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Publication numberUS20040252921 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/461,653
Publication dateDec 16, 2004
Filing dateJun 13, 2003
Priority dateJun 13, 2003
Also published asWO2004113197A2, WO2004113197A3
Publication number10461653, 461653, US 2004/0252921 A1, US 2004/252921 A1, US 20040252921 A1, US 20040252921A1, US 2004252921 A1, US 2004252921A1, US-A1-20040252921, US-A1-2004252921, US2004/0252921A1, US2004/252921A1, US20040252921 A1, US20040252921A1, US2004252921 A1, US2004252921A1
InventorsPeggy Winiarski, Zain Saad
Original AssigneeWiniarski Peggy B., Saad Zain E.M.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oven bag with pre-formed perforations
US 20040252921 A1
Abstract
An oven bag and methods for using the same are disclosed. The oven bag may be used in a range of different ovens. The oven bag is characterized by pre-formed perforations that provide for both venting of hot gasses and a secondary opening. The oven bag may comprise different kinds of closure devices including, but not limited to, drawstrings and hand ties.
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Claims(30)
We claim:
1. An oven bag comprising:
a first panel comprising first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another;
a second panel comprising first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another, the first edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the first edge of the second panel, the second edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the second edge of the second panel, the third edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the third edge of the second panel;
an opening formed by the first and second panels defined in part by the fourth edge of the first panel and the fourth edge of the second panel;
a closure device operatively associated with the opening; and
a plurality of pre-formed perforations in at least one of the first panel and second panel, the perforations providing ventilation during cooking and forming a rupturable scoreline for opening the bag when desired.
2. The oven bag of claim 1, further including at least one pleat extending between the first and second panels.
3. The oven bag of claim 2, wherein the pleat runs substantially parallel to the opening.
4. The oven bag of claim 2, wherein first and second pleats flank the bag and run substantially perpendicular to the opening.
5. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the perforations are arranged linearly and extend around an entire perimeter of the bag.
6. The oven bag of claim 5, wherein the perforations are substantially parallel to the second edges and between the opening and the second edges.
7. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the perforations are provided in one of the first and second panels.
8. The oven bag of claim 4, wherein the perforations are provided in one of the first and second panels.
9. The oven bag of claim 8, wherein the perforations form a continuously looped scoreline.
10. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the closure device comprises a hand tie.
11. The oven bag of claim 10, wherein certain portions of the fourth edges are recessed below flanking portions of the fourth edges, providing for a first tie handle and a second tie handle.
12. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the closure device comprises a drawstring.
13. The oven bag of claim 12, wherein the drawstring is operatively enclosed within a casing, wherein the casing is operatively associated with the fourth edges.
14. The oven bag of claim 12, wherein a plurality of holes are provided in the first and second panels, the plurality of holes being in a substantially linear fashion, the drawstring being looped through the holes in an alternating fashion.
15. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the bag is manufactured from a high melting point polymer.
16. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the bag is manufactured from polyethylene terephthalate.
17. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the bag is manufactured from nylon.
18. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the bag is transparent.
19. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the melting point is at least 400° F.
20. An oven bag comprising:
a first panel comprising first, second, third and fourth side edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another;
a second panel comprising first, second, third and fourth side edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another, the first edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the first edge of the second panel, the second edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the second edge of the second panel, the third edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the third edge of the second panel;
an opening formed by the first and second panels defined in part by the fourth edge of the first panel and the fourth edge of the second panel;
a closure device operatively associated with the opening, the closure device including a drawstring and a plurality of holes in the first and second panels, said holes arranged in a substantially linear fashion along the fourth edges, the drawstring being threaded through the holes in an alternating fashion;
a pleat extending between the second edges of the first and second panels; and
a plurality of perforations forming a scored line in at least one of the first panel and second panel, the perforations providing ventilation during cooking and forming a rupturable scoreline for opening the bag when desired.
21. The oven bag of claim 20, further including a second pleat extending between the first edges of the first and second panels, and a third pleat extending between the third edges of the first and second panels.
22. The oven bag of claim 20, wherein the scoreline extends around a perimeter of the bag.
23. The oven bag of claim 20, wherein the scoreline forms a continuous loop in one of the first and second panels.
24. The oven bag of claim 20, wherein the bag is manufactured from a high melting point polymer.
25. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the bag is manufactured from polyethylene terephthalate.
26. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the bag is manufactured from nylon.
27. The oven bag of claim 1, wherein the bag is transparent.
28. The oven bag of claim 15, wherein the melting point is at least 400° F.
29. A method of cooking food in an oven, comprising:
inserting food into an oven bag, the oven bag including a first panel having first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another, a second panel having first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another, the first edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the first edge of the second panel, the second edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the second edge of the second panel, the third edge of the first panel being operatively associated with the third edge of the second panel, an opening formed by the first and second panels defined in part by the fourth edge of the first panel and the fourth edge of the second panel, a closure device operatively associated with the opening, and a plurality of pre-formed perforations in at least one of the first panel and second panel;
activating the closure device so as to seal the food in the oven bag;
heating the bag and food in an oven, heated air venting from the bag through the pre-formed perforations;
removing the bag and food from the oven; and
tearing the bag along the pre-formed perforations to allow for access to and removal of the food.
30. The method of claim 29, wherein the food and bag are heated to a temperature of up to 400° F.
Description
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

[0001] The disclosure generally relates to polymeric bags and, more specifically, to oven bags.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

[0002] Oven bags are used as a cooking aid, and serve essentially as a liner to the pan or pot in which the food is placed. The bags are manufactured from suitable high melting or combustion point materials to withstand the temperature rise generated during cooking. Solid and liquid matter is therefore contained during cooking without rupturing the bag. By using such bags, cleaning of the pan after cooking is greatly facilitated in that little or no food is able to contact or adhere to the sides of the pan. In addition, the bag can be used to remove the food from the pan after cooking. Known oven bags include the following:

[0003] Irace, et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 5,772,331) discloses an oven or microwave safe bag (FIGS. 1-4). The '331 bag resembles a standard brown lunch bag comprising a rectangular bottom and gusseted sides that allow the bag to rest upright and open. The '331 bag includes a closing mechanism consisting of a strap that can hold the bag closed after it is rolled shut. Specifically, the closing mechanism employs a pressure sensitive adhesive. The '331 bag is constructed from one- or two-ply packaging paper that is preferably treated with a grease and/or oil treatment to prevent leaking. The bag may also include a heat resistant film, which is laminated or glued to the paper used in making the bag. The bag may be formed of paper, a heat resistant polymer film, such as polyester, polyethylene, or the like or may be formed of a combination of paper and such polymer films.

[0004] Toshima et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 5,928,553) disclose a sealed bag for microwave heating of food. The '553 bag may be composed of various plastics such as polypropylene, polyesters, polyethylene, and nylon. The '553 bags include a hermetic seal that is maintained during distribution and storage of the bag with food therein. Microwave heating of the contents of the bag results in water vapor pressure, which ultimately breaks the seal of the bag. Further, '553 discloses gusset folds or pleats in both edges of the bag.

[0005] LeBaw, et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 4,904,487) discloses a microwavable popcorn bag. One embodiment of the '487 bag (see e.g., FIG. 7) has gusseted sides, but instead of having a flat rectangular bottom as in the '331 bag described above, the '487 has a bottom end that is folded over and attached to a back panel at a bottom seal.

[0006] Mendenhall (U.S. Pat. No. 5,061,500) discloses a gusseted, rectangular-bottomed microwavable bag with closure that allows for venting and easy opening. The '500 bag closure comprises an adhesive.

[0007] Most of the above-referenced type of oven bags are limited to use in the microwave, and do not allow for safe, effective cooking in conventional ovens. Many oven bags are also limited to pre-packaged contexts. That is, such bags are bought pre-filled with food, and without any easy mechanism to open the bag until after cooking. Attempts to open the bag prior to cooking often compromises the utility of these bags. One is then unable to place things in the bag that one would like to heat in an oven.

[0008] Both home cooks and commercial chefs need better oven bags that are easier to use and compatible with the relatively high temperatures of conventional ovens. They need bags that allow both facile opening and closing, as well as ease of filling and emptying. Cooks would also benefit from oven bags that provide a tight seal to prevent leakage, but at the same time allow steam venting. Transparent oven bags are also desirable, because they allow the cook to view the bag contents without opening the bag.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

[0009] A first aspect of the disclosure provides an oven bag comprising first and second panels. The first panel comprises first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another. The second panel comprises first, second, third and fourth edges so disposed that the first and third edges are substantially parallel to one another, and the second and fourth edges are substantially parallel to one another. The first edge of the first panel is operatively associated with the first edge of the second panel. The second edge of the first panel is operatively associated with the second edge of the second panel. The third edge of the first panel is operatively associated with the third edge of the second panel. The bag further comprises an opening formed by the first and second panels defined in part by the fourth edge of the first panel and the fourth edge of the second panel. The bag also comprises a closure device operatively associated with the opening. The bag still further comprises a plurality of pre-formed perforations in at least one of the first panel and second panel, the perforations providing ventilation during cooking and forming a rupturable scoreline for opening the bag when desired.

[0010] A second aspect of the disclosure provides an oven bag with the features of that provided in the first aspect of the disclosure, wherein the closure device includes a drawstring and a plurality of holes in the first and second panels, said holes arranged in a substantially linear fashion along the fourth edges, the drawstring threaded through the holes in an alternating fashion. The bag further includes a pleat extending between the second edges of the first and second panels.

[0011] A third aspect of the disclosure provides a method of cooking food in an oven. Food is placed into the oven bag according to the first aspect of the disclosure, and the closure device is activated so as to seal the food in the oven bag. The bag and food are heated in an oven, heated air venting from the bag through the preformed perforations. The bag and food are removed from the oven. The bag is then torn along the preformed perforations to allow for access to and removal of the food.

[0012] In addition to the foregoing, the disclosure includes, as an additional aspect, all embodiments of the disclosure narrower in scope in any way than the variations specifically mentioned above. Although the applicant(s) invented the full scope of the claims appended hereto, the claims appended hereto are not intended to encompass within their scope the prior art work of others. Therefore, in the event that statutory prior art within the scope of a claim is brought to the attention of the applicants by a Patent Office or other entity or individual, the applicant(s) reserve the right to exercise amendment rights under applicable patent laws to redefine the subject matter of such a claim to specifically exclude such statutory prior art or obvious variations of statutory prior art from the scope of such a claim. Variations of the disclosure defined by such amended claims also are intended as aspects of the disclosure.

[0013] The above aspects and features of the disclosure will become more apparent from the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the oven bag in an open position holding food in accordance to the teachings of the disclosure.

[0015]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the oven bag in a closed position holding food in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0016]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the oven bag in a partially closed position holding food, having been partially opened along the plurality of pre-formed perforations, in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0017]FIG. 4 is a plan view of the bag shown in FIG. 1 containing no food, in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0018]FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the bag shown in FIG. 4 taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

[0019]FIG. 6 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0020]FIG. 6 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0021]FIG. 7 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0022]FIG. 8 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0023]FIG. 9 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0024]FIG. 10 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0025]FIG. 11 is a plan view of a bag in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0026]FIG. 12 is a flow chart depicting sample steps that may be taken according to a method of using an oven bag to cook food in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure.

[0027] While the disclosure is susceptible to various modifications and alternative constructions, certain illustrative embodiments thereof have been shown in the drawings and will be described below in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intention to limit the disclosure to the specific embodiments disclosed, but on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, alternative constructions, and equivalents falling within the spirit and scope of the disclosure as defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0028] Referring now to the drawings and with specific reference to FIG. 1, an oven bag 10 is provided constructed from a first panel 20 and a second panel 30, wherein the bag has an exterior 12 and an interior 14. These panels may be made from any material, but materials that having melting points (or ignition or degradation temperatures) of at least 400° F. are preferred. Materials include, but are not limited to, high melting point polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate and nylons as will be described in further detail herein.

[0029] The first panel 20 has first 22, second 24, third 26, and fourth 28 edges, so that the first 22 and third 26 edges are substantially parallel to one another, and so that the second 24 and fourth 28 edges are substantially parallel to one another. The second panel 30 has first 32, second 34, third 36, and fourth 38 edges, so that the first 32 and third 36 edges are substantially parallel to one another, and so that the second 34 and fourth 38 edges are substantially parallel to one another. The first edge 22 of the first panel 20 is operatively associated with the first edge 32 of the second panel 30, the second edge 24 of the first panel 20 is operatively associated with the second edge 34 of the second panel 30, and the third edge 26 of the first panel 20 is operatively associated with the third edge 36 of the second panel 30.

[0030] An opening 40 is formed by the first 20 and second 30 panels defined in part by the fourth edge 28 of the first panel 20 and the fourth edge 38 of the second panel 30.

[0031] A closure device 50 is operatively associated with the opening 40. In FIG. 1, the closure mechanism shown comprises a drawstring 52 looped through holes 54 in an alternating fashion. Looped in an alternating fashion comprises having the drawstring 52 threaded from the exterior 12 through a hole 54 to an interior 14 and back through an adjacent hole 54 to the exterior 14. The closure device 50 may be activated to close the bag. The bag 10 in the closed position is shown in FIG. 2. When the closure device 50 includes a drawstring 52, the drawstring 52 may be pulled taught bringing the holes 54 and panels 20 and 30 close together as shown in FIG. 2. The drawstring 52 may then be tied or knotted. The drawstring embodiment of FIGS. 1-5 is shown for illustrative purposes only. The bag 10 may include any type of closure device 50, some of which are shown in the other figures, and will be discussed in further detail below.

[0032] A plurality of pre-formed perforations 70 may be provided on the bag 10 as well as the bags of other embodiments, for example bags 110, 210, 310, 410, 510 and 610 shown in FIGS. 6-11. The perforations 70 may constitute a scoreline 75 to allow venting during cooking, and to form a secondary opening 45, as shown in FIG. 3, without necessitating the deactivation of the closure device 50. The perforations 70 and scoreline 75 may appear in any arrangement, shape, or size, and may appear on the first panel 20, the second panel 30 or both panels. As illustrated in FIGS. 1-7, the bags 10, 110 and 210 have the perforations 70 on both panels 20 and 30 around a perimeter 15 of the bag 10 forming the scoreline 75. In FIGS. 8-10, the perforations 70 form a scoreline 75 that is continuously looped. While the continuously looped scoreline 75 is shown on only the first panel 20 or second panel 30, a scoreline 75 may appear on both sides, such an embodiment being particularly advantageous as it allows for opening of the bag regardless of the bag's orientation. A bag may also incorporate more than one type of scoreline 75, e.g. in a particular embodiment, the perforations 70 may form both a scoreline as shown in bag 10 and in bag 310. The perforations allow air, water vapor, etc. to escape from the interior 14 to the exterior 12 of the bag, e.g. 10.

[0033] The oven bags of this disclosure may also incorporate one or more pleats 80, also referred to as “gussets.” The pleat 80 in bag 10 is substantially parallel to the opening 40 as shown in FIGS. 1-5, and in FIGS. 6 and 7 in bags 110 and 210, but this is for illustrative purposes only. As demonstrated in FIGS. 8-10, the pleats 80 may also flank the bag, e.g., 310, 410, and 510, such that they are substantially perpendicular to the opening 40. However, the pleats 80 are also capable of flanking the bag, e.g. 610 shown in FIG. 11, and may also be substantially parallel to the opening 40. The pleats 80 allow the bag, e.g. 10, to be opened to a full volume more readily aiding insertion and extraction of food 90 from the bag 10. FIGS. 1-3 illustrate that when the pleat 80 is substantially parallel to the opening 40 as in bag 10, the bag can be made to stand upright, further aiding the user. Pleats 80 may be formed in any manner. In some embodiments, the pleats are formed from the first and second panels 20, 30, the pleat apex 82, see e.g. FIG. 5, extending from the second edges 24, 34. In other embodiments, the pleats 80 maybe separately formed panels heat welded or otherwise joined to the panels 20, 30.

[0034] The closure device 50 may take a variety of forms and the embodiments 110, 210, 310, 410, 510 and 610 shown in FIG. 6-11 are exemplary, but are not meant to be limiting in any way. As will be seen, not only can the closing device be provided in the form of adversity, but may also include, twist ties, handle ties, laces, zippers, tongue and groove fasteners and the like.

[0035] For example, in some embodiments, as shown if FIG. 6, a bag 110 may include a closure device that again comprises a drawstring 52, but instead of holes 54, the drawstring is held by a casing 56, which also allows the first and second panels 20, 30 to be pulled taught and the bag 110 closed. The casing 56 is operatively associated with the fourth edges 28, 38. In FIG. 10, a bag 510 demonstrates a variation on the embodiment shown in FIG. 6 as bag 110, in that both bags 110, 510 comprise a drawstring 52 held by a casing 56.

[0036] In some embodiments, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 9, a bag 210 or 410 may include a closure device 50 that comprises a first and second tie handle 57, 58 that may be knotted together to close the opening 40. The tie handles are formed by recessing center portions 29, 39 of the fourth edges 28, 38 from flanking portions 27, 37. Such a “hand tie” closure device resembles that found on plastic grocery bags.

[0037] In some embodiments, as shown in FIG. 8, a bag 310 may include a closure device 50 that comprises a twist tie 60 that may or may not be operatively attached to the bag 310 before use. When one desires to close the bag 310, one may pull and twist together the first and second panels 20, 30 and activate the twist tie 60.

[0038] In FIG. 11, a bag 610 demonstrates a closure device 50 that includes a first series of cross-ties 62 and a second series of cross-ties 63 running substantially parallel to each other and substantially perpendicular to the opening 40. When the user desires to activate the closure device 50, a cross-tie 64 from the first series 62 and a cross-tie 65 from the second series 63 are knotted together, e.g. as one would tie shoe laces. This process is then repeated with the remainder of the cross-ties 64, 65 of the first and second series 62, 63. As illustrated in FIG. 11, the bag 610 does not have an opening 40 formed by the fourth edges 28, 38, but in other embodiments the bag 610 may comprise such an opening in that position. The closure device 50 shown in FIG. 11 is a lace-type closure that resembles the laces on a football.

[0039] As described above, the panels 20, 30 of the bag 10 may be constructed of a variety of materials, but high melting point polymers are preferred. Such polymers include, but are not limited to Nylon, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Nylon 6, Nylon 6, 6, Nylon 6, 6/6, Nylon 11 and Nylon 12. The drawstring 52, cross-ties 64, 65 and other components of the bag may be made of similar materials. Transparent materials are preferred as their use allows the user to view the contents of the bag 10 without having to open the bag. In some embodiments, the bag 10 has a melting point of at least 400° F. The intended cooking temperature will help dictate the particular materials used.

[0040] As for dimensions, it is to be understood that bags may be constructed in accordance with the teachings of the disclosure to have any desired shape or dimension. However, for the purposes of clarity and best mode, certain exemplary embodiments and their dimensions are now described.

[0041] In some embodiments, the bag 10 measures about 10-25 inches by about 5-20 inches and comprises approximately 0.25 inch sized holes 54 punched about 1 inch apart and about 0.25 to 5 inches from the top with a scoreline 75 about 5-24.5 inches from the second edges 24, 34. In such embodiments, there is a pleat 80 substantially parallel to and extending to an apex 82 about 0.5-10 inches from the second edges 24, 34, and the drawstring 52 is about 10-75 inches long and is looped through adjacent holes 54 in an alternating fashion.

[0042] In some embodiments, the bag 10 measures about 16 inches by about 13 inches and comprises approximately 0.25 inch sized holes 54 punched about 1 inch apart and about 1.5 inches from the top with a scoreline 75 about 10 inches from the second edges 24, 34. In such embodiments, there is a pleat 80 substantially parallel to and extending about 3 inches from the second edges 24, 34, and the drawstring 52 is about 40 inches long and is looped through adjacent holes 54 in an alternating fashion.

[0043] In some embodiments, the bag 10 measures about 16.25 inches by about 13.25 inches and comprises approximately 0.25 inch sized holes 54 punched about 1 inch apart and about 1.75 to 2.25 inches from the top with a scoreline 75 about 10.25-10.5 inches from the second edges 24, 34. In such embodiments, there is a pleat 80 substantially parallel to and extending to an apex 82 about 3.5 inches from the second edges 24, 34, and the drawstring 52 is about 30 inches long and is looped through adjacent holes 54 in an alternating fashion.

[0044] The bag features described and illustrated above may be combined and arranged in any multiplicity in a given bag embodiment. For example, a particular embodiment of the bag, e.g. 10, taught by this disclosure may have multiple openings 40, closure devices 50, scorelines 75 and pleats 80. Certain features may not be used in a particular embodiment. The description and illustration of features for bag 10 apply to other bag embodiments, except as noted. The oven bags of this disclosure can be made in any size or shape, those qualities may be influenced by the size of the food that one wants to cook. For example, an oven bag for cooking a turkey would generally be larger than one for cooking a cornish hen. When particular features are described as being perpendicular or parallel to other features, those terms should not be considered limiting. That is, elements may have relative orientations to one another of other than 90 and 180 degrees.

[0045] In FIG. 12, a flow chart demonstrates a method 700 of cooking food using the bag, e.g. 10, taught by this disclosure. In a first step 710, food 90 may be inserted through the opening 40. In a second step 720, the closure device 50 is activated to seal the food 90 in the bag 10. In a third step 730, the bag 10 and food 90 are heating in an oven. In a fourth step 740, the bag 10 and food 90 are removed from the oven. In a fifth step 750, the bag 10 is torn using the pre-formed perforations 70 along the scoreline 75 to allow for access and removal of the food 90. The order of the above-described steps may be altered, steps deleted, and steps added before, after or in between the described steps. The user may wish to activate and deactivate the closure device at various times during the cooking process so as to add or remove food, spices, liquid, etc. The food may be removed from the opening 40 without using the perforations 70 to form a secondary opening 75.

[0046] In some embodiments, the user preheats the oven to 350° F., and if roasting to 325° F. The bag 10 is placed in a baking pan without allowing the bag to hang outside of the pan. Food is placed inside the bag optionally along with spices, sauces and vegetables. The bag is closed using the drawstring 52 and the drawstring placed inside the pan. The bag is positioned in the oven to allow room for bag expansion during cooking without the bag touching the oven walls or racks. The user bakes the food according to recipe, but depending on the bag material composition does not use temperatures above 400° F. or 200° C. Food is served by carefully tearing the bag along the scoreline 75.

[0047] The foregoing description of bags and methods have been set forth merely to illustrate the disclosure and are not intended to be limiting. Because modifications of the disclosed embodiments incorporating the spirit and substance of the disclosure may occur to persons skilled in the art, the disclosure should be construed to include everything within the scope of the appended claims and equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7543530 *Jul 31, 2007Jun 9, 2009Robert CohnBarrier submersion cooking pouch and basket
US8342081May 1, 2009Jan 1, 2013Bsc Technologies, Inc.Barrier submersion cooking pouch and basket
US20070164035 *Jan 12, 2007Jul 19, 2007M&Q Plastic Products, Inc.Contour Fit Pan Liner For A Food Service Pan
US20120174373 *Jul 8, 2011Jul 12, 2012Whitney Steven GSterile electronics bag and sterile closure mechanism
US20130323369 *May 29, 2012Dec 5, 2013Rand PetermanCompact microwavable bag
EP1955962A1 *Feb 12, 2007Aug 13, 2008Pierre-Olivier ChristenFlexible packaging
WO2008124600A1 *Apr 4, 2008Oct 16, 2008Ernest E BachertHigh temperature stand-up oven bag
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/207, 383/76, 383/120, 383/75, 383/106, 383/102, 383/71
International ClassificationB65D33/28, B65D75/58, B65D81/34, B65D33/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2205/02, B65D75/5827, B65D33/165, B65D81/343, B65D33/28
European ClassificationB65D75/58E, B65D33/28, B65D81/34C, B65D33/16D4