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Publication numberUS20040253129 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/891,642
Publication dateDec 16, 2004
Filing dateJul 15, 2004
Priority dateAug 31, 1999
Publication number10891642, 891642, US 2004/0253129 A1, US 2004/253129 A1, US 20040253129 A1, US 20040253129A1, US 2004253129 A1, US 2004253129A1, US-A1-20040253129, US-A1-2004253129, US2004/0253129A1, US2004/253129A1, US20040253129 A1, US20040253129A1, US2004253129 A1, US2004253129A1
InventorsGary Sorensen, Michael Morgan
Original AssigneeSorensen Gary P., Morgan Michael D.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid venting surgical cassette
US 20040253129 A1
Abstract
A surgical system having a cassette with an aspirant vent line that permits a fluidic connection between the inlet to a aspirant pump and the outlet of the aspirant pump through a vent valve. When the aspiration vent valve is open, fluid flows from the pump outlet into the pump inlet, thereby releasing any pressure within the pump inlet. Such a system does not require a second source of irrigation fluid, minimizes pressure surges into the irrigation fluid line and does not affect the fluidic performance of the aspiration system.
Images(3)
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Claims(1)
We claim:
1. A cassette, comprising:
a) a body;
b) an aspiration line extending through the body;
c) an aspiration exhaust line extending through the body and connected to a waste bag;
d) an aspiration vent line extending through the body, the aspiration vent line connected on one end to the aspiration exhaust line and to the aspiration line on the other end; and
e) a vent valve located in the body in the aspiration vent line.
Description

[0001] This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/430,974, filed May 7, 2003, currently co-pending which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/407,388, filed Apr. 4, 2003, which is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/846,724, filed May 1, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,572,349 B2, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/437,392, filed Nov. 10, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,293,926 B1, and a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/153,371, filed May 28, 2002, and is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/925,989, filed Aug. 9, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,740,074 B1, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/771,945, filed Jan. 29, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,632,214 B1, which is a divisional of U.S. patent application No. 09/387,357, filed Aug. 31, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,261,283 B1.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates generally to the field of cataract surgery and more particularly to an aspiration system for a handpiece for practicing the phacoemulsification technique of cataract removal.

[0003] The human eye in its simplest terms functions to provide vision by transmitting light through a clear outer portion called the cornea, and focusing the image by way of the lens onto the retina. The quality of the focused image depends on many factors including the size and shape of the eye, and the transparency of the cornea and lens.

[0004] When age or disease causes the lens to become less transparent, vision deteriorates because of the diminished light which can be transmitted to the retina. This deficiency in the lens of the eye is medically known as a cataract. An accepted treatment for this condition is surgical removal of the lens and replacement of the lens function by an artificial intraocular lens (IOL).

[0005] In the United States, the majority of cataractous lenses are removed by a surgical technique called phacoemulsification. During this procedure, a thin phacoemulsification cutting tip is inserted into the diseased lens and vibrated ultrasonically. The vibrating cutting tip liquifies or emulsifies the lens so that the lens may be aspirated out of the eye. The diseased lens, once removed, is replaced by an artificial lens.

[0006] A typical ultrasonic surgical device suitable for ophthalmic procedures consists of an ultrasonically driven handpiece, an attached cutting tip, and irrigating sleeve and an electronic control console. The handpiece assembly is attached to the control console by an electric cable and flexible tubings. Through the electric cable, the console varies the power level transmitted by the handpiece to the attached cutting tip and the flexible tubings supply irrigation fluid to and draw aspiration fluid from the eye through the handpiece assembly.

[0007] The operative part of the handpiece is a centrally located, hollow resonating bar or horn directly attached to a set of piezoelectric crystals. The crystals supply the required ultrasonic vibration needed to drive both the horn and the attached cutting tip during phacoemulsification and are controlled by the console. The crystal/horn assembly is suspended within the hollow body or shell of the handpiece by flexible mountings. The handpiece body terminates in a reduced diameter portion or nosecone at the body's distal end. The nosecone is externally threaded to accept the irrigation sleeve. Likewise, the horn bore is internally threaded at its distal end to receive the external threads of the cutting tip. The irrigation sleeve also has an internally threaded bore that is screwed onto the external threads of the nosecone. The cutting tip is adjusted so that the tip projects only a predetermined amount past the open end of the irrigating sleeve. Ultrasonic handpieces and cutting tips are more fully described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,589,363; 4,223,676; 4,246,902; 4,493,694; 4,515,583; 4,589,415; 4,609,368; 4,869,715; 4,922,902; 4,989,583; 5,154,694 and 5,359,996, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

[0008] In use, the ends of the cutting tip and irrigating sleeve are inserted into a small incision of predetermined width in the cornea, sclera, or other location. The cutting tip is ultrasonically vibrated along its longitudinal axis within the irrigating sleeve by the crystal-driven ultrasonic horn, thereby emulsifying the selected tissue in situ. The hollow bore of the cutting tip communicates with the bore in the horn that in turn communicates with the aspiration line from the handpiece to the console. A reduced pressure or vacuum source in the console draws or aspirates the emulsified tissue from the eye through the open end of the cutting tip, the cutting tip and horn bores and the aspiration line and into a collection device. The aspiration of emulsified tissue is aided by a saline flushing solution or irrigant that is injected into the surgical site through the small annular gap between the inside surface of the irrigating sleeve and the cutting tip.

[0009] During surgery, the hollow, resonating tip can become occluded. During occlusion, vacuum can build in the aspiration line downstream of the occlusion. When the occlusion eventually breaks apart, this pent up vacuum is released into the eye which can, depending upon the amount of vacuum, draw a significant amount of fluid from the eye, thereby increasing the risk of anterior chamber collapse. To address this concern, modem surgical console can detect increases in aspiration line vacuum beyond normal operating parameters and therefore predict occlusions. These consoles can then either stop or slow the aspiration pump, or sound an alarm so that the surgeon can take appropriate precautions.

[0010] The cassettes used in modem consoles also allow the aspiration line to be vented, either to atmosphere or to a liquid so as to reduce or eliminate vacuum surge upon occlusion break. Prior art air vented cassettes allow ambient air to enter the aspiration line, however, venting air into the aspiration line changes the fluidic performance of the aspiration system. Liquid venting systems allow irrigation fluid to bleed into the aspiration line, thereby reducing any impact on the fluidic performance of the aspiration system. Liquid venting cassettes are more fully described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,832,685 and 4,935,005 (Haines) and U.S. Pat. No. 4,713,051 (Steppe, et al.), the entire contents of which being incorporated herein by reference. When higher aspiration vacuums are used, cassettes that vent the aspiration line to the irrigation line can cause high pressure surges in the irrigation line. Other systems provide a separate source of irrigation fluid to vent the aspiration line, requiring the use of two irrigation fluid sources and increasing the cost and complexity of the system.

[0011] Therefore, a need continues to exist for a simple surgical system that allows rapid venting of excess aspiration vacuum without introducing pressure variations in the irrigation line or the downstream aspiration line.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0012] The present invention improves upon the prior art by providing a surgical system having a cassette with an aspirant vent line that permits a fluidic connection between the inlet to a aspirant pump and the outlet of the aspirant pump through a vent valve. When the aspiration vent valve is open, fluid flows from the pump outlet into the pump inlet, thereby releasing any pressure within the pump inlet. Such a system does not require a second source of irrigation fluid, minimizes pressure surges into the irrigation fluid line and does not affect the fluidic performance of the aspiration system.

[0013] Accordingly, one objective of the present invention is to provide a surgical system having a aspiration line vent.

[0014] Another objective of the present invention is to provide a surgical system having a cassette that allows the aspiration line to be vented of excess vacuum.

[0015] Another objective of the present invention is to provide a surgical system having a cassette that vents the aspiration line to an aspirant collection chamber.

[0016] Another objective of the present invention is to provide a surgical system that vents the aspiration line without introducing pressure surges in the irrigation line.

[0017] Another objective of the present invention is to provide a surgical system that vents the aspiration line without affecting the fluidic performance of the aspiration system.

[0018] These and other advantages and objectives of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description and claims that follow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

[0019]FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a first embodiment of the system and cassette of the present invention.

[0020]FIG. 2 is a schematic illustration of a second embodiment of the system and cassette of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0021] As best seen in FIG. 1, first embodiment of system 10 of the present invention generally includes surgical console 12 and cassette 14. Console 12 may be any suitably modified commercially available surgical console, such as the SERIES TWENTY THOUSAND® LEGACY®V, INFINITI® or ACCURUS® surgical systems available from Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, Tex. Cassette 14 may be any suitably modified commercially available surgical cassettes, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,267,956, 5,364,342 and 5,499,969 (Beuchat, et al.) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,899,674 (Jung, et al.), the entire contents of which being incorporated herein by reference. Cassette 14 is held in operative association with console 12 by means well-known in art.

[0022] As seen in the FIG. 1, console 12 generally contains aspiration pump mechanism 16, which may be any suitable flow or vacuum based pump, such pumps being widely known in the art. For example, pump mechanism 16 may be a peristaltic pump roller head that interacts with a peristaltic pump tube formed by aspiration line 20 and aspiration exhaust line 34. Aspiration line 20 is connected to surgical handpiece 22 on one end and end 18 of aspiration line 20 opposite handpiece 22 interacts with pump mechanism 16 so as to draw fluid through handpiece 22. Aspiration line 20 is intersected between handpiece 22 and 18 by aspiration vent line 24. In fluid communication with aspiration vent line 24 is pressure sensor 26, which may be one of a variety of invasive or non-invasive pressure sensors well-known in the art.

[0023] Cassette 14 generally contains fluid reservoir 28. Extending from reservoir 28 at or near bottom 29 is aspiration vent line 32, which fluidly connects to aspiration vent line 24 through vent valve 30. Aspirant or exhaust from pump mechanism 16 is directed into reservoir 28 through aspiration exhaust line 34. Reservoir 28 may also vent to ambient through fluid line 41, waste bag 40 and vent line 36, which may contain antimicrobial filter 38.

[0024] As discussed above, while it is preferred that pump mechanism 16 be a peristaltic roller head and aspiration line 20 and aspiration exhaust line 34 be formed in one continuous length so as to form a peristaltic pump tube that interacts with pump mechanism 16, one skilled in the art will recognize that aspiration line 20 and aspiration exhaust line may be formed as a separate piece or pieces or may be formed integrally with cassette 14 and that pump mechanisms 16 other that peristaltic pump roller heads may be used, such as linear peristaltic pumps.

[0025] In addition, pressure sensor 26 is depicted as being contained within console 12. One skilled in the art will recognize that portions of pressure sensor 26, such as a pressure diaphragm (not shown) may be contained in or on cassette 14 and interact with a force transducer or other means (not shown) contained within console 12.

[0026] In use, cassette 14 is installed on or within console 12 and held in operative association with console 12 by means well-known in the art. System 10 is primed initially with clean surgical fluid so that a small amount of fluid fills reservoir 28. During surgery, pump mechanism 16 draws aspirant through handpiece 22 and into reservoir 28. If the vacuum within aspiration line 20 is too high and needs to be vented, vent valve 30 is opened allowing aspirant to be drawn off of bottom 29 of reservoir 28 (reservoir 28 being at or near ambient) and into aspiration line 20 (which contains a vacuum) through aspiration vent line 24. One skilled in the art will recognize that by varying the vertical position of reservoir 28 relative to aspiration line 20, various vent head pressures may be achieved. Reservoir 28 may be relatively small, and not capable of holding all of the aspirant collected during surgery. Waste bag 40 may be used to drain and hold excess fluid from reservoir 28, through fluid line 41 above bottom 29 of reservoir 28. Waste bag 40 may be integrally formed within cassette 14 or may be formed as a separate collapsible bag attached to cassette 14, as is well-known in the art.

[0027] As best seen in FIG. 2, second embodiment of system 100 of the present invention generally includes surgical console 112 and cassette 114. Console 112 may be any suitably modified commercially available surgical console, such as the SERIES TWENTY THOUSAND® LEGACY® or ACCURUS® surgical systems available from Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, Tex. Cassette 114 may be any suitably modified commercially available surgical cassettes, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,267,956, 5,364,342 and 5,499,969 (Beuchat, et al.) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,899,674 (Jung, et al.), the entire contents of which being incorporated herein by reference. Cassette 114 is held in operative association with console 112 by means well-known in art.

[0028] As seen in FIG. 2, console 112 generally contains aspiration pump mechanism 116, which may be any suitable flow or vacuum based pump, such pumps being widely known in the art. For example, pump mechanism 116 may be a peristaltic pump roller head that interacts with a peristaltic pump tube formed by aspiration line 120 and aspiration exhaust line 134. Aspiration line 120 is connected to surgical handpiece 122 on one end and end 118 of aspiration line 120 opposite handpiece 122 interacts with pump mechanism 116 so as to draw fluid through handpiece 122. Aspiration line 120 is intersected between handpiece 122 and 118 by aspiration vent line 124. In fluid communication with aspiration vent line 124 is pressure sensor 126, which may be one of a variety of invasive or non-invasive pressure sensors well-known in the art.

[0029] Extending from vent line 134 is aspiration vent line 132, which fluidly connects to aspiration vent line 124 through vent valve 130. Aspirant or exhaust from pump mechanism 116 is directed into vent line 132 through aspiration exhaust line 134 but is prevented from entering line 124 by valve 130. Exhaust line 134 empties into waste bag 40, which may vent waste bag 140 to atmosphere through vent line 136, which may contain antimicrobial filter 38.

[0030] As discussed above, while it is preferred that pump mechanism 116 be a peristaltic roller head and aspiration line 120 and aspiration exhaust line 134 be formed in one continuous length so as to form a peristaltic pump tube that interacts with pump mechanism 116, one skilled in the art will recognize that aspiration line 120 and aspiration exhaust line 134 may be formed as a separate piece or pieces or may be formed integrally with cassette 114 and that pump mechanisms 116 other that peristaltic pump roller heads may be used, such as linear peristaltic pumps.

[0031] In addition, pressure sensor 126 is depicted as being contained within console 112. One skilled in the art will recognize that portions of pressure sensor 126, such as a pressure diaphragm (not shown) may be contained in or on cassette 114 and interact with a force transducer or other means (not shown) contained within console 112.

[0032] In use, cassette 114 is installed on or within console 112 and held in operative association with console 112 by means well-known in the art. System 100 is primed initially with clean surgical fluid so that a small amount of fluid fills exhaust line 134 and waste bag 140. During surgery, pump mechanism 116 draws aspirant through handpiece 122 and into exhaust line 134. If the vacuum within aspiration line 120 is too high and needs to be vented, vent valve 130 is opened allowing aspirant to be drawn out of exhaust line 134 and into aspiration line 120 (which contains a vacuum) through aspiration vent line 124, effectively shunting positively pressurized fluid from exhaust line 134 into negatively pressurized aspiration line 120.

[0033] This description is given for purposes of illustration and explanation. It will be apparent to those skilled in the relevant art that changes and modifications may be made to the invention described above without departing from its scope or spirit. For example, one skilled in the art will recognize that by varying the vertical position of the distal end of exhaust line 134 relative to aspiration line 120, various vent head pressures can be achieved.

Referenced by
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US7326183Sep 28, 2005Feb 5, 2008Alcon, Inc.Intraocular pressure control
US7712802Jun 12, 2006May 11, 2010Alcon, Inc.Cassette clamping mechanism
US7713237Sep 28, 2005May 11, 2010Alcon, Inc.Surgical cassette for intraocular pressure control
US7764370Jun 30, 2006Jul 27, 2010Alcon, Inc.System and method to zero chambers in a surgical cassette
US7786457Jun 28, 2006Aug 31, 2010Alcon, Inc.Systems and methods of non-invasive level sensing for a surgical cassette
US7896839Mar 31, 2010Mar 1, 2011Alcon, Inc.Surgical cassette for intraocular pressure control
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US8272387Jun 30, 2006Sep 25, 2012Novartis AgSystem and method for the modification of surgical procedures using a graphical drag and drop interface
US8396232Jul 25, 2007Mar 12, 2013Novartis AgSurgical console operable to playback multimedia content
US8430840Oct 6, 2011Apr 30, 2013Novartis AgIntraocular pressure control
US8631802Aug 22, 2012Jan 21, 2014Novartis AgSystem and method for the modification of surgical procedures using a graphical drag and drop interface
US8721594Jun 19, 2007May 13, 2014Alcon Research, Ltd.Post-occlusion chamber collapse canceling system for a surgical apparatus and method of use
US20080114300 *Nov 8, 2007May 15, 2008Advanced Medical Optics, Inc.Fluidics cassette for ocular surgical system
US20110184374 *Jan 27, 2010Jul 28, 2011Gao Shawn XPeristaltic Pump and Cassette
US20120083728 *Dec 14, 2011Apr 5, 2012Gary SorensenPhacoemulsification hand piece with integrated aspiration pump
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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/435, 417/572
International ClassificationA61B19/00, A61M1/00, A61B17/00, F04B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2017/00199, A61M2205/6018, F04B43/1269, A61M2205/123, A61M1/0033, A61M1/00, A61M2205/3337, A61M1/0058, A61M1/0031, A61M2205/12, A61M2205/6063, A61B2019/448, A61M1/0066, A61B19/44
European ClassificationA61B19/44, A61M1/00H2, A61M1/00, A61M1/00K, F04B43/12G4