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Publication numberUS2004202 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1935
Filing dateNov 2, 1928
Priority dateNov 2, 1928
Publication numberUS 2004202 A, US 2004202A, US-A-2004202, US2004202 A, US2004202A
InventorsHorton Albert F
Original AssigneeBoston Wire Stitcher Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tag printing and stapling machine
US 2004202 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 11, 1935. A. F. HORTON TAG PRINTING AND STAPLING MACHINE FiledNov. 2, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet l WWW MW w 4 June 11, 1935. A. F. HORTON TAG PRINTING AND STAPLING MACHINE Filed Nov. 2, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet June 11, 1935. A. F. HORTON TAG PRINTING "AND \STAPLING MACHINE 7 Filed Nov. 2, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ava/i; .72

Patented June 11, 1935 TAG PRINTING AND STAPLING momma Albert F. Horton, Cranston, R. L, assignor to Boston Wire Stitcher Company, Portland, Maine, a corporation of Maine Application November 2, 1928, Serial No. 316,836

This invention relates to an automatic tag- 19 Claims.

printing and -aflixing machine for printing pricetags, tickets, labels. and the like and simultaneously attaching the same to hosiery,-garments or other articles of commerce.

One object of the invention is to provide a machine for feeding price-tags, tickets, labels and the like in strip form and simultaneously printing a tag, severing it from the strip, and

stitching it to the work.

Another object of the invention is to provide.

an automatic tag-printing and -aflixing machine wherein the tags or the like are fed through the machine and printed with price symb indicia by means actuated by or stapling-mechanism. i

01s or other from the Another object of the invention is to provide an automatic tag-afiixing machine wherein the tags, or the like, are fed' through the machine in strip form and individually detached from the strip by severing means actuated by or from the stapling-mechanism.

forth in the following specification which describes a preferred form of construction of the invention, by way of example only,- as illustrated by the accompanying drawings. ings:

the draw- Fig. i is a part-sectional side elevation of the improved tag-printing and -afiixing machine shown as embodied in a preferred form of construction;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged front elevation of the machine showing the stapling-head lowered against the work;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the parts in position near the completion of thestapling operation;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view of the front of the machine, showing the stapling-head raised and the ink pad positioned against t type;

he printing Fig. 5 is a plan view of the machine;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the base of the machine showing the strip of tags and the feeding-mechanism therefor;

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the machine taken on line 'l-'l of- Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of the rear portion of themachine, showing the means for sup tag-strip spool or roll; and

porting the Fig. 9 is 'a perspective view showing a portion of the tag-strip.

The invention is herein illustrated and described as embodied in a hand-operated machine adapted to affix price tags to hosiery, underwear 5 and other articles of commerce, but it is to be understood thatcertain or all of its features may be applied to use with machines of other types; and that in lieu of price-tags, other devices such as tickets, labels and the like in strip or other form may also be used without departing from the scope of the invention. For the sake of brevity, however, the strip to be fed and printed in the machine will be hereinafter referred to as comprising tags.

In general, the improved machine comprises a base or standard having a stapling-arm hinged thereto. The stapling-arm is constructed to provide a magazine for holding a supply of staples and at its outer end is a head carrying the staplingor stitching-mechanism for aflixing the tags to the work. The head also carries means for printing suitable price symbols or other indicia on the tags as they are aflixed to the work. Preferably, the tags used with the machine are in strip form, the strip being rolled or coiled on a spool rotatively mounted at the rear of the base of the machine. To provide that the tags may be readily detached from the strip, the latter is perforated or slitted laterally at uniform intervals and the stapling-head carries cutters for parting the unslitted portion of the strip to sever the tag therefrom during the stapling operation. For holding the work in position in aflixing a tag thereto, the base is provided at its forward end with a platen, and preferably the platen or work-support carries means 'for clinching or bending over the legs of the staples after the latter have been drive through the tag and the work.

The machine is preferably so constituted that during its operation the initial downward movement of the stapling-arm causes the strip of tags to be fed forwardly the required distance to position the foremost tag over the work held on the platen whereupon it is printed and stapled or stitched to the work. The stapling-head is provided with a spring-pressed plunger which may carry the type for printing the indicia on the tag as well as the staple-driving means, and also the tag-severing means. .When the stapling-arm has reached the limit ofits downward movement the continued pressure applied-against the top of the plunger causes it to descend, and during this action three operations are performed simultaneously: a staple from the magazine on the arm is carried downwardly and its legs driven through the tag and the work and clinched against the underside thereof; the faces of the type are impressed upon the tag; and the tag severed or detached from the strip. when the plunger reaches the limit of its downward stroke the pressure of the hand is removed and both the plunger and the arm are returned to raised position through the action of springs or other suitable instrumentalities as provided for this purpose. The work is then removed from the platen and a new piece inserted, whereupon the opera tion is repeated.

Referring to the drawings, the improved machine as herein illustrated comprises a base designed to rest on a table, bench or other support and-preferably provided with cushioned feet 24. Hingedly mounted on the base I is the stapliiigarm |3 carrying the head l2 which is adapted to be pressed down against the work placed on the platen M at the forward'end of the base. The base II also supports a bifurcated frame l5 for carrying the roll or spool of tags T'in strip form. The arm I3 is constructed to serve as a magazine for holding a supply of wire staples s, and mounted within the base beneath the arm are means for feeding the strip of tags T forwardly a predetermined distance when the stapling-head is depressed.

The base II is preferably formed of a pair of similarly-shaped sheet-metal side-plates l6 held in spaced relation by a plurality of cylindrical struts l1 arranged at intervals to provide a rigid structure. The ends of the struts l'l have threaded holes for receiving the shanks of screws I8 passing through openings in the plates I6 and set up thereagainst to clamp the parts in place. Adjacent their forward ends the plates I61 are cut away or notched at is with the metal at the sides of the notches folded or bent to provide,

- respectively, inwardly projecting vertical fingers 20, and inwardly extending horizontal flanges 2|.

The fingers 20 are disposed beneath the rear of the head l2, while the horizontal flanges 2| constitute means for supporting the platen H which is secured thereto by screws 22, or other suitable fastening means, see Figs. 1, 2 and 3. At the lower corners of the side-plates l6 are angular strips of sheet-metal 23, made integral therewith or fastened thereto, the horizontal portions of which carry the feed or pads 24. Elongated openings 25 are formed in the rear portion of the plates |6 to save weight and permit access to the interior of the base for convenience in inserting or adjusting the strip of tags T.

The stapling-arm |3 may be constructed in the form of a flat-sided bar of suitable width to adapt the staples s to be straddled across its top. On the under side of the arm I3 is a hingemember 21, preferably formed from sheet-metal and secured to the arm by means of screws 28 shown in Fig. 7. The member 21 constitutes the means by which the arm I3 is pivotally mounted on the base one end of the hinge-member being provided with depending perforated ears 29 through which extends abolt or pin 30 secured fast in the side-plates l6, see Fig. 6. To hold the arm l3 laterally with respect to the base H, the sides of the hinge-member 21 extending rearwardly from the ears 2! are provided with upwardly bent wings or flanges 3| abutting the sides of the arm, see Figs. land '7.

The stapling-arm I3 is normally maintained in raised position, as shown in Fig. 1, by means of a coil spring 32 located at the rearward end of the base One end of the spring 32 is secured to a pin' 33 projecting from one of the side-plates l6, while its opposite end is attached to the extremity of a-tail-piece or finger 34 fasv tened to the bottom of the arm by means of a screw 26. The upward swinging movement of the arm I3 is limited by an angularly disposed saddle 35 extending between the side-plates l6 of the base beneath the rearward portion of the arm. The saddle 35 is preferably constructed from sheet-metal bent into U-shape, as shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, and fastened to the plates l6 by screws, rivets or other suitable means.

The stapling-head 2 comprises opposite vertical side-plates 36 fastened to the sides of the arm l3. The plates 36 extend upwardly above the top of the arm l3 to form a hollow casing and are rounded off on their rearward edges. Abutting the inner faces of the plates 36 are thinner lining-plates 31 secured in place by means as later described. The lining-plates 31 have their lower edges spaced slightly above the top of the arm |3 to provide a channel for the upper cross-bars of the staples s, see Fig. 7, and the outer plates 36 are recessed adjacent the sides of the arm to permit the legs of the staples to readily slide therealong. The forward portions of the lining-plates 31 are cut away except at the bottom, where the metal is slitted to form pointed prongs 39 bent inwardly to provide a rest for supporting the lower end of a coil spring 40 which operates the stapling-plunger in the manner as later explained.

The lining-plates 31 are held in position abutting the inner faces of the plates 36 by spacers 4| and 42. The upper spacer 4| has a hexagonal body, the ends of which are bored and threaded to receive the shanks of screws 43 project-1 ing through holes in the plates. The lower spacer 42 is constructed in the form of a stud having an enlarged central portion arranged with its shoulders abutting the inner faces of the lining-plates 31 and its reduced ends inserted through holes in the outer plates 36. The spacer 42 is employed as a guide for a spring 44 which operates a staple-pusher 45 to be next described.

The staple-pusher 45 consists of a sheet-metal slide of inverted U-shape, arranged with its sides straddling the top of. the arm l3 as shown in Fig. 7. The rearward end of the staple-pusher 45 is provided with a tail-piece 46 having a hook 41 engaged through an opening in the bottom of a curved finger-loop 48. The forward end of the finger-loop 48 is slitted to adapt it to receive the end of the fiat ribbon-like spring 44, which is looped through the slits to secure it thereto. The forward end of the spring 44 is cured to a cross-member 50 held between the inner side-plates 31. From the coil the spring 44 extends down under the spacer 42, and reaching back to the pusher 45 tends to slide the latter on the arm l3 to feed the staples forward to deliver them individually under the staple-driver in the manner as later morefully explained.

A staple-guard 5|, constructed from an angularly folded sheet-metal strip, is welded to one side of the arm |3, see Fig. 5, with its upper part overlying the top of thearm in spaced relation with respect thereto as shown in Fig. 7. The staples s slide in the space between the overhanging guard 5| and the top of the arm l3 and are thereby restrained from rising up on the arm. The stapling-mechanism is operated from a reciprocating plunger 52 constructed in the form of a hollow or part-tubular shell which may be struck-up from sheet-metal. The opposite sides of the plunger 52 straddle the forward sides of the head [2 and are. bent inwardly to provide runners 53, see Fig. 1, which slide in vertical grooves 54 formed in the outer faces of the plates 36. At the top of the plunger 52 is a knob or presser 55 having its hub 55 fitted within the sides of the plunger and fastened in place by a screw 51 reaching through from the front. A pin 58 projects downwardly from the hub 56 and passes through'the upper coils of the spring 49 which, as before explained, has its lower end resting on the prongs 39. The spring 40, as will be observed by reference to Fig. '7, acts to raise the plunger 52 to its uppermost position, and to return it to this position after each stroke is made to apply a staple to the work.

The staple-driver is of usual form, being constructed as a fiat blade 59 shouldered on its lateral edges to provide-narrow splines 60 which slide in vertical grooves or guideways 6| formed on the inner faces of the side-plates 35. The staple-driver 59 is held in parallel spaced relation with respect to the forward wall of the plunger 52 by means of a shouldered stud 52. The stud 62 has a. reduced portion riveted through the front of the plunger 52, and-a. reduced shank at its rearward end projecting into a hole in the staple-driver. Preferably, the staple-driver is provided with two holes for this purpose so that it may be reversed in position when its lower edge becomes worn.

The upper edge of the staple-driver-59 bears against the underside of the hub 56 to take the thrust of the knob 55 when the plunger 52 is slid downwardly during the stapling operation. It will be understood that the staple-driver is slid downward y in the grooves 6| to cause its lower edge to impinge again'stthe top of the forward staple fed off from the end of the arm l3 in the manner as shown in Fig. 7. It will be observed that the grooves extend downwardly across the front of the arm l3 so that when the leading staple in the series feeds off from the end of the arm its legs will be held in the grooves bearing against the forwardedges thereof. It is to be further observed that the legs of the forward staple are held 'ffiiztidfifllfihtli grooves 5| by the pressure of the following staples feeding from the rear until this foremost staple is carried downwardly by the descent of the driver 59.

The under side of the forward end of the arm I3 is cut away or recessed-at 53 to receive a staple-supporter 64, shown most clearly in Fig. '7. When the staple being driven slides downwardly beyond the control of the following staples it engages with the supporter 64 which holds it from dropping out of the grooves 5|; The staplesupporter 64 consists of a spade-shaped lever carried by a pivot pin 55 driven through the sides of the recess 53 in the arm I3. Normally, when the driver 59 is in raised position, the staplesupporter 64 is urged outwardly by the action of a plunger 65 which slides in a bore 61 in the .end of the arm l3, the plunger being forced outwardly by a coil spring 68 pocketed in the bore. Theupper rearward side of the supporter 54 is flatted off at 69 to adapt it'to strike against the forward end of the arm Hi to limit its outward swinging action.

It will be understood that the knob 55 is depressed against the force of the spring 48 to slide the plunger 52 downwardly to actuate the staple-driver 59, the reciprocatory action of the plunger being controlled by means which prevent the driver from being withdrawn or raised above the end of the arm [3 unless or until the staple being acted upon has been driven completely through the work. This means comprises an automatically operated trip-latch on the plunger 52 which is shown and described in detail in a prior application for U. S. Letters Patent, Serial No. 241,591, filed December 21, 1927.

The supporting frame I5 for the tag-strip 'roll or spool comprises a pair of parallel sheet-metal arms, the inner ends of which are pivotally connected to the side-plates l5 of the base by a spacer-rod 80. The spacer-rod 88 is bored at its ends and threaded to receive the shanks of screws 8| passed through holes in the side-plates l6, see Figs. 5, 6, '7 and 8. The ends of the spacer-rod 80 bear against the side-arms of the frame I5 to frictionally hold the latter against the inner faces of the side-plates 3, this construction permitting the frame to be swung upwardly to fold across the top of the machine and to adjust it to operative position as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawings.

Intermediate their ends the arms of the frame I 5 are provided with alined holes 82, in which are mounted the reduced ends of a spindle 84 adapted for insertion through the axial opening in the wooden core or spool 85*which holds the tag-strip roll. 86. The outer ends of the arm of the frame l5 are connected by a thumb-screw 83 which may be removed for placing the roll in position to provide or replenish the supply of tags T. When the screw 83 is removed from the frame 15 the sidearms may be sprung apart sufficiently to withdraw the ends of the spindle 84 from the holes 82, thus permitting the empty spool 85 to be removed and a full spool inserted in its place.

' The tag-strip T is fed forwardly to the staplingmechanismin the head l2 to position the foremost tag it beneath the driver 59 *by means engaging the slits 81 disposed equidistantly along the length of the strip. The slits 81 terminate adjacent the edges of the strip T, that portion of the strip between each two adjacent slits constituting one tag, see Figs. 6 and 9, and the marginal portion of the strip connecting the tags at each end of the slit is adapted to be severed by means to be hereinafter described.

The tag-strip T is brought from the bottom of the roll 86 into the rearward open end of the base I I and then passed through a feed-chute constituted by a tube 88 disposed beneath the staplingarm |3. The tube 88 is constructed from sheetmetal, folded to provide a flat top 89, relatively narrow sides, and an open bottom comprising inward extensions or flanges 9|. The bottom of the tube is disposed parallel with its top and spaced a suitable distance therefrom to provide an opening through which the strip of tags T may travel. The free edges of the flanges 9| are separated a suitable distance to provide a relatively broad slot or gap extending lengthwise of the tube 88, the strip being supported by the flanges 9| on the bottom of the chute.

Depending from the bottom of the chute 88 are ears 92, preferably constructed in bifurcated form from folded sheet-metal strips and having their connecting portions welded, soldered or otherwise suitably secured to the flanges 9| at a point intermediate the ends of the chute. An L-shaped bell-crank lever 94 is pivotally connected at its upper end to the ears 92 by means of a pin 95 projecting through alined openings therein as shown in Fig. 7. Through this connection the tube 88 is i so the cross-strip 96 of the lever.

, mounted on the base II by means of a bolt 98 passing through alined openings in its arms 93 and the side-plates I6, see Figs. 2, 3 and '1. Sleeves or bushings 99 are mounted on the bolt '98 between the sides of the lever 94 and the inner faces of the side-plates I6 to hold the lever from lateral displacement with respect to the base I I, see also Fig. 6.

Thebottom of the feed-chute 88 has a second pair of ears I00 depending from its forward end, these cars being seeured to the bottom flanges 9I in the same manner as the ears 92. The cars I08- support the end of a strip-feeding pawl IOI which is pivotally mounted therebetween by means of a pin I 02, see Fig. 7,'with its forward end disposed in the gap between the flanges 91 of the chute 88. The pawl I 0| is preferably formed from sheetmetal with its outer end curled upwardly to form a finger or toe I03 adapted to engage the slits 81 in the strip of tags T and to pass through the strip and enter a slot 90 formed in the top 89 of the chute 88 near the forward end thereof. For operating the pawl IOI to carry its finger I03 into successive slits in the strip T, resilient means are provided in the form of a wire spring I 04. The spring I04 is coiled around the pivot-pin 95 of the lever 94 with one arm I05 underlying the pawl IM and its other arm I08 bearing against The tension of the spring I04 normally retains the finger I03 at the free end of the pawl engaged in the slot 90 in the top of the tube 88.

The forward end of the stapling-arm I 3 carries 9. depending U-shaped bracket I01, preferably formed from sheet-metal and having its sides secured to the lower portion of the side-plates 38 of the head I2 by suitable means such as the screws I08, see Figs. 1 and 4. The bottom-plate I09 of the bracket I01 is spaced a suitable distance below the lower face of the arm I3 to provide a support for the strip of tags T as it is fed forwardly from the chute 88, see Fig. 7. As shown in Figs. 2, 4 and 5, the tag-strip T is in most cases "wider than the stapling-head l2, and therefore the bottom 1090f the bracket I01 is widened to accommodate the strip. To provide for this construction filler-plates I25, formed from rectangular pieces of sheet-metal, are inserted between the sides of the bracket I01 and the side-plates 35 of the head I2. The plates I are held in place by dowel-pins I 26 and the screws I08 which fasten the bracket to the head I2.

Fastened to the lower face of the arm I3 overlying the feed-chute or tube 88 is a plate I [0 provided with a depending, inclined extension or arm I I I, against which the. forward end of the tube 88 is adapted to ride. The inclined extension III of the plate I I0 terminates in a forward portion I I2 disposed in parallel spaced relation with respect to the arm I3 and projecting into the space between the sides of the bracket I01, see Fig. '1.

A, spring finger II3 projects from the forward.

end of the portion II2 of the arm III, being secured thereto by a screw II 4 or other suitable means. The tip of the finger I I3 is curled downwardly to adapt it to engagethe slits 81 in the tag-strip T, whereby it acts as a check-pawl to -margina1 portions of prevent retrogressive movement of the strip.

The plate IIO has an ear 5 projecting from one side thereof and provided with a hole II6 through which extends the upper end of a rod I I1, see Figs. 5, 6 and 7. The lower end of the rod H1 is pivotally connected at II 8 to the forward end of the short arms 91 of the bell-crank lever 94; see also Fig. 1. A coil spring II9 encircles the rod II1 with its lower end bearing againsta pin I20 projecting through the rod, while the upper end of the spring bears against the lower face of the ear II5 on the plate H0. The upper end of the rod II1 carries a pin I2] which serves to prevent the rod from being withdrawn through the hole H8 in the ear II5 under force of the spring 9.

The function of the spring I I9 is to actuate the bell-crank lever 94 when the arm I3 is depressed whereby to operate the feeding-mechanism to feed the tag-strip T forwardly. The forward movement of the arms 93 of the lever 94 is limited by an adjustable stop which, .as shown in Fig. 7, may comprise a screw I22 mounted in a flanged plate I23 fastened to the inner face of one' of the side-plates I8 of the base II, the screw being locked in adjusted position by means of a checknut I24 set up against the face of-the plate.

The sides of the bracket I01 are provided with laterally projecting ears I21, see Figs. 1 and 4, disposed at the forward ends thereof and preferably constructed integral therewith. Carried by the ears I21 are knives or cutters I29 pivotally mounted thereon by suitable means such as the bolts I28. The cutters I29 are disposed transversely of the arm I3 beneath the stapling-plunger 52 and their free ends are normally maintained in raised position by a yoke-shaped leaf-spring I 30 formed with upwardly bent ends as shown in Fig. 4. The spring I30 straddles the bottom of the bracket I01, being secured thereto by a screw I3I or other suitable means. The upwardly-extending ends of the spring I30 bear against the rearward bottom edges of the cutters I29 to force them upwardly, the upward swinging movement of the cutters being limited by stop-lugs I32 projecting laterally from theears I21, see also Fig. 5. It will be observed by reference to Figs. 1, 2 and 4 that the lower portions of the side-plates 36 of the head I2 are cut away or notched at v I33 to permit the tips of the cutters I29 to pass downwardly through the unslitted therefrom.

the strip T to sever the tags the plunger 52 as it approaches the end of its downward stroke, the sides of the plunger carrying plates I34 formed with inturned bottom flanges I35 for engaging the rounded ends I36 of the cutters. The action of the cutters in severing the tags t from the strip T is hereinafter more fully explained in connection with the operation of the complete machine.

To enhance the usefulness of machinesfalling within the scope of the present inventignfl means are provided for printing the sizes and prices of the goods or other indicia on the tags t as they are'aflixed to the articles. One form of device for this purpose is herein shown as including a typecase I31 which is carried on a horizontal tongue I30 projecting forwardly-- from the plunger 52, being secured thereto by. means of a screw I39. The type-case I 31 is preferably made in the form of a rectangular sheet-metal tube, the two opposite sides of which are extended upwardly in ears I and I42 folded one over the other to provide a slot I40 at the top of the case for the insertion of the tongue I38. The screw I39 is threaded through the folded ears I4I, I42 and screwed down against the tongue I38 to clamp the case in place.. By loosening the screw I39 the case I31 may be removed to provide for setting the type therein. The tongue I38 on the plunger I2 may be formed by slitting the bottom portion of its front face vertically and then bending the cutaway strip of stock outwardly in the manner shown in Fig. '7. In this way a recess I48 is formed in the bottom of the plunger 52 for receiving the rearward wall of the type-case I31,

whereby the case is held firmly in place and prevented from turning on the screw I39.

A plurality of type units I43 may be mounted within the case I31 with quads" or blanks employed when required to fill out the space;

Clamping-plates I 44 are arranged within the case I31 abutting two sides of the type and clamped thereagainst by screws I45. When it is necessary to change the type the case I31 is removed from the head of the machine in the manner before described and the screws I45 loosened to release the pressure of the plates I44 againstv the type I43.

A pad I41 for inking the faces of the type I43 is mounted on the end of an arm I49 and secured thereto by a screw I48, see Figs. 2 to 4. The arm I49 is pivotally connected at I58 to a crank-arm II which is fast on the forward end of a rockshaft I52 shown most clearly in Fig. 5. The arm I49 is loosely connected to the crank-arm I5I to permit movement thereof independently of the crank. The crank-arm I5I is provided with lugs I53 and I54 disposed on its opposite sides and adapted to engage the arm I49 to control its swinging movement in the manner and for the purpose as'later explained.

The rock-shaft I52 is journalled in cars I55 projecting laterally from a bracket I56 fastened to the side of the plunger 52 as shown in Fig. 5. The end of the rock-shaft I52 opposite to the end carrying the crank-arm I5I is provided with a secondcrank I51 from which projects a crankpin I58. The crank-pin I58 is adapted to ride along the edge of a cam I59 which is rigidly supported from the base II. As herein shown the cam I59 is formed on the upper end of the plate I23, hereinbefore referred-to as carrying the stopscrew I22 for the bell-crank lever 94. The plate I23 is extended upwardly abovethe top of the base II and the cam I59 formed by bending over a portion of the metal as shown most clearly in Figs. 2 and 7.

The crank-pin I58 is held in engagement with the cam I59 by means of a spring I68 coiled around the rock-shaft I52. One end of the spring I68 is fixedto a pin I6I driven through the shaft I52 while its opposite end is extended to engage 9, lug I62 on the crank-arm I 51. The form and location of the cam I59 is such as to cause it to release the crank-pin I58 when the stapling-head I2 is carried downwardly whereby the rock-shaft I 52 is turned by the spring I68 to swing the arm I49 to carry the pad I41 away from the face of the type I43. On the otherhand, when the arm I3 is raised after the stapling operation the crank-pin I58 rides against the cam to rock the shaft I52 and lower the arm I49 to bring the pad against the type. The lug I54 operates the arm I49 to cause the removal of the pad from the faces of the type, while the opposite lug I53 serves as a stop to prevent the arm I49 from-being accidently swung upwardly. The method of operation of the" complete machine is as next explained:

In Fig. 1 of the drawings the machine is illustrated with its base II resting on a suitable support and the stapling-arm I3 held raised under the action of the spring 32. The work W, which may comprise articles of wearing apparel or other objects to which a tag is to be aifixed, is laid across the platen I4 in the manner shown in Fig. 7. With the arm I 3 in raised position the bell-crank lever 94 carrying the strip-feeding chute 88 will be swung rearwardly under the action of the connecting-rod I I1, see Fig. 1, and the front end of the chute will be tilted upwardly under the force of the spring I84 to engage it with the plate H8 at the rear of the inclined arm III thereof. After the work, has been placed in position the operator presses against the'knob 55 to first carry the arm I3 downwardly. As the arm I3 starts to swing downwardly the bell-crank lever 94 is swung forwardly on its pivot 98 by the pressure of the spring II9, thereby carrying the chute 88 forward with its end sliding on the inclined arm III of the plate I I8. Continued downward movement of the arm I3 causes the chute 88 to be swung forwardly with its delivery end riding along the inclined arm III to finally bring it into the position as illustrated in Fig. 7. This action of the chute 88 causes the feed-pawl I 8I carried thereby to feed the tag-strip T forwardly a distance equal to the length of a single tag, it being understood that the extent of feed effected by the chute is regulated in accordance with different requirements by the adjustment of the stop-screw I22. As the tag-strip is fed in this manner the slit 81 in advance of the one engaged by the pawl I8I comes into register with the finger or check-pawl H3 and is engaged thereby to restrain the strip from retrogressive movement when the pawl I8I is carried back to engage a rearward slit in the strip after the completion of one operation of the machine. As illustrated in Fig. 7 of the drawings, there will be two tags in advance of the finger II3, the foremost tag t overlying the work on the platen I4 and the slit between this tag and the next adjacent one disposed in alinement with the cutters I 29. It should be further noted that the tags t are fed forwardly in the manner above explained during the descent of the stapling-head I2 on the arm I3 to the platen, this action taking place prior to the depression of the stapling-plunger 52.

' When the arm I3 is swung downwardly the bottom of'the. head I2 presses the tag t projecting from the front of the machine against the work W and clamps the later against the platen I4. It will be understood that the spring 32 which normally maintains the arm I3 in raised position has less force than the spring 48 under the presserknob 55 so that the plunger 52 will not initially be forced down on the head I2. When, however, the bottom of the head has clamped the tag and the work against the platen I4, then the continued pressure on knob 55 will slide the plunger 52 downwardly. As the plunger is slid downwardcontrolled in its upward movement by theauto-i-L-fl. matic action of the latch 18 in the manner as fully explained inthe pending application for patent hereinbefore referred to. g The purpose of- H this control is to prevent the staple-device 59 from being raised above the end of the arm I3 to release a new staple until the first one fed into the grooves GI has been driven out therefrom and applied to the work. As the downward sliding movement of the plunger 52 is continued the staple-driver 59 forces the staple s down through the guideways IiI with the legs of the staple straddling the sides of the staple-supporter 64. At this point the staple is held by the supporter G4 and in the normal operation of the device as the stroke of the staple-driver 59 is continued the staple will be driven into the work, puncturing the tag t and passing through the article therebeneath as the supporter 64 swings back out of the way.

As the staple s is thus driven through the tag 7 and the work the ends of its legs enter a groove I65 in the upper face of the platen I4 near the rearward edge thereof. The bottom of this groove is formed in the manner as usual in machines of the present type to bend the legs of the staple inwardly and clinch them against the under side ofthe work. i

' As the plunger 52 reaches the end of its descent the face of the type I43 mounted in the case I 31 is carried against the tag t to impressthe appropriate legend or indicia thereon. The type faces are inked previous to this printing stroke through the operation of the arm I49 carrying the pad I41. The arm I 49 is operated from the rock-shaft I 52 under the influence of the cam I59 during the upward movement of the stapling-arm I3 in the manner as later explained.

As the staple is being driven through the tag and the work in the. manner above explained, the flanges I35 on the plates I34 on the sides of the plunger 52 engage the rounded ends of the cutters I29 as shown in Fig. 3 to force the cutters downwardly against the tension of the spring I39. This action causes the cutters to sever the foremost tag from the strip at the slitted portion thereof, so that when pressure is removed from the knob 55 and the arm I3 is returned to its normal raised position the work and the tag,

affixed thereto may be removed from the machine.

After the three operations of printing, affixing and severing the tag from the strip have been completed, the pressure on the knob 55 is released so that the plunger 52 will be slid upwardly under the action of its spring 49. When the plunger is released the spring 32 comes into action to raise the arm I3 into the position shown in Fig. 1. During the upward movement. of the arm I3 the strip-feeding means is returned to first position as shown in Fig. 1 under the action of the rod II1 which rocks the bell-crank lever-94. It will be noted that the rearward motionof the lever 94 is effected positively through its connection with the arm I3 to carry the pawl I9I back lever 94 the'check pawl II3 holds the tag-strip from moving with it, while the feed pawl ml is caused to rock against the tension of its spring M4 to release its toe or finger I93 from the slit 81 in the strip. Therelease'of the pawl I9I is effected automatically as the edge of the slit 81 rides up over the curved finger I93 to depress the pawl against the light tension of its spring I94; the pawl being held depressed as its finger. I93 rides on the under side of the strip until it registers with the next slit therein. At this juncture the spring I94 presses the pawl upwardlyagain to cause its finger I93 to enter through the registering slit 81 in the tag-strip and the opening 99 in the top ofthe chute 88 to effect a firm grip on the tag-strip whereby it will be fed forward in the manner as previously explained at the next downward movement of the stapling-arm I3.

It is noted here that the forward movement of the bell-crank lever 94 is effected yieldingly through its connection with the arm I 3. That is to say, when the arm I3-is swung downwardly it acts through the spring II9 to rock the lever 94 so that the forward movement of the feedchute 88 may adjust itself to the required extent of feed. Stated briefly, the movement of the feed-chute is not in direct ratio to the movement of the arm I3, but is proportioned to feed the tag-strip T a distance corresponding exactly to the length of one tag as regulated by the stop-screw I22. This screw may be adjusted to allow the feed-chute to be moved forward to a greater or less extent in accordance with the length of tags or various sizes or shapes, the spring connection between the arm I3 and the bell-crank lever 94 permitting lost motion between these parts in the proportion as required.

It has been stated that the raising of the arm I3 causes the ink-pad I41 to be pressed against the type faces and this is accomplished in the manner as next explained. The spring I69 on the rock-shaft I52 tends to hold the crank-arm I5I at the forward end of the shaft in the position illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. With the crank-arm I 5| in this relation the arm I49 carrying the ink-pad I41 is sustained in substantially horizontal position against the action of gravity by the lug I54 on the crank-arm engaging its lower edge. As the stapling-arm I3 is raised under the action of its spring 32 the crank-pin I58 at the rearward end of the rockshaft I52 is brought against the curved edge of the fixed cam I59 to cause it to slide therealongv as shown in Figs. 1 and 4. The inclined edge of the cam I59 is so formed as to cause the crankpin I58 to rock the shaft I52 during this sliding engagement whereby to turn the crank-arm I5I to swing the arm I49 into the position illustrated in Fig. 4. As the arm I 49 is thus lowered into vertical position the ink-pad I41 is carried down into position beneath the face of the type I43 in the case I31. Now, as the turning movement of the crank-arm is continued at the last end of the upward movement of the arm I3, it acts with a camming effect, due to the eccentric relation of the pivot I59 to its axis, to draw the arm I49 upwardly whereby to press the ink-pad I41 firmly against the type to apply the inkthereto.

Immediately the arm I3 is depressed again, however,.t he crank-pin I 59 will ride off from the edge of the cam I59, as shown in Fig. 2, and its release allows the rock-shaft I52 to be rotated by its spring I99 to turn the crank-arm I5I whereby to swing the arm I49 outwardly to remove the ink-pad I41 from the type.

It will be observed from the foregoing that the present invention provides a machine which is entirely automatic in its operation for print ing, aflixing and severing the tags from the strip to apply them to various articles such as apparel or other merchandise. The machine may be loaded to supply a large number 'of tags and the requisite number of staples for affixing them to the work, and may be operated at a high rate of speed. by simply carrying the stapling-arm down against the work and pressing the plunger to print the tags and stitch them to the article to be labeled or price-marked. The improved machine thus provides for economy of time and labor in tagging or price-marking practically all types of goods and supplies a need which to my knowledge has heretofore not been satisfied.

The mechanism of the machine is simple in construction, efficient in action and designed for economy in manufacture, while being particularly staunch and durable to avoid wear or getting out of order.

While I have herein shown and described the improved device as embodied in a preferred form of construction, it is to be understood that modifications may be made in the form and arrangement of its mechanism without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Therefore,

without limiting myself in this respect, I claim:

1. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, means for feeding tags or the like into position to be stapled to the work held on the support, an arm movable with respect to the work-support, stapling-means carried on the arm and operative to insert the staples to attach the tags to the work, and printing-means operated from the stapling-means to print the tags as they are attached to the work.

2. In a stapling-machine, the combinationof a work-support, means for feeding tags or the like into position to be stapled to the work held on the support, an arm movable with respect to the work-support, stapling-means carried on the arm and operative to insert the staples to attach the tags to the work, means actuated from the movement of the arm to operate the tag-feeding means, and printing-means carried on the arm and operated from the stapling-means to print the tags as they are attached to the work.

3. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a base, a work-support on the base, means for feeding tags or the like into position to be stapled to the work held on the support, an arm hinged to the base to adapt it to be moved down against the tag and work held on the support, staplingmeans carried by said arm and operative to apply staples to attach the tags to the work, and printing-means carried by the stapling-means and operated therefrom to print the tags as they are attached to the work;

4. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a base, a work-support on the base, an arm hinged to the base to adapt it to be moved into position above the work-support, stapling-means carried by the arm, means for feeding tags or the like beneath the stapling-means,-means actuated by the movement of the arm with respect to the work-support to actuate the tag-,feeding means, and printing-means carried by the arm and operated by the stapling-means to print the tags as they are attached to the work;

5. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a base, a work-support on the base, an arm hinged to the base to adapt it to be moved against the work on the support, stapling-means carried by the arm, means for feeding a strip of tags or the like to position them above the work held on the support including a pawl engageable with the strip, oscillating-means for operating the feeding-means, and means connecting the arm ,to oscillate said operating-means during the opposite strokes of the arm.

6. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, an arm hinged to move toward and away from said support, stapling-means carried by the arm in position to operate on the work held on the support, means for feeding'tags or the like beneath the stapling-means, means for operating the feeding-means, and resilient means yieldingly connecting the arm with the operating-means, said resilient means actuating the operating-means to feed a tag or the like during movement of the arm.

7. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, an arm hinged to swing with respect to the support, stapling-means carried by the arm, means for raising the arm away from the support, means for feeding tags or the like beneath the stapling-means, a lever for operating the feeding-means, a link connecting the lever to the stapling-arm to positively actuate the feeding-means when the arm is raised, and resilient means connecting. the arm tooperate the lever to actuate the feeding-means when the arm is depressed prior to the stapling operation.

8. In"a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, stapling-means for operating on the work held on the support, and means for feeding tags or the like to the stapling-means comprising a chute for receiving a perforated strip of tags, a pawl for engaging the perforations in the tag-strip, means for moving the chute to feed the tags to the stapling-means, and means the chute forwardly to feed the tags to the stapling-means, means for retracting the chute to cause the feed-pawl to engage a new perforation in the strip, and means for holding the strip to prevent retrogressive movement thereof.

10. In a stapling-machine, the combination withthe stapling-means, of means for feeding tags or the like thereto comprising a chute through which the perforated strip of tags passes, a pawl engaging the perforations in the strip passing through the chute, a lever for oscillating the feed-chutameans for actuating said lever to move the chute rearwardly to withdraw its pawl from one perforation in the strip and engage it wiith a succeeding perforation, means for holding the tag-strip from retrogressive movement, and means operative to move the feed-chute forwardly to feed a fresh tag into position with respect to the stapling-means.

11, In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, reciprocable means for feeding a strip of tags or the like to successively present them to the work held on the support, a movable stapling-arm, stapling-means on the arm for afiixing the tags to the work, means-actuated by the movement of the stapling-arm to reciprocate the tag-feeding means, and means actuated during the operation of the stapling-means tosever the foremost tag from the strip as it is stapled to the work.

12. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a Work-support, a movable stapling-arm, a,

stapling-head on the arm, a stapling-means carried by the head, reciprocable means for feeding a strip of tags or the like to successively present them to the work held on the support, means actuated by the movement of the stapling-arm to sem 13. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, a stapling -arm movable with respect to the work-support, means forv feeding tags or the like to'the work held on the support, stapling-means on the arm for attaching the tags to the work, and means carried by the arm and operated by the stapling-means for printing the tags as they are attached to the work. Y

14. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a movable stapling-arm, a stapling-head on the arm, stapling-means reciprocable on the head, means for feeding tags orthe like to the staplingmeans, and means carried by the stapling-means and reciprocable therewithto print the tags as they are stapled to the work.

15. In a stapling-machine, the combination of a work-support, means for feeding tags or theing operation.

16. In a device of the type specified, the combination of stapling-means, means for feeding a strip of tags or the like relative to the staplingmeans, a pair of knives at the sides of the stapling-means, and means for actuating the knives during the stapling operation to cause them to sever the edges of the tag-strip.

17. In a device of the type specified, the combination of a work-support, greans for feeding a strip of perforated tags to successively position the individual tags above the work held on the support, stapling-means for applying staples to attach the tags to the work, and a knife at either side of the work-support operated from the stapling-means to sever theedges of the tag to detach it from the strip.

18. In a. device of the type specified, the combination of a work-support, meaiisgfor feeding a perforated strip of tags across the worksupport, stapling-means above the work-support, knives pivoted at the sides of the. stapling-means, a plunger for operating the stapling-means to staple the tags to the work, and means operated from the plunger to actuate the knives to sever the edges of the strip to detach the tagstherefrom.

19. In a device of the type specified, the combination of a work-support, means for feeding a perforated strip of tags across the work-support, stapling-means above the work-support, a plunger for actuating the stapling-means, a pair of knives pivoted at the opposite sides of the stapling-means, resilient-means for normally maintaining the knives in elevated position, and means on the plunger for moving the lmives downward to cause them to sever the edges of the strip to detach the tags therefrom.

ALBERT F. HORTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478115 *Feb 17, 1944Aug 2, 1949Linnemann Joseph GTagging device
US2482542 *Aug 16, 1946Sep 20, 1949Hanrahan Emery MTape printing machine
US2626565 *Jul 18, 1947Jan 27, 1953Schuster UlysseTicket and strip printing machine
US2638822 *Apr 22, 1950May 19, 1953Mackechnie Jr James GTicket printing and feeding apparatus for wire stitcher machines
US2720821 *Oct 2, 1951Oct 18, 1955Bateman Eugene WTagging device
US2889768 *May 29, 1956Jun 9, 1959Addressograph MultigraphPrinting machines
US2935019 *Sep 19, 1958May 3, 1960Standiford Fred WVertical proof press
US3112697 *Mar 2, 1959Dec 3, 1963Edward Pittman ClarenceAutomatic marking machine
US3343485 *Feb 5, 1965Sep 26, 1967Nashua CorpLabel printer and dispenser having reciprocable print carriage
US3660203 *Nov 19, 1968May 2, 1972Pitney Bowes IncTape printing and handling system
US3861280 *Aug 8, 1973Jan 21, 1975Sato KenkyushoPortable tagging machine
US5292048 *Dec 13, 1991Mar 8, 1994Weber Marking Systems, Inc.Semiautomatic lumber tag stapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/325, 493/343, 493/323, 493/375, 493/385, 101/288, 226/58, 227/100, 156/DIG.220
International ClassificationB65C5/00, B65C5/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65C5/06
European ClassificationB65C5/06