosslinking of collagen molecules.
32. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes a radiocontrast media.
33. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes an analgesic.
34. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes an antibiotic.
35. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes a polysaccharide.
36. The synovial joint of claim 35 wherein said polysaccharide is a proteoglycan.
37. The synovial joint of claim 35 wherein said polysaccharide is a hyaluronic acid.
38. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes growth factors.
39. The synovial joint of claim 21 wherein said collagen-based material additionally includes one or more other types of cells effective to promote healing, repair, regeneration and/or restoration of a facet joint, and/or to facilitate proper joint function.
40. A synovial joint according to any of claims 21 through 39 wherein said synovial joint is a facet joint.
Description
REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application 60/426,613, filed Nov. 15, 2002.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates generally to materials and methods for treating synovial joints, and more particularly to materials and methods for augmenting synovial joints with collagen-based materials.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Synovial joints are the most common joints of the mammalian appendicular skeleton, representing highly evolved, movable joints. A typical synovial joint comprises two bone ends covered by layer of articular cartilage. The cartilage is smooth and resilient, and facilitates low-friction movement of the bones in the joint.

[0004] The bone ends and associated cartilage are surrounded by a joint capsule—a “sack” of membrane that produces synovial fluid. The capsule and fluid protect and support the cartilage and connective tissue, carrying nutrients to the articular cartilage and removing the metabolic wastes.

[0005] The articular cartilage is a thin (2-3 mm) layer of hyaline cartilage on the epiphysis of the bone. It lacks a perichondrium, and thus has a limited capacity for repair when damaged. Additionally, the natural aging process can cause the articular cartilage to degenerate somewhat, reducing its capacity to protect and cushion the bone ends.

[0006] Zygapophysial joints, better known as facet joints, are the mechanism by which each vertebra of the spine connects to the vertebra above and/or below it. Each joint comprises two facet bones—an inferior facet and a superior facet—with the inferior facet of one vertebra connecting to the superior facet of an adjacent vertebra. The joints facilitate movement of the vertebra relative to each other, and allow the spine to bend and twist.

[0007] As in all synovial joints, where the facets contact each other there is a lining of cartilage lubricated by a thin layer of synovial fluid. The cartilage and synovial fluid decrease friction at the joint, extending joint life and preventing inflammation and associated pain.

[0008] As the natural aging process progresses, the cartilage covering the joint may deteriorate and start to fray. The fraying process may cause pieces of cartilage to break free, and the previously smooth surfaces may become rough. The facet bones then begin to rub together, creating friction which leads to further deterioration of the joint. Moreover, the nerves associated with the joint become irritated and inflamed, causing severe pain and restricting movement of the spine.

[0009] Techniques for addressing degeneration of synovial joints in general, and facet joints in particular, joint have heretofore relied primarily on injections to block pain and reduce inflammation. This treatment is only temporary though, and rarely leads to any significant improvement of the underlying condition.

[0010] A need therefore exists for materials and methods effective for treating degenerating synovial joints, and particularly for materials and methods effective for supplementing or replacing the cartilage that lubricates and protects the joint. The present invention addresses that need.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] Briefly describing one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method for treating synovial joints by injecting a collagen-based material into the joint. The material may be injected in a dehydrated form, and rehydrated after implantation, or it may be injected in a hydrated form, such as a slurry or gel. The material may be fresh or frozen. Cross-linking agents such as glutaraldehyde may be included in the injected material to promote collagen crosslinking. In addition, radio-contrast materials may be included to enhance imaging of the injected material. Similarly, performance-enhancing additives such as analgesics and/or antibiotics may be included to provide additional therapeutic benefits.

[0012] Objects and advantages of the claimed invention will be apparent from the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0013]FIGS. 1A-1D show a procedure for injecting a collagen-based material into a facet joint, according to one preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[0014]FIGS. 2A-2F show a procedure for injecting a collagen-based material into a facet joint, according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0015] For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to certain preferred embodiments and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the preferred embodiments being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

[0016] As indicated above, one aspect of the present invention relates to materials and methods for using collagen-based material to treat a degenerating synovial joint. In the most preferred embodiments the collagen-based material is injected into the joint capsule. In some preferred embodiments the inventive method includes surgically adding to a synovial joint a composition comprising particulate collagen-based material. In other embodiments the inventive method includes surgically adding to a synovial joint a composition consisting essentially of particulate collagen-based material.

[0017] The collagen-based material may be derived from natural, collagen-rich tissue, such as intervertebral disc, fascia, ligament, tendon, demineralized bone matrix, etc. The material may be autogenic, allogenic, or xenogenic, or it may be of human-recombinant origin. In alternative embodiments the collagen-based material may be a synthetic, collagen-based material. Examples of preferred collagen-rich tissues include disc annulus, fascia lata, planar fascia, anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments, patella tendon, hamstring tendons, quadriceps tendons, Achilles tendons, skins, and other connective tissues.

[0018] The collagen-based material may be provided in any form appropriate for introduction into a synovial joint. For example, the material may be a solid, porous, woven, or non-woven material, and may be provided as particles, small pieces, gel, solution, suspension, paste, fibrous material, etc. The material may be used while it is still fresh and hydrated, or it may be used after having been processed, such as having been frozen and/or dehydrated.

[0019] In some embodiments the material is provided in a dehydrated state, and is “rehydrated” after injection in the joint. In other embodiments the material is implanted in a hydrated state. When the material is implanted in a hydrated state, it may be that way because it has never been dehydrated, or it may have been dehydrated and reconstituted. When reconstituted, the material may be reconstituted with saline or another aqueous medium, or it may be reconstituted with a non-aqueous medium such as ethylene glycol or another alcohol. Moreover, when provided in a “hydrated” state, the material may be provided as a gel, solution, suspension, dispersion, emulsion, paste, etc.

[0020] In the most preferred embodiments the material is a particulate and/or fibrous material suitable for injection through a hypodermic needle into a synovial joint.

[0021] In the most preferred embodiments the collagen material is provided as particles ranging between 0.05 mm and 5 mm in size. When materials such as fascia lata or disc annulus particles are used the particles preferably range in size from 0.1 mm to 5 mm. When materials such as demineralized bone matrix or gelatin are used the particles preferably range in size from 0.05 mm to 3 mm. When small plugs of material are used the plugs preferably range in size from 0.5 mm to 5 mm. In some embodiments larger sized pieces, such as pieces up to 20 mm in size, may be used.

[0022] The materials may be processed or fabricated using more than one type of tissue. For example, mixtures of fascia lata and demineralized bone matrix may be preferred in appropriate cases, as may mixtures of DBM and annulus fibrosis material.

[0023] Cross-linking agents may be added to the formulation to promote cross-linking of the collagen material. For example, glutaraldehyde or other protein cross-linking agents may be included in the formulation. The cross-linking agents may promote covalent or non-covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Similarly, agents to inhibit protein denaturization may also be included. Crosslinking agents that would be appropriate for use in the claimed invention are known to persons skilled in the art, and may be selected without undue experimentation.

[0024] When the material is to be used as a slurry or gel, additives to promote slurry or gel formation may also be included. These additives may promote protein folding, water binding, protein-protein interactions, and water immobilization.

[0025] In addition, a radiographic contrast media, such as barium sulfate, or a radiocontrast dye, such as sodium diatrizoate (HYPAQUE®), may be included to aid the surgeon in tracking the movement and/or location of the injected material. Radiocontrast materials appropriate for use in discography are known to persons skilled in the art, and may be selected for use in the present invention without undue experimentation.

[0026] Finally, other additives to provide benefits to the injected collagen-based material may also be included. Such additives include analgesics to reduce pain, antibiotics to minimize the potential for bacterial infection.

[0027] Polysaccharides such as proteoglycans and/or hyaluronic acid may also be included to attract and/or bind water to keep the synovial joint hydrated. Additionally, growth factors and/or other cells (e.g., intervertebral disc cells, stem cells, etc.) to promote healing, repair, regeneration and/or restoration of the joint, and/or to facilitate proper joint function, may also be included. Additives appropriate for use in the claimed invention are known to persons skilled in the art, and may be selected without undue experimentation.

[0028] In some embodiments the collagen material is dehydrated before injection into the joint, where it is rehydrated by absorbing fluid from the surrounding area. In other embodiments the collagen material is provided as a gel, slurry, or other hydrated formulation before implantation.

[0029] The collagen-based material is “surgically added” to the synovial joint. That is, the material is added by the intervention of medical personnel, as distinguished from being “added” by the body's natural growth or regeneration processes. The surgical procedure preferably includes injection through a hypodermic needle, although other surgical methods of introducing the collagen-based material into the joint may be used. For example, the material may be introduced into a synovial joint by extrusion through a dilated opening, infusion through a catheter, insertion through an opening created by trauma or surgical incision, or by other means of invasive or minimally invasive deposition of the materials into the joint space.

[0030] Referring now to the drawings, FIGS. 1A-1D show one method of injecting a collagen-based material into a joint. In FIG. 1A, dehydrated particulate fascia lata or annulus fibrosis material 11 is provided in a syringe 12 (in a sterile package). The material is rehydrated and/or dispersed in a suspension medium as shown in FIG. 1B, to provide a wet dispersion 13 of collagen-based material. A hypodermic needle 14 is attached to syringe 12, and the syringe is inserted into the joint capsule 16 (FIG. 1C). The needle/syringe may be moved around within the joint capsule, sweeping from side to side and back and forth, to ensure uniform distribution of the collagen-based material 13 within the space, as shown in FIG. 1D. It is preferred, however, that the tip of the needle be maintained near the center of the joint capsule to ensure deposition of the material within the space, and to minimize potential leakage.

[0031] Alternatively, small diameter collagen plugs 21 may be inserted into the joint as shown in FIGS. 2A-2F. The collagen plugs 21 may be compressed before or by insertion into a small diameter tube 22, and are provided in a delivery cannula 23 (FIGS. 2A-2C). The delivery cannula 23 is attached to a dilator 24.

[0032] The compressed plugs are inserted into a joint 25 by penetrating the joint with a guide needle 27 (FIG. 2D). Dilator 24, preferably with delivery cannula 23 already attached, is inserted over guide needle 27 (FIG. 2E). The collagen plugs 21 are then ready for injection (or extrusion) into the joint. A plunger 28 may be used to push the plugs from the cannula. The plugs expand upon exiting the dilator, and may further expand as they rehydrate in the joint.

[0033] Benefits and advantages arising from use of the materials and methods of the present invention include the following:

[0034] (1) the invention provides lubrication and/or cushioning to degenerated synovial joints, improving or restoring proper joint function;

[0035] (2) the rehydration provided by the invention is expected to slow the degenerative process;

[0036] (3) the invention relieves pain due to improved lubrication of the joint;

[0037] (4) the procedure is percutaneous or a minimally invasive outpatient procedure;

[0038] (5) the risks are minimal, as similar techniques and materials are used in cosmetic procedures;

[0039] (6) the materials are biocompatible since natural or human-recombinant collagen-based materials are used;

[0040] In one preferred embodiment the materials and methods of the present invention may be used to treat synovial joints in the spine, particularly facet joints. In other preferred embodiments hip, knee, ankle, finger, toe, elbow, shoulder, wrist, sacroiliac, temporomandibular, carpometacarpal, etc., joints may all be treated by injecting a collagen-source material into the joint space to supplement/augment the cartilage that lubricates the joint.

[0041] Reference will now be made to specific examples using the processes described above. It is to be understood that the examples are provided to more completely describe preferred embodiments, and that no limitation to the scope of the invention is intended thereby.

EXAMPLE 1

[0042] A gel or suspension of hydrated particulate or fibrous (autologous or allogenic) fascia lata in a biocompatible medium such as water, saline, or ethylene glycol is used to supplement the cartilage of a facet joint. The particle size can be in the range from 0.01 mm to 5 mm, preferably between 0.05 and 0.25 mm. The suspension is injected directly into the articular facet joint space through an intact joint capsule using a hypodermic needle. The suspension is contained within the joint capsule following injection. The medium subsequently diffuses out of the disc space and leaves the hydrated fascia lata material behind. A single injection is effective for improving the facet joint structure, although additional injections may be necessary to achieve appropriate level of treatment.

EXAMPLE 2

[0043] A gel or suspension of hydrated particulate or fibrous allogenic annulus fibrosis in a biocompatible medium such as water, saline or ethylene glycol is used to supplement the cartilage of a facet joint. The particle size can be in the range from 0.01 mm to 5 mm, preferably between 0.05 and 0.25 mm. The suspension is injected directly into the articular facet joint space through an intact joint capsule using a hypodermic needle. The suspension is contained within the joint capsule following injection. The medium subsequently diffuses out of the disc space and leaves the hydrated annulus fibrosis material behind. Single injection is desirable; however, additional injections may be necessary to achieve the appropriate level of treatment.

EXAMPLE 3

[0044] Dehydrated annulus fibrosis material in granule, particulate or power form is used to supplement the cartilage of a facet joint. The particle size can range between 0.01 mm and 5 mm, preferably between 0.05 to 0.25 mm. The material is loaded in its dehydrated state into a specially designed syringe for delivery of particulate matter. The material is extruded into the articular facet joint space through a small, dilated capsule opening. The material remains inside the articulating facet joint space after the needle is removed. It subsequently absorbs moisture or body fluids and swells up in vivo.

[0045] While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only the preferred embodiment has been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the invention are desired to be protected.

Referenced by
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US7648509 *Mar 10, 2004Jan 19, 2010Ilion Medical LlcSacroiliac joint immobilization
US7825083 *Feb 10, 2005Nov 2, 2010Spine Wave, Inc.Synovial fluid barrier
US8057458Oct 30, 2006Nov 15, 2011Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Method for treating facet pain
US8292954Sep 10, 2010Oct 23, 2012Articulinx, Inc.Disc-based orthopedic devices
US8292955Sep 26, 2011Oct 23, 2012Articulinx, Inc.Disc-shaped orthopedic devices
US8298289Sep 12, 2008Oct 30, 2012Articulinx, Inc.Suture-based orthopedic joint device delivery methods
US8357203Sep 26, 2011Jan 22, 2013Articulinx, Inc.Suture-based orthopedic joint devices
US8454618Dec 1, 2009Jun 4, 2013John G. StarkSacroiliac joint immobilization
US8506633Dec 27, 2005Aug 13, 2013Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Rehydration and restoration of intervertebral discs with polyelectrolytes
US8580289Jun 23, 2011Nov 12, 2013Isto Technologies Inc.Tissue matrix system
US8702677Oct 31, 2008Apr 22, 2014Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Device and method for directional delivery of a drug depot
US8715223Jul 22, 2009May 6, 2014Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Device and method for delivery of a drug depot near the nerve
US8734456May 8, 2013May 27, 2014Ilion Medical LlcSacroiliac joint immobilization
US8740912Feb 27, 2008Jun 3, 2014Ilion Medical LlcTools for performing less invasive orthopedic joint procedures
US8801790Dec 27, 2005Aug 12, 2014Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Intervertebral disc augmentation and rehydration with superabsorbent polymers
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 7, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: SDGI HOLDINGS, INC., DELAWARE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TRIEU, HAI H.;SHERMAN, MICHAEL C.;REEL/FRAME:014689/0923
Effective date: 20031031