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Publication numberUS20050016081 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/853,365
Publication dateJan 27, 2005
Filing dateMay 25, 2004
Priority dateMay 30, 2003
Publication number10853365, 853365, US 2005/0016081 A1, US 2005/016081 A1, US 20050016081 A1, US 20050016081A1, US 2005016081 A1, US 2005016081A1, US-A1-20050016081, US-A1-2005016081, US2005/0016081A1, US2005/016081A1, US20050016081 A1, US20050016081A1, US2005016081 A1, US2005016081A1
InventorsJean Gomree, Robert Beck, Robert Oren, Jeffrey Weber
Original AssigneeGomree Jean Francois, Beck Robert L., Robert Oren, Weber Jeffrey A.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Workspace habitat
US 20050016081 A1
Abstract
A workspace habitat and community of workspace habitat habitats, wherein each workspace habitat includes a first wall having a generally semi-circular horizontal cross section. Each habitat further includes at least one door having a horizontal cross section in the shape of at least one sixth of a circle, but not more than three quarters of a circle. Each door is moveable between an open and closed position. When each door is in the closed position, each workspace habitat is fully enclosed.
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Claims(70)
1. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of at least half, but not more than three quarters of a circle, thereby defining an opening in the workspace, the wall having an inner surface and an outer surface; and
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of at least one quarter, but not more than half of a circle, said first door being movable between a closed position wherein said first door closes at least a portion of said opening to thereby create an enclosed workspace, and an open position wherein one side edge of the first door is adjacent one side edge of the wall and wherein another side edge of the first door is adjacent the outer surface of the wall, to thereby create an open workspace; and
wherein the enclosed workspace has dimensions suitable for a user to work in either a standing or a sitting position.
2. The workspace habitat of claim 1 further comprising a second door, and wherein each of the first door and the second door have a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of one quarter of a circle.
3. The workspace habitat of claim 2 wherein the wall, the first door and the second door each comprise a ceiling portion, and wherein the ceiling portions cooperate to close the top of the workspace when the door and the second door are in the closed position.
4. The workspace habitat of claim 3 wherein the ceiling portions of the wall and the first and second door are all generally horizontal.
5. The workspace habitat of claim 3 wherein the ceiling portions of the wall and the first and second door all slope down from a point generally in the horizontal center of the workspace habitat.
6. The workspace habitat of claim 3 wherein the ceiling portion of the wall slopes down from a point generally in the horizontal center of the workspace habitat, and wherein the ceiling portions of the first and second door are all generally horizontal.
7. The workspace habitat of claim 3 wherein the first door and the second door are pivotally joined to the wall through a pivot point in the ceiling portions, said pivot point located at approximately the horizontal center of the workspace.
8. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor, the wall having a first and second side edge, a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of half of a circle, an outer surface and an inner surface, with the inner surface supporting at least one shelf;
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, having first and second side edges, and being movable between an open position wherein the first door is positioned along the outer surface of the wall and wherein the first side edge of the first door is adjacent the first side edge of the wall, and a closed position wherein the second side edge of the first door is adjacent the first side edge of the wall; and
a second door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, having first and second side edges, and being movable between an open position wherein the second door is positioned along the outer surface of the wall and wherein the first side edge of the second door is adjacent the second side edge of the wall, and a closed position wherein the second side edge of the second door is adjacent the second side edge of the wall;
whereby, when both the first and second doors are in the closed position, the first side edges of the first and second doors are adjacent and an enclosure is formed with a generally circular shaped horizontal cross section.
9. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a ceiling portion, said wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of at least half, but not more than three quarters of a circle, thereby defining an opening in the workspace, and said wall having an inner and outer surface; and
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of at least one quarter of a circle, said first door having a ceiling portion, wherein said first door is movable between a closed position wherein said first door closes at least a portion of said opening, and an open position.
10. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said wall is semi-stationary.
11. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said wall is supported by a plurality of rollers, thus facilitating transport of said workspace habitat along a floor.
12. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said first door is positioned along said outer surface of said wall when in the open position.
13. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said first door is pocketed within said wall when in the open position.
14. The workspace habitat of claim 7 wherein said first ceiling portion is sloped.
15. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein the wall is made of rigid frame members covered by at least one panel.
16. The workspace of claim 15 wherein the panel is made of a light transmitting material.
17. The workspace of claim 15 wherein the first door is made of rigid frame members covered by at least one panel.
18. The workspace of claim 17 wherein the panel of the wall and the panel of the door are both made of a light transmitting material.
19. The workspace of claim 18 wherein the light transmitting material is transparent.
20. The workspace habitat of claim 19 further comprising light-filtering features.
21. The workspace habitat of claim 20 wherein said light-filtering features are adjustable by a user of said workspace habitat.
22. The workspace habitat of claim 21 wherein said light-filtering features comprise rotating blinds.
23. The workspace habitat of claim 20 wherein said light-filtering features are static.
24. The workspace habitat of claim 23 wherein said light-filtering features are opaque areas.
25. The workspace habitat of claim 23 wherein said opaque areas include a visibility gradient.
26. The workspace habitat of claim 25 wherein said visibility gradient is a series of horizontal lines.
27. The workspace habitat of claim 17 wherein the panel of the wall and the panel of the door are made from a material independently selected from the group consisting of metal, glass and plastic.
28. The workspace habitat of claim 17 wherein at least one of the panels of the wall or the door is designed to enhance noise reduction.
29. The workspace habitat of claim 17 wherein at least one of the panels is designed to allow ambient light to enter the workspace habitat.
30. The workspace habitat of claim 2 wherein at least one caster is attached to each of said first and second doors, thereby assisting in moving between said open and closed positions.
31. The workspace habitat of claim 3 wherein the top plan view of the ceiling portion of the wall is generally in the shape of half of a circle and the top plan view of said ceiling portions of the first and second doors are generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle.
32. The workspace habitat of claim 11 wherein at least one of said first, first or second doors includes a window.
33. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said workspace habitat is pre-wired for power and data.
34. The workspace habitat of claim 1, further comprising at least one environmentally enhancing device controllable by a user of the workspace habitat.
35. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said device is controllable by a touch-activated control panel.
36. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said device is controlled by voice.
37. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said at least one environmentally enhancing devices includes lighting for a user of said workspace habitat.
38. The workspace habitat of claim 37 wherein said lighting is supported by said wall.
39. The workspace habitat of claim 37 wherein said lighting is incorporated into said wall.
40. The workspace habitat of claim 37 wherein said lighting is LED lighting.
41. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said at least one environmentally enhancing feature comprises a ventilation system.
42. The workspace habitat of claim 41 wherein said ventilation system comprises a fan.
43. The workspace habitat of claim 41 wherein said ventilation system comprises a heating unit.
44. The workspace habitat of claim 41 wherein said ventilation system comprises a cooling unit.
45. The workspace habitat of claim 41 wherein said ventilation system comprises a thermostat, settable by a workspace habitat user.
46. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said environmentally enhancing feature comprises an audio system.
47. The workspace habitat of claim 34 wherein said environmentally enhancing feature comprises a video display within said workspace habitat.
48. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein said wall includes at least one vertically oriented hanger frame.
49. The workspace habitat of claim 48 wherein said at least one hanger frame includes a plurality of slots.
50. The workspace habitat of claim 48 wherein said wall has at least two pieces of office furniture attached at two different heights.
51. The workspace habitat of claim 1, wherein the wall has an inner surface and further comprising a worksurface shaped to fit against the inner surface of the wall.
52. The workspace habitat of claim 51 wherein said worksurface is attached to said inner surface of the wall.
53. The workspace habitat of claim 51 wherein said worksurface is self-supported and movable within said workspace habitat.
54. The workspace habitat of claim 51 wherein said worksurface comprises an extension which is extendable to a position that allows a user of said workspace habitat to sit behind the extension of said worksurface while looking out of said workspace habitat when either one or both of said first and second doors are in the open position.
55. The workspace habitat of claim 51 wherein said worksurface comprises a first extension and a second extension, and said first extension extends as said first door is moved from said open position to said closed position, and said second extension extends as said second door is moved from said open position to said closed position.
56. The workspace habitat of claim 2 wherein said wall and said first and second doors are all supported by rollers, thus facilitating transport of said workspace habitat along a floor.
57. The workspace habitat of claim 56 wherein said rollers supporting said wall can be locked to thereby make said wall stationary while said rollers on said first and second doors facilitate the movement of said first and second doors between the open and closed positions.
58. The workspace habitat of claim 2 wherein said first and second doors are supported on tracks affixed to said wall.
59. The workspace habitat of claim 1 further comprising a floor.
60. The workspace habitat of claim 59 wherein said floor is circular and generally covers the space below said closed workspace habitat.
61. The workspace habitat of claim 1 further comprising an outlet panel for utilities, selected from the group consisting of power, data and telephone as well as combinations thereof.
62. The workspace habitat of claim 1 wherein a user can lock said first and second doors in the closed position, thereby enclosing said workspace habitat.
63. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a first ceiling portion, a second ceiling portion, and a defined opening to said wall, said wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a half of a circle, and said wall having an inner and outer surface;
said first ceiling portion slopes upwardly away from said wall toward the top horizontal center of said workspace habitat, said first ceiling portion having a cross section generally in the shape of half of a circle;
said second ceiling portion extending horizontally away from the top horizontal center of said workspace habitat opposite said first ceiling portion, and said second ceiling portion having a cross section generally in the shape of a half of a circle;
said first and second ceiling portions defining a footprint for said workspace habitat in a generally circular shaped cross section;
a pole extending downwardly from said second ceiling portion, and said pole supported by a floor;
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, said first door having first and second side edges, and said first door being movable between an open position wherein said first side edge of said first door is adjacent to said second side edge of said wall, and a closed position wherein said second side edge of said first door is adjacent said second side edge of said wall and said first side edge of said first door is adjacent to said pole;
a second door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, said second door having first and second side edges, and said second door being movable between an open position wherein said first side edge of said second door is adjacent said first side edge of said wall, and a closed position wherein said second side edge of said second door is adjacent said first side edge of said wall and said first side edge of said second door is adjacent to said pole;
said first and second doors are positioned along said outer surface of said wall; and
whereby when both said first and second doors are in the closed position, said first side edges of said first and second doors are adjacent to each other and said pole, and an enclosure is formed with a generally circular shaped horizontal cross section.
64. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a first ceiling portion and a defined opening to said wall, said wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape half of a circle, and said wall having an inner and outer surface; and
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a square and is positioned along said outer surface of said wall, said first door having a second ceiling portion, and said first door is configured to be movable between a closed position wherein said first door closes at least a portion of said defined opening to said wall, and an open position wherein said first door does not close said defined opening to said wall;
a second door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a square and is positioned along said outer surface of said wall, said second door having a third ceiling portion, and said second door is configured to be movable between a closed position wherein said second door closes at least a portion of said defined opening to said wall, and an open position wherein said second door does not close said defined opening to said wall; and
whereby when both said first and second doors are in the closed position, said first and second doors are adjacent and an enclosure is formed with a cross section generally in the shape of a rectangle with a semi-circular end.
65. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a first ceiling portion and a defined opening to said wall, said wall having an inner and outer surface, and said wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of half of a circle;
a first pole and a second pole, said first pole extending from said wall at about a 60 degree angle and said second pole extending from said wall at about a 60 degree angle, said first pole and second pole oriented at about a 60 degree angle therebetween;
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, said first door having a second ceiling portion, and said first door being movable between an open position wherein said first door is positioned along said outer surface of said wall and does not close a portion of said defined opening to said wall, and a closed position wherein said first door closes a portion of said defined opening to said wall and is supported by said first pole;
a second door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, said second door having a third ceiling portion, and said second door being movable between an open position wherein said second door is positioned along said outer surface of said wall and does not close a portion of said defined opening to said wall, and a closed position wherein said second door closes a portion of said defined opening to said wall and is supported by said second pole; and
whereby when both said first and second doors are in the closed position, said first side edges of said first and second doors are adjacent and an enclosure is formed with a generally circular shaped horizontal cross section.
66. A workspace habitat comprising:
a wall adapted to rest on a floor and having a first ceiling portion, a second ceiling portion, first and second side edges, and a defined opening to said wall, said wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a half of a circle;
said first ceiling portion slopes upwardly away from said wall toward the top horizontal center of said workspace habitat, said first ceiling portion having a cross section generally in the shape of half of a circle;
said second ceiling portion extending horizontally away from the top horizontal center of said workspace habitat opposite said first ceiling portion, said second ceiling portion having a curved edge, and said second ceiling portion having a cross section generally in the shape of a half of a circle;
said first and second ceiling portions defining a footprint for said workspace habitat in a generally circular shaped cross section;
first and second poles extending downwardly from said second ceiling portion, wherein said first pole is located at about 60 degrees from said wall along said curved edge of said second ceiling portion, said second pole is located at about 120 degrees from said wall along said curved edge of said second ceiling portion and 60 degrees from said first pole, and said poles supported by a floor;
a first door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of one sixth of a circle, said first door having a hinged edge and an unhinged edge wherein said hinged edge is rotatably attached to said first pole, and said first door being movable between an open position wherein said unhinged edge is spaced apart from said first side edge of said wall and a closed position wherein said unhinged edge is adjacent to said first side edge of said wall;
a second door having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of one sixth of a circle, said second door having a hinged edge and an unhinged edge wherein said hinged edge is rotatably attached to said first pole, and said second door being movable between an open position wherein said unhinged edge is spaced apart from said second pole and a closed position wherein said unhinged edge is adjacent to said second pole;
a fourth wall having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of one sixth of a circle, said fourth wall having a hinged edge and an unhinged edge wherein said hinged edge is rotatably attached to said second pole, and said fourth wall being movable between an open position wherein said unhinged edge is spaced apart from said second side edge of said wall and a closed position wherein said unhinged edge is adjacent to said second side edge of said wall;
whereby when said second, third, and fourth walls are all in the closed position, an enclosure is formed with a generally circular shaped horizontal cross section.
67. A workspace habitat community comprising:
a first workspace habitat having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a circle;
a second workspace habitat having a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a circle;
a hub configured to receive utilities for a business environment including power, data, voice, or phone connections; and
a conduit connecting said first workspace habitat to said second workspace habitat wherein said utilities for a business environment are transferred to said first and second workspace habitats through said conduit.
68. A workspace habitat community comprising:
a plurality of workspace habitats, wherein each workspace habitat includes a defined opening defined by a wall, first and second doors being movable between an open position wherein said first and second doors do not close any portion of said opening defined by said wall and a closed position wherein said first and second door close said opening defined by said wall;
said plurality of workspace habitats arranged such that when said first and second doors of said plurality of workspace habitats are in an open position, said opening defined by said wall of each of said plurality of workspace habitats face inwardly toward a common central point.
69. A workspace habitat community comprising:
a plurality of workspace habitats, wherein each workspace habitat includes a defined opening defined by a wall, first and second doors being movable between an open position wherein said first and second doors do not close any portion of said opening defined by said wall and a closed position wherein said first and second door close said opening defined by said wall;
said plurality of workspace habitats arranged such that when said first and second doors of said plurality of workspace habitats are in an open position, said opening defined by said wall of each of said plurality of workspace habitats face outwardly away from a common central point.
70. A workspace habitat community comprising:
a plurality of workspace habitats, wherein each workspace habitat includes a defined opening defined by a wall, first and second doors being movable between an open position wherein said first and second doors do not close any portion of said opening defined by said wall and a closed position wherein said first and second door close said opening defined by said wall;
said plurality of workspace habitats arranged such that when said first and second doors of said plurality of workspace habitats are in an open position, said opening defined by said wall of each of said plurality of workspace habitats are coplanar.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present patent document claims the benefit of the filing date under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of Provisional U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 60/475,133, entitled “Workspace Habitat” filed May 30, 2003, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

1. Technical Field

The present invention relates to workspace modules, and more particularly to a workspace habitat.

2. Background Information

Most large offices with open floor plans have a system of providing individual work spaces in which the floor plan is divided into various work areas through a series of vertical partitions extending from the floor or ceiling. These partitions are sometimes moveable and changeable in order to provide the floor plan with a variety of configurations, thus creating a plurality of workspace habitats or offices. The ability to change the shape or size of each of these workspace habitats allows the various needs of individual employees to be met.

These prior art partitions create a semi-permanent floor plan that may not be as conducive to both individual activity and group activity without sacrifices. In order to create an atmosphere conducive to group interaction, the workspace habitats are more open, thus not providing as much private working space.

Today's business environment often requires both a group atmosphere where multiple team members can gather to discuss an entire project, then the individuals can go back to their workspace in order to work on a small part of the overall project. Thus, it is important to have a floor plan that suits both requirements: privatized individual workspaces as well as open general meeting areas. While conference rooms allow such open meeting areas, they do not provide private work environments for each individual, and individual offices with closable doors are not accommodating to large group meetings.

The workspace environments generally are not enclosable so as to provide a quiet work atmosphere. Instead, the vertical partitions often do not extend the entire distance between the floor and ceiling, thereby allowing noise to freely enter the workspace which can create a variety of distractions to the employee.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The workspace habitat includes a first wall wherein the wall has an opening. A door is attached to the first wall portion and has an open and a closed position. When the door is in an open position, the opening of the first wall is not closed, and when the door is in a closed position, at least a portion of the opening is closed. More than one door can be attached to the first wall.

A community of workspace habitats can be created by arranging a plurality of workspace habitats in a variety of configurations. The community of workspace habitats provides individual workspaces and also allows for an opened environment in which the users can interact directly with each other.

Advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description of the preferred embodiments of the invention which have been shown and described by way of illustration. As will be realized, the invention is capable of other and different embodiments, and its details are capable of modification in various respects. Accordingly, the drawings and description are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not as restrictive.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a workspace of the preferred embodiment in which both doors are in a partially open position;

FIG. 2 is a rear view of a workspace in which the doors are in a closed position;

FIG. 3 is a rear view of a workspace in which one door is in an open position and a second door is in a closed position;

FIG. 4 is a top view of a workspace in which one door is in a closed position and the second door is rotating to an open position;

FIG. 5 is a top perspective view of a workspace atop a raised floor;

FIG. 6 is a top view of a community of workspaces connected to a hub;

FIG. 7 is a top view of a community of workspaces in which the workspaces are flexibly connected in series;

FIG. 8 is a top perspective view of a community of workspaces in which the doors of each workspace is in a closed position;

FIG. 9 is a top perspective view of a first alternative embodiment of a workspace;

FIG. 10 is a top perspective view of a second alternative embodiment of a workspace;

FIG. 11 is a top perspective view of a third alternative embodiment of a workspace;

FIG. 12 is a top perspective view of a fourth alternative embodiment of a workspace

FIG. 13 is an exploded view of a single disc and door attachment configuration;

FIG. 14 is an exploded view of a disc and door attachment configuration for two doors;

FIG. 15 is a side view of the door attachment configuration for two doors;

FIG. 16 is a top view of a workspace habitat with a user in which the doors are disposed outside of the stationary wall;

FIG. 17 is a top view of a workspace habitat with a user in which the doors are housed within the stationary wall;

FIG. 18 is a top perspective view of a single door;

FIG. 19 is a rear view of the stationary wall;

FIG. 20 is a bottom perspective view of the structural support member with attachments;

FIG. 21 is a rear view of a stationary wall without a sloped ceiling;

FIG. 22 is a side view of an alternative embodiment of a workspace habitat;

FIG. 23 is a side view of the workspace habitat as shown in FIG. 22;

FIG. 24 is a top perspective view of the workspace habitat as shown in FIG. 22;

FIG. 25 is a top view of an alternative embodiment of a workspace habitat illustrating the movement of the doors;

FIG. 26 is a top perspective view of the workspace habitat of FIG. 25 in a fully closed position;

FIG. 27 is a top perspective view of the workspace habitat of FIG. 25 in a fully open position;

FIG. 28 is a top perspective view of the workspace habitat of the preferred embodiment with a footrest and worksurface;

FIG. 29 is a top view of an alternative embodiment of a workspace habitat in the fully open position;

FIG. 30 is a top view of the workspace habitat of FIG. 29 in a fully closed position;

FIG. 31 is a top view of an alternative embodiment of a workspace habitat with curved doors; and

FIG. 32 is a top view of the workspace habitat of FIG. 31 with linear doors.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS AND THE PRESENTLY PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The preferred embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 of the present invention provides the user with a fully enclosed, highly privatized, individual work environment that is transformable into an open workspace that allows for group interaction. A plurality of workspace habitats 10 can be attached in various formations in order to form a community of individual working environments. Each workspace habitat 10 includes a first wall portion 11 with an opening for ingress and egress and at least one door 40 movable between and open position and a closed position. The workspace habitat provides the user with a personalized area within the entire working environment or building. Each user can add or arrange a variety of objects within the workspace habitat to differentiate theirs from all others. The workspace habitat is generally where the worker performs the day-to-day tasks and it is separate and apart from the surroundings.

As shown in FIGS. 1-4, the first wall portion 11 rests on the floor and preferably has a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a half of a circle. Alternatively, the cross-section can be more or less than one half. Generally, the cross section will be between one-quarter and three-quarters of a circle. It is noted that, by the terms “half” and “quarter,” exactness is not required unless specified otherwise. The terms are only meant as an approximate portion of the circle. The first wall portion 11 has rectangular opening in the vertical plane that is closable by two doors 40. Each door 40 preferably has a horizontal cross-section in the shape of about a quarter of a circle, and is moveable between an open and a closed position. When both doors 40 are in a fully open position, no portion of the opening is closed by either door 40. When both doors 40 are in a fully closed position, at least a portion of the opening is closed by the doors 40. When the doors 40 completely close the opening in the first wall portion 11, the entire workspace habitat 10 is enclosed. The footprint on the floor of a workspace habitat 10 in a fully closed position is generally circular with a diameter of about 90 inches.

The preferred embodiment of the workspace habitat 10, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, includes a centrally disposed structural support member 20. The structural support member 20, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 20, is in the shape of an inverted-U, wherein the structural support member 20 divides the workspace between a generally stationary enclosed portion and an open, yet closeable, portion. The generally stationary portion, or first wall portion 11, is stationary when in use, but is movably, thereby allowing for various arrangements of multiple workspaces. It should be understood that although the first wall portion 11 is normally in a predetermined location, the first wall portion 11 is movable between different locations.

Preferably, the structural support member 20 includes a pair of vertically oriented support posts 21, 22 and a horizontally oriented support beam 23 in which both support posts 21, 22 and the support beam 23 are made of hollow steel tube stock with a rectangular cross-section. The cross-section of the hollow tube stock is about 2 inches by 3 and has a wall thickness of about ¼ inch. The hollow tube stock results in less weight for the overall structure, thereby increasing the ability to readily move the entire workspace habitat 10. Each support post 21, 22 is attached to an opposing distal ends of the support beam 23 at a right angle by a weld. It should be understood that the support posts 21, 22 can also be attached to the support beam 23 an adhesive, bolts, or any other means sufficient to withstand the various loads applied to the structural support member 20. The structural support member 20 is about 81 inches tall by about 79½inches wide. In general, hollow cross section of the structural support member 20 defines a conduit through which necessaries for the business environment can be run, including wiring for phone, data, voice, and power. The workspace habitat 10 is preferably pre-wired for these necessaries.

In an alternative embodiment, each support post can include a pair of spaced apart vertical hollow frame members connected at each distal end by a horizontal hollow frame member. The support beam includes two spaced apart horizontal frame members in which the distal ends of each horizontal frame member is attached to the upper horizontal frame member of each support post. The vertical and horizontal hollow frame members of the structural support member define open spaces between the spaced apart frame members in which at least one panel can reside. The hollow frame members are configured to be a conduit for wiring business environment necessaries throughout the workspace habitat.

The lower distal end of each support post 21, 22 is preferably supported on the floor with casters that are lockable. The casters, or rollers, can be attached to the lower distal end of each support post 21, 22, thereby providing a more mobile workspace habitat 10, as shown in FIG. 1. In an alternative embodiment, the support posts can rest on the floor. In a further alternative embodiment, a threaded leveling mechanism can be attached to the lower distal end of each of the support posts to provide stability to the workspace habitat when placed on an uneven floor. It should be understood that a variety of mechanisms can be attached to the bottom of the support posts 21, 22 to increase the mobility of the habitat or to define a gap between the habitat and the floor or to level the workspace on an uneven floor.

A frame section, as shown in FIG. 2, is preferably attached to the vertical edge on of one side of the structural support member 20 to form the skeleton of the first wall portion 11. Preferably, the frame section includes a horizontal base member 31, two vertically spaced apart vertical frame members 30, 32, a sloped frame member 38, and two ceiling frame members 36, 37. The first wall portion 11 has a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of about a half of a circle.

The base member 31 preferably defines a half circle and is oriented to be parallel to the floor, as shown in FIG. 19. Each opposing end of the base member 31 is attached to a coplanar vertical edge of the opposing support posts 21, 22 in an abutting, perpendicular relationship. The downwardly facing surface of the base member 31 is aligned with the downwardly facing edge of the support post 21, 22. The base member 31 is preferably attached to the support posts 21, 22 by a weld, but any other means of attachment sufficient to withstand movement of the workspace habitat 10 and the various loads applied to the habitat can be used. The base member is preferably made of steel tube stock with a generally rectangular cross section with dimensions of 2 inches by 3 inches and a wall thickness of ¼ inch. It should be understood that the dimensions of the steel tube stock can be vary depending upon the overall size of the workspace habitat 10.

Two vertical frame members 32, 33 are preferably attached to the top surface of the base member 31 and extend upwardly therefrom, as shown in FIGS. 2, 4 and 19. The first vertical frame member 32 is spaced about 60 degrees from one distal end of the defined arc of the base member 31. The second vertical frame member 33 is spaced an additional about 60 degrees from the first vertical frame member 32 along the arc, and thus is about 60 degrees from the opposite end of the base member 31. The vertical frame members 32, 33 are preferably in an abutting, perpendicular relationship with the base member 31, and attached by a weld.

A sloped frame member 38 is attached to the upper distal end of each vertical frame member 32, 33 and to the upper distal end of each support post 21, 22, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 19. In the preferred embodiment, the planar projection of the sloped frame member 38 defines an arc in the general shape of about half of an oval, and slopes downwardly away from the support beam 23, thereby defining an ungula of a right cylinder. The sloped frame member 38 is preferably made of steel tube stock with the same dimensions as the base member 31.

The sloped frame member 38 is further secured to the support beam 23 by two ceiling frame members 36, 37, as shown in FIG. 19. The ceiling frame members 36, 37 divide the ceiling of the first wall portion 11 into three distinct wedge-shaped areas, wherein each wedge has an arc length of about 60 degrees. A light-transmitting ceiling panel 35 is attached to the outward facing surfaces of the sloped frame member 38 and the ceiling frame members 36, 37. The vertical frame members 32, 33 and the ceiling frame members 36, 37 are attached to the sloped frame member 38 at the same point along the arc of the sloped frame member 38. Because the sloped frame member 38 slopes downwardly at an angle, the vertical frame members 32, 33 abut and attach to the sloped frame member 38 at the same angle. The ceiling frame members 36, 37 are coplanar with the sloped frame member 38. The ceiling frame members 36, 37 are preferably made of steel tube stock. In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIG. 21, the vertical frame members extend upwardly from the base member and the sloped frame member extends horizontally from the support beam. Thus, when the doors are in a fully closed position, the workspace habitat has the shape of a right cylinder.

The base member 31, the vertical frame members 32, 33 and the sloped frame member 38 define a frame to which a vertical panel 39 is attached to form the outer surface to the first wall portion 11. Additionally, the ceiling defined by the sloped frame member 38 is divided into three sections in the shape of wedges. In an alternative embodiment, a light-transmitting ceiling panel can be placed within each of the openings defined by the ceiling frame members. As can be seen, the covering panels are made from a transparent material, such as Plexiglas®. However, as discussed below, other materials may be used.

Preferably, an outlet panel 55 is disposed within the centrally located open area defined between the base member 31, the sloped frame member 38, and the two vertical frame members 32, as shown in FIG. 1. The outlet panel 55 is configured to provide access to necessary utilities, including power, data, and phone to the user. The outlet panel 55 can be disposed within the defined open space either in conjunction with, or independent from, a panel member 36 disposed within the same opening. The outlet panel 55 allows the user a plug-and-play method of connection in which the user need only plug in the particular device, such as a phone, then begin using such. The outlet panel 55 preferably receives the wiring from a hub 62, disposed externally from the workspace habitat 10, to which several other workspace habitats 10 can also be connected, as shown in FIG. 6. Preferably, the wiring to the outlet panel 55 for the business environment necessaries can be routed through any of the members that comprise the skeleton of the first wall portion 11. In the preferred embodiment, the wiring from the hub 62 enters the first wall portion 11 through a support post 21, 22 and at least some of the wiring is routed through the hollow base member 31 to the outlet panel 55. In an alternative embodiment, the wiring can enter the workspace habitat 10 through a gap between the base member 31 and the floor. The wiring can then be connected to the outlet panel 55, after which the wiring is routed throughout the first wall portion 11 to other locations.

At least one door 40 is preferably adapted to hingedly enclose the workspace habitat 10. As shown in FIG. 1, the preferred embodiment includes two doors 40. Each door 40 is attached to the midpoint of the support beam 23 and is movable between a fully open position and a fully closed position or any position therebetween. Each door 40 preferably includes two spaced apart vertical frame members 41 a pair of horizontal frame members 42 a vertical panel 49, three horizontal arms 43, and a ceiling panel 44, as shown in FIGS. 1, 4, and 18. Each door 40 is about 77½ inches in height. However, it should be understood that each door, or combination of doors, can be of any shape sufficient to close the defined opening to the first wall portion 11.

The vertical frame members 41 of a door 40 are spaced apart, as shown in FIG. 18. The vertical frame members 41 are preferably made of hollow steel tube stock. A first horizontal frame member 42 is attached to the lower distal end of both vertical frame members 41. A second horizontal frame member 42 is attached to the upper distal end of both vertical frame members 41. The horizontal frame members 42 are curvilinear and preferably form about a quarter of a circle, or about a 90 degree arc. The horizontal frame members 42 are attached to the vertical frame members 41 by a weld. A vertical panel 49 is preferably attached to the vertical and horizontal frame members 41, 42 with a bolt, thereby forming a solid wall portion. In the alternative, the frame members define a frame with open areas between the frame members in which curved vertical panels can be placed. In an alternative embodiment, the doors can be curtains that can be slid along a track disposed on the downwardly facing surface of a ceiling portion in which the curtains are adapted to fully close the opening in the first wall portion.

Three horizontally oriented arms 43 preferably connect the upper distal ends of the frame members 41, 42 of a door 40 to the support beam 23 of the structural support member 20, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 14. Each arm 43 is connected to the upper distal end of a vertical frame member 41 preferably with a bolt. The arms 43 extend horizontally from the upper horizontal frame member 42 toward the center point along the horizontal length of the support beam 23. The arms 43 are preferably welded at the point of intersection with each other. The middle arm 43 divides the area of the ceiling portion of the door into two wedge-shaped areas in which a ceiling panel 44 can reside. In the preferred embodiment of a door 40, as shown in FIG. 4, the upper horizontal frame member 42 and light-transmitting ceiling panel 44 form a solid ceiling portion. The ceiling panel 44 is disposed above the arms 43, and is attached by bolts. In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the ceiling panel is removed, thereby creating an opening in the ceiling portion of the door.

A disc 48, as shown in FIGS. 13, 14 and 15, is attached by a weld at the point of connection of the three arms 43. The disc 48 is oriented horizontally so that the axial centerline is perpendicular to the floor. The disc 48 includes a hole 47 extending vertically through the axial centerline and is configured to receive a pin 46. The thickness of the disc 48 is dependent upon the number of doors attached to the first wall portion 11. In the preferred embodiment, two doors 40 are attached to the first wall portion 11 and the two discs are in a stacked configuration, and the thickness of each disc is about half the height of the arms 43. For example, when two doors 40 are attached to the support beam 23, one disc is connected to the upper portion of the distal end of the arms 43 of one door 40 while the second disc is connected to the lower portion of the distal end of the arms 43 of the second door 40, as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. When the doors 40 are mounted to the support beam 23, the holes align and the discs are in a stacked orientation with the pin 46 extending through the holes in both discs, thereby connecting the doors 40 to the structural support member 20. The axis of rotation of each door 40 is about the longitudinal axis of the pin 46.

At least one caster 52, or roller, is connected to the downwardly facing edge of the lower horizontal frame member 42 of the door, as shown in FIG. 3, in order to allow the door to contact the floor as it is moved between an open and a closed position. The door is preferably disposed outside of the first wall portion 11. With the doors 40 preferably disposed outside of the first wall portion 11, one door 40 cannot rotate past the second door 40. In other words, the arms 43 that connect the frame of the door to the support beam 23 are configured such that as one door 40 is rotated and the other door 40 is stationary, the arms of the stationary door 40 prevent the arms of the rotating door 40 from moving past the stationary door 40. However, it should be understood that the doors can be configured to allow both doors to have complete freedom of movement past each other without interference.

In an alternative embodiment, the door can be housed within the first wall portion when in an open position, as shown in FIG. 17. In a further alternative embodiment, each door can slide along a track disposed atop the floor or around the outer surface of the first wall portion. The track is configured to receive a protrusion from the door.

Each door 40 preferably includes a handle 48 attached to a vertical frame member 41 in order to allow the user to manually move the door 40 between the open and closed positions from within the workspace habitat 10, as shown in FIG. 1. The handle 48 is attached to the inwardly-facing edge of a vertical frame member 41 at a height of about four feet. Additionally, a handle can be disposed on the opposite surface of the vertical frame member to allow the user to open or close the door while on the outside of the workspace habitat. Preferably, the handle 48 is c-shaped, but any type of handle or latch mechanism capable of assisting the user in manually opening or closing the door can be used. In an alternative embodiment, the door can be operated electronically by the user, in which a motor is used to rotate the door between an open and closed position. The motor can be controlled by the user with a switch mounted on the inside of the workspace habitat 10. Having a switch located within the workspace habitat 10 allows the user complete control over the position of the door.

Each door 40 is lockable from both the inside and outside when in a closed position. The ability to lock the workspace habitat 10 while the user is on the inside allows the user the ultimate sense of security while working and decreases the amount of possible distractions. The lock also allows the user to secure personal belongings or confidential work within the workspace habitat 10 while away.

It is not necessary that the door 40 be completely moved to the open or closed position. Instead, the user can move the door 40 to any position, thereby closing only a portion of the opening in the first wall portion 11, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 16. For example, if a single door 40 is attached to the first wall portion 11, the door is preferably in the shape of a half of a circle, and in a fully closed position it closes the entire opening defined. The user can also rotate the door 40 to close only half of the opening, thus leaving the remaining half of the opening opened. The user's ability to determine the amount of the defined opening to be closed by the door 40 provides the users with a sense of personalized control over their individual work environment.

The door 40 preferably moves about the outer surface of the first wall portion 11 by sliding along the ground on casters or rollers 52 attached to the lower horizontal frame member 42. The rollers 52 are adapted to assist the movement of the door 40 by supporting the weight of the door as the door is moved between the open and closed positions.

A small gap is formed between the door 40 and the outer surface of the first wall portion 11, thereby allowing the door 40 to rotate without contacting the first wall portion 11. The gap between the door 40 and the first wall portion 11 can be filled by a piece of rubber such that the rubber pieces also act as a buffer to prevent the metal frame members of the door 40 from rubbing against the metal skeleton of the first wall portion 11. The rubber piece can also act to create a seal between the vertical frame members 41 of the door 40 and the first wall portion 11.

Additionally, rubber can be attached to the exposed edge of the support beam 23 such that when the door is in a fully closed position, the entire workspace habitat 10 is sealed, save a small gap between the floor and the downwardly facing surfaces of the door 40 and first wall portion 11. The gap is produced by the casters, rollers, or leveling mechanisms attached to the bottom edge of the first wall portion 11 and the doors 40. When the workspace habitat 10 is sealed, a fan can be configured to either force fresh air into, or stale air out of, the fully enclosed environment such that the gap assists in the air transfer. When more than two doors 40 are attached to the first wall portion 11, each door can be configured to include a rubber seal or lightseal on the edge of the vertical frame member adjacent the opposing door in a fully closed position to create a complete seal between the doors 40 and the first wall portion 11.

In the preferred embodiment, each door 40 is has a horizontal cross section generally in the shape of a quarter of a circle, as shown in FIG. 4. Each door 40 is configured to close half of the opening in the first wall portion 11. However, it should be understood that any number of doors can be attached to the first wall portion 11 such that when all doors are in a fully closed position, the entire defined opening to the first wall portion 11 is closed. For example, as shown in FIG. 30, the workspace can include four movable sections to make up the enclosure.

Vertical panels can be incorporated within each of the open areas between the frame members of the first wall portion 11 and also between the frame members of the doors. These vertical panels provide separation between the user and the environment external to the workspace habitat 10. The vertical panels can all be made of the same material, or each one made of a material with a pre-defined characteristic dependent upon the location at which it is incorporated. Not every defined open area needs to contain a vertical panel. The preferred embodiment of the first wall portion 11 and doors 40, the vertical panels 49 act as a skin or partition between the inside and outside of the workspace habitat 10. The vertical panels are attached to the outer surfaces of the frame members of the doors and first wall portion. In the alternative, a single panel can be disposed within each of the defined open areas of the workspace habitat, and each panel can be made of plastic. It should be understood that other materials can be used for the panels including glass, Plexiglas®, metal, a clear material, an opaque material, and soundproofing material. Additionally, a whiteboard, a tackboard, video display or any other object sufficient to provide a barrier between the user and the external environment can also be used. For example, a vertical panel within the frame section of the first wall portion 11 can include a monitor for incorporating a video display, and surrounded by a curved opaque sheet of plastic. It should also be understood that the vertical panels are not required to fill an entire open area. For example, a vertical panel may be disposed within the vertical open area in a door and only extend halfway up from the lower horizontal frame member. The upper half of the defined open area therefore remains open.

The vertical panels or partitions can have a predetermined level of seclusion between the inner workspace and the exterior environment, or an adjustable level determined by the user. For example, an adjustable partition includes an extendable or rotatable blind. The blind can be extended or rotated by manual, electronic, or automatic adjustment. An example of a blind is one in which slats are rotatable to allow various amounts of light to pass. Another type of blind that can be used includes a sheet of material that can extend or retract to vary the amount of light or privateness. An example of a predetermined level of seclusion includes a plastic panel with a visibility gradient, or an opaque material in which ambient light can pass through and yet prevents others from seeing into the workspace habitat 10.

The vertical panel 39 of the frame section is preferably plastic with a visibility gradient that is fully opaque at the portion of the vertical panel 39 nearest the base member 31 and becomes increasingly clear as the gradient approaches the sloped frame member 38 until it becomes completely clear. The visibility gradient is created by horizontal lines that are wide and close together near the bottom of the vertical panel 39 and become thinner and more spaced apart as the gradient extends vertically. The vertical panel 39 of the frame section has a curved planar shape defined by the arcuate shape of the base member 31 and sloped frame member 38, and disposed on the outer surfaces of the frame members of the first wall portion 11.

The light-transmitting ceiling panel 35 of the first wall portion 11 is also preferably made of clear plastic. The ceiling panel 35 is generally in the shape of a flat wedge with about a 180 degree arc, and is attached to the outwardly facing surfaces of the frame members of the ceiling portion of the first wall portion 11. The vertical panel 49 of door 40 is preferably made of plastic with the same visibility gradient as the vertical panel 39 of the first wall section 11.

The ceiling panel 51 of door 40 is flat and in the shape of wedges of a circle with an arc of about 90 degrees, as shown in FIG. 4. The ceiling panel 51 is preferably made of clear plastic and is attached to the upwardly facing surfaces of the horizontal arms 44.

In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of panels can be disposed within a single defined open area between the frame members of either the first wall portion or a door. The number of panels disposed within each defined open areas can be dependent upon various workspace conditions desired by the user including, but not limited to, soundproofing, utility, aesthetic appearances, and a personalizable level of privacy or seclusion. For example, each defined open area between frame members in the workspace habitat 10 can have two spaced apart panels made of glass. Between the panels is a blind or curtain that can be adjusted between an open and a closed position in which the open position allows for full visibility into the workspace habitat 10 and the closed position allows for no visibility in or out of the workspace habitat 10. The blinds can be adjusted to different levels within the open area so as to increase or decrease the area of the panel through which a passer-by can see into the workspace habitat 10. This allows the user to control the level of seclusion between the working environment and the environment external to the workspace habitat 10. In the alternative, a blind itself can be disposed within the defined open space without the spaced apart panes of glass

In a further alternative embodiment, two spaced apart panels can be disposed within a defined open area wherein each panel is of a different material. For example, the vertical panel of a door can be a tackboard attached to the inwardly facing surface and an erasable whiteboard on the outwardly facing surface. This allows the user to be able to hang personal items on the inside of the door and also allows others to write messages to the user when the door, particularly when a door is in a closed position. Both panel members provide a utilitarian purpose for the user when the door is in a closed position

A variety of environmentally enhancing features can be attached at various locations to the first wall portion 11. FIG. 20 illustrates several of these features attached or incorporated into the support beam 23. The support beam 23 can include a variety of openings on the downwardly-facing surface to which attachments can be temporarily mounted or the openings can be configured to receive permanent fixtures. The openings can define a variety of shapes and sizes dependent upon the various needs of the user. For example, a first opening can be configured to receive a grate 25 that aids in distributing fresh air to the workspace habitat 10. The grate 25 can be connected to a ventilation system. The ventilation system can include a fan, air conditioning unit, a heating unit, or any combination therein. The ventilation system can be attached to the workspace habitat 10, or can be an externally located stand-alone unit that is connected to the grate 25 by a duct or series of ducts. The ventilation system can include a thermostat or control panel that can be controlled by the user within the workspace habitat 10.

Additionally, an opening can be configured to house permanent light fixtures 66 for the workspace habitat 10. The light fixture resides in an opening and can be operated by the user by a switch connected to the lighting fixture or by a switch on a control panel within the workspace habitat 10. Alternatively, the opening can receive temporary lighting fixtures 67 that extend downwardly from the support beam, as shown in FIG. 20. The light fixtures can be controlled by a switch, or a series of switches, on a control panel 28 located within the workspace habitat 10.

Another alternative environmentally enhancing feature includes a sound system within the workspace habitat 10. The speakers of the system can be incorporated into an opening in the support beam. The sound system can be configured such that the user can listen to music when the workspace habitat 10 is fully enclosed such that the environment external to the workspace habitat 10 will not receive any sound from the sound system. Each workspace habitat 10 can be configured to have a resident sound system, or the sound system can be connected to each habitat such that each habitat receives a common signal. The sound system can be controlled by the user through a control panel 28 located within the workspace habitat 10.

The environmentally enhancing features, such as the ventilation system, lighting system, and the sound system, are preferably controlled on a single control panel 28, as shown in FIG. 1. The control panel 28 can include various switches or knobs by which each of the environmentally enhancing features is controlled. Alternatively, the control panel can be touch or voice activated by the user. A touch screen control panel allows the user to control each of the features by a single touch and can provide more accurate control of the features. The voice activated control panel allows the user to control the environmental features through a of voice command. Ideally, the voice activated controls are sensitive to the particular user of the particular workspace habitat 10.

The inwardly facing surfaces of the support posts 21, 22 and the vertical frame members 32, 33 of the first wall portion 11 preferably have an inwardly facing hanger frame attached thereto. A hanger frame includes a plurality of spaced apart slots running the entire height of the frame. The slots are adapted to receive and support various types of workspace furniture or components to be removably attached to the first wall portion 1. These components include worksurfaces, shelves, displays, storage bins, and other workspace furniture.

The preferred embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 includes a curved worksurface 63 mounted to the first wall portion 11, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 16. The worksurface 63 is preferably curved to fit the inside surface of the workspace habitat. The worksurface 63 is mounted flush with the first wall portion 11, and forms a workpiece about the entire inner surface of the first wall portion 1. As shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, the worksurface 63 is configured such that everything located on the worksurface 63 is within reach of the user without the user moving. The worksurface 63 is removably attached to the support posts 21, 22 and the vertical frame members 32, 33 by way of the vertically oriented slots in the hanger frame. It should be understood that the worksurface 63 can also include legs for additional support, or legs with casters for increased mobility when attached to the workspace habitat 10. The preferred worksurface 63 has extendable portions disposed along the downwardly facing surface of the worksurface 63, and are extendable and retractable at will by the user. Thus, the user can extend the portions whether the doors are in an open or closed position.

In an alternative embodiment, the worksurface has an extendable portion at each end of the worksurface nearest the defined opening to the first wall portion 11, and located beneath the working surface. The extendable portions are curved in the same manner as the worksurface such that when the door is in a closed position, the extendable portions of the worksurface can create a workpiece that fully encloses the user within 360 degrees of workspace. Furthermore, the extendable worksurface portions can be slidably attached to a vertical frame member of the door such that as the door is rotated between an open and closed position, the extendable worksurface portions likewise follow by extending or retracting as the door is rotated.

The vertical slots located in the hanger frame mounted along the height of the support posts 21, 22 and the vertical divider members 32, 33 are also adapted to receive a shelf 64, storage bin, or display 65, as shown in FIG. 1. The worksurface 63, shelf 64, storage bin, and display 65 each have brackets configured to be inserted into the slots, thereby providing a temporary hanging or supporting connection with the workspace habitat 10. It should be understood that any other workspace furniture, having similar bracketry, can also be mounted to the first wall portion 11. The temporary mounting characteristic provided by the slots allows the user to rearrange the workspace or replace pieces of furniture easily and customize the workspace habitat 10 as the user desires.

The workspace habitat 10 can also include a footrest 70 shaped to have an abutting relationship with the inner surface of the first wall portion 11, as shown in FIG. 28. The footrest 70 can extend beyond the edges of the first wall portion 11, thereby defining a footprint for the workspace habitat. The vertical cross section of the footrest 70 can be in the shape of a triangle, rectangle, or square. The footrest 70 need not extend along the entire inner surface of the stationary wall portion 11, but instead can be small sections selectively located along the inner surface.

The ceiling portions of the workspace habitat 10 are preferably connected to the respective structures through a fuseable link. That is, the ceiling portions attach to the structures such that excessive heat, likely due to fire, releases the ceiling portions, thereby providing openings along the top of the workspace habitat 10 in which water from sprinklers or a hose can enter the workspace environment. The sealant disposed between the frame structure and the ceiling portion can be heat sensitive, or the mechanical attachment can be configured to release the ceiling portions in case of a fire.

As shown in FIG. 5, an alternative embodiment of the workspace habitat 10, the entire workspace habitat 10 is mounted atop a platform 105. The platform can be raised or it can be a surface disposed between the workspace habitat and the floor, whereby wiring can be run. The platform 105 provides the workspace habitat 10 with a predetermined footprint, wherein each habitat has a defined area of personal use by the user. The platform 105 also allows for the delivery of power and data capabilities to the workspace habitat 10 through the platform 105 and into the structural support member 20. In this embodiment, the doors 140 and the first wall portion 11 are flush with the platform 105, and thus there is no gap between the habitat and the platform 105. However, it should be understood that casters, rollers, or threaded leveling mechanisms can also be used to provide such a gap. The platform can also include a track or rails in which the doors can move between an open and closed position, and the path of movement of the doors is defined by the track.

As shown in FIG. 9, another alternative embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 includes the first wall portion of the preferred embodiment with a full ceiling member 201 attached to the support beam and extends horizontally in a direction opposite the frame section. The full ceiling member 201 creates a visual spatial limitation and helps define a set, unchangeable footprint. The full ceiling member 201 is made of steel, and is in a coplanar, abutting relationship with the support beam 23. The full ceiling member is welded to the support beam 23. The full ceiling member 201 is formed in the shape of a half of a circle, and is horizontally oriented, extending from the structural support member 20 away from the frame section. The full ceiling member 201 is supported on the ground with a vertical supporting pole 202. The supporting pole 202 is mounted to the downwardly facing surface of the full ceiling member 201 with a weld. The supporting pole 202 is connected at about the midpoint along the arc of the full ceiling member 201, or at a point perpendicular with the support beam 23 from the point at which a door 240 is mounted. A ceiling panel member is not disposed within the horizontally defined open space at the top of a door 240 because of the redundancy of materials with the full ceiling member 201 whether the door is in an open or closed position. As an alternative to this embodiment, the ceiling portion of the doors 240 is a solid structure, and the full ceiling member is only a frame to which the downwardly extending pole is attached. The full ceiling member does not include a ceiling portion because of the redundancy in materials with the solid ceiling of the doors 240.

As shown in FIG. 10, a further alternative embodiment of the workspace habitat 10, two poles 301 are attached to the preferred embodiment of the first wall portion 11. The poles 301 are attached to the support beam, extending in a direction opposite the frame section. The poles 301 include a horizontal bar 302 and a vertical bar 303. The horizontal bars 302 are attached to the edge of the support beam at the midpoint of the length, and extend horizontally therefrom to form 60 degree angles between each horizontal bars 302 and the support beam as well as a 60 degree angle between the bars 302. Each horizontal bar 302 is attached to a vertical bar 303 that extends downwardly and is supported on the floor. The poles 301 provide structural support to a door when in a closed position and also create a defined footprint on the floor, thus defining a boundary between personal and communal spaces.

As shown in FIG. 11, a further alternative embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 includes the first wall portion 11 of the preferred embodiment, but has a full ceiling member 401, two poles 402 extending downwardly therefrom, and three doors 440 attached to the poles 402. Two doors 440 are hingedly attached to one pole 402, and the third door 440 is hingedly attached to the second pole 402. Each pole 402 acts as an axis of rotation about which the doors 440 rotate. Each door 440 can rotate freely between an open and closed position independent of the other doors 440.

As shown in FIG. 12, another alternative embodiment of the workspace habitat 10, the first wall portion of the preferred embodiment has at least one rotatable door 540 attached thereto. Each door 540 has a square cross section and is attached to the support beam. The doors 540 rotate between and open and closed position by sliding along the floor, supported by casters. The horizontal cross section of each door 540 is generally an ell and provides a larger enclosed area within the workspace habitat 10 when the doors 540 are in a fully closed position. The doors 540 are connected at the midpoint along the length of the support beam. When the doors 540 are in a fully closed position, the horizontal cross section of the workspace habitat is generally in the shape of a rectangle with a rounded, semi-circular, end.

As shown in FIGS. 25-27, another embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 incorporates the first wall portion 11 of the preferred embodiment with two doors that slide along tracks attached to the wall portion. Alternatively, the doors can be rotatably attached to the support beam of the first wall portion. Each door has an elongated wall portion, the ends of which are angled inwardly. A horizontal cross section of each door is generally in the shape of a straight line in which one end has a small perpendicular ell and the opposite end is angled less severely in the same general direction. When the doors are in a fully opened position, the doors are tangentially disposed along opposing sides of the first wall portion. In a fully closed position, an inwardly facing edge of each door is immediately adjacent the same edge of the opposing door. The horizontal cross section of the workspace habitat when the doors are in a fully closed position is in the general shape of a triangle extending away from the free edges of a half of a circle.

FIGS. 29 and 30 illustrate an embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 that includes four movable or rotatable wall sections. In the fully open position, as shown in FIG. 29, the wall sections are concentrically stacked within each other. In other words, each wall section has a unique inner and outer radius from the central axis of rotation for the wall sections such that each successive wall section can slide past each of the other wall sections. In the fully closed position, each opposing vertical edges of each wall section are generally adjacent to a vertical edge of another wall section, as shown in FIG. 30. The central axis of rotation is common between each of the wall sections. The ceiling portion of each wall section can either be solid or have an opening therethrough. The wall sections are slidably rotatable by casters or rollers attached to the bottom surface of each wall portion. The casters or rollers are lockable so as to create a temporarily stationary wall section.

FIGS. 31 and 32 illustrate another embodiment of the workspace habitat 10 in which the first wall portion 11 includes two poles extending therefrom. Each pole has a horizontally extending member attached to a vertically extending member that is supported by the floor. The poles are attached to the support beam, and extend away from the support beam at about a 45 degree angle with the support beam, and about a 90 degree angle between each pole. A door is rotatably attached to each pole. In the first variation, the doors have an arcuate shape and have a horizontal cross section in the shape of a quarter of a circle, or a 90 degree arc, as shown in FIG. 31. In the second variation, each door is linear and is rotatably attached to a pole at about the horizontal midpoint of the door.

A plurality of workspace habitats 10 can be arranged in a variety of configurations to form a community of individual working environments, as shown in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8. In one embodiment of a community, a plurality of workspace habitats 10 can be arranged such that a central hub 62 distributes power and to a predefined group of habitats, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 8. A conduit 61 containing the necessaries for the business environment descends from the ceiling or extends upwardly from the floor to the central hub 62. Each of the workspace habitats 10 is flexibly attached to the hub 62, wherein the flexible connection is a conduit for routing the power and data lines from the hub 62 to each workspace.

As shown in FIGS. 6-8, and 33-35, the workspace habitats 10 in a community can be arranged such that the defined openings to the first wall portions 11 are facing away from a central hub 62. In an alternative embodiment, the workspace habitats 10 in a community can be arranged such that the defined openings to the first wall portions face the same direction, or in series, as shown in FIG. 7. Each habitat 10 is connected to the next by a flexible attachment.

The preferred embodiment, as shown in FIG. 33, has a community of workspace habitats 10 is arranged such that when the doors 40 are in an open position, the defined opening to the first wall portion 11 of each habitat is directed to a central point, or location, such as a table. When the doors of each workspace habitat are in a closed position, each user is separated from the others in the community. Such an arrangement provides a conference room-type setting with the doors in an open position, yet allows the users to retreat to their individual habitats when a meeting is finished. This embodiment allows for both group interaction and a variety of individually controlled environments.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been described, it should be understood that the invention is not so limited and modifications may be made without departing from the invention. The scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, and all devices that come within the meaning of the claims, either literally or by equivalence, are intended to be embraced therein.

It is therefore intended that the foregoing detailed description be regarded as illustrative rather than limiting, and that it be understood that it is the following claims, including all equivalents, that are intended to define the spirit and scope of this invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7348736 *Jan 24, 2006Mar 25, 2008Philips Solid-State Lighting SolutionsMethods and apparatus for providing workspace lighting and facilitating workspace customization
US8733028 *Jan 8, 2010May 27, 2014Mechdyne CorporationDisplay transformation assembly for a visualization system
US20110168653 *Jan 8, 2010Jul 14, 2011Chris GarrettDisplay transformation assembly for a visualization system
WO2006081186A2 *Jan 24, 2006Aug 3, 2006Color Kinetics IncMethods and apparatus for providing workspace lighting and facilitating workspace customization
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/36.1
International ClassificationE04H1/12, A47B13/04, E04B1/82
Cooperative ClassificationA47B13/04, E04H1/125, E04B1/8218
European ClassificationE04H1/12C, E04B1/82D, A47B13/04