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Publication numberUS2004027 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1935
Filing dateOct 27, 1933
Priority dateOct 27, 1933
Publication numberUS 2004027 A, US 2004027A, US-A-2004027, US2004027 A, US2004027A
InventorsDonald E Baxter
Original AssigneeDonald E Baxter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure for containers
US 2004027 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. E. BAXTER Filed Oct. 27, 1955 cLosURE Fon CONTAINERS June 4, 1935.

Patented yJune 4, 1935 ammi wat?

PATENTl ori-lcs i cLosUna ron commas l mmmnsummannlmcm. K Applicants october :1, lass, semi No. amants'- s cmm. (ci. zia-v4) This invention relates to closures and relates more particularly to closures for containers holding sterile iiuids 'such as intravenous solutions,

etc.

It is a general object of the invention to provide a simple, practical and effective closureV lmeans for a container that is operable to positively prevent the entrance of air or foreign mate rial into the container.

Another object of the invention is to provide a closure for a container that involves va novel and effective sealing means thatprovides a perfectly air-tight seal for the container whereby its contents may beipreserverd indefinitely.

Another object of the invention is to provide a closure for a container that includes a sealing means that allows the air to be exhausted from' vthecontainer to insure the preservation of its contents.

Another object of the invention is to provide a closure for a container that facilitates the sterilization of the contents of the container and that visibly indicating that a vacuum is maintained in the container.

may be easily opened to allow the contents to/be drained from the container.

v It is another object of the invention to provideV a' closure for a container that visibly indicates that the container is sealed against the entrance of air and foreign matter. v

It isa further object of the invention to provide a closure means for a container that includes a valve member or sealing member operable to open under a reduced pressureV or vvacuum to allow the air to be exhausted from the container and that automatically closes to effectively seal 'the con- I tainer when again subjected to eitternal or atmospheric pressure, said sealing member thereafter reduced pressure' or It is a further object of the invention to provide a closure means/of the character-mentioned that is simple and inexpensive of manufacture and that is easy to apply and use. y y

Other objects and featuresof the invention will be better and fully understood from the following detailed description of a typical form and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is had to the accompanying drawing, in which: A

Fig. 1 is a vertical detailed sectional view illustrating a typical embodiment of the invention employed on a container and showing the manner of exhausting the air from the container. Fig. 2

is an enlarged vertical detailed sectional view of the closure means and the upper portion of the container illustrating the sealing member in the iilcations that mayfall within yposition it assumes after the air has been exhausted from the container.` Fig. 3 is a vertical dey tailed sectional view o f they closure means and the upper portion of the container with the outer dise and cap in position. Fig. 4 is an enlarged" 5 perspective view of the outer disc, and Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical 'detailed sectional view ofthe threadedcap included in the closure means. D T'he improved closure means provided' by the .present inventionmay be embodied in forms for 10v use in connection with containers of various types and for use on containers holding fluids offdifferent characters. Throughout the following detailed disclosure, I will describe a typical form ofV the invention used on a simple bottle or container, 15 it being understood'that the invention is not to be construed as limited or restricted to the specific form and application about to be described, `but is to be taken as including any features or mod- 'I'he typical container C illustrated in the drawing is in the nature of a glass nask or bottle oi' more or less conventional shape. The container C has cylindrical side walls reduced in diameter at the upper portion of the container to provide a substantially cylindrical neck N. The exterior a surface of the neck N is cylindricallycurved and f is provided with a continuous thread T. The wall of the opening O in the neck N is smooth and is 30 cylindrically curved. The upper end of the neck N is flat and normal to the longitudinal axis of the container C.

' The closure means of the present invention includes generally. e, body or plug III for arrange- 35 ment in the opening O of the container neck N and havingan air inlet opening II vand a iuid discharge opening I2, a removable valve member or sealing member I3 for closing'the upper ends of the openings II and I2, an outer protective 40 and sealing (llsc I4, and a cap I5 for clamping. the disc I4 in position.

i The body or plug I0 of the closure is shaped 4and proportioned to tightly flt in the opening O /ot the container. The plug I is preferably made 45 of,a good grade of gum'rubber to vhave substantially resiliencyy so as to bear outwardly against the wall of the opening O with considerable pressure. The tight iit of the plug It in the opening O.v and the inherentresiliency of the plug insures the effective sealingengagement of the exterior of the plug with the wall of the opening. The ,plug I0 is long or of considerable depth to have extensive sealing contact with the wall of the opening O. Anannularradial lip or flange yI6 is 55 the scope of the 20 2y provided on the plug III to bear and seal against the upper end of the neck N. In the particular structure illustrated. the nance I9 is of the san-iev external diameter as the neck of the container. The upper end I1 of theplug III is preferably flat and smooth.

In accordance with the invention, the air inlet opening II and the discharge opening I2 extend longitudinally through the plug I0 to have their inner ends in communication with the interior of the container. C and to have their outer .ends opening at the upper surface II of the plug. The openings II and I2 are. spaced a suitable distance apart and are preferably located at diametrically opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the plug I0. The fluid discharge opening I2 which is provided to permit the discharge of the contents from the container C may have a restricted or reduced portion I2* adjacent its upper end to tightly receive and grip the end portion of adischarge tube (not shown) that may be insertedA in the opening to facilitate draining of the contents from the contents The tube I9 has its outer portion carried in the opening II and extends to a point ad- Y jacent the bottom of the container C. The opening I I may be proportioned so that the tube I9 is tightly or securely heldin position. A bead or rim 20 is provided on the outer end oi' the tube I9 and is counter-sunk or received in a recess at the outer end of the opening II. The lower or inner portion of the opening II may be enlarged in di-V ameter.

The valve member or sealing member I3 is normally arranged on the outer end I1 of the plug I0 to seal or close the upper ends of the openings II and I2 to exclude air or foreign material from the container C. The sealing member I3 is an important feature of the present invention as it permits air to be exhausted from the container C and automatically closes immediately after the air exhausting operation to seal off'the outer ends of the openings I I and Il thereby maintaining the vacuum in the container. The valve member'and sealing member I3 is in the nature of a sheet of rubber or similar material and' seals against the outer end I1 of the plug I0. It has been found practical to form the sealing member I3 of rather flexible rubber or rubber composition and to make it comparatively thin. The sealing member I3 is preferably disc shaped and is proportioned to completely cover the outer ends of both the openings II and I2 and to have sealing contact with a substantial part of the outer end I'I of the plug. In the preferred construction, the sealing member I3 is somewhat smaller in diameter than the outer end I1 of the plug I0 so that there is an exposed annular portion of the end I1 surrounding'the i and flat.

sealing member I3. The opposite surfaces of the sealing member I3 are parallel and are smooth side or end is then placed on the plugso that its annular end surfaces seats cn and seals with lthe exposed peripheral portion of the end I'I of the plug. The iltting F is connected with a vacuum line or reduced pressure pipe P by ports D. A central stop or stem E projects from the bottom4 or upper end of the socket S and is adapted to contact or engage the sealing member I 3' at a point spaced between the plug openings II and I2. Upon the vacuum being drawn on the pipe P, the air is first exhausted from the socket S and the atmospheric pressure within the container C lifts or raises the sealing member I3 from the upper ends of the openings I I and I2 So that air is admitted to the socket S and exhaust ed through the pipe P. When a predetermined or suitable amount of air has been exhausted from the container C, the sealing member I3 of course returns to its normal position where it engages the upper end I'I of the plug around the upper ends of the openings II and I2. Upon the fitting F being removed, the external pressure or. atmospheric pressure tightly holds the sealing member I3 on the upper end I1 of the plug and forces the sealing member I3 into the upper end portions of the openings II andV I2 so that it is cupped or' depressed at these points as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawing. This depressing or indenting of the flexible sealing member I3 on the upper ends of the openings II and I2 through the action of the atmospheric pressure, insures the tight effective sealing engagement of the member I3 with the plug at these points so that a perfectly airtight seal is provided around the outer ends of the openings in the plug. In actual practice, the atmospheric pressure may cause the sealing member I3.to

bear downwardly against and seal with the'bead 20 on the upper end of the tube I9. The flaring outer end part of the opening I2 permits the cupped or inwardly distended portion of the seal- `ing member I3 to effectively seal against this portionof the plug. It will be apparent that the presence of the depressions or recesses in the sealing member I3 caused by the atmospheric pressure acting upon the unsupported parts of the member at the ends of the openings II and I2 visibly indicates the preservation of the vacu-f um in the container C and therefore indicates the perfect air-tight sealing of the container. From the above it will be seen that the sealing member I3 operates as a valve during the exhaustion or the air from the container C and thereafter forms an effective seal for the container and indicates the perfect preservation of the contents of the container.

The disc I-I is provided to protect the sealing member I3 and to seal with* the sealing member and the plug I0 to provide a secondary or outer seal with the closure means. The disc I4 may be a simple sheet metal member of approximately the same diameter as the outer end of the plug II). The disc I4 may be lacquered or treated to resist the action of the fluids with which it may come in contact and has flat smooth surfaces as illustrated in the drawing. 4After the sealing member I3 has been positioned on the plug I9 and the air has been exhausted from the container C, the disc I4 is laid on the sealing member I3 to cover the upper and the exposed peripheral portion of the end I'I of the plug.

The cap I6 is adapted to be removably screwthreaded on the neck N of the container to clamp the disc I4 against the sealing member I3 and the exposed part of the end of the container.

The cap I1 may be formed of sheet metal, or the like, and is a simple member adapted vtobe `easily and quickly threaded on the neckNLand removed from the neck N. 'I'he cap I5 has a tubular portion 25 provided with a thread 26 for cooperatingwith the thread T of the neck N. vAn

inwardly projecting annular lip or flange 21 is` provided on the upper end of the cap I5 to engage the outer surface of the disc I4.v The ilange ing member I4 against the outer side I1 of theV plug and to bend or flex the peripheral portion of the disc I4 inwardly against the outer surface of the plug. In this manner the disc Il is clamped downwardly to hold the sealing member I4 at and in tight sealing engagement with the outer side of-the plug and to engage the peripheral portion of the plug to provide a second or outer seal.

It is believed that the operation of the closure means provided by the invention will be readily understood from the foregoing detailed description. The plug III may be readily forced into the opening O of the container to have its flange I8 bearing and sealing against the outer end of the neck N. The plug III may carry the air inlet tube I9 when it is positioned in the opening O, or the tube I9 may be inserted after'the arrangement of the plug in the opening. When the container C is to be closed or sealed, the sealing member I3 is laid in a substantially concentric position on the outer surface I1 of the plug so that it covers the outer end of the openings II and I2. When a reduced pressure or vacuum is to be provided Y in the container C the fitting F is arranged on the closure plug I lso that its annular lower end seats on the exposed peripheral portion of. the plug. The sealing member I3 automatically opens when the air is exhausted from the container and automatically tightly seals with' the upper endl I1 of the plug when again subjected to atmospheric pressure. The atmospheric pressure acting on the sealing member Il causes it to be stretched or distended inwardly at the outer ends of the p openings I I and I2 to have recesses or depressions at these points. This cupping or distorting of the sealing member I3 at the outer ends of the openings II and I2 insures a more elIective and perfect seal and visibly indicates that the vacuum is maintained in the container. The disc I4 may then be laid on the outerside of the sealing member I3 and the cap I5-threaded on the neck -N to have its :dange 21 clamp against the disc.

When the cap I5 is tightly threaded down on the neck N, the peripheral portion of the disc Il engaged by the ange 2`I may be flexed or bent inwardly against the outer end I1 of the plug and the sealing member Il is tightly clamped against the plug. The disc IlA further provides a secondary or outer seal, protects the inner sealing member I3, and holds the sealing member in tight engagementwith the outer surface I1 of the plug III. When the contents of the container C are to be preserved in a sterile state, the various parts of the closure are of course sterilized before use and are handled with the utmost care. The maior portion of the outer surface of the disc Il Vis exposed to` view and may be-suitably marked to indicate the contents of the container.

To open the container, itis merely necessary to unthread the cap I5 from the neck N and remove `the disc I 4 whereupon the sealing member I3 Vmay be easily disengaged or pulled from lthe upper lend I1 'of the plug. To drain thecontents from the container C it may be necessary or desirable to insert a drain tube in the opening I2 t'o carry the contents from the container when the container is inverted. As the beadA onV the upper end of the air inlet tubeIS is visible after the removal of the sealing memberA I3, 4there is no possibility of the inadvertent insertion of a drain tube in the air inlet opening II. When the container I4 is' inverted and'draining, the air inlet tube I9 admits atmospheric* pressure intov the container to provide for the `free steady drainage of its contents. After use, the plug I0, cap I5, and if desired, the disc Il may be sterilized for re-use. It is to be noted that the present invention provides a closure means that is particularly simple and inexpensive of manufacture and that is convenient to apply and use. The closure means in providing a perfectly airtight seal for a container, is particularly adapted for use on containers for holding intravenous solutions, etc. Further, the closure means may be easily sterilized and maintained in a sterile condition, and the provision of the inner sealing member and the protective outer sealing disc I4 positively prevents the accidental breaking of the seal and contamination of the contents of the container.

The sealing member I 5 may be viewed at any time. by removing the cap I5 and disc I 4 to determine the condition of the contents of the con- Y The indenting or depression of the sealtainer. ing member I 2 at the outer ends of the openings II and I2 visibly indicates that the vacuum is being maintained in the container. If these in-` dentations or recesses are not present in the sealing member it may indicate that the seal has been broken and that the contents of the container C may be contaminated or unfit for use.

Having described only a typical form and application of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific form and application herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any modiilcations or variations that may appear to those skilled in the art or fall within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

l. Closure means for the opening of a container including, a closure body closing the opening and having a discharge opening communicating with the interior of the container, a removable sealing member arranged on the outer end of the body and sealing the outer end of the discharge opening through the action of atmospheric pressure. a removable disc covering the sealing member, and means for clamping the disc against the sealing member. Q 2. Closure means for the opening of a container including, a closure body for closing the opening and having an opening in communication with the interior of the container, a removable sealing member engaging the outer end of the body and covering the end of the latter opening, the seal- 1 ot the plug.

sealing member. and means for clamping the said part against the sealing member and body.

3. CIOIUB melhl 101' th Opel-'tml 0! l GQ11151136! inoludins. a plus in the `opening having two spaced openings in communication with the interior of the container, a comparatively thin sealing member removably arranged on the outer end oi the plug over the ends o! its openings. the member being flexible to be tightly forced against the plug to seal therewithby atmospheric pressure when a reduced pressure is present in thecontainer, a removable disc covering the sealing member, and a cap threaded on the container and clamping the disc on the' sealing member and' outer end 4. Closure means Iorthe opening of a container including, a plug in the opening having two spaced openings in communicatlon'withi-the interior oi' the container, removable ilexible disc of rubber on the,` outer end of the plug covering its openings. there-being an emular portion oi the end of the plug exposed aroundA seid dise. an aix-inlet tube having a portion'carried in lone o! the openings and extending to a remote point in' the container. an outer disc arranged against the rubber disc, and a member threaded on the container and clamping the outer disc against the rubber disc and the said exposed portion of the plug. p

5. In combination with a container having an open end, a closure for said open end, said olosure being provided with two opening therethrough, avthin elastic seal engaging theouteru vface oi said closure and extending overisaid DONALD BAXTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2421313 *Dec 12, 1941May 27, 1947Baxter Laboratories IncClosure for containers
US2424151 *Mar 27, 1944Jul 15, 1947Tanglefoot CompanyReservoir for atomizers
US2457120 *Nov 28, 1944Dec 28, 1948Baxter Laboratories IncContainer and method of using same
US3337074 *Dec 6, 1963Aug 22, 1967Baxter Don IncParenteral liquid container and method of making same
US5807359 *Jun 8, 1993Sep 15, 1998Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction system
US5931822 *Sep 14, 1998Aug 3, 1999Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction system
US6244311Jan 29, 1999Jun 12, 2001Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMethod and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6358232Jan 29, 1999Mar 19, 2002Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMethod and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6368310Jun 11, 1999Apr 9, 2002Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction system
US6494869Jun 26, 2000Dec 17, 2002Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMethod and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6626877Mar 28, 2001Sep 30, 2003Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
US6672477Jan 11, 2002Jan 6, 2004Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMethod and apparatus for disposing of bodily fluids from a container
US6673055Apr 4, 2002Jan 6, 2004Bemis Manufacturing CompanyWith automatic cleaning and draining
US7115115Dec 23, 2003Oct 3, 2006Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction system
US7585292Apr 29, 2004Sep 8, 2009Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction apparatus and draining of same
US7674248Jan 7, 2004Mar 9, 2010Bemis Manufacturing CompanyMedical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/276, 604/404, 215/DIG.300, 215/311, 215/309, 604/111
International ClassificationB65D51/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/03, B65D51/002
European ClassificationB65D51/00B