Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050014554 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/794,338
Publication dateJan 20, 2005
Filing dateMar 4, 2004
Priority dateMar 4, 2003
Also published asUS20070077985, WO2004079671A2, WO2004079671A3
Publication number10794338, 794338, US 2005/0014554 A1, US 2005/014554 A1, US 20050014554 A1, US 20050014554A1, US 2005014554 A1, US 2005014554A1, US-A1-20050014554, US-A1-2005014554, US2005/0014554A1, US2005/014554A1, US20050014554 A1, US20050014554A1, US2005014554 A1, US2005014554A1
InventorsJay Walker, James Jorasch, John Packes, Steven Santisi
Original AssigneeWalker Jay S., Jorasch James A., Packes John M., Santisi Steven M.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiplayer gaming device and methods
US 20050014554 A1
Abstract
A multiplayer gaming device allows two players to collaboratively play, for example, a Monopoly®-style game against the “house.” Each player may have his own game controls, coin dispenser/acceptor, and display screen. A larger display screen may display the game board and player game characters, shared by the two players and operated by the machine. The players may wager a flat fee per game, and are given an amount of game money to use for the duration of the game. Throughout the game, players take turns spinning dice represented on the display of the gaming device, and move around a Monopoly®-style board. As the players move around the board, game money is deducted as they land on properties owned by house players. A player's turn may result in his game piece landing on a game board spot owned by a house player, and cost the player $100 in game money. The game lasts until both players go bankrupt. The total number of game board spaces each player has moved without going bankrupt determines each player's payout.
Images(13)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(17)
1. A method comprising:
generating a first spin result for a first player;
generating a second spin result for a second player;
determining whether the first and second spin results are complementary; and
modifying a cumulative outcome based upon a result of determining whether the first and second spin results are complementary.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the first and second spin results are complementary when both spin results include matching symbols.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the first and second spin results are complementary when both spin results include compatible symbols.
4. A method comprising:
generating a first plurality of spin results for a first player during a first time period;
generating a second plurality spin results for a second player during the first time period; and
modifying a cumulative outcome based upon whether the first and second spin results are complementary.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein the first and second plurality of spin results are complementary when individual spin results of the first plurality include first game pieces that occur within a predefined second time period after compatible game pieces occur in individual spin results of the second plurality.
6. The method of claim 4 wherein the first and second plurality of spin results are complementary when individual spin results in the first plurality include symbols representative of secondary game pieces that occur synchronously with individual spin results in the second plurality that include symbols representative of secondary game pieces that are compatible with the secondary game pieces of the first plurality.
7. The method of claim 4 wherein the first and second plurality of spin results are complementary when individual spin results in the first plurality include first game pieces that occur synchronously with individual spin results in the second plurality that include second game pieces that are compatible with the first game pieces of the first plurality.
8. The method of claim 4 wherein the first and second plurality of spin results are complementary when individual spin results in the first plurality include first game pieces that occur within a predefined second time period after an occurrence of individual spin results in the second plurality that include second game pieces that are compatible with the first game pieces of the first plurality.
9. A method comprising:
generating a first plurality of spin results for a first player during a first time period;
generating a second plurality spin results for a second player during the first time period; and
modifying a cumulative outcome based upon whether individual spin results in the first plurality include first game pieces that occur within a predefined second time period after compatible game pieces occur in the second plurality.
10. A method comprising:
generating a first plurality of spin results for a first player during a first time period;
generating a second plurality spin results for a second player during the first time period; and
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome during the first time period based upon whether individual spin results in the first plurality include first game pieces that occur synchronously with compatible game pieces occurring in the second plurality.
11. A method comprising:
generating a first plurality of spin results for a first player during a first time period wherein individual spin results include outcomes with symbols and at least one of the symbols is representative of at least one first player game piece;
generating a second plurality spin results for a second player during the first time period wherein individual spin results include outcomes with symbols and at least one of the symbols is representative of at least one second player game piece; and
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome during the first time period based upon whether first player game pieces occur synchronously with second player game pieces.
12. A method comprising:
generating a plurality of spin results for a first player wherein individual spin results include outcomes with symbols and at least one of the symbols is representative of a first player game piece;
generating, concurrently with the plurality of spin results for the first player, a plurality of spin results for a second player wherein individual spin results include outcomes with symbols and at least one of the symbols is representative of a second player game piece; and
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome during the first time period based upon whether the first player game pieces occur synchronously with the second player game pieces.
13. A method comprising:
generating first spin results that each include a subset of symbols selected from among a set that includes at least one symbol that is a first game piece;
generating second spin results while the first spin results are being generated wherein the second spin results each include a subset of symbols selected from a set that includes at least one symbol that is a second game piece;
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome while the spin results are being generated based upon whether outcomes that include the first game piece happen synchronously with outcomes that include the second game piece.
14. A method comprising:
generating first spin results that each include a subset of symbols selected from among a set that includes at least one symbol that is a first game piece;
generating second spin results while the first spin results are being generated wherein the second spin results each include a subset of symbols selected from a set that includes at least one symbol that is a second game piece;
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome while the spin results are being generated based upon whether an outcome that includes the first game piece occurs within a predefined time period after an outcome that includes the second game piece.
15. A method comprising:
generating first spin results that each include a subset of symbols selected from among a set that includes at least one symbol that is a first game piece;
generating second spin results while the first spin results are being generated wherein the second spin results each include a subset of symbols selected from a set that includes at least one symbol that is a second game piece;
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome while the spin results are being generated based upon whether an outcomes that include the first game piece and outcomes that include the second game piece occur in a predefined sequence.
16. A method comprising:
generating first spin results that each include a subset of symbols selected from among a set that includes at least one symbol that is a first game piece;
generating second spin results while the first spin results are being generated wherein the second spin results each include a subset of symbols selected from a set that includes at least one symbol that is a second game piece;
continuously modifying a cumulative outcome while the spin results are being generated based upon occurrence of a sequence of outcomes that include the first game piece and outcomes that include the second game piece occur.
17. A method comprising:
generating a first plurality of spin results for a first player;
generating a second plurality spin results for a second player while the first plurality of spin results are being generated; and
continually modifying a cumulative outcome while the spin results are being generated based upon whether the first and second pluralities of spin results together include a complementary sequence of symbols.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to commonly-owned, co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/452,163, filed Mar. 4, 2003, entitled “MULTIPLAYER GAMING DEVICE AND METHODS,” the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to gaming and gaming devices. More specifically, the present invention relates to games and gaming devices involving multiple players.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Gaming devices (e.g., reeled slot machines or video poker machines) generate more than $15 billion per year in revenue for casinos in the United States alone. This figure accounts for more than half of the gaming revenue for a typical United States casino. The situation is similar in other countries in which gaming devices are popular, such as Europe and Australia. Accordingly, casino operators are interested in increasing the enjoyment of playing a slot machine in order to maintain or increase this level of revenue.

Since casino profits are directly proportional to the amount wagered by patrons, casinos are highly motivated to expand and retain share within their given market. Increased playing duration, average wager, and rates of play are key factors contributing to the profitability of the slot floor of a casino.

One way in which casinos have sought to boost profitability associated with these factors is to make the machines as entertaining as possible. Many techniques are currently used to entertain players at a slot machine, such as attractive colors and graphics, sound effects associated with winning payouts, and jackpots or bonus rounds that offer players the chance to win a large amount of money for only a small wager. While such efforts have made modem slot machines more entertaining than the previous generation of machines, entertainment options open to consumers have expanded as well. Casinos now compete not only with the casino across the street, but with alternative player entertainment options such as home theater systems, handheld video game devices, greatly expanded television and movie offerings, and the like.

Many players are attracted to table games such as blackjack, which are more expensive to operate and generate far less revenue for the casino. One reason some players prefer table games over slot machines is that there is a social element to table games. Psychologically, players may feel as though they are playing as a group—teaming up against the house.

Accordingly, a need exists for means by which casinos can provide increased entertainment for their players using gaming devices.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an example system according to some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an example alternative system according to some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating an example gaming device according to some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating an example multiplayer gaming device according to some embodiments of the present invention.

FIGS. 5A through 5C are plan views of a multiplayer gaming device according to some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a table illustrating an example data structure of a player database for use in some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a table illustrating an example data structure of a session database for use in some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a table illustrating an example data structure of a asset database for use in some embodiments of the present invention.

FIGS. 9A and 9B are flow charts illustrating an example process according to some embodiments of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

The invention overcomes the above and other drawbacks of the prior art by providing a gaming device for multiple players. In some embodiments, a multiplayer gaming device allows two players to collaboratively play, for example, a Monopoly®-style game against the “house.” Each player has his/her own game controls, coin dispenser/acceptor, and display screen. A larger display screen displays the game board and player game characters, shared by the two players and operated by the machine. The players wager a flat fee per game, and are given an amount of game money to use for the duration of the game. Throughout the game, players take turns spinning dice represented on the display of the gaming device, and move around a Monopoly®-style board. As the players move around the board, game money is deducted as they land on properties owned by house players. For example, a player's turn may result in his game piece landing on a game board spot owned by a house player, and cause the player to lose $100 in game money. The game lasts until both players go bankrupt. After the game concludes, the total number of game board spaces each player has moved without going bankrupt determines each player's payout.

In the following description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which is shown, by way of illustration, specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, and it is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that structural, logical, software, hardware, and electrical changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention. The following description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limited sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims. Referring to the drawings, note that the left most digit(s) of a reference numeral identifies the figure in which the reference numeral first appears. Also note that in block diagrams and tables, blocks and cells with identical labels but different reference numerals are intended to represent identical (or very similar) components in different contexts, environments, configurations, locations, networks, databases, and/or positions.

A. TERMS

Throughout the description that follows and unless otherwise specified, the following terms may include and/or encompass the example meanings provided in this section. These terms and illustrative example meanings are provided to clarify the language selected to describe embodiments of the invention both in the specification and in the appended claims.

The term “controller” may refer to an electronic device (e.g., a computer) that communicates with one or more gaming devices. In a manner known in the art, the controller may be embodied as a computer server and may (i) control the actions of gaming devices and/or (ii) receive and store information associated with the gaming devices. For example, the controller may employ one or more databases to record gaming device statistics such as e.g., coin-in, coin-out, jackpot information, theoretical wins, etc.

The term “game” may refer to a gambling event with a beginning and end that may encompass a number of outcomes (such as reel spins or hands of video poker) or span of time. The end of the game may be determined voluntarily (in which the player elects to stop play) or involuntarily (in which the gaming device terminates play).

The term “primary game” may refer to a gambling event (i.e., one or more chance-based event(s) executed in exchange for player consideration and yielding a potential prize) yielding a spin result. In accordance with the present invention, a primary game may be embodied as a reel-based slot machine game. Termination of the game may be established voluntarily (e.g., where a player elects to stop play) or involuntarily (e.g., where the gaming device terminates play based on the occurrence of a termination event).

The term “secondary game” may refer to a game employed by a gaming device characterized by an objective that is dependent on results achieved in a primary game. For example, a secondary game in accordance with the present invention may require a player to acquire game pieces throughout the course of playing a primary game or primary game session. The object of a secondary game may be referred to as a secondary game objective or overall game objective.

The term “game character” may refer to a character, which may be a cartoon and/or digitally generated, which is involved in the game playing experience. The character may entertain the player, explain payouts, try to steal objects from the player, try to defend objects held by the player, and the like. The character could be a life-like animation of a television character, or even just the audio associated with a well-known character.

The term “game money” may refer to non-cash value game currency for use during a gaming session. In some embodiments, an amount of game money may translate to a payout.

The term “outcome” may generally refer to the result of game, such as cherry-cherry-cherry in a slot machine game, a push in blackjack, a flush in video poker, the completion of a puzzle, the attainment of a goal, etc. Different types of gaming devices may have widely varying types of outcomes. Several are described in detail herein and still others will be apparent to those of skill in the art based on the present disclosure.

The term “spin result” may refer to an outcome that is the result of a player executing a given spin or handle pull. In accordance with the present invention, the spin result may be expressed in a number of ways. More specifically, the spin result may be expressed as a value (e.g., $5.00), as a factor based on which a value may be determined (e.g., 2× wager amount), or in any other suitable manner. In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the spin result may be communicated graphically, as a series of discreet symbols appearing on a first game area of the gaming device. Further, as mentioned above, the spin result and any corresponding prize or payout may be generated or determined randomly or through a combination of randomness and player skill. A spin result may include a subset of symbols selected from among a larger set of symbols. For example, the spin result “BAR-CHERRY-LEMON” may be a spin result determined from the symbol set “ORANGE, CHERRY, 7, BAR, LEMON, APPLE, PLUM, GRAPE, and PEAR.”

The term “symbol” may refer to any graphic or other indicia that appears on the reels of a gaming device, or in any game area of a gaming device, or on the display of another device that may represent an outcome or a portion thereof. Symbols may include for example an image of a piece of fruit and may be represented herein using text as in, for example, “CHERRY.” Typically the value of a symbol or a group of symbols is defined by a pay table. In some embodiments, symbols may include game pieces.

The term “game piece” may refer to an element of a secondary game that may occur in a primary game and then may be applied to achieving an overall game objective. For example, in a three-legged race secondary game, a “RIGHT STEP” game piece that appears as a symbol on a primary game reel may be used help players advance their racer along a track. In some embodiments however, the occurrence of a particular game piece may detract from achieving an objective. For example, if in the three-legged race secondary game a “RIGHT STEP” game piece appears repeatedly in the primary game (i.e., without a partner getting a “LEFT STEP” game piece), the player's racer may waste time turning in circles instead of advancing down the track.

The terms “secondary game result” and “cumulative outcome” shall be synonymous and may refer to an indication of a players' progress toward completing a defined objective. In accordance with the present invention, a game result may be expressed in a number of ways including e.g., a percentage of completion (e.g., 80% complete), a completion ratio (e.g., 15 of 28 steps completed), a collection of game pieces combined together to complete an objective, etc. In some embodiments, a cumulative outcome may be determined and displayed as play progresses and be modified as players advance toward (or regress from) completing their objective. Thus, during play, a cumulative outcome may be continually changing.

The term “gaming device” may refer to any electrical, mechanical, or electromechanical device operative to: accept wagers; execute a process to determine a spin result; based on the spin result, determine progress toward a game result; determine an game result, and provide entitlement to a prize based on (i) the spin result, (ii) the game result, or (iii) both (i) and (ii). The spin result may be generated or determined randomly (e.g., as with a slot machine) or through a combination of randomness and player skill (e.g., as with video poker). In accordance with the present invention, gaming devices may include slot machines (both video reel and mechanical reel), video poker machines, video blackjack machines, video roulette machines, video keno machines, video bingo machines, pachinko machines, video lottery terminals, hand held gaming devices, and the like. Gaming devices also include multiplayer gaming devices, two-player cabinet machines, and slot machines built for two (or more).

The term “multiplayer gaming device” may refer to a gaming device comprising two or more player controls, seats, primary and/or secondary display screens, credit input/output devices, as well as one or more shared primary and/or secondary display screens, controls, etc. In some embodiments, a multiplayer gaming device may comprise one or more single player gaming devices operatively connected to another single-player gaming device or to a controller.

The terms “spin” and “handle pull” shall be synonymous and may refer to an occurrence of the determination of a spin result. In accordance with the present invention, a spin yields a spin result that may be communicated to a player via a first game area of the gaming device. One or more spin result(s) may then be used to determine a secondary game result (i.e., an indication of progress toward an objective), which may be indicated to a player via a second game area of the gaming device. A player may initiate a spin by depositing currency or establishing credit with the gaming device and subsequently actuating a lever or designated button.

The term “payout” may refer to the actual prize, reward, winnings, or funds associated with a particular spin result and/or game result. Typically, the payout may be embodied as cash and/or credit dispensed or otherwise made available to the gaming device player. Alternatively, a payout may be embodied as goods or services to which the player may be entitled.

The term “peripheral device” may refer to a device operatively in communication with a gaming device and that is configured to assist in the operation of game-related functions.

The term “player tracking card” may refer to a means by which a casino owner or operator may identify an individual gaming device player and monitor and record certain information associated with the player. Typically, a player tracking card may be embodied as a plastic card bearing identifying indicia or encoded information via which the controller and/or gaming device may identify the player. Generally, the identifying information is used as an index to one or more database record(s), which store information associated with e.g., the demographics of the player and historical information associated with past play (if any).

The term “prepaid session” may refer to a duration of time or number of spins that are paid for in advance and subsequently utilized by the player. In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the player may purchase (i.e., wager upon) a plurality of spins, following execution of which a game result may be determined and any resultant payout conferred to the player.

The terms “primary game area,” “first game area,” “main game area,” and “lower game area” shall be synonymous and may refer to an area of the gaming machine's facade via which a player may be informed of a spin result. The first game area may include any number of appropriate output devices and/or display devices including a screen, audio output, mechanical reels and/or electronic representations of reels, etc.

The term “primary game screen” may refer to a screen used as the primary game area.

The terms “secondary game area,” “second game area,” “upper game area,” and “alternate game area” shall be synonymous and may refer to an area of the gaming machine's facade via which a player may be informed of a game result and/or a level of progress toward achieving an overall or secondary game objective. In accordance with some embodiments, the second game area may include one or more dedicated output devices and/or display devices for displaying or otherwise indicating progress toward a game result or game objective.

The term “secondary game screen” may refer to a screen used as the secondary game area.

The term “termination event” may refer to one or more criteria that when satisfied instruct a gaming device and/or controller to evaluate a level of progress toward a secondary game objective having been achieved at a gaming device. For example, a termination event in accordance with the present invention may comprise the completion of a given number of spins, an elapsed duration of time (e.g., the end of a prepaid gaming session), and/or a particular spin result. In some embodiments, a termination event may comprise the completion of the secondary game objective. In some embodiments with team competitions, a competing team achieving a secondary game objective could result in a termination event for other competing teams.

B. SYSTEM

Turning to FIG. 1, the present invention can be configured to function as a system 100 in a network environment including a controller 102 (e.g., a slot server of a casino) that is in communication, via a communications network, with one or more gaming devices 104, 106, 108 (e.g., slot machines, video poker machines, multiplayer gaming devices).

The controller 102 may communicate with the gaming device(s) 104, 106, 108 directly or indirectly, via a wired or wireless medium such as the Internet, LAN, WAN or Ethernet, Token Ring, or via any appropriate communications means or combination of communications means.

Each of the gaming devices 104, 106, 108 may comprise computers, such as those based on the Intel® Pentium® processor, that are adapted to communicate with the controller 102. Any number and type of devices may be in communication with the controller 102.

Communication between the devices (including the gaming devices 104, 106, 108) and the controller 102, and among the devices, may be direct or indirect, such as over the Internet through a web site maintained by controller 102 (e.g., where the controller hosts an on-line or virtual casino), on a remote server and/or over an on-line data network. Such data networks may include commercial on-line service providers, bulletin board systems and the like. In accordance with yet other embodiments, the devices may communicate with one another and/or the controller 102 via radio frequency (RF), cable TV, satellite links and the like.

Some, but not all, possible communication networks that may comprise the network or be otherwise part of the system include: a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), the Internet, a telephone line, a cable line, a radio channel, an optical communications line, and a satellite communications link. Possible communications protocols that may be part of the system include: Ethernet (or IEEE 802.3), SAP, ATP, Bluetooth™, and TCP/IP. Communication may be encrypted to ensure privacy and prevent fraud in any of a variety of ways known in the art (e.g., using hash functions or public/private key systems).

Those skilled in the art will understand that devices in communication with each other need not be continually transmitting to each other. On the contrary, such devices need only transmit to each other periodically or as necessary, and may actually refrain from exchanging data most of the time. For example, a device in communication with another device via the Internet may not transmit data to the other device for weeks at a time.

In accordance with some embodiments, a controller 102 (e.g., a server computer) may not be necessary and/or preferred. For example, the present invention may, in one or more embodiments, be practiced on a stand-alone gaming device 104 and/or a gaming device 104 in communication only with one or more other gaming devices 106, 108 and/or a controller 102. In such an embodiment, any function(s) described as being performed by the controller 102 or data described as stored at the controller 102 may instead be performed by or stored at one or more gaming devices 104.

Turning to FIG. 2, an alternative system 200 according to at least one embodiment of the present invention may include a controller 202 (e.g., a slot server of a casino) that is in communication, via a communications network, with one or more gaming devices 204, 206, 208 (e.g., slot machines, video poker machines). A differentiating characteristic between the aforementioned system 100 and the alternative system 200 being that in the present system 200 at least one gaming device 204 is also in communication with one or more peripheral devices 210, 212, 214.

A peripheral device 210, 212, 214 may, in turn, be in communication with a peripheral device server 216 and, in some embodiments, with the controller 202. In one or more embodiments the peripheral device server 216 may be in communication with one or more gaming devices 208 and/or the controller 202.

The controller 202 may communicate with the devices (including the gaming devices 204, 206, 208) and peripherals 210, 212, 214, 216 directly or indirectly, via a wired or wireless medium such as the Internet, LAN, WAN or Ethernet, Token Ring, or via any appropriate communications means or combination of communications means. For example, the controller 202 may communicate directly with one of the gaming devices 204 (e.g., via a LAN) and indirectly (e.g., via a gaming device 204) with a peripheral device 210. In accordance with another example embodiment, the controller 202 may communicate with one of the gaming devices 206 via a LAN and with another of the gaming devices 208 via the Internet (e.g., if the particular gaming device 208 comprises a personal computer in communication with an online casino).

Each of the devices (including the gaming devices 204, 206, 208 and peripherals 210, 212, 214, 216) may comprise one or more computer(s), such as those based on the Intel® Pentium® processor, that are adapted to communicate with the controller 202. Further, each of the devices may comprise a gaming device such as an electronic, mechanical or electromechanical slot machine, video poker machine, video blackjack machine, video keno machine, pachinko machine, video roulette machine, and/or a lottery terminal. Further yet, each of the devices may comprise an external or internal module associated with one or more of the gaming devices 204, 206, 208 that is capable of communicating with one or more of the gaming devices 204, 206, 208 and of directing one or more gaming devices 204, 206, 208 to perform one or more functions. Any number of devices may be in communication with the controller 202. Any number and type of peripheral devices 210, 212, 214 may be in communication with a gaming device 204, peripheral device server 216 and/or the controller 202.

Communication between the devices and the controller 202, between the devices themselves, between the peripheral device server 216 and the devices, and between the peripheral device server 216 and the controller 202, may be direct or indirect. Such communications may include those such as over the Internet through a web site maintained by the controller 202, on a remote server or over an on-line data network. Such data networks may include commercial on-line service providers, bulletin board systems and the like. In yet other embodiments, any and all of the devices of the system 200 (i.e., the devices (including the gaming devices 204, 206, 208 and peripherals 210, 212, 214), the controller 202, and the peripheral device server 216) may communicate with one another over RF, cable TV, satellite links and the like.

Some, but not all, possible communication networks that may comprise the network or otherwise be part of the system include: a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), the Internet, a telephone line, a cable line, a radio channel, an optical communications line, a satellite communications link.

Possible communications protocols that may be employed by the system include: Ethernet (or IEEE 802.3), SAP, ATP, Bluetooth™, and TCP/IP among others. Such communications may be encrypted or otherwise encoded to ensure privacy and prevent fraud in any of a variety of ways known in the art (e.g., using hash functions and/or public/private key systems).

In some embodiments, the controller 202 may not be necessary and/or preferred. For example, the present invention may, in one or more embodiments, be practiced on a stand-alone gaming device 204, on one or more gaming devices 204 in communication with one or more peripheral devices 210, on one or more gaming devices 208 in communication with a peripheral device server 216, on one or more peripheral devices 214 in communication with a peripheral device server 216, and/or on a gaming device 206 in communication only with one or more other gaming devices 208. In such embodiments, any functions described as performed by the controller 202 or data described as stored in the memory of the controller 202 may instead be performed by or stored on one or more gaming device(s) 204, 206, 208, one or more peripheral device(s) 210, 212, 214, and/or peripheral device server(s) 216.

Similarly, a peripheral device server 216 may not be desired and/or needed in some embodiments of the present invention. In such embodiments that do not involve a peripheral device server 216, any or all of the functions described herein as being performed by a peripheral device server 216 may instead be performed by the controller 202, one or more gaming devices 204, 206, 208, one or more peripheral devices 210, 212, 214, or a combination thereof.

Similarly, in embodiments that do not involve a peripheral device server 216 any data described herein as being stored in a memory of a peripheral device server 216 may instead be stored in a memory of another server computer (e.g., the controller 202), one or more gaming devices 204, 206, 208, one or more peripheral devices 210, 212, 214, or a combination thereof.

Any or all of the gaming devices 204, 206, 208 may, respectively, include or be in communication with a peripheral device 210, 212, 214. A peripheral device 210 may be a device that receives information from (and/or transmits information to) one or more gaming devices 204, 206, 208. For example, a peripheral device 210 may be operable to receive information about games being played on a gaming device 204, such as the initiation of a game, a random number that has been generated for a game, the result or outcome of a handle pull, spin or gaming session at the gaming device, etc.

In one or more embodiments, one or more such peripheral devices 210 may be in communication with a peripheral device server 216. This enables the peripheral device server 216 to receive information regarding a plurality of games being played on a plurality of gaming devices 204, 206, 208. The peripheral device server 216, in turn, may be in communication with the controller 202. It should be understood that any functions described herein as performed by a peripheral device 210 may also or instead be performed by the peripheral device server 216.

Similarly, any data described herein as being stored on or accessed by a peripheral device 210 may also or instead be stored on or accessed by the peripheral device server 216. A peripheral device 210 may be operable to access a database (e.g., of a peripheral device server 216) to provide benefits (e.g., cashless gaming receipts) based on, for example, an outcome of a game and or a gaming session at the gaming device 204.

The peripheral device server 216 may also monitor player gambling history over time by associating gambling behavior with player identifiers, such as player tracking card numbers. For example, information about the player obtained or accessed by a peripheral device server 216 may be analyzed, e.g., to identify those players that a particular gaming machine owner, operator, or manufacturer finds most desirable. Based upon desired objectives, the peripheral device server 216 may direct the appropriate peripheral device 210 to issue customized messages, images, offers, and games to specific players.

Information received by a peripheral device 210 from a gaming device 204 may include gambling data such as number of games initiated per unit of time, outcomes displayed for games initiated, payouts corresponding to outcomes displayed, a credit meter balance of the gaming device, and/or data associated with the player currently playing the gaming device.

The functions described herein as being performed by a peripheral device server 216 and/or a peripheral device 210 may, in one or more embodiments, be performed by the controller 202 (e.g., in lieu of (or in conjunction with) being performed by a peripheral device server 216 and/or a peripheral device 210).

In one or more embodiments, a peripheral device 210 may be useful for implementing the embodiments of the present invention into the operation of a gaming device 204. For example, in order to avoid or minimize the necessity of modifying or replacing a program already stored in a memory of a conventional gaming device 204, an external or internal module that comprises a peripheral device 210 may be added to, coupled to, or otherwise associated with the gaming device 204.

Thus, for example, a peripheral device 210 may be utilized to monitor play of the gaming device 204 and display or output messages, images, image portions and/or an overall outcome of a game. In such embodiments the gaming device 204 with which the peripheral device 210 is in communication may continue to operate. In such embodiments the gaming device 204 may output an outcome for each spin or handle pull and overall game progress (e.g., the completion of a puzzle) may be indicated or output by the peripheral device 210. The peripheral device 210 may further output a secondary game outcome or secondary game payout when appropriate.

The peripheral device 210 may also output messages to the player. For example, the peripheral device 210 may be embodied as a player tracking system including a screen for outputting messages and/or game status information to the player.

The peripheral device may also provide benefits to a player (e.g., coins, tokens, electronic credits, paper receipts exchangeable for cash, services, and/or merchandise).

Accordingly, a peripheral device 210 may include (i) a communications port (e.g., for communicating with one or more gaming devices 204, peripheral device server 216, another peripheral device 212, and/or a computer); (ii) a display (e.g., for displaying messages and/or outcomes and payouts), (iii) another output means (e.g., a speaker, light, or other device for communicating with a player), and/or (iv) a benefit providing means (e.g., a printer and paper dispensing means, a credit meter, and/or a hopper and hopper controller).

In one or more embodiments, the peripheral device 210 may not output outcomes and/or messages to a player but may instead direct the processor of a gaming device 204 to perform such functions. For example, a program stored in a memory of peripheral device 210 may cause a processor of a gaming device 204 to perform certain functions. More specifically, a program stored in a memory of peripheral device 210 may cause a processor of a gaming device 204 to output an outcome, determine an outcome, output a message, access a database, provide a benefit, refrain from providing a benefit (e.g., by not sending a signal to a hopper controller of the gaming device 204 not to dispense tokens when it otherwise normally would), and/or communicate with another device.

Examples of peripheral devices 210 include e.g., (i) electronic apparatuses “retrofitted” to conventional gaming devices 204 so that inventive processes disclosed herein may be realized through game play at the gaming device 204, (ii) Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) such as those manufactured by Palm, Inc., (iii) lap top computers, (iv) cellular telephones, (v) pagers, and/or (vi) any appropriate combination thereof.

C. DEVICES

Turning to FIG. 3, in accordance with the present invention, a gaming device 104/204 may be implemented as a system controller, a dedicated hardware circuit, an appropriately programmed general-purpose computer, or any other equivalent electronic, mechanical or electromechanical device. (Note that from this point forward, each reference to a “gaming device” followed by the reference numeral 104 is intended to be equivalent to a reference to any of the gaming devices from either system 100 or system 200.)

The gaming device 104 may comprise, for example, a slot machine, a video poker machine, a video blackjack machine, a video keno machine, a video lottery machine, a pachinko machine or a tabletop game.

In various embodiments, a gaming device 104 may comprise, for example, a personal computer (e.g., which communicates with an online casino via a Web site), a telephone (e.g., to communicate with one or more remote gaming services), or a portable handheld gaming device (e.g., a PDA). The gaming device 104 may comprise any or all of the gaming devices of the aforementioned systems.

In some embodiments, a user device such as a PDA or cell phone may be used in place of, in combination with, or in addition to, some or all of the gaming device components. In one or more embodiments, the gaming device 104 may comprise a computing device operable to execute software that simulates play of a reeled slot machine game, video poker game, video blackjack game, video keno game, video roulette game, and/or lottery game.

The gaming device 104 disclosed herein comprises a processor 300, such as one or more Intel® Pentium® processors. The processor 300 is in operative communication with at least one random (or pseudo-random) number generator 302, which may be a component of the gaming device 104.

The random number generator 302, in accordance with at least one embodiment of the present invention, may generate data representing random or pseudo-random values (referred to as “random numbers” herein). The random number generator 302 may generate a random number every predetermined unit of time (e.g., every thousandth of a second) or in response to an initiation of a game on the gaming device 104. In the former embodiment, the generated random numbers may be used as they are generated (e.g., the random number generated at substantially the time of game initiation is used for that game) and/or stored for future use.

A random number generated by the random number generator 302 may be used by the processor 300 to determine, for example, at least one of an outcome, a reel position, an arrangement of symbols and a payout. A random number generator 302, as used herein, may be embodied as a secondary (e.g., tamper-evident) processor separate from but working in cooperation with a primary gaming device processor 300.

Alternatively, the random number generator 302 may be embodied as an algorithm, program component, or software stored in the memory of the gaming device and used to generate a random number.

Note that, although the generation or obtainment of a random number is described herein as involving a random number generator 302 of a gaming device 104, other methods of determining a random number may be employed. For example, a gaming device owner or operator may obtain sets of random numbers that have been generated by another entity. For example, HotBits™ is a service that provides random numbers that have been generated by timing successive pairs of radioactive decays detected by a Geiger-Muller tube interfaced to a computer. Various methods and devices for generating and using random numbers for gambling purposes will be apparent to one of skill in the art.

The processor 300 may further be operable to communicate with a benefit output device 304, which may be a component of gaming device 104. For example, the benefit output device 304 may comprise one or more devices for outputting a benefit to a player of the gaming device 104. In accordance with some embodiments, the gaming device 104 may provide coins and/or tokens as a benefit (e.g., a spin payout or a game payout). In accordance with such an embodiment the benefit output device 304 may comprise a hopper 306 coupled to a hopper controller 306, for dispensing e.g., coins and/or tokens into a coin tray of the gaming device.

In another example, the gaming device 104 may provide a receipt or other document on which there is printed an indication of a benefit (e.g., a cashless gaming receipt that has printed thereon an indication of a monetary value, which is redeemable for cash in the amount of the monetary value). In accordance with such an embodiment, the benefit output device 304 may comprise a printing and document dispensing mechanism or ticket-in/ticket-out device (not pictured).

According to yet another embodiment, the gaming device may provide electronic credits as a benefit (which, e.g., may be subsequently converted to coins and/or tokens and dispensed from a hopper into a coin tray). In such an embodiment the benefit output device 304 may comprise or include a credit meter balance and/or a processor that manages the amount of electronic credits that is indicated on a display of a credit meter balance.

In accordance with another embodiment, the gaming device 104 may credit a monetary amount to a financial account associated with a player. The financial account may be, for example, a credit card account, a debit account, a charge account, a checking account, and/or a casino account. In such an embodiment the benefit output device 304 may comprise a device for communicating with a server on which the financial account is maintained.

Note that, in one or more embodiments, the gaming device 104 may include more than one benefit output device 304. For example, the gaming device may include both a hopper 306 and hopper controller 308 combination and a credit meter balance (not pictured). Accordingly, the gaming device 104 of the present invention may be operable to provide more than one type of benefit to a player of the gaming device 104.

Alternatively, a single benefit output device 304 may be operable to output more than one type of benefit. For example, a benefit output device 304 may be operable to increase the balance of credits in a credit meter and communicate with a remote device in order to increase the balance of a financial account associated with a player.

The processor is also operable to communicate with a display device 310, which may be a component of the gaming device 104. The display device 310 may comprise, for example, one or more display screens or areas for outputting information related to game play on the gaming device. For example, the display device 310 may comprise or include a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor, liquid crystal display (LCD) screen, or light emitting diode (LED) screen. In one or more embodiments, a gaming device 104 may comprise more than one display device 310. For example, a gaming device 104 may comprise a first game area having an LCD display for displaying electronic representations of reels and a second game area comprising a second LCD for displaying broader game objective information (e.g., various image portions having been secured by the player).

A display device 310 may comprise, for example, one or more display areas. For example, one of the display areas may display outcomes of spins or handle pulls played on the gaming device (e.g., on electronic reels of a gaming device). A second display area may display information associated with a player's progress toward a broader game objective. A third display area may display e.g., the benefits obtainable by playing a game of the gaming device (e.g., in the form of a payout table). In one or more embodiments, the gaming device 104 may include more than one display device 310, one or more other output devices 312, or a combination thereof (e.g., an upper game area, a lower game area, a credit meter, and left and right audio speakers).

As suggested above, the processor 300 may also be in communication with one or more other devices besides the display device, for outputting information (e.g., to a player or another device). Such other output devices 312 may also be components of the gaming device 104 of the present invention. Such devices 312 may comprise, for example, an audio speaker (e.g., for outputting an outcome or information related thereto, in addition to or in lieu of such information being output via a display device 310), an infra-red transmitter, a radio transmitter, an electric motor, a printer (e.g., such as for printing cashless gaming vouchers), a coupon or product dispenser, an infra-red port (e.g., for communicating with a second gaming device 106 or a portable device of a player), a Braille computer monitor, and a coin or bill dispenser.

For gaming devices 104, common output devices 312 include a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor on a video poker machine, a bell on a gaming device 104 (e.g., rings when a player wins), an LED display of a player's credit balance on a gaming device 104, an LCD display of a personal digital assistant (PDA) for displaying keno numbers, etc.

The processor 300 may also be in communication with an input device 314, which is a device that is capable of receiving an input (e.g., from a player or another device) and which may be a component of gaming device 104. An input device 314 may communicate with or be part of another device (e.g., a server, a gaming device, etc.).

Exemplary input devices 314 include: a bar-code scanner, a magnetic stripe reader, a computer keyboard or keypad, a button, a handle, a keypad, a touch-screen, a microphone, an infrared sensor, a voice recognition module, a coin or bill acceptor, a sonic ranger, a computer port, a video camera, a motion detector, a digital camera, a network card, a universal serial bus (USB) port, a GPS receiver, a radio frequency identification (RFID) receiver, an RF receiver, a thermometer, a pressure sensor, and an infrared port (e.g., for receiving communications from a second gaming device or from a another device such as a smart card or PDA of a player).

With respect to the gaming device 104 of the present invention, additional or alternative input devices 314 may include one or more button(s) or touch-screen(s) (e.g., on a slot machine), a lever or handle connected to the gaming device, a magnetic stripe reader (e.g., to read a player tracking card inserted into a gaming device), a touch-screen for input of player selections during game play, and a coin and bill acceptor.

The processor 300 may also be in communication with a payment system 316, which may be a component of the gaming device 104. The payment system 316 may be a device capable of accepting payment from a player (e.g., a bet or establishment of a balance) and/or providing payment to a player (e.g., a spin payout and/or a game payout). Payment may not be limited to money, but may also include other types of consideration, including products, services, and alternate currencies. Exemplary methods of accepting payment by the payment system 316 include (i) receiving currency (i.e., coins, tokens or bills). Accordingly, the payment system 316 may comprise a coin or bill acceptor.

In accordance with other embodiments of the invention, the payment system 316 may receive payment via an alternate currency (e.g., a paper cashless gaming voucher, a coupon, a non-negotiable token). Accordingly the payment system 316 may comprise a bar code reader or other sensing means. In some embodiments, a payment system 316 may operate to receive a payment identifier (e.g., a credit card number, a debit card number, player tracking card number, etc.) and to debit an account identified by the payment identifier.

The processor is additionally in communication with a memory and a communications port 324 (e.g., for communicating with one or more other devices). The memory may comprise any appropriate combination of magnetic, optical and/or semiconductor memory, and may include, for example, Random Access Memory (RAM) 320, Read-Only Memory (ROM) 322, a compact disc and/or a hard disk 318. That is, the memory may comprise or include any type of computer-readable medium. The processor 300 and the memory may each be, for example: (i) located entirely within a single computer or other device; or (ii) connected to each other by a remote communication medium, such as a serial port cable, telephone line or radio frequency transceiver. In one embodiment, the gaming device 104 may comprise one or more devices that are connected to a remote server computer for maintaining databases.

The memory stores a program 326 for controlling the processor 300. The processor 300 performs instructions of the program 326, and thereby operates in accordance with the present invention, and particularly in accordance with the methods described in detail herein.

The program 326 may be stored in a compressed, uncompiled and/or encrypted format. The program 326 furthermore includes program elements that may be necessary, such as an operating system, a database management system and “device drivers” for allowing the processor 300 to interface with computer peripheral devices. Appropriate program elements are known to those skilled in the art, and need not be described in detail herein.

The terms “computer-readable medium” and “computer-readable media” as used herein are synonymous and may refer to any medium that stores and/or participates in providing instructions to the processor 300 of the gaming device 104 (or any other processor of a device described herein) for execution. Such a medium may take many forms, including but not limited to, non-volatile media, volatile media, and transmission media. Exemplary non-volatile media include e.g., optical or magnetic disks, such as compact discs (CDs), Digital Versatile Discs (DVDs), etc. Exemplary volatile media may include dynamic random access memory (DRAM), which typically constitutes the main memory. Transmission media include coaxial cables, copper wire and fiber optics, including wires comprising a system bus coupled to the processor. Transmission media may carry acoustic or light waves, such as those generated during radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR) data communications.

Exemplary forms of computer-readable media include, for example, a floppy disk, a flexible disk, hard disk, magnetic tape, other magnetic medium, a CD-ROM, DVD, any other optical medium, punch cards, paper tape, any other physical medium with patterns of holes, a RAM, a PROM, an EPROM, a FLASH-EEPROM, any other memory chip or cartridge, a carrier wave as described hereinafter, or any other medium from which a computer can read data.

Various forms of computer readable media may be involved in carrying one or more sequences of one or more instructions to processor 300 (or any other processor of a device described herein) for execution. For example, the instructions may initially be borne on a magnetic disk of a remote computer. The remote computer can load the instructions into its dynamic memory and send the instructions over a telephone line using a modem. A modem local to a gaming device 104 (or, e.g., a server) can receive the data via telephone line and use an infrared transmitter to convert the data to an infrared signal. An infrared detector can receive the data carried in the infrared signal and place the data on a system bus for the processor 300. The system bus may transmit the data to main memory, from which the processor 300 retrieves and executes the instructions. The instructions received by main memory may optionally be stored in memory either before or after execution by the processor 300. In addition, instructions may be received via a communication port 324 as electrical, electromagnetic or optical signal(s), which are exemplary forms of carrier waves that carry data streams representing various types of information.

According to some embodiments of the present invention, the instructions of the program 326 may be read into a main memory (e.g., RAM 320) from another computer-readable medium, such as from a ROM 322. Execution of sequences of the instructions in the program 326 may cause the processor 300 to perform the process steps described herein.

In accordance with alternate embodiments of the present invention, hard-wired circuitry may be used in place of (or in combination with) software instructions for implementation of the processes of the present invention. Thus, embodiments of the present invention are not limited to any specific combination of hardware and software.

As discussed with respect to aforementioned systems 100, 200, execution of sequences of the instructions in a program of a peripheral device 210 in communication with the gaming device 204 may also cause the processor 300 to perform some of the process steps described herein.

The gaming device 104 and/or controller 102 memory also stores a plurality of databases including (i) a probability database 328, (ii) at least one payout database 330, (iii) a player database 332, (iv) a session database 334, and (v) an asset database 336. Each of the aforementioned databases will be described in detail herein below. Some or all of the data stored in each database is additionally described in conjunction with the description of the process steps also described herein below.

The described or illustrated entries of the databases represent exemplary information only. Those skilled in the art will understand that the number and content of the entries can be different from those illustrated herein. Further, despite any description of the databases as tables, an object-based model could be used to store and manipulate the data types of the present invention and likewise, object methods or behaviors can be used to implement the processes of the present invention.

Note that, although these databases may be described as being stored in a gaming device, in other embodiments of the present invention some or all of these databases may be partially or wholly stored in another device, such as one or more of the peripheral devices, the peripheral device server and/or the controller.

Further, some or all of the data described as being stored in the databases may be partially or wholly stored (in addition to or in lieu of being stored in the memory of the gaming device) in a memory of one or more other devices, such as one or more of the peripheral devices, another gaming device, the peripheral device server and/or the controller.

As discussed herein, in one or more embodiments the gaming device 104 may take the form of a slot machine configured to operate in conjunction with the present invention. Generally, a slot machine for use in the present invention comprises (i) a first game area, operative to display or conduct a reel-based slot machine game (e.g., a three reel or five reel slot machine game) and (ii) a second game area operative to display or conduct a secondary game based on results of the reel-based game. For example, a secondary game may compel a player to attempt to assemble (to the extent possible) a complete image from a plurality of image portions occurring within the context of the reel-based game, as described above.

In some embodiments the gaming device may take the form of a slot machine configured to operate in conjunction with the present invention, in which two or more players may operate the gaming device via one or more sets of controls, displays, credit acceptors/dispensers, etc. A more specific description of such a multiplayer slot machine suitable for use with the present invention is provided below.

The gaming device's first game area may include a display area in which an outcome for a game of the reel-based slot machine game is displayed to the player. The first game area may be embodied, for example, as a video display that displays graphical representations of reels. The first game area may, in another example, be glass behind which mechanical reels are located.

The first game area may further include a payline. In accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention, a spin result is a set of symbols displayed along a payline of a reeled slot machine (i.e., the first game area).

The slot machine may further comprise means for initiating a reel-based game, such as a handle or dedicated button. A player may initiate the movement of the reels in the first game area by pulling the handle or actuating the button. Either or both of the handle and start button are exemplary embodiments of an input device 314, described herein above.

The gaming device 104 of the present invention may further comprise a second game area, for outputting information to a player. The second game area may be utilized, for example, to inform a player of his or her level of progress toward a game objective, such as assembling a completed image from a plurality of image portions. For example, the secondary game area may display information including image portions having been secured by the player as they relate to the completed image. In addition, the secondary game area may be utilized to inform a player of a level of completion of the game objective upon completion of a terminating event. Such an event may comprise an amount of elapsed time (e.g., 3 minutes) and/or a given number of spins or handle pulls (e.g., 100 pulls). As mentioned above, the player's progress may be indicated in any number of ways including but not limited to e.g., a percentage (e.g., 80% complete) and/or a ratio (e.g., 15 of 24 images secured).

The slot machine may also include a payment system 316, which may be comprised of a bill acceptor, a credit card reader, and/or a coin acceptor. A player may utilize the gaming device payment system 316 to establish a credit balance with the machine 104, to provide a wager as consideration for a given spin or handle pull and/or to receive payment for achieving a favorable result in the primary and/or secondary game(s).

The slot machine may further comprise a credit meter balance. The gaming device credit meter balance may operate to indicate an amount of electronic credits currently available to a player, as described above. The player may use the credits, for example, as wagers or consideration for primary or secondary games played on the gaming device. When appropriate, the electronic credits may be “cashed out” as coins, bills, tokens, a cashless gaming receipt, and/or credits to another financial account associated with the player.

Finally, the slot machine may comprise a hopper 306, hopper controller 308, and coin tray (not pictured). Dispensing coins or tokens into the coin tray may render payment to the player. Such coins may be dispensed based on, for example, a player's indication that the player would like to cash out his credit meter balance and/or a payout obtained by a player as a result of playing a primary or secondary game on the slot machine. Note that, where appropriate, the slot machine may comprise alternative and/or additional components besides (or in addition to) those discussed herein.

Turning to FIG. 4, in accordance with the present invention, a multiplayer gaming device 106/206 may be implemented as a system controller, a dedicated hardware circuit, an appropriately programmed general-purpose computer, or any other equivalent electronic, mechanical or electromechanical device. (Note that from this point forward, each reference to a “multiplayer gaming device” followed by the reference numeral 106 is intended to be equivalent to a reference to any of the gaming devices from either system 100 or system 200.)

A multiplayer gaming device 106 may be manufactured to accommodate two or more players at a single cabinet. It may include multiple player positions that provide different players with their own sets of controls and displays. Such an arrangement may be used to facilitate cooperative or head-to-head competitive play. Other benefits of multiplayer gaming devices 106 include reduced floor space requirements, reduced cost per player in terms of hardware savings, and facilitating couples playing in close proximity.

A multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise, for example, a slot machine, a video poker machine, a video blackjack machine, a video keno machine, a video lottery machine, a pachinko machine or a tabletop game.

In various embodiments, a multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise, for example, a personal computer (e.g., which communicates with an online casino via a Web site). The multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise any or all of the gaming devices of the aforementioned systems.

In one or more embodiments, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise a computing device operable to execute software that simulates play of a reeled slot machine game, video poker game, video blackjack game, video keno game, video roulette game, and/or lottery game.

The multiplayer gaming device 106 disclosed herein comprises a processor 400, such as one or more Intel® Pentium® processors. The processor 400 is in operative communication with at least one random (or pseudo-random) number generator 402, which may be a component of the multiplayer gaming device 106.

The random number generator 402, in accordance with at least one embodiment of the present invention, may generate data representing random or pseudo-random values (referred to as “random numbers” herein). The random number generator 402 may generate a random number every predetermined unit of time (e.g., every thousandth of a second) or in response to an initiation of a game on the multiplayer gaming device 106. In the former embodiment, the generated random numbers may be used as they are generated (e.g., the random number generated at substantially the time of game initiation is used for that game) and/or stored for future use.

A random number generated by the random number generator 402 may be used by the processor 400 to determine, for example, at least one of an outcome, a reel position, an arrangement of symbols and a payout. A random number generator 402, as used herein, may be embodied as a secondary (e.g., tamper-evident) processor separate from but working in cooperation with a primary gaming device processor 400.

Alternatively, the random number generator 402 may be embodied as an algorithm, program component, or software stored in the memory of the gaming device and used to generate a random number.

Note that, although the generation or obtainment of a random number is described herein as involving a random number generator 402 of a multiplayer gaming device 106, other methods of determining a random number may be employed. For example, a gaming device owner or operator may obtain sets of random numbers that have been generated by another entity. For example, HotBits™ is a service that provides random numbers that have been generated by timing successive pairs of radioactive decays detected by a Geiger-Muller tube interfaced to a computer. Various methods and devices for generating and using random numbers for gambling purposes will be apparent to one of skill in the art.

The processor 400 may further be operable to communicate with a benefit output device 404, which may be a component of multiplayer gaming device 106. For example, the benefit output device 404 may comprise one or more devices for outputting a benefit to a player of the multiplayer gaming device 106. In accordance with some embodiments, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may provide coins and/or tokens as a benefit (e.g., a spin payout or a game payout). In accordance with such an embodiment the benefit output device 404 may comprise a hopper 406 coupled to a hopper controller 408, for dispensing e.g., coins and/or tokens into a coin tray of the gaming device.

In another example, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may provide a receipt or other document on which there is printed an indication of a benefit (e.g., a cashless gaming receipt that has printed thereon an indication of a monetary value, which is redeemable for cash in the amount of the monetary value). In accordance with such an embodiment, the benefit output device 404 may comprise a printing and document dispensing mechanism or ticket-in/ticket-out device (not pictured).

According to yet another embodiment, the gaming device may provide electronic credits as a benefit (which, e.g., may be subsequently converted to coins and/or tokens and dispensed from a hopper into a coin tray). In such an embodiment the benefit output device 404 may comprise or include a credit meter balance and/or a processor that manages the amount of electronic credits that is indicated on a display of a credit meter balance.

In accordance with another embodiment, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may credit a monetary amount to a financial account associated with a player. The financial account may be, for example, a credit card account, a debit account, a charge account, a checking account, and/or a casino account. In such an embodiment the benefit output device 404 may comprise a device for communicating with a server on which the financial account is maintained.

Note that, in one or more embodiments, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may include more than one benefit output device 404. For example, the gaming device may include both a hopper 406 and hopper controller 408 combination and two separate credit meter balances 470A, 470B. Accordingly, the multiplayer gaming device 106 of the present invention may be operable to provide more than one type of benefit to the player(s) of the multiplayer gaming device 106.

The processor is also operable to communicate with a display device 410, which may be a component of the multiplayer gaming device 106. The display device 410 may comprise, for example, one or more display screens or areas for outputting information related to game play on the gaming device. For example, the display device 410 may comprise or include a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor, liquid crystal display (LCD) screen, or light emitting diode (LED) screen. In one or more embodiments, a multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise more than one display device 410. For example, a multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise a first game area having an LCD display for displaying the results of a first player and a second game area comprising a second LCD for displaying game results of a second player.

A display device 410 may comprise, for example, one or more display areas. For example, one of the display areas may display outcomes of spins or handle pulls played on the gaming device (e.g., on electronic reels of a gaming device). A second display area may display information associated with the progress of two players toward a broader game objective. A third display area may display e.g., the benefits obtainable by playing a game of the gaming device (e.g., in the form of a payout table). In one or more embodiments, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may include more than one display device 410, one or more other output devices 412, or a combination thereof (e.g., an upper game area, a lower game area, a credit meter, and left and right audio speakers).

As suggested above, the processor 400 may also be in communication with one or more other devices besides the display device, for outputting information (e.g., to a player or another device). Such other output devices 412 may also be components of the multiplayer gaming device 106 of the present invention. Such devices 412 may comprise, for example, an audio speaker (e.g., for outputting an outcome or information related thereto, in addition to or in lieu of such information being output via a display device 410), an infra-red transmitter, a radio transmitter, an electric motor, a printer (e.g., such as for printing cashless gaming vouchers), a coupon or product dispenser, an infra-red port (e.g., for communicating with a second multiplayer gaming device 106 or a portable device of a player), a Braille computer monitor, and a coin or bill dispenser.

For multiplayer gaming devices 106, common output devices 412 include a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor on a video poker machine, a bell on a multiplayer gaming device 106 (e.g., rings when a player wins), an LED display of a player's credit balance on a multiplayer gaming device 106, an LCD display of a personal digital assistant (PDA) for displaying keno numbers, etc.

An output device may also include reel controllers 450A, 450B for controlling reels 452A, 454A, 456A; 452B 454B, 456B respectively for displaying spin results at each player station.

The processor 400 may also be in communication with an input device 414, which is a device that is capable of receiving an input (e.g., from a player or another device) and which may be a component of multiplayer gaming device 106. An input device 414 may communicate with or be part of another device (e.g., a server, a gaming device, etc.).

Exemplary input devices 414 include: a bar-code scanner, a magnetic stripe reader, a computer keyboard or keypad, a button, a handle, a keypad, a touch-screen, a microphone, an infrared sensor, a voice recognition module, a coin or bill acceptor, a sonic ranger, a computer port, a video camera, a motion detector, a digital camera, a network card, a universal serial bus (USB) port, a GPS receiver, a radio frequency identification (RFID) receiver, an RF receiver, a thermometer, a pressure sensor, and an infrared port (e.g., for receiving communications from a second gaming device or from a another device such as a smart card or PDA of a player).

With respect to the multiplayer gaming device 106 of the present invention, additional or alternative input devices 414A, 414B may include one or more button(s) or touch-screen(s) (e.g., on a slot machine), a lever or handle connected to the gaming device, a magnetic stripe reader (e.g., to read a player tracking card inserted into a gaming device), a touch-screen for input of player selections during game play, and a coin and bill acceptor. In some embodiments, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may include player tracking card devices 460A, 460B. These devices may include, e.g., card readers 462A, 462B; keypads 464A, 464B; and displays 466A,466B, respectively.

The processor 400 may also be in communication with a payment systems 416A, 416B, which may be components of the multiplayer gaming device 106. The payment systems 416A, 416B may be devices capable of accepting payment from a player (e.g., a bet or establishment of a balance) and/or providing payment to a player (e.g., a spin payout and/or a game payout). Payment may not be limited to money, but may also include other types of consideration, including products, services, and alternate currencies. Exemplary methods of accepting payment by the payment systems 416A, 416B include (i) receiving currency (i.e., coins, tokens or bills). Accordingly, the payment systems 416A, 416B may comprise coin or bill acceptors.

In accordance with other embodiments of the invention, the payment systems 416A, 416B may receive payment via an alternate currency (e.g., a paper cashless gaming voucher, a coupon, a non-negotiable token). Accordingly the payment systems 416A, 416B may comprise bar code readers or other sensing means. In some embodiments, payment systems 416A, 416B may operate to receive payment identifiers (e.g., a credit card number, a debit card number, player tracking card number, etc.) and to debit accounts identified by the payment identifiers.

The processor is additionally in communication with a memory and a communications port 424 (e.g., for communicating with one or more other devices). The memory may comprise any appropriate combination of magnetic, optical and/or semiconductor memory, and may include, for example, Random Access Memory (RAM) 420, Read-Only Memory (ROM) 422, a compact disc and/or a hard disk 418. That is, the memory may comprise or include any type of computer-readable medium. The processor 400 and the memory may each be, for example: (i) located entirely within a single computer or other device; or (ii) connected to each other by a remote communication medium, such as a serial port cable, telephone line or radio frequency transceiver. In one embodiment, the multiplayer gaming device 106 may comprise one or more devices that are connected to a remote server computer for maintaining databases.

The memory stores a program 426 for controlling the processor 400. The processor 400 performs instructions of the program 426, and thereby operates in accordance with the present invention, and particularly in accordance with the methods described in detail herein.

The program 426 may be stored in a compressed, uncompiled and/or encrypted format. The program 426 furthermore includes program elements that may be necessary, such as an operating system, a database management system and “device drivers” for allowing the processor 400 to interface with computer peripheral devices. Appropriate program elements are known to those skilled in the art, and need not be described in detail herein.

The terms “computer-readable medium” and “computer-readable media” as used herein are synonymous and may refer to any medium that stores and/or participates in providing instructions to the processor 400 of the multiplayer gaming device 106 (or any other processor of a device described herein) for execution. Such a medium may take many forms, including but not limited to, non-volatile media, volatile media, and transmission media. Exemplary non-volatile media include e.g., optical or magnetic disks, such as compact discs (CDs), Digital Versatile Discs (DVDs), etc. Exemplary volatile media may include dynamic random access memory (DRAM), which typically constitutes the main memory. Transmission media include coaxial cables, copper wire and fiber optics, including wires comprising a system bus coupled to the processor. Transmission media may carry acoustic or light waves, such as those generated during radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR) data communications.

Exemplary forms of computer-readable media include, for example, a floppy disk, a flexible disk, hard disk, magnetic tape, other magnetic medium, a CD-ROM, DVD, any other optical medium, punch cards, paper tape, any other physical medium with patterns of holes, a RAM, a PROM, an EPROM, a FLASH-EEPROM, any other memory chip or cartridge, a carrier wave as described hereinafter, or any other medium from which a computer can read data.

Various forms of computer readable media may be involved in carrying one or more sequences of one or more instructions to processor 400 (or any other processor of a device described herein) for execution. For example, the instructions may initially be borne on a magnetic disk of a remote computer. The remote computer can load the instructions into its dynamic memory and send the instructions over a telephone line using a modem. A modem local to a multiplayer gaming device 106 (or, e.g., a server) can receive the data via telephone line and use an infrared transmitter to convert the data to an infrared signal. An infrared detector can receive the data carried in the infrared signal and place the data on a system bus for the processor 400. The system bus may transmit the data to main memory, from which the processor 400 retrieves and executes the instructions. The instructions received by main memory may optionally be stored in memory either before or after execution by the processor 400. In addition, instructions may be received via a communication port 424 as electrical, electromagnetic or optical signal(s), which are exemplary forms of carrier waves that carry data streams representing various types of information.

According to some embodiments of the present invention, the instructions of the program 426 may be read into a main memory (e.g., RAM 420) from another computer-readable medium, such as from a ROM 422. Execution of sequences of the instructions in the program 426 may cause the processor 400 to perform the process steps described herein.

In accordance with alternate embodiments of the present invention, hard-wired circuitry may be used in place of (or in combination with) software instructions for implementation of the processes of the present invention. Thus, embodiments of the present invention are not limited to any specific combination of hardware and software.

As discussed with respect to aforementioned systems 100, 200, execution of sequences of the instructions in a program of a peripheral device 210 in communication with the gaming device 204 may also cause the processor 400 to perform some of the process steps described herein.

The multiplayer gaming device 106 and/or controller 102 memory also stores a plurality of databases including (i) a probability database 428, (ii) at least one payout database 430, (iii) a player database 432, (iv) a session database 434, and (v) an asset database 436. Each of the aforementioned databases will be described in detail herein below. Some or all of the data stored in each database is additionally described in conjunction with the description of the process steps also described herein below.

The described or illustrated entries of the databases represent exemplary information only. Those skilled in the art will understand that the number and content of the entries can be different from those illustrated herein. Further, despite any description of the databases as tables, an object-based model could be used to store and manipulate the data types of the present invention and likewise, object methods or behaviors can be used to implement the processes of the present invention.

Note that, although these databases may be described as being stored in a gaming device, in other embodiments of the present invention some or all of these databases may be partially or wholly stored in another device, such as one or more of the peripheral devices, the peripheral device server and/or the controller.

Further, some or all of the data described as being stored in the databases may be partially or wholly stored (in addition to or in lieu of being stored in the memory of the gaming device) in a memory of one or more other devices, such as one or more of the peripheral devices, another gaming device, the peripheral device server and/or the controller.

As discussed herein, in one or more embodiments the multiplayer gaming device 106 may take the form of a slot machine configured to operate in conjunction with the present invention. Generally, a slot machine for use in the present invention comprises (i) a first game area, operative to display or conduct a reel-based slot machine game (e.g., a three reel or five reel slot machine game) and (ii) a second game area operative to display or conduct a secondary game based on results of the reel-based game. For example, a secondary game may involve the cooperation of two players toward achieving a common goal.

In some embodiments the gaming device may take the form of a slot machine configured to operate in conjunction with the present invention, in which two or more players may operate the gaming device via one or more sets of controls, displays, credit acceptors/dispensers, etc. A more specific description of such a multiplayer slot machine suitable for use with the present invention is provided below.

The gaming device's first game area may include a display area in which an outcome for a game of the reel-based slot machine game is displayed to the player. The first game area may be embodied, for example, as a video display that displays graphical representations of reels. The first game area may, in another example, be glass behind which mechanical reels are located.

The first game area may further include a payline. In accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention, a spin result is a set of symbols displayed along a payline of a reeled slot machine (i.e., the first game area).

The slot machine may further comprise means for initiating a reel-based game, such as a handle or dedicated button. A player may initiate the movement of the reels in the first game area by pulling the handle or actuating the button. Either or both of the handle and start button are exemplary embodiments of an input device 414, described herein above.

The multiplayer gaming device 106 of the present invention may further comprise a second game area, for outputting information to a player. The second game area may be utilized, for example, to inform a player of his or her level of progress toward a game objective, such as his position in a racing game. For example, the secondary game area may display information including images indicating where a canoe controlled by the actions of two players is positioned relative to a competing canoe controlled by a computer opponent. In addition, the secondary game area may be utilized to inform a player of a level of completion of the game objective upon completion of a terminating event. Such an event may comprise an amount of elapsed time (e.g., 4 minutes) and/or a given number of spins or handle pulls (e.g., 100 pulls). As mentioned above, the player's progress may be indicated in any number of ways including but not limited to e.g., a percentage (e.g., 80% complete) and/or a ratio (e.g., 15 of 24 images secured).

The slot machine may also include payment systems 416A, 416B, which may be comprised of a bill acceptors, a credit card readers, and/or a coin acceptors. Player may utilize the multiplayer gaming device payment systems 416A, 416B to establish credit balances with the machine 104, to provide wagers as consideration for a given spin or handle pull and/or to receive payments for achieving favorable result in the primary and/or secondary game(s).

The slot machine may further comprise one or more credit meter balances 470A, 470B. The gaming device credit meter balance may operate to indicate an amount of electronic credits currently available to a player, as described above. The player may use the credits, for example, as wagers or consideration for primary or secondary games played on the gaming device. When appropriate, the electronic credits may be “cashed out” as coins, bills, tokens, a cashless gaming receipt, and/or credits to another financial account associated with the player.

Finally, the slot machine may comprise a hopper 406, hopper controller 408, and coin tray (not pictured). Dispensing coins or tokens into the coin tray may render payment to the player. Such coins may be dispensed based on, for example, a player's indication that the player would like to cash out his credit meter balance and/or a payout obtained by a player as a result of playing a primary or secondary game on the slot machine. Note that, where appropriate, the slot machine may comprise alternative and/or additional components besides (or in addition to) those discussed herein.

Turning to FIGS. 5A through 5C, illustrations of example multiplayer gaming devices 106A, 106B, 106C are provided. Device 106A includes a single shared central display 500A that may be useful for displaying cumulative outcome information and other secondary game information to players. The device 106A also provides both of the players with their own set of main display areas 506A and 508A, respectively, as well as their own payment systems 510A and 512A, respectively, and handles 504A and 502A, respectively. Separate payment systems 510A and 512A facilitate making different payouts to each player and accepting payments for each player individually. However, separate payment systems 510A and 512A are not absolutely necessary as illustrated in example device 106B of FIG. 5B. In the multiplayer gaming devices 106B, players may receive payouts and pay for credit balances separately through the use of player tracking card accounts and cashless gaming receipts in a single, shared payment system 508B. Alternatively, the gaming device 106B may only accept a single payment for both players, for example, in the case of a husband and wife players. The device 106B still allows both players to control the actual play by providing separate handles 502B and 504B. Turning to FIG. 5C, illustrates that in some embodiments players may share the main play area 506C while still allowing both players to control the actual play by providing separate handles 502C and 504C. In such an embodiment, players may alternate making handle pulls or only cause one or two reels to spin each. In some embodiments, the secondary game area may instructed the players when to make a handle pull.

D. DATABASES

As indicated above, it should be noted that although the example embodiments depicted in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4 include five particular databases 328, 330, 332, 334, 336 stored on a hard disk memory 318, other database arrangements may be used which would still be in keeping with the spirit and scope of the present invention. In other words, the present invention could be implemented using any number of different database files or data structures, as opposed to the five depicted in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4. Further, the individual database files could be stored on different devices (e.g., located on different storage devices in different geographic locations, such as on a third-party server). Likewise, the program 326 could also be located remotely from the hard disk memory 318 and/or on another server. As indicated above, the program 326 may include instructions for retrieving, manipulating, and storing data in the databases 328, 330, 332, 334, 336 as may be useful in performing the methods of the invention as will be further described below.

1. Probability Database

Where appropriate, a probability database may be utilized in the performance of the inventive processes described herein. More specifically, a probability database may be stored in a data storage device (e.g., of the gaming device and/or controller) in tabular form, or any other appropriate database form, as is known in the art.

The data stored therein may include a number of exemplary records or entries, each defining a random number. Those skilled in the art will understand that the probability database may include any number of entries. The tabular representation may also define fields for each of the entries or records. The fields may specify: (i) a random number or range of random numbers that may be generated by the random number generator; and (ii) an outcome, that indicates the one or more indicia comprising the outcome that corresponds to the random number of a particular record.

A gaming device may utilize a probability database to determine, for example, which outcome corresponds to a random number generated by a random number generator and to display the determined outcome in accordance with a reel-based game (e.g., a three-reeled game). For example, the outcome may comprise the three symbols to be displayed along the payline of a three-reel slot machine.

Other arrangements of probability databases or probability tables are possible. For example, the book “Winning At Slot Machines” by Jim Regan (Carol Publishing Group Edition, ©1997), the entirety of which is incorporated by reference herein for all purposes, illustrates examples of probability tables and how they may be derived.

2. Payout Database

Where appropriate, one or more payout database(s) 330 may be utilized in the performance of the inventive processes described herein. More specifically, a first payout database may be employed for purposes of conducting a reel-based slot machine game at the gaming device. Further, a second payout database may be employed for purposes of conducting a secondary game at the gaming device. More specifically, the first payout database may be used to determine payouts to be awarded to players for achieving favorable outcomes during a reel-based slot machine game (e.g., three matching symbols on the machine's payline). The second payout database may be used to determine an appropriate award for achieving a level of completion associated with a secondary game objective. In accordance with the invention, the secondary game objective may compel the player to attempt to assemble a completed image from a plurality of image portions occurring within the context of a reel-type slot machine game. In another embodiment, a single payout database is shared between two or more players. Each player contributes outcomes to a combined game, with payouts determined by a common payout table.

In accordance with various embodiments of the present invention, the one or more payout database(s) may be stored at the gaming device and/or controller in tabular form, or any other appropriate database form, as is well known in the art.

The data stored therein includes a number of example records or entries, each defining an outcome that may be obtained on a gaming device that corresponds to a payout. For purposes of the reel based game, the first payout table may comprise a field defining various symbol combinations stored in correlative relation to information defining an award that may be conferred to a player for having achieved the symbol combination.

For purposes of the secondary game, the second payout table may comprise a field indicating levels or amounts of progress toward an overall game objective, such as the progress of a game character in a three legged race. The individual indications of progress may be stored in correlative relation to an amount of payout or award to be conferred or entitled to the player in exchange for achieving the corresponding level of progress.

Those skilled in the art will understand that the payout database(s) may include any number of entries. Other arrangements of payout databases are possible. For example, the book “Winning at Slot Machines” by Jim Regan incorporated above, illustrates examples of payout tables and probability tables (described above) and how they may be derived.

3. Player Database

Turning to FIG. 6, in accordance with the present invention, a data storage device or hard disk memory 318 of the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may operate to store a player database 332. Generally, the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may utilize the player database 332 to store data relating to the player such as a name, address, or indication of partners linked to his gaming device 104. Specific uses for player information will be described in detail below.

According to some embodiments of the invention, the player database 332 may be stored in tabular form at either (or both) the gaming device 104 and/or controller 102. In accordance with other embodiments of the invention, the player database 332 may be stored at any location and in any form that is practicable.

The player database 332 may include any number of records or entries. The database may define fields for each of the entries including (i) a player identifier field 602, (ii) a player name field 604, (iii) an address field 606, (iv) a “How Linked?” filed 608, (v) a partner identifier field 610, (vi) a linked machine identifier field 612, and (vii) a preferred game related identity field 614.

For each record or entry in the player database 332, a player identifier field 602 stores a unique numeric, alphanumeric or other type of code that uniquely identifies the corresponding player. The player identifier 602 may be generated and assigned e.g., by an administrator of the system of the present invention.

For each record or entry, a name field 604 and address field 606 stores information that may be used by the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 for purposes of identifying or contacting the particular player.

For each record or entry in the player database 332, a “How Linked?” field 608 stores an indication of whether or not the identified player is linked with another player on the gaming floor. For example, in the context of the game described above wherein two players engage in a cooperative slot game at a two person cabinet, field 608 may store an indication of“TWO PLAYER CABINET” to indicate that the identified player is participating in a two player game at a single game cabinet. In an embodiment in which two machines are linked together via a network, field 608 may indicate “VIA NETWORK” for those players currently linked via the network.

For each record or entry of the player database 332, partner identifier fields 610 store information representing the identity of the player who is currently playing a game with the identified player. For example, filed 610 indicates that “P 222 222” is the partner of player “P 111 111”. As previously indicated with reference to field 608, these players are both playing at “TWO PLAYER CABINET”. Note that for those players not playing linked sessions, field 610 indicates “N/A”.

For each record or entry of the player database 332, a linked machine identifier 612 field stores information identifying the gaming device which a particular player is linked to via the network. For example, players “P 333 333” and “P 444 444” are currently linked via the network using machines “M 4567” and “M 7612”.

For each record or entry of the player database 332, a preferred game related identity filed 614 stores information identifying game tokens/avatars that are preferred by that particular player. For example, player “P 111 111” prefers the game symbols “HAT, DOG”, so that when a gaming session is initiated that uses such symbols (such as a Monopoly® game) the player may automatically be assigned his preferred game token when the game begins.

4. Session Database

Turning to FIG. 7, in accordance with the present invention, the data storage device or hard disk memory 318 of the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may operate to store a session database 334. Generally, the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may utilize the session database 334 to store information relating to a gaming session associated with one or more players. For example, a player may establish a gaming session with another player in which Monopoly(& game properties are collected during the game session. These assets are held by the players during the session and may result in coin payouts during or at the conclusion of the session.

The session database 334 may comprise a plurality of records or entries. The database itself may be stored in tabular form or any other form that is practicable (e.g., object-based). The database defines fields for each of the entries, including (i) a player identifier field 702, (ii) a first asset field 704, (iii) a second asset field 706, (iv) a third asset field 708, and (v) a fifth asset field 710. The information stored in the session database 334 may be generated by controller 102 and/or gaming device 104

For each record or entry, a player identifier field 702 may store a unique numeric, alphanumeric or other type of code that uniquely identifies the player of the gaming session.

For each player identifier 702 stored in the previously described field, an entry may be stored in one of the four asset fields 704, 706, 708, and 710 of the corresponding record or entry, e.g., “P 111 111” is associated with a first asset 704 of “A 1234”, a second asset 706 of “A 1237”, a third asset 708 of “A 1239” and a fourth asset 710 of “A 1225”. These assets may provide benefits to the player throughout the duration of his gaming session, as will be described more fully below with respect to the asset database of FIG. 8.

5. Asset Database

Turning to FIG. 8, in accordance with the present invention, the data storage device or hard disk memory 318 of the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may operate to store an asset database 336. Generally, the gaming device 104 and/or the controller 102 may utilize the asset database 336 to store information pertaining to assets that may be accumulated by players in gaming sessions at gaming device 104.

The asset database 336 may comprise a plurality of records or entries. The database itself may be stored in tabular form or any other form that is practicable (e.g., object-based). The database defines fields for each of the entries, including (i) an asset identifier field 802, (ii) an asset name field 804, and (iii) an asset description field 806.

For each record or entry in the asset database 336, an asset identifier 802 may store data that uniquely identifies an asset that has been obtained by a player, either alone or in cooperation with one or more other players.

For each asset identifier 802 stored in a record of the asset database 336, an asset name field 804 stores data describing the name of the asset. For example, asset identifier “A 3490” is associated with asset name 804 of “GOLD TREASURE CHEST”.

For each asset identifier 802 stored in a record of the asset database 336, an asset description field 806 stores a description of the particular asset which may include monetary awards associated with the asset or rules governing the duration of the asset. For example, asset identifier 802 of A 4678” corresponds to an asset description 806 of“WILDCARD WHICH CAN ONLY BE USED TO COMPLETE A FLUSH. EXPIRES AFTER 30 SPINS.”

E. METHODS

The system discussed above, including the hardware components and the databases, are useful to perform the methods of the invention. However, it should be understood that not all of the above described components and databases are necessary to perform any of the present invention's methods. In fact, in some embodiments, none of the above described system is required to practice the present invention's methods. The system described above is an example of a system that would be useful in practicing the invention's methods. For example, the spin results database described below may be useful for tracking and analyzing information about a players' outcomes, but it is not absolutely necessary to have such a database in order to perform the methods of the invention. In other words, the methods described below may be practiced, for example, by directly passing spin results to the process that analyzes outcomes using a processor's registers.

Referring to FIGS. 9A and 9B, flow charts are depicted that represent some embodiments of the present invention that may be performed by the controller 102, gaming devices 104,106,108, and/or the casino. It must be understood that the particular arrangement of elements in the flow charts of FIGS. 9A and 9B, as well as the number and order of example steps of various methods discussed herein, is not meant to imply a fixed order, sequence, quantity, and/or timing to the steps; embodiments of the present invention can be practiced in any order, sequence, and/or timing that is practicable. Likewise, the labels used to reference the individual steps of the methods are not meant to imply a fixed order, sequence, quantity, and/or timing to the steps. In other words, for example, Step SC2 may be followed by Step SC4 in some situations and Step S3 in others.

Turning to FIGS. 9A and 9B, flow charts are provided depicting an example method embodiment of the present invention in which three processes 900, 902, 904 run concurrently. In general, process 900 involves generating a spin result in Step SA1, recording the spin result in Step SA2, determining if a termination event has occurred in Step SA3 and if not, repeating the process 900. This process 900 may be performed for a first player of a gaming device or for a first one of the players of a multiplayer gaming device 106. Likewise, process 902, which may run while process 900 runs, involves the same three steps as process 900. Process 902 may be performed for a second player by a gaming device linked to the first player's gaming device or for a second one of the players of a multiplayer gaming device. Clearly, processes 900, 902 may be replicated on any number of gaming devices or at any number of stations of a multiplayer gaming device.

Process 904 depicted in FIG. 9B includes Step SC1, retrieving the spin results stored by the linked gaming devices (or multiplayer gaming device) operating the processes 900, 902 described above, determining if the spin results collectively include a complementary sequence of symbols in Step SC2, advancing a cumulative outcome if they do in Step SC3, and returning to Step SC1 to retrieve additional spin results if no termination has occurred in Step SC6. If the retrieved results do not include a complementary sequence of symbols as determined in Step SC2, in some embodiments a determination is made if the retrieved results include a conflicting sequence of symbols in Step SC4. If so, the cumulative outcome may be regressed in Step SC5. In either case, flow returns to Step SC1 to retrieve additional spin results if no termination has occurred in Step SC6.

Details and variations of the above general steps will now be discussed. Processes 900, 902 may include the linked gaming devices (or multiplayer device) making payouts for individual spin results as winning outcomes of the primary games occur. The players effectively contribute their spin results to the secondary game when the system stores the results for the process 904. Note that in some embodiments, all the spin results are stored for process 904 but in other embodiments, only spin results that include a game piece relevant to a secondary game may be stored for process 904. Note that in some embodiments, spin results are not stored but merely passed to process 904 which receives them as they become available.

Process 904 is provided as an example embodiment of the present invention. Many variations within the scope of the invention are possible. As indicated above, retrieving spin results may involve merely receiving results as opposed to retrieving them from, for example a database or a first-in-first-out memory stack. In different embodiments, the spin results may be gathered for consideration as they are generated, at a regular frequency, and/or only after a set number accumulate in memory.

The determination of whether the spin results include “a complementary sequence of symbols” as described in Step SC2 may actually include many different alternative and/or additional determinations. In some embodiments, for example, the system may simply compare on a one-for-one basis a spin result (or symbol, or game piece) from each player and decide if they match, correspond, fit together, and/or otherwise relate to each other. In some embodiments the relative or absolute timing of the different player's contributions may be considered. For example, a sequence of game pieces from two players may include the following:

Piece# Player Piece Time Stamp
961 Player 2 RIGHT OAR 10:03:09 AM
962 Player 1 LEFT OAR 10:03:25 AM
963 Player 2 RIGHT OAR 10:03:30 AM
964 Player 1 LEFT OAR 10:03:45 AM
965 Player 2 RIGHT OAR 10:06:09 AM
966 Player 1 RIGHT OAR 10:06:11 AM
967 Player 1 RIGHT OAR 10:06:15 AM
968 Player 1 RIGHT OAR 10:06:20 AM

In some embodiments, the determination of whether the spin results include “a complementary sequence of symbols” may require, for example, that player's contribute a pair of compatible (or balanced) game pieces in an alternating sequence every thirty seconds to be considered a “complementary sequence.” Thus, in the above example sequence of game pieces, pieces 961 through 964 meet the criteria of this example to be considered a complementary sequence. However, the remaining game pieces do not. Piece 965 arrived (occurred) too late after the thirty second deadline, and 966 through 968 do not form balanced pairs (nor do they alternate). Thus, in any particular embodiment, any type of criteria may be chosen as a gate to whether the individual player contributions include a complementary sequence.

Likewise, in Step SC4, in any particular embodiment, any type of criteria may be chosen as a gate to whether the individual player contributions include a conflicting sequence of symbols, game pieces, and/or spin results. Referring again to the example sequence above, the sequence of game pieces 965 through 968 may be deemed conflicting if the criteria of a particular embodiment specifies that, for example, more than two unbalanced (or incompatible) game pieces in a row is a conflict.

In some embodiments, advancing a cumulative outcome in Step SC3 means moving players closer to achieving a secondary or overall objective. For example, in a secondary game that is based on a virtual boat race, advancing a cumulative outcome may involve moving the players' boat icon along a virtual regatta course. Likewise, regressing a cumulative outcome in Step SC5, may involve steering the players' boat off course, moving it in the wrong direction, stalling it in place, or otherwise not advancing it.

In some embodiments, play of the secondary game continues until a termination event is detected in Step SC6. A termination event may comprise the completion of a given number of spins, an elapsed duration of time (e.g., the end of a prepaid gaming session), and/or a particular spin result. In some embodiments, a termination event may comprise the completion of the secondary game objective. In some embodiments with team competitions, a competing team achieving a secondary game objective could result in a termination event for other competing teams.

In embodiments where two or more players play a collaborative secondary game that is dependent on separate primary games hosted by two or more gaming devices (or a multiplayer device), the collaborative secondary game may be based on popular games such as the “Monopoly®” and/or the “Sorry!®” board games by Milton Bradley®. For example, players may register to play such collaborative secondary games at a dedicated terminal (e.g., a kiosk) or at the gaming devices themselves. Players may select or be assigned separate “game related identities” (e.g., “game piece” icons, such as a hat, an iron, a race car) for use in the collaborative secondary game. At separate (but perhaps physically adjacent) gaming devices (or on multiplayer gaming devices), the players then commence play of the primary games (e.g., standard slot machine games), which affect their common standing in the collaborative secondary game. For example, a first player might receive a certain property symbol on the reels of a first gaming device through a primary game, and a second player might independently receive a second, similar property symbol on the reels of a second gaming device through a second primary game. The acquired property symbols (“assets”) may together form a “monopoly” in the collaborative secondary game, and both players may be provided with a bonus payout accordingly. For example, if a first player acquires “Pennsylvania Avenue” and “North Carolina Avenue” and a second player acquires “Pacific Avenue,” a “green” monopoly is formed.

The steps of such an embodiment follow. Although the below embodiment may be described as being performed by a central server, such an embodiment may be facilitated by one or more gaming devices communicating directly with each other or a stand alone multiplayer device.

At a first step, the central server receives a request from two or more players to register for a collaborative secondary game. In one embodiment, two or more players may “pre-register” to play a collaborative secondary game at a dedicated device (e.g., a “registration” kiosk) that is operatively connected to the central server. In various embodiments, such players may be required to (a) enter player tracking cards into the dedicated device, (b) select separate game related identities, and/or (c) pay a fee to pre-register for the collaborative secondary game. In another embodiment, players may register for collaborative secondary games from one or more gaming devices. For example, prior to or during play of a primary game, a player may be provided with an offer (through the gaming device's screen) to “team up” with the player sitting next to her by pressing a button. A player at an adjacent gaming device may similarly be provided with such an offer. Alternately, a first player of a first gaming device may indicate to “team up” with a second player of a second gaming device by inputting a second device identifier, which may be visible to players by way of device signage (e.g., “Machine #1407”). Each player may be assigned, or may select, game related identities and may be required to provide additional payment.

It should be noted that game related identity preferences might be stored for each player in a database (e.g., FIG. 6). Such stored game related identities may be recalled by the gaming server and/or gaming device(s) upon presentation of player tracking cards. In this way, players may have their favorite game pieces (e.g., in the case of a Monopoly® embodiment, hats, thimbles, race cars, dogs, etc.) stored in association with their player tracking cards.

Next, the server initiates a primary game at a first gaming device. For example, a player may commence slot machine play in a conventional manner by depositing a wager amount and initiating a handle pull. Then, the server initiates a primary game second gaming device.

The server then initiates a secondary game and outputs a secondary game status. After both registered players have commenced play of separate primary games at separate gaming devices, the server may begin to output status regarding the collaborative secondary game to the players. For example, secondary game screens may show the players' initial standing in the collaborative secondary game by showing the players' game related identities at a starting position on a representation of a Monopoly® style game board.

Next, the server determines an outcome of the primary game at the first gaming device. That is, in a conventional manner, an outcome is determined at a first gaming device. Such an outcome may yield a payout for a first player without affecting the collaborative secondary game. Then, the server determines an outcome of a primary game at the second gaming device.

Thereafter, the server adjusts a secondary game status based on at least one of the determined outcomes. In other words, based on at least one outcome determined at one of the gaming devices, the server determines whether to adjust the status of the collaborative secondary game. For example, if one player receives a certain property symbol on the reels of her slot machine, both players may receive the property symbol in the collaborative secondary game.

Next, the server determines whether to provide a payout to the players based on the adjusted secondary game status. For example, based on the players' shared status in the collaborative secondary game, the server may determine that the players should be awarded a bonus payout (e.g., $2 each), which may be provided directly through the separate gaming devices.

In some embodiments, a player may initiate a primary game without indicating to “team up” with another player pursuant to a collaborative secondary game. In one such embodiment, a secondary display screen may be used to output a message encouraging the player to engage in collaborative play (e.g., a display screen reads, “Did you know you can team up with other players to build valuable Monopolies? Press the “Team Play” button to learn how.”).

Another exemplary method according to some embodiments of the present invention may be described as follows. In Step 1, payment is received for a gaming session. The gaming device receives payment from players wishing to begin a gaming session. In one embodiment, players each pay a flat price for a specific length of gameplay. For example, a game may cost $5, in exchange for which each player receives 25 ‘spins’ such as rolls of virtual dice, or reel spins. Players may be able to increase payment for longer gaming sessions, or wager more per gaming session. Either or both players may submit payment via a common device, or each may be provided with separate devices through which the players can submit payment.

In Step 2, the gaming session begins. After payment for the gaming session is received and players are ready, the gaming session begins. Game parameters are determined by the controller or the gaming device, including: number of ‘virtual’ or house players (in competition with human players); assets assigned to each of the players (for example, in a monopoly-type game, properties and railroads may be assigned to players, or players may be able to pick the properties they wish to own for the duration of the gaming session); and/or starting game money balance of each player (for example, players may receive a flat amount of game money per gaming session) Game money may represent non-cash value game currency for use during a gaming session. For example, players may receive $1,500 in game money for a $5 wager. Additionally, players may be able to raise their wager for higher amounts of game money, and/or exchange assets for game money.

In Step 3, game play begins. Game play commences after game play parameters are determined. In some embodiments, game play consists of each player taking turns rolling ‘virtual’ dice, and moving a character representative of the player around a digital board. Based on the outcome of the dice, the character of the player moves, landing on a space on the board. If the space on the board corresponds to an asset of another player (see databases herein), the player landing on the space may pay a penalty out of his/her gaming money account, or receive a bonus, based on the game parameters. In one embodiment, gameplay continues until a predetermined number of player turns is reached. For example, gameplay may conclude when each player has taken 25 turns. Many configurations of gameplay parameters are possible.

In Step 4, game play ends. In some embodiments, game play continues until a predetermined number of player turns is reached. For example, gameplay may conclude when each player has taken 25 turns. There are many other ways in which the conclusion of gameplay may be determined, such as concluding gameplay if a player's game account reaches a specific low or high balance (e.g., $0 or $2,000), a player quits the game, a player reaches a threshold above all other players (e.g., player's gaming account is twice all other players combined), or based on other parameters.

In Step 5, payouts are provided based on the game money of each player. Using a payout database for example, the players are issued payouts based on at least one gaming parameter, such as the player's game money balance at the end of the game. In some embodiments, the amount of game money the player has at the end of a game or gaming session is used as an index into the payout database, and a corresponding amount of actual money or credits is paid out to the player(s). Players may be paid via one or more benefit output devices, such as one or more coin trays, cashless gaming receipt printers, etc. Players may need a threshold amount of game money to receive payouts.

Yet another exemplary method according to some embodiments of the present invention may be described as follows. In the first step, a gaming session begins. Players begin a gaming session. In this exemplary game, two players play a multiplayer device, each position having traditional three reels, individual payment and control mechanisms. Each player's reels, however, have a special symbol. Together the two players must collect the special symbols in order to win payouts. Each player pays for the gaming session via individual payment mechanisms, and is able to view their progress via a display screen which displays information regarding the progress of the two players.

In the second step, at least one outcome of a first player is received. The two players begin gameplay and receive outcomes. The multiplayer gaming device tracks the player's outcomes and displays them via the display screen common to both players. In some embodiments, the two players are playing a three-legged race game in which the two players must alternatively receive special symbols enabling their character (displayed via the display screen) to walk toward a finish line. The gaming device detects outcomes including the special symbols, and adjusts the display and other game data accordingly.

In the third step, at least one outcome of a second player is received. As with the first player, the gaming device detects the outcome of special symbols and adjusts game data and displays accordingly. In some embodiments, the first player must receive the special symbol first, and the players must alternate receiving the special symbols for their character to advance. For example, special symbols received by the second player may not count until the first player receives a special symbol.

In the fourth step, based on at least two of the outcomes, at least one payout is determined. The game may conclude when a predetermined number of turns, or a time limit is reached. Upon game conclusion, players may receive individual or common payouts based on the success of their character, determined by the number of and order in which special symbols are received. For example, if the players moved their character fifty feet of a possible one-hundred feet, the two players may receive a payout equal to half of the top payout. A number of payout scenarios are possible based on the type of game and casino preferences.

In the fifth step, based on the determined payout(s), payouts, if any, are provided to players via each player's respective payment system or via a shared payment system. In one embodiment, players receive payouts throughout the game, in addition to or instead of one or more payouts at the conclusion of the game.

F. EXAMPLE ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

The following very specific additional examples are provided to illustrate particular embodiments of the present invention, particularly from the perspective of potential users of the invention, including players and casinos.

Example 1

Two players play a ‘Million Dollar Monopoly’ game. Player sit at the gaming device, which features separate controls and displays for each player, and a common display screen showing the game board and each player's game piece. Players pay for the game, and each receives an amount of gaming money and properties. Players can cooperate and trade properties in order to form monopolies. For each monopoly made, each player gets a bonus. The game lasts until both players are bankrupt, the players losing money when they land on board spaces that neither of them own. Payouts are made based on the number of successful turns each player takes before becoming bankrupt. At the end of the game, the machine pays each player via his/her respective coin tray.

Example 2

Two casino players play a multiplayer Monopoly®-style game. The machine features two seats and controls for each player, as well as a single large Monopoly®-style board display. Players compete against virtual house players for prizes. Beginning their game, the two players pre-pay $5 for the game, and receive $1500 in Monopoly® money and two monopolies each. Beginning the game, each player (including the virtual house players) takes turns rolling virtual dice, via the machine controls. If a player lands on a property owned by another player, the player must pay any fees associated with the property, which are deducted from the player's Monopoly® money account. The game ends when each player has rolled the dice 25 times. At the end of the game, the players are paid by the machine based on the amount of cash and/or monopolies they have left.

Example 3

Two players sit at a multiplayer ‘three legged race’ slot machine. The object of the game is for the players to enable their avatars, displayed as two people with each of their right and left legs respectively adjoined, to cross a finish line. When they begin playing, the race starts. The players have three minutes to get their avatar across the finish line, and then the game ends and a new game begins. In addition to traditional reel symbols and payouts, the player on the left has reels including a ‘left leg’ reel symbol, and the player on the right has reels including ‘right leg’ reel symbol. Not only must the players receive a certain number of the symbols in order to get their avatar across the finish line, but they also must receive the symbols in ‘stride’ so the avatar doesn't veer off course. As the game begins, player 2 receives three right leg symbols in a row, moving the avatar slightly forward, but turning the avatar left at the same time. Then player 1, playing even faster in an effort to straighten out the path of the avatar, receives four left leg symbols, correcting the avatar's course and turning it slightly right. As the game progresses the players receive traditional bar and seven combinations and payouts. At the end of the three-minute game the players fell short of the finish line and did not receive bonus payouts. The avatar is returned to the starting line and the players are able to restart the race.

G. ADDITIONAL EMBODIMENTS

In some embodiments, players or teams of players can compete against each other, either directly (e.g., team v. team) or as groups (e.g., one team out of ten wins a race). In a team v. team embodiment, two pairs of players may compete in a monopoly-type game (described above). In a group embodiment, multiple teams may compete to, for example, win a race. For example, two players may compete against other pairs of players in a multiplayer canoe race game. Each team of players sit at team machines (e.g., machines that are on the same ‘team’) and together compete with other teams to get their canoe up the river first, by receiving the most canoe reel symbols within an allotted timeframe. The teams of players play the machines as they usually would, and receive common outcomes. Once every twenty minutes, the machines participating in the canoe race announce via an audio message, “its time to race!”. Players are allowed to opt-in to the race by placing a bonus bet. For the following 100 reel spins, the team of players that receives the most canoe reel symbols and thus pushes their canoe up the river the farthest wins the bonus payout. In addition to the bonus game entry, players can bet on which canoe they think will win the race, lose the race, place second, etc.

In some embodiments, players may be able to retain certain parameters of the previous game for use in the next game. For example, a player may like the assets he/she was assigned for the previous game, and may choose to keep the same configuration and/or pay to keep the current configuration. Players can begin a new game by inserting credits, or directing the gaming device to debit an account of credits of the player(s).

In some embodiments, two or more existing slot machines may be operatively connected to provide multiplayer functionality. For example, two existing slot machines may be combined with a common display screen on which data representative of a game played by players operating both slot machines, and/or generated or received from both slot machines may be displayed.

The following very specific additional examples are provided to illustrate particular alternate embodiments of the present invention.

Example 4

Two casino patrons sit together at a new ‘multiplayer’ slot machine. The machine has three reels with common symbols, and special ‘helium balloon’ symbols. As the two players play the slot machine, the special helium balloon symbols appear every few reels spins. When a special symbol is received on the pay line for either player, it lifts a random number of coins from a virtual treasure chest, and drops the coin(s) into either a joint account of the players (e.g., the two players split the prize), or into an account of one or the other player randomly.

Example 5

Two casino patrons decide to play a new multiplayer slot machine. Sitting at the machine they learn that the machine offers standard payouts, and a special payout that allows the players to combine each of their three reel outcomes to form a six reel outcome, providing they insert an extra coin per pull to play the ‘bonus’ game. Both playing the bonus game, on their 4th spin they each receive three bars, combining to form a six bar payout in addition to their individual three bars each payout. The payout for the six bar outcome is evenly distributed to the two players.

A few spins later, they again each receive three bars. Player 1, however, neglected to insert the coin to play the bonus round. Instead of receiving half each of the bonus payout in addition to the standard payout for three bars, the bonus payout is negated and the players each receive the standard three-bar payout.

Player 2, frustrated with Player 1 for not paying for the bonus round, decides to pay for the bonus spin for both players, doubling her bonus round bet (e.g., plays one coin for herself and one coin for her partner). A few spins later the two players each receive three sevens. Player 1, neglecting to play the bonus round, receives the standard payout for three sevens. Player 2, playing the bonus bet for both players, receives the standard payout for three sevens as well as double the bonus payout (i.e., the bonus prize that would have been awarded to player 1 is instead paid to player 2.)

H. CONCLUSION

It should be noted that the embodiments described with reference to the following figures are presented for illustrative purposes only and are not meant to be limiting in any sense. It should also be noted that, as used herein, the terms “first embodiment”, “second embodiment”, “third embodiment”, “an embodiment”, “embodiment”, “embodiments”, “the embodiment”, “the embodiments” “one or more embodiments”, “some embodiments”, and “one embodiment” mean “one or more embodiments” unless expressly specified otherwise. Further, although particular features of the present invention may be described with reference to one or more particular embodiments or figures, it should be understood that such features are not limited to usage in the one or more particular embodiments or figures with reference to which they are described.

Further, it should be noted that although process steps, method steps, algorithms or the like may be described in a sequential order, such processes, methods and algorithms may be configured to work in alternate orders. In other words, any sequence or order of steps that may be described does not necessarily indicate a requirement that the steps be performed in that order.

It is clear from the foregoing discussion that the disclosed systems and methods to provide multi-player type games represents an improvement in the art of gaming. While the method and apparatus of the present invention has been described in terms of its presently preferred and alternate embodiments, those skilled in the art will recognize that the present invention may be practiced with modification and alteration within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. The specifications and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense.

Further, even though only certain embodiments have been described in detail, those having ordinary skill in the art will certainly appreciate and understand that many modifications, changes, and enhancements are possible without departing from the teachings thereof. All such modifications are intended to be encompassed within the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7097562 *Jun 3, 2003Aug 29, 2006Wms Gaming Inc.Peer-to-peer distributed gaming application network
US7591725Jun 25, 2008Sep 22, 2009IgtMethod for consolidating game performance meters of multiple players into regulatorymeters
US7785194 *Oct 31, 2003Aug 31, 2010IgtPlayer specific rewards
US7833094 *Jun 1, 2006Nov 16, 2010Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with community award based on best selection from all players
US7841938Jul 10, 2006Nov 30, 2010IgtMulti-player regulated gaming with consolidated accounting
US8118679Jun 21, 2006Feb 21, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Peer-to-peer distributed gaming application network
US8118680 *Nov 5, 2010Feb 21, 2012Ami Entertainment Network, Inc.Multi-touchscreen module for amusement device
US8128488Apr 26, 2006Mar 6, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine with repeated award feature
US8133120 *Jan 17, 2006Mar 13, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with alternating picks
US8192267Jul 3, 2008Jun 5, 2012Patent Investment & Licensing CompanyShared game play on gaming device
US8216052 *Jul 19, 2006Jul 10, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Sharing game assets in a wagering game network
US8235791 *Jun 27, 2008Aug 7, 2012Bally Gaming, Inc.Community lines game apparatus
US8235792 *Jun 27, 2008Aug 7, 2012Bally Gaming, Inc.Game method using community lines
US8241106 *Jun 27, 2008Aug 14, 2012Bally Gaming, Inc.Game with community lines
US8298066 *Jun 27, 2008Oct 30, 2012Bally Gaming, Inc.Game method using community reels
US8298067 *Jun 27, 2008Oct 30, 2012Bally Gaming, IncGame system including community reels
US8348767 *Sep 26, 2011Jan 8, 2013Zynga Inc.Dynamic asset and obstacle generation in online games
US8439744Jun 9, 2006May 14, 2013Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game system with pausing feature
US8475254Dec 28, 2009Jul 2, 2013Patent Investment & Licensing CompanyLinked game play on gaming devices
US8506386Jul 28, 2004Aug 13, 2013Rocket Gaming Systems, LlcMethod and apparatus for awarding wins for game play
US8545305 *Jun 28, 2010Oct 1, 2013Wms Gaming Inc.Devices, systems, and methods for dynamically simulating a component of a wagering game
US8602865Aug 6, 2007Dec 10, 2013IgtGaming system and method providing a group bonus event for linked gaming devices
US8628404 *Jul 16, 2004Jan 14, 2014Rocket Gaming Systems, LlcMethod and apparatus for awarding wins for game play
US8715055 *Apr 27, 2012May 6, 2014Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with multiple viewpoint display feature
US8715076 *Apr 27, 2012May 6, 2014Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with multiple viewpoint display feature
US8777720 *Jun 27, 2008Jul 15, 2014Bally Gaming, Inc.Community reels game apparatus
US8808092Jun 25, 2008Aug 19, 2014IgtMethods and systems for consolidating game meters of N gaming machines
US8821240Nov 15, 2005Sep 2, 2014Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with collection of objects to influence game outcome
US8827803 *Jun 30, 2012Sep 9, 2014Bally Gaming, Inc.Game system with community play
US20080220841 *Jul 19, 2006Sep 11, 2008Gagner Mark BSharing Game Assets in a Wagering Game Network
US20090197665 *Feb 6, 2008Aug 6, 2009Erik ChristensenTournament gaming machine
US20090325668 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyCommunity Reels Game Apparatus
US20090325669 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyGame Method Using Community Reels
US20090325670 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyGame System Including Community Reels
US20090325671 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyCommunity Lines Game Apparatus
US20090325672 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyGame Method Using Community Lines
US20090325673 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyGame System Including Community Lines
US20110306397 *Nov 5, 2010Dec 15, 2011Harmonix Music Systems, Inc.Audio and animation blending
US20110319152 *Jun 28, 2010Dec 29, 2011Wms Gaming Inc.Devices, systems, and methods for dynamically simulating a component of a wagering game
US20120028711 *Aug 17, 2011Feb 2, 2012Ami Entertainment Network, Inc.Multi-touchscreen module for amusement device
US20120077580 *Sep 26, 2011Mar 29, 2012Zynga, Inc.Dynamic asset and obstacle generation in online games
US20120214578 *Apr 27, 2012Aug 23, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with multiple viewpoint display feature
US20120220371 *Apr 27, 2012Aug 30, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with multiple viewpoint display feature
US20130005428 *Jun 30, 2012Jan 3, 2013Bryan KellyGame System With Community Play
US20130017882 *Jan 13, 2012Jan 17, 2013Vladimir DunaevskySystems and methods of conducting a game of chance
US20130260889 *Mar 28, 2012Oct 3, 2013IgtEmailing or texting as communication between mobile device and egm
WO2006019443A1 *Apr 28, 2005Feb 23, 2006De Courssou Thierry BrunetIntegral ergonomic gaming terminal
WO2006116426A2 *Apr 26, 2006Nov 2, 2006Benjamin T GomezGaming machine with repeated award feature
WO2008109988A1 *Mar 7, 2008Sep 18, 2008Peter A GuterresPoker video game terminal
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/20
International ClassificationG07F17/32, A63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/3286, G07F17/32, G07F17/3211, G07F17/3276, G07F17/3274, G07F17/3232
European ClassificationG07F17/32, G07F17/32E6, G07F17/32M8B, G07F17/32C2F, G07F17/32M8D, G07F17/32P
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 24, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: WALKER DIGITAL, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WALKER, JAY S.;JORASCH, JAMES A.;PACKES, JR., JOHN M.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015816/0261;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040615 TO 20040921