Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050023710 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/874,077
Publication dateFeb 3, 2005
Filing dateJun 22, 2004
Priority dateJul 10, 1998
Also published asUS20080318189, US20100038807
Publication number10874077, 874077, US 2005/0023710 A1, US 2005/023710 A1, US 20050023710 A1, US 20050023710A1, US 2005023710 A1, US 2005023710A1, US-A1-20050023710, US-A1-2005023710, US2005/0023710A1, US2005/023710A1, US20050023710 A1, US20050023710A1, US2005023710 A1, US2005023710A1
InventorsDmitri Brodkin, Carlino Panzera, Arun Prasad, Grant Day, Stefan Borenstein
Original AssigneeDmitri Brodkin, Carlino Panzera, Arun Prasad, Day Grant P., Stefan Borenstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Obtaining digital data of teeth, designing enlarged die or mold, rapid prototyping, applying ceramic material and sintering; reliability, strength, efficiency
US 20050023710 A1
Abstract
Solid free form fabrication techniques can be utilized indirectly to manufacture substrates, dies, models, near-net shapes, shells, and wax-ups that are then used in the manufacture of dental articles. Digital light processing is the most preferred indirect method for the production of substrates. After the substrates are produced, various coating or deposition techniques such as gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, dipping, colloidal spray deposition or electrophoretic deposition are used to manufacture the dental article.
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(66)
1. A process for manufacturing a dental article comprising:
obtaining digital data of a patient's tooth or teeth;
designing an enlarged die or mold based on the digital data of the patient's tooth or teeth;
rapid-prototyping the enlarged die or mold;
applying ceramic particulate material onto or into the enlarged die or mold;
sintering the ceramic particulate material to form the dental article.
2. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of obtaining digital data of a patient's tooth or teeth comprises scanning a master die, a working die, or a wax-up of a dental restoration, or intraorally scanning the patient's teeth.
3. The process of claim 1 wherein the enlarged die or mold is enlarged according to an amount the ceramic particulate material will shrink during the sintering step.
4. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of designing an enlarged die or mold comprises creating a virtual die or mold with the use of a computer.
5. The process of claim 1 further comprising preparing the enlarged die or mold after the step of rapid-prototyping the enlarged die or mold.
6. The process of claim 5 wherein the step of preparing the enlarged die or mold comprises trimming the die or mold or coating the die or mold with conductive paint.
7. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of applying ceramic particulate material onto the enlarged die or mold comprises gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, pressure casting, direct coagulation, dipping, colloidal spray deposition, electrophoretic deposition.
8. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of applying ceramic particulate material into the enlarged die or mold comprises filling the mold by injection molding, extrusion, heat pressing, hot pressing, hot casting, centrifugal casting, gravity casting, pressure casting, gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting and slip pressing.
9. The process of claim 1 wherein the ceramic particulate material is in the form of a suspension, slurry, slip, gel, pellet or feedstock.
10. The process of claim 1 further comprising heat-treating the ceramic particulate material prior to sintering to release the die or mold and to eliminate organic ingredients from the ceramic particulate.
11. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of sintering the ceramic particulate material comprises sintering to full density.
12. The process of claim 1 further comprising finishing the dental article after the step of sintering the ceramic particulate material.
13. The process of claim 12 wherein finishing the dental article after the step of sintering the ceramic particulate comprises applying one or more layers of porcelain, glass, or glass-ceramic having a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) up to about 񶕭0−6/C of the CTE of the sintered ceramic particulate material.
14. The process of claim 1 wherein the step of rapid-prototyping the enlarged die comprises rapid-prototyping by stereolithography, photo-stereolithography, digital light processing, selective area laser deposition, selective laser sintering (SLS), electrophoretic deposition(EPD), robocasting, fused deposition modeling (FDM), laminated object manufacturing (LOM), or 3D printing.
15. The process of claim 1 wherein the ceramic particulate material is selected from the group consisting of zirconia, ytrria, hafnia, alumina, ceria, magnesia, titania, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitride, mullite, garnets, porcelain, or mixtures thereof.
16. The process of claim 15 wherein the ceramic particulate comprises a solid solution, agglomerates, complexes or mixtures thereof.
17. The process of claim 15 wherein the porcelain comprises glass, leucite, lithium disilicate, mullite or mica.
18. The process of claim 15 wherein the zirconia comprises tetragonal zirconia.
19. The process of claim 1 wherein the enlarged die or mold is fabricated of die stone, clay, plaster of paris, gypsum, silica, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, zirconia, alumina, magnesia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures thereof.
20. The process of claim 19 wherein the silica comprises crystalline silica, amorphous silica, colloidal silica, or mixtures thereof.
21. The process of claim 1 wherein the die or mold thermally decomposes during the sintering step.
22. The process of claim 1 wherein the enlarged die or mold is fabricated of a wax, paraffin, rubber, plastic, polymeric material, thermoplastic material, thermosetting material or light curable resin or mixture thereof.
23. The process of claim 22 wherein the light curable resin is curable by visible or UV light.
24. The process of claim 22 wherein the light curable resin comprises acrylic, epoxy, silicone resins or monomers or mixtures thereof.
25. The process of claim 1 wherein dental article is in the shape of a coping, framework, pontic, denture teeth, a bridge, crown, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliance, orthodontic retainer, denture, post, jacket, inlay, onlay, facing, veneer, facet, implant, abutment, splint, partial crown, cylinder, pin, or connector.
26. A dental article formed by the method comprising:
obtaining digital data of a patient's tooth or teeth;
designing an enlarged die or mold based on the digital data of the patient's tooth or teeth;
rapid-prototyping the enlarged die or mold;
applying ceramic particulate onto or into the enlarged die or mold; and
sintering the ceramic particulate material to form the dental article.
27. A method for producing a dental article comprising:
obtaining three-dimensional digital data relating to a patient's dentition;
designing an enlarged virtual prosthesis for said dentition using the three-dimensional digital data;
transmitting digital data corresponding to the virtual prosthesis to an automated prototyping system;
producing an enlarged prototype of the dental prosthesis with the automated prototyping system;
applying a material that can be hardened or cured on the prototype;
allowing the material to harden partially or completely to form an enlarged shell around the prototype;
removing the prototype from within the shell to produce an enlarged die or mold for the dental prosthesis;
filling the enlarged mold with a ceramic particulate material to produce a green body in a shape of the dental article;
removing the enlarged mold; and
sintering the green body to produce the dental article.
28. The method of claim 27 wherein the prototype is fabricated of a wax, thermoplastic material, thermosetting material or light curable resin.
29. The method of claim 28 wherein the wax comprises paraffin wax, microcrystalline wax, synthetic hydrocarbon wax, oxidized polyethylene wax or a mixture thereof.
30. The method of claim 27 wherein the prototype is fabricated of thermally decomposable material.
31. The method of claim 27 wherein the mold is fabricated of a plastic material.
32. The method of claim 27 wherein the mold is fabricated of silicone rubber.
33. The method of claim 27 wherein the mold is fabricated of an investment material.
34. The method of claim 27 wherein the enlarged die or mold is fabricated of die stone, clay, plaster of paris, gypsum, silica, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, alumina, magnesia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures thereof.
35. The method of claim 27 wherein the step of applying a material on the prototype comprises injection molding, extrusion, heat pressing, hot pressing, hot casting, centrifugal casting, gravity casting, pressure casting, gel casting, slip casting, or slurry casting.
36. The method of claim 27 wherein the ceramic particulate material is in the form of a suspension, slurry, slip, gel, pellet or feedstock.
37. The method of claim 27 wherein the dental article is in the shape of a coping, framework, pontic, denture teeth, a bridge, crown, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliance, orthodontic retainer, denture, post, jacket, inlay, onlay, facing, veneer, facet, implant, abutment, splint, partial crown, cylinder, pin, or connector.
38. A dental article formed by the method comprising:
obtaining three-dimensional digital data relating to a patient's dentition;
designing an enlarged virtual prosthesis for said dentition using the three-dimensional digital data;
transmitting digital data corresponding to the virtual prosthesis to an automated prototyping system;
producing an enlarged prototype of the dental prosthesis with the automated prototyping system;
applying a material that can be hardened or cured on the prototype;
allowing the material to harden partially or completely to form a shell around the prototype;
removing the prototype from within the shell to produce a mold for the dental article;
filling the mold with a ceramic particulate material to produce a green body in a shape of a dental article;
removing the mold material; and
sintering the green body to produce the dental article.
39. The dental article of claim 38 formed by the method further comprising:
finishing the dental article after the step of sintering the green body, wherein the finishing step comprises applying one or more layers of porcelain, glass, or glass-ceramic having a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) up to about 񶕭0−6/C of the CTE of the sintered dental article.
40. A process for the mass production dental articles comprising:
obtaining digital data of a number of patients' tooth or teeth;
designing enlarged substrates, dies or molds based on the digital data of the patients' tooth or teeth;
concurrently rapid-prototyping a multiplicity of the enlarged substrates, dies or molds;
preparing the enlarged substrates, dies or molds for coating, deposition, casting, pressing or a molding process;
simultaneously applying ceramic particulate material onto a multiplicity of the substrates or into a multiplicity of the enlarged dies or molds;
sintering a multiplicity of green bodies to form the dental articles.
41. The process of claim 40 wherein simultaneously applying ceramic particulate onto a multiplicity of the substrates or into a multiplicity of the enlarged dies or molds comprises casting, pressing, molding or investing.
42. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of obtaining digital data of a patient's tooth or teeth comprises scanning a master die, a working die, or a wax-up of a dental article, or intraorally scanning the patient's teeth.
43. The process of claim 40 wherein the enlarged substrates, dies or molds is enlarged according to an amount the ceramic particulate will shrink during the sintering step.
44. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of designing enlarged substrates, dies or molds comprises creating virtual substrates, dies or molds with the use of a computer.
45. The process of claim 40 further comprising preparing the enlarged substrates, dies or molds after the step of rapid-prototyping the enlarged substrates, dies or molds.
46. The process of claim 42 wherein the step of preparing the enlarged substrates, dies or molds comprises trimming the substrates, dies or molds or coating the substrates, dies or molds with conductive paint.
47. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of applying ceramic particulate material onto the enlarged substrates, dies or molds comprises gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, pressure casting, direct coagulation, dipping, colloidal spray deposition, electrophoretic deposition.
48. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of applying ceramic particulate material into the enlarged substrates, dies or molds comprises filling the mold by injection molding, extrusion, heat pressing, hot pressing, hot casting, centrifugal casting, gravity casting, pressure casting, gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting and slip pressing.
49. The process of claim 40 wherein the ceramic particulate material is in the form of a suspension, slurry, slip, gel, pellet or feedstock.
50. The process of claim 40 further comprising heat-treating the ceramic particulate material prior to sintering to release the substrates, dies or molds and to eliminate organic ingredients from the ceramic particulate.
51. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of sintering the ceramic particulate material comprises sintering to full density.
52. The process of claim 40 further comprising finishing the dental article after the step of sintering the ceramic particulate material.
53. The process of claim 52 wherein finishing the dental article after the step of sintering the ceramic particulate comprises applying one or more layers of porcelain, glass, or glass-ceramic having a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) up to about 񶕭0−6/C of the CTE of the sintered ceramic particulate material.
54. The process of claim 40 wherein the step of rapid-prototyping the multiplicity of the enlarged substrates, dies or molds comprises rapid-prototyping by stereolithography, photo-stereolithography, digital light processing (DLP), selective area laser deposition, selective laser sintering (SLS), electrophoretic deposition (EPD), robocasting, fused deposition modeling (FDM), laminated object manufacturing (LOM), or 3D printing.
55. The process of claim 40 wherein the ceramic particulate material is selected from the group consisting of zirconia, ytrria, hafnia, alumina, ceria, magnesia, titania, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitride, mullite, garnets, porcelain, or mixtures thereof.
56. The process of claim 55 wherein the ceramic particulate material comprises a solid solution, agglomerates, complexes or mixtures thereof.
57. The process of claim 55 wherein the porcelain comprises glass, leucite, lithium disilicate, mullite or mica.
58. The process of claim 55 wherein the zirconia comprises tetragonal zirconia.
59. The process of claim 40 wherein the enlarged substrates, dies or molds are fabricated of die stone, clay, plaster of paris, gypsum, silica, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, zirconia, alumina, magnesia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures thereof.
60. The process of claim 59 wherein the silica comprises crystalline silica, amorphous silica, colloidal silica, or mixtures thereof.
61. The process of claim 40 wherein the substrates, dies or molds thermally decompose during the sintering step.
62. The process of claim 40 wherein the enlarged substrates, dies or molds are fabricated of a wax, paraffin, rubber, plastic, polymeric material, thermoplastic material, thermosetting material or light curable resin or mixture thereof.
63. The process of claim 62 wherein the light curable resin is curable by visible or UV light.
64. The process of claim 62 wherein the light curable resin comprises acrylic, epoxy, silicone resins, or monomers or mixtures thereof.
65. The process of claim 40 wherein the dental article is in the shape of a coping, framework, pontic, denture teeth, a bridge, crown, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliance, orthodontic retainer, denture, post, jacket, inlay, onlay, facing, veneer, facet, implant, abutment, splint, partial crown, cylinder, pin, or connector.
66. Dental articles formed by the method comprising:
obtaining digital data of a number of patients' tooth or teeth;
designing enlarged substrates, dies or molds based on the digital data of the patients' tooth or teeth;
concurrently rapid-prototyping a multiplicity of the enlarged substrates, dies or molds;
preparing the enlarged substrates, dies or molds for coating, deposition, casting, pressing or a molding process;
simultaneously applying ceramic particulate onto a multiplicity of the substrates or into a multiplicity of the enlarged dies or molds;
sintering a multiplicity of green bodies to form the dental articles.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/053,430, filed Oct. 22, 2001, which is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/946,413 filed Sep. 5, 2001 which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/350,604 filed Jul. 9, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,322,728, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/092,432 filed on Jul. 10, 1998, and is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/027,017 filed Dec. 18, 2001, which is a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/376,921, filed Aug. 18, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,354,836, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/097,216, filed Aug. 20, 1998, and is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/857,482, filed May 28, 2004, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/474,166, filed May 29, 2003, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to dental restorations made from ceramics, glass-ceramics, metals, alloys, and polymeric composite materials using solid free-form fabrication methods.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The fabrication of current all-ceramic dental restorations often requires extensive labor and time and the proficiency of highly skilled technicians. Many state-of-the-art dental restorations reveal a sense of artistry that can typically only be achieved manually or 揵y hand. While aesthetics are preserved with this process, microstructural inhomogeneities may appear, affecting strength and reliability. The industry has attempted to automate this process by, for example, pressing crowns. Although pressable crowns reduce some of the skill time required, about two hours of concerted effort is necessary to complete a crown. Pressed crowns may also suffer from similar strength and reliability problems typical of 揾and made crowns.

Computer assisted design/computer assisted milling (CAD/CAM) processes and equipment have been recently introduced into the dental industry. In these processes, a three-dimensional image of a tooth to be restored is created along with the teeth surrounding the tooth in an effort to create a dental restoration which is to be placed over the tooth. This image is displayed on a computer screen. Based on the tooth and surrounding teeth, the dental technician may then select a tooth from a plurality of tooth forms stored in the computer to best fit the tooth to be restored. The selected tooth is projected onto the tooth to be restored until an optimum positioning and fit of the dental restoration is achieved. The digital data concerning the dental restoration thus formed are supplied to a numerically controlled milling machine operating in three dimensions. The milling machine cuts a blank of metal or porcelain material into the dental restoration design based on the data supplied.

Commercially available systems such as CEREC from Siemens, PROCERA from Nobel Biocare AG, and CICERO from Cicero Dental Systems, have attempted to reduce labor and increase structural reliability. However, the necessary machining steps limit the choice of materials that can be used in dental restorations and sometimes compromise the strength and/or aesthetics of the finished restoration.

One of the current limitations of the CAD/CAM approach, which is not easy to overcome, is the fact that currently available systems at best produce copings that require veneering layers to provide a natural appearance. Consequently, final processing of the crown is still in the hands of dental technicians which may limit the resulting structural reliability of the restoration. The existing commercial CAD/CAM systems are unable to produce full crowns. Some of the systems can machine inlays/onlays from a solid ceramic block and are not able to produce crowns or even copings. Others produce copings that make a core of the crown that can fit on the prepared tooth but require additional work by dental technicians to provide final shapes and esthetics. This entails manual building and firing of porcelain layers on top of a coping received from the CAD/CAM facility. Supposedly, one or more systems will be able to automate forming of successive veneering layers of porcelain on top of a CAD/CAM coping which will involve sintering of consecutive porcelain layers following their forming by machining or pressing. This is an automation of steps that are otherwise performed by dental technicians and very well may not be practically advantageous.

One of the key limitations intrinsic to CAM methods is the fact that machining is not competitive technology for mass production of parts and components of any kind including dental restorations, e.g. dentures and crowns. At any given period of time one cutting tool can be used to machine only one part and can not be concurrently used to machine another part.

It is desirable that the automation of the manufacture of dental restorations be conducive to mass production of restorations. It is beneficial that the automation of the manufacture of dental restorations be efficient and useful for a variety of materials.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

These and other objects and advantages are accomplished by the process herein directed to solid free-form (SFF) fabrication of dental restorations. SFF techniques can be used directly to manufacture single and multi-unit frameworks, cores, net shape and near-net shape dental articles or alternatively SFF methods can be utilized indirectly to manufacture substrates, dies, models, near-net shapes, shells, and wax-ups that will be used in manufacturing dental restorations. Among direct solid free-form fabrication techniques, three dimensional printing and fused deposition modeling are preferred because both ceramic and resin-based composite dental restorations can be produced in solid (e.g. denture teeth) or multilayered form (e.g. crowns). Three-dimensional printing is the most preferred direct method for mass-production of dental restorations. Digital light processing (DLP) is the most preferred indirect method for production of substrates that can be converted to dental articles by various coating or deposition techniques such as gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, dipping, colloidal spray deposition or electrophoretic deposition.

Three-dimensional printing is used to create a dental restoration by ink-jet printing a binder into selected areas of sequentially deposited layers of powder. Each layer is created by spreading a thin layer of powder over the surface of a powder bed. Instructions for each layer may be derived directly from a CAD representation of the restoration. The area to be printed is obtained by computing the area of intersection between the desired plane and the CAD representation of the object. All the layers required for an aesthetically sound restoration can be deposited concurrently slice after slice and sintered/cured simultaneously. The amount of green body oversize is equivalent to the amount of shrinkage which occurs during sintering or curing. While the layers become hardened or at least partially hardened as each of the layers is laid down, once the desired final shaped configuration is achieved and the layering process is complete, in some applications it may be desirable that the form and its contents be heated or cured at a suitably selected temperature to further promote binding of the powder particles. The individual sliced segments or layers are joined by one or more binders to form the three dimensional structure. The unbound powder supports temporarily unconnected portions of the component as the structure is built but is removed after completion of printing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Features of the present invention are disclosed in the accompanying drawings, wherein similar reference characters denote similar elements throughout the several views, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a shell formed by rapid prototyping;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of a model that has been formed from the shell of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a shell 10 with die 20 formed therein;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a plug for use in the shell of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a shell for use in the lost wax process;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of a space made from the shell in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of working dies used in the process herein;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view of a series of copings attached to a building platform;

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of a series of copings attached to a building platform ready for insertion into a suspension of charged particles; and

FIG. 10 is an elevational view of a series of copings attached to a building platform ready for insertion into a slip bath.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A number of techniques have been developed in recent years that are known under the generic name of solid free-form (SFF) fabrication or also known as rapid prototyping and are successfully used for net-shape manufacturing of advanced materials (ceramics, polymers) into small and complex shapes. These techniques are similar to CAD/CAM techniques in that the digital representation of the final shape and its implementation is designed and controlled by a computer. However, the machining step in these techniques is substituted by other computer assisted net-shaping techniques including but not limited to three-dimensional printing, selective area laser deposition or selective laser sintering (SLS), electrophoretic deposition, robocasting, fused deposition modeling (FMD), laminated object manufacturing (LOM), stereolithography, photostereolithography and digital light processing (DLP). Most of these techniques were developed for net-shaped fabrication of polymeric or wax parts, however, some of them, such as three-dimensional printing and fused deposition modeling can be used to build complex shapes from ceramic or even metallic materials as well. A large variety of ceramic, polymeric and composite materials can be fabricated into complex shapes using these techniques. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,340,656, 5,490,882, 5,204,055, 5,518,680, 5,490,962, 5,387,380, 5,700,289, and 4,672,032 are directed to solid free-form fabrication methods and techniques and are hereby incorporated by reference.

In this invention, SFF techniques are used to make dental restorations and various dental articles including but not limited to denture teeth, crowns, bridges, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliances, orthodontic retainers, dentures, posts, jackets, inlays, onlays, facings, veneers, facets, implants, abutments, splints, partial crowns, teeth, cylinders, pins, and connectors. SFF techniques can be used directly to manufacture single and multi-unit frameworks, cores, net shape or near-net shape dental articles or alternatively SFF methods can be utilized indirectly to manufacture substrates, dies, models, near-net shapes, shells, and wax-ups that will be used in manufacturing dental articles or restorations. Among direct solid free-form fabrication techniques, three-dimensional printing and fused deposition modeling are preferred because both ceramic and resin-based composite dental articles or restorations can be produced in solid (e.g. denture teeth) or multilayered form (e.g. crowns). Three-dimensional printing is the most preferred direct method for mass-production of dental restorations. DLP is the most preferred indirect method for production of substrates that can be converted to dental articles by various coating or deposition techniques such as gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, dipping, colloidal spray deposition or electrophoretic deposition.

Similarly to CAD/CAM methods, the design of the restoration is carried by a CAD device which uses at least two inputs: (1) the digital image taken optically directly from a mouth of the patient (optical impression) or created by digitizing the impression/die by contact or by an optical digitizer; and (2) a library of teeth shapes and forms. CAD devices assure both natural-like shape and proper function of the restoration. Both optical and contact digitizers providing input (1) above are described in the literature and some of them are commercially available. The specific techniques may require additional software to build the shape according to the CAD file.

In one of the embodiments of the present invention, a three-dimensional printing machine is used for mass-production of dental restorations including, but not limited to denture teeth, bridges, crowns, bridges, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliances, orthodontic retainers, dentures, posts, jackets, inlays, onlays, facings, veneers, facets, implants, abutments, splints, partial crowns, teeth, cylinders, pins, and connectors. Suitable printing devices include both those with a continuous jet stream print head and a drop-on-demand stream print head. A high speed printer of the continuous type may be used which has a line printing bar containing approximately 1500 jets which can deliver up to 60 million droplets per second in a continuous fashion and can print at speeds up to 900 feet per minute. Both raster and vector apparatuses can be used. A raster apparatus is where the printhead goes back and forth across the bed with the jet turning on and off. This can have problems when the material is likely to clog the jet upon settling. A vector apparatus is similar to an x-y printer. Although potentially slower, the vector printer may yield a more uniform finish.

Three-dimensional printing is used to create a dental restoration by ink-jet printing a binder into selected areas of sequentially deposited layers of powder. Each layer is created by spreading a thin layer of powder over the surface of a powder bed. The powder bed is supported by a piston which descends upon powder spreading and printing of each layer, or conversely, the ink jets and spreader are raised after printing of each layer and the bed remains stationary. Instructions for each layer may be derived directly from a CAD representation of the restoration. The area to be printed is obtained by computing the area of intersection between the desired plane and the CAD representation of the object. The individual sliced segments or layers are joined to form the three dimensional structure. The unbound powder supports temporarily unconnected portions of the component as the structure is built but is removed after completion of printing.

The three-dimensional printing apparatus includes a powder dispersion head which is driven reciprocally in a shuttle motion along the length of the powder bed. A linear stepping motor assembly is used to move the powder distribution head and the binder deposition head. The powder material is dispensed in a confined region as the dispensing head is moved in discrete steps along the mold length to form a relatively loose layer having a typical thickness of about 100 to about 200 microns. All the layers required for an aesthetically sound restoration can be deposited concurrently slice after slice and sintered/cured simultaneously. The amount of green body oversize is equivalent to the amount of shrinkage which occurs during sintering or curing. Although powder is used herein to identify the material, the material may include particles of any shape including fibers, rod-shaped particles, spherical particles, or any shape or form of material used in the manufacture of dental restorations. An ink jet print head having a plurality of ink-jet dispensers is also driven by the stepping motor assembly in the same reciprocal manner so as to follow the motion of the powder head and to selectively produce jets of a liquid binder material at selected regions thereby causing the powdered material at such regions to become bonded. The binder jets are dispensed along a line of the printhead which is moved in substantially the same manner as the dispensing head. Typical binder droplet sizes are about 15 to about 50 microns. The powder/binder layer forming process is repeated so as to build up the restoration, layer by layer.

While the layers become hardened or at least partially hardened as each of the layers is laid down, once the desired final shaped configuration is achieved and the layering process is complete, in some applications it may be desirable that the form and its contents be heated or cured at a suitably selected temperature to further promote binding of the powder particles. In either case, whether or not further curing is required, the loose, unbounded powder particles are removed using a suitable technique, such as ultrasonic cleaning, to leave a finished restoration.

For effective use, the powder particles should be uniformly deposited at a relatively high rate, the rate being selected in accordance with the application for which the technique is used. For many useful applications the powder particles can preferably be packed at relatively high densities, while in other applications the density may be considerably lower where restorations having greater porosity are desired. Known techniques used in the fields of colloidal science and powder dispersion chemistry can be used to provide the desired uniform depositions of such powders at the required rates and densities. Thus, powders can be dispensed either as dry powders or in a liquid vehicle, such as in a colloidal dispersant or in an aqueous suspension. In the dry state, the desired compaction of particles can be achieved using mechanical vibrating compaction techniques or by applying acoustic energy, i.e., either sonic or ultrasonic vibrations, to the deposited powder or by applying a piezoelectric scraper to the deposited powder.

The ink-jet printing of the binder material should utilize droplets of materials having shrinkage characteristics such that the dimensional tolerances of the restoration being made are maintained upon hardening thereof. While the binder solution must have a relatively high binder content, the viscosity thereof should be low enough so as to be able to flow through the printing head for deposit into the powder material. The binder material should be selected to penetrate the layer and to perform its binding action relatively rapidly in each layer so that the next layer of powder particles can be subsequently applied thereto. When using certain ink-jet technology the binder material may require at least a minimum electrical conductivity, particularly when using currently available continuous jet printing heads, for example, which require enough conductivity to establish charge on the binder solution droplets as they are emitted from the head. Where conductivity cannot be established in the binder, as with certain organic solvents, for example, the binder can be applied using drop-on-demand print heads.

The binder material may have a high binding strength as each layer is deposited so that, when all the layers have been bonded, the component formed thereby is ready for use without further processing. In other cases, it may be desirable, or necessary, to perform further processing of the restoration. For example, while the process may be such as to impart a reasonable strength to the restoration which is formed, once the restoration is formed it can be further heated or cured to further enhance the binding strength of the particles. In some cases, the binder is removed during such heating or firing process, while in others, it can remain in the material after firing. Which operation occurs depends on the particular binder material which has been selected for use and on the conditions, e.g., temperature, under which the heating or firing process is performed. Other post-processing operations may also be performed following the formation of the restoration. The rate at which a ceramic, metal, plastic, or composite restoration can be made depends on the rates used to deposit the powder and to supply the binder liquid, and on the rate at which each bonded layer hardens as the layers are deposited one on the other.

Any ceramic material having strength to withstand forces in the mouth may be used herein. Preferably, the ceramic material is in particulate form. Examples of ceramic materials include, but are not limited to glass-ceramic materials, glass materials, high-strength ceramic materials such as alumina, zirconia, mullite, silica, spinel, tricalcium phosphate, apatite, fluoroapatite, hydroxyapatite and mixtures thereof. To enhance sintering, particles can be coated with silica, for example by treating with TEOS as described below. Many possible combinations of powder and binder materials can be selected in accordance with the invention. For example, ceramic powders or ceramic fibers can be used with either inorganic or organic binder materials or with a metallic binder material; a metal powder can be used with a metallic binder or a ceramic binder; and a plastic powder can be used with a solvent binder or a plastic binder, e.g., a low viscosity epoxy plastic material. Other appropriate combinations of powder and binder materials will occur to those in the art for various applications.

The resulting color including but not limited to shade, translucency, and fluorescence, of the restoration is controlled by the pigments, opacifiers, fluorescing agents and the like, added to the powder bed components as well as components delivered through nozzles. The printed material that is used to bond successive layers can be a curable or removable organic material. When a curable material is used, the polymer-ceramic composite restoration results from the green body after curing is completed. Both natural and synthetic dispersants are available for these materials in organic vehicles. Organic dispersants have been used in the ceramics industry and are typically polymeric resins obtained form a variety of sources. They can be either water soluble, such as cellulosic binders, as used in extrusion technology, or they can be soluble in only volatile organic solvents, such as the butyral resins, as used in tape casting technology. The latter water soluble systems can be removed relatively quickly and seem particularly useful in the invention. Another example of a binder is a ceramic precursor material such as polycarbosilazane.

Inorganic binders are useful in cases where the binder is to incorporated into the final component. Such binders are generally silicate based and are typically formed from the polymerization of silicic acid or its salts in aqueous solution. An exemplary inorganic binder which can be used is tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). During drying, the colloidal silica aggregates at the necks of the matrix particles to form a cement-like bond. During firing, the silica flows and acts to rearrange the matrix particles through the action of surface tension forces and remains after firing.

Composite materials for use in the invention include a polymeric matrix with particulate or fiber filled components. The polymeric matrix element of the fiber-reinforced and particulate-filled composites is selected from those known in the art of dental materials, including but not being limited to polyamides, polyesters, polyolefins, polyimides, polyarylates, polyurethanes, vinyl esters or epoxy-based materials. Other polymeric matrices include styrenes, styrene acrylonitriles, ABS polymers, polysulfones, polyacetals, polycarbonates, polyphenylene sulfides, and the like.

Preferred polymeric materials include those based on acrylic and methacrylic monomers, for example those disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,066,112, 3,179,623, and 3,194,784 to Bowen; U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,751,399 and 3,926,906 to Lee et al.; commonly assigned U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,276,068 and 5,444,104 to Waknine; and commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,684,103 to Jia et al., the pertinent portions of all which are herein incorporated by reference. An especially preferred methacrylate monomer is the condensation product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate, 2,2′-bis[4-(3-methacryloxy-2-hydroxy propoxy)-phenyl]-propane (hereinafter abbreviated 揃IS-GMA). Polyurethane dimethacrylates (hereinafter abbreviated 揚UDMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (hereinafter abbreviated 揟EGDMA), polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (hereinafter abbreviated 揚EGDMA), polycarbonate dimethacrylate (hereinafter abbreviated 揚CDMA) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (hereinafter abbreviated 揈BPADMA) are also commonly-used principal polymers suitable for use in the present invention.

The polymer matrix typically includes polymerization initiators, polymerization accelerators, ultraviolet light absorbers, anti-oxidants, and other additives well known in the art. The polymer matrices may be visible light curable, self-curing, dual curing, and vacuum, heat, and pressure curable compositions as well as any combination thereof. The visible light curable compositions include the usual polymerization initiators, polymerization accelerators, ultraviolet absorbers, fluorescent whitening agents, and the like. Preferred light curing initiators include camphorquinone (CQ) and trimethyl benzoyl phosphine oxide (TPO). The heat curable compositions, which are generally filled compositions, include, in addition to the monomeric components, a heat cure initiator such as benzoyl peroxide, 1,1′-azobis(cyclohexanecarbo-nitrile), or other free radical initiators. The preferred fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix is a curable matrix, wherein light cure effects partial cure of the matrix, and final curing is by heat under controlled atmosphere.

The fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix may further comprise at least one filler known in the art and used in dental restorative materials, the amount of such filler being determined by the specific use of the fiber-reinforced composite. Generally, no or relatively little additional filler is present in the polymeric matrix, i.e., up to thirty percent by weight of the composite. Suitable fillers are those capable of being covalently bonded to the polymeric matrix itself or to a coupling agent that is covalently bonded to both. Examples of suitable filling materials include but are not limited to those known in the art such as silica, silicate glass, quartz, barium silicate, strontium silicate, barium borosilicate, strontium borosilicate, borosilicate, lithium silicate, amorphous silica, ammoniated or deammoniated calcium phosphate and alumina, zirconia, tin oxide, and titania. Particularly suitable fillers for dental filling-type materials prepared in accordance with this invention are those having a particle size ranging from about 0.1-5.0 microns with a silicate colloid of 0.001 to about 0.07 microns and may be prepared by a series of milling steps comprising wet milling in an aqueous medium, surface etch milling and dry or wet silanation. Some of the aforementioned inorganic filling materials are disclosed in commonly-assigned U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,544,359 and No. 4,547,531 to Waknine, the pertinent portions of which are incorporated herein by reference.

The particulate-filled polymeric matrix comprises at least one filler known in the art and used in dental restorative materials, the amount of such filler being determined by the specific use of the particulate-filled composite. Generally, from about 65 to about 85% by weight of a filler is present in the particulate-filled composite and preferably, about 75 to about 83% by weight of the composite is filler in combination with about 17 to about 35% by weight and preferably about 20 to about 30% by weight and more preferably about 20 to about 26% by weight of the composite is unfilled heat curable dental resin material which makes up the polymeric matrix. Suitable fillers are those capable of being covalently bonded to the polymeric matrix itself or to a coupling agent that is covalently bonded to both. Examples of suitable filling materials include but are not limited to those known in the art such as silica, silicate glass, quartz, barium silicate, barium sulfate, barium molybdate, barium methacrylate, barium yttrium alkoxy (Ba2Y(OR)x), strontium silicate, barium borosilicate, strontium borosilicate, borosilicate, lithium silicate, amorphous silica, ammoniated or deammoniated calcium phosphate, alumina, zirconia, tin oxide, tantalum oxide, niobium oxide, and titania. Particularly suitable fillers for dental filling-type materials prepared in accordance with this invention are those having a particle size ranging from about 0.1-5.0 microns with a silicate colloid of 0.001 to about 0.07 microns and may be prepared by a series of milling steps comprising wet milling in an aqueous medium, surface etch milling and dry or wet silanation. Some of the aforementioned inorganic filling materials are disclosed in commonly-assigned U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,544,359 and 4,547,531 to Waknine, the pertinent portions of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Preferably, the particulate-filled composite comprises an inorganic filler having an average particle size diameter of about 0.5 to about 5 microns homogeneously dispersed in an organic polymerizable monomeric matrix comprising ethoxylated dimethacrylate which is set forth in commonly owned, copending application No. 08/998,849 filed Dec. 29, 1997, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,969,000, which is hereby incorporated by reference. In addition, a relatively small amount of fumed silica is also predispersed within the monomeric matrix. The inorganic filler primarily comprises an X-ray opaque alkali metal or alkaline earth metal silicate such as lithium alumina silicate, barium silicate, strontium silicate, barium borosilicate, strontium silicate, barium borosilicate, strontium borosilicate, borosilicate, as well as the aforementioned materials. For purposes of illustration, and as the preferred silicate species, barium borosilicate will hereinafter be employed as being typical of the alkali metal or alkaline earth metal silicates which can be suitable employed in the present invention. The barium borosilicate exhibits an index of refraction close to that of the organic monomeric matrix in which it is dispersed. The filler can additionally contain a relatively small amount of borosilicate glass which imparts greater compressive strength to the resulting composite and enhances the translucency thereof thereby enabling better blending of the restorative material with the adjacent teeth. In addition, the presence of the borosilicate glass helps narrow the gap in the mismatch of refractive indices between the barium borosilicate inorganic fiber phase and the organic monomeric matrix.

Details of the preparation of the inorganic filler, which comprises a mixture of from about 5 to about 20% by weight of borosilicate glass and form about 80 to about 95% by weight barium borosilicate, and has an average particle size diameter of from about 0.5 to about 5 microns, can be found in the aforementioned U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,544,539 and 4,547,531.

The reinforcing fiber element of the fiber-reinforced composite preferably comprises ceramic, glass, carbon, graphite, polyaramid, or other fibers or whiskers known in the art, such as polyesters, polyamides, and other natural and synthetic materials compatible with the polymeric matrix. Some of the aforementioned fibrous materials are disclosed in commonly assigned copending U.S. patent application Nos. 08/907,177, 09/059,492, 60/055,590, 08/951,414, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,013,694, and U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,717,341 and 4,894,012 all which are incorporated herein by reference. The fibers may further be treated, for example, chemically or mechanically etched and/or silanized, to enhance the bond between the fibers and the polymeric matrix. The fibers preferably take the form of long, continuous filaments, although the filaments may be as short as 0.1 to 4 millimeters. Shorter fibers of uniform or random length might also be employed. Preferably, the fibers are at least partially aligned and oriented along the longitudinal dimensions of the wire. However, depending on the end use of the composite material, the fibers may also be otherwise oriented, including being normal or perpendicular to that dimension.

As set forth above, in all procedures herein, metal powder may be used to form the dental restoration or model or other desired product to be manufactured in accordance herein. The metal powder may be provided as metal alone, in any know form such as in powder or molten form and may be used in combination with a binder. If a binder is used, the powder/binder mixture comprises from about 50 to about 99 percent powder and from about 1 to about 50 percent binder, and preferably from about 70 to about 99 percent powder and from about 1 to about 30 percent binder, and more preferably from about 90 to about 99 percent powder and from about 1 to about 10 percent binder. Most preferably, the powder is present in about 95% by weight and the binder is present in about 5% by weight.

The metal powder may comprise one or more precious metals, non-precious metals and alloys thereof. Preferably, the metal powder is a high fusing metal and preferably, the metal powder comprises a non-oxidizing metal. More preferably, the metal powder is selected from one or more of gold, platinum-Group metals, silver and alloys thereof whereby the alloys may comprise one or more of the metals in combination with one another or with a different metal, such as copper, iridium, rhodium, palladium, indium, tin, gallium and mixtures thereof. One preferred alloy comprises about 85 to about 99% Au, 0 to about 15% Pt, and 0 to about 15% of one or more of Ag, Pd, Rh, Ir, In, Ru, and Ta.

The particle size of the metal powder is not limited to any specific size. The metal powder may comprise a multimodal particle size distribution to achieve high density during sintering. The multimodal particle powder comprises larger or coarse particle size powder in combination with a smaller or fine particle size powder. The average size of the coarse particle powder can be about 25 to about 35 microns, with the majority of the particles exhibiting diameters in the range from about 5 to about 100 microns and preferably with the maximum size no greater than about 44 microns (−325 mesh) to about 50 microns (−270 mesh). The fine particle size is less than about 5 microns and preferably less than about 2 microns. The coarse particles are present in an amount in the range of about 85 to about 95% by weight and the fine particles are present in an amount in the range of about 5 to about 15% by weight of the powder.

In some applications, it may be preferable that the binder harden relatively rapidly upon being deposited so that the next layer of particles placed on a surface of the previous layer is not subject to particle rearrangement due to capillary forces. Moreover, a hardened binder is not subject to contamination from solvents which may be used in powder deposition. In other cases, it may not be necessary that the binder be fully hardened between layers and a subsequent layer of powder particles may be deposited on a previous layer which is not yet fully hardened.

The number of restorations printed simultaneously is essentially limited by the size of the powder bed, number of nozzles and the ability to recognize and sort different restorations. To facilitate the latter operation, the robotized device can be used to pick up and sort different restorations.

It is an essential part of the present invention that components creating and/or modifying color, translucency, biocompatibility, mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness and wear) and perceived shape are contained in the powder bed and/or delivered through nozzles. This offers a unique advantage in creating esthetics (colors, shapes) and structure (functionally gradient structures). Techniques similar to water-marks are used to create interference colors, opalescence and fluorescing effects. Other techniques are used to create perceived geometry similar to techniques used in sculpture to create impressions of the face that is perceived as a full-bodied face always looking at the observer from any angle of view.

In another embodiment of the present invention, moldable articles are fabricated in the form of feed stock (wire or filament) that is formed into the required shape of a dental restoration using a fused deposition modeling machine such as FDM2000 available from Stratasys Inc., Eden Prairie, Minn. The software used accounts for the anticipated shrinkage. The free-standing shaped article is then sintered to full density. This method can only be used for powder such as alumina or zirconia which is capable of isotropic shrinkage during sintering. U.S. Pat. No. 5,900,207 is directed to solid free form fabrication methods which is hereby incorporated by reference.

In another embodiment of the present invention, a slurry or paste of a polymer or ceramic powder is mixed with a carrier formed into a coping of a multi-layered final shape of a dental restoration using a machine similar to a fused deposition modeling machine. This machine emits or sprays beads of slurries as opposed to a fused deposition modeling machine which emits liquefied thermoplastic materials. Examples of binder materials include curable organic materials such as mixtures of monomers or organic materials that are burned out prior to sintering. The shrinkage and setting of the materials are taken into account by oversizing the green body prior to sintering/curing.

In yet other embodiments of the present invention, other solid free-form fabrication techniques are used to make dental restorations from ceramic, glass-ceramic, metal or composite materials.

In still another embodiment herein, SFF methods are used to provide only a skeleton of a dental restoration, e.g. a structure with interpenetrating porosity or a reticulated (cellular, honeycomb) body. This body is later infiltrated with 揵iological soup containing cell cultures or peptides that can yield in-vitro grown materials similar to human tooth or bone tissues also known as biomimetic materials. For example, this infiltration media can contain biomimetically grown dental enamel crystals as described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,672,032 by Slavkin et al, which is hereby incorporated by reference. Another example of infiltration media is cultured periosteal cells as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,700,289 to Breitbart et al.

In still yet another embodiment herein, rapid prototyping methods are used to form a 搉egative or an impression of the tooth, teeth, or portion of the patient's mouth to be restored. As standard procedure, the dentist prepares the patient's tooth or teeth to be restored. Thereafter, the dentist takes an impression of the teeth. Alternatively, the dentist may scan the patient's teeth with a scanning device to obtain data that represents the shape of the patient's teeth. Scanning can be performed on a patient's teeth, a master die, a working die, or a wax-up of a dental restoration. If an impression is taken, it is typically sent to a laboratory where a master die is made, or otherwise, the scanned data is sent to the laboratory or milling center for preparation of the restoration.

In accordance herein, if an impression is taken, it is scanned with a scanning device to obtain data representative of the shape of the impression. With the data obtained from the scanning of the impression or the scanning of the patient's mouth, a 搉egative or shell material is prepared by a rapid prototyping process. The material used to prepare the shell is any material capable of withstanding the weight and force of a duplicate master or refractory model material including, but not limited to polymeric materials including, but not limited to waxes, nylons, plastics, rubber materials and other thermoplastic materials. Also, plaster and composite materials are other examples that may be useful herein. Examples of waxes include but are not limited to paraffin waxes, microcrystalline waxes, synthetic hydrocarbon waxes, oxidized polyethylene waxes and combinations of the foregoing. It is preferable that the wax has a modulus of elasticity of below about 10 GPa and more preferably below about 5 GPa. It is preferable that the wax have flow characteristics according to American Dental Association (ADA) Specification No. 4 for Type I and Type II waxes. At 45 C., the Type I and Type II waxes have a minimum flow percentage of 70% and a maximum flow percentage of 90%. If the shell is used as a wax pattern for casting or pressing restorations, it should burn out cleanly during burn-out procedures. It is important that waxes used are not too brittle and do not undergo dimensional changes under ambient conditions.

The aforementioned techniques and procedures discussed above in regard to the rapid prototyping of dental restorations apply hereto to the rapid prototyping of shells and dies and are hereby incorporated by reference. The techniques used to form the shell and die may include three-dimensional printing, selective area laser deposition or selective laser sintering (SLS), electrophoretic deposition, robocasting, fused deposition modeling (FMD), laminated object manufacturing (LOM), stereolithography and photostereolithography. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,340,656, 5,490,882, 5,204,055, 5,518,680, 5,490,962, 5,387,380, 5,700,289, and 4,672,032 are directed to solid free-form fabrication methods and techniques and are hereby incorporated by reference.

The design of the shell is carried out by a CAD device which uses at least two inputs: (1) the digital image taken optically directly from a mouth of the patient (optical impression) or created by digitizing the impression/die by contact or by an optical digitizer; and (2) a library of teeth shapes and forms. CAD devices assure both natural-like shape and proper function of the shell. Both optical and contact digitizers providing input (1) above are described in the literature and some of them are commercially available. The specific techniques may require additional software to build the shape according to the CAD file.

The data from the CAD file is input into the rapid prototyping device such as a fused deposition modeling machine. A continuous filament or rod of a polymeric material such as wax is introduced into a channel of a nozzle inside which the rod/filament is driven by a motor and associated rollers to move like a piston. The front end, near a nozzle tip, of this piston is heated to become melted. The rear end or solid portion of this piston pushes the melted portion forward to exit through the nozzle tip. The nozzle is translated under the control of a computer system in accordance with previously sliced CAD data to trace out a three-dimensional shell point by point and layer by layer. The CAD data may be modified to provide a shell having a thickness sufficient to withstand the weight and pressure of refractory die material that will be poured into the shell for fabrication of a model or die. The structure of the shell may be solid or reticulated. Preferably, the area of the shell closest to the internal surface of the shell exhibits a solid structure or form and the area further from the internal surface exhibits a reticulated or honey-comb structure. If the shell is to be used as a wax pattern for casting, it does not require bulking. It should have the dimensions of the restoration to be fabricated.

The shell or full model of the restoration obtained by rapid prototyping techniques is then used to fabricate a master model and/or a working die, both of which are used in the fabrication of dental restorations. Alternatively, as discussed, the shell can be used as a wax pattern for casting or pressing restorations. The technique used is commonly known as the lost-wax process. The shell, as the wax pattern, is invested in a refractory investment material. The wax pattern is 揵urned out to form a cavity in the shape of a coping. Ceramic, metal, polymeric or other similar material is then injected, vibrated, poured, pressed, or inserted by similar means into the cavity to form the dental restoration. The ceramic, metal or polymeric material may include any materials known in the field of dentistry including the aforementioned materials discussed above.

The shell or full model of the restoration, produced by techniques discussed herein, obviates the need for a dentist to send an impression to a dental laboratory, saving time and labor, and thereby expediting the process of manufacturing a dental restoration. After manufacture of the shell by rapid prototype techniques, a refractory die material or gypsum material is poured into the shell to provide a model or working die. Alternatively, the die or working model may be formed by rapid prototyping processes as discussed herein from refractory, ceramic, glass, metal, polymeric and composite materials or from known milling processes. Examples of metal materials for manufacture of the die include, but are not limited to, molybdenum, nickel or alloys comprising nickel or molybdenum. Commercially available metals include Rexillium III from Pentron Corporation, Hastelloy from Haynes International, Inc. and Inconel 600 from Inco Alloys International, Inc.

Alternatively, a substrate, die or mold is designed from the digital data obtained from a patient's tooth or teeth. The die or mold may be enlarged to accommodate for the shrinkage that occurs in the ceramic material that is applied to the die or mold. The enlarged die or mold or prototype may be fabricated of any material able to withstand the weight of the dental material applied thereto including, but not limited to, wax, paraffin, rubber, plastic, polymeric material, thermoplastic material, thermosetting material or a light curable resin material. The light curable resin may be curable by visible or UV light. Examples of waxes include, but are not limited to, paraffin waxes, microcrystalline waxes, synthetic hydrocarbon waxes, oxidized polyethylene waxes and mixtures thereof. Examples of light curable resins include, but are not limited to, acrylic, epoxy, silicone resins or monomers or mixtures thereof.

A dental material, such as ceramic, composite, or alloy material, is applied or pressed onto the die to provide a dental restoration.

It is preferred that ceramic particulate material is used. Application of the ceramic particulate material onto or into the mold or die may include gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, pressure casting, direct coagulation, dipping, colloidal spray deposition, electorphoretic deposition, injection molding, extrusion, heat pressing, hot pressing, hot casting, centrifugal casting, gravity casting.

The mold or die may be fabricated of any known material including, but not limited to, die stone, clay, plaster of paris, gypsum, silica, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, zirconia, alumina, magnesia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures thereof.

The ceramic particulate material may be in the form of a suspension, slurry, slip, gel, pellet, or feedstock.

In accordance with an embodiment herein, a ceramic material that is in its green state or that has been partially sintered or soft-sintered, may be milled, machined, or formed by solid free form fabrication methods, into a coping or framework. Partial or soft sintering comprises sintering to less than full density, preferably less than about 92%, more preferably less than about 80%, and most preferably less than about 75%. Partial or soft sintering produces a product having about 8 to about 25 percent porosity, making it easier to mill.

Ceramic materials useful herein include high strength ceramic materials such as, but not limited to alumina, zirconia, hafnia, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, various gamets etc. and porcelain materials such as commercially available OPC3G porcelain and OPC porcelain, both available from Jeneric/Pentron Inc., Wallingford, Conn., and commercially available Empress porcelain and Empress II porcelain, both available from Ivoclar North America, Amherst, N.Y. The porcelain materials may include leucite, lithium disilicate, mullite or mica as the crystal phase.

Milling procedures include those known in the art and methods and equipment described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,937,928, 5,910,273, 4,575,805, and 4,663,720 and are hereby incorporated by reference. Examples of commercially available CAD/CAM systems include the Cerec system available from Sirona USA, Charlotte, N.C., and the Pro 50 system available from Cynovad, Quebec City, Canada. Solid free form fabrication methods include those described herein.

The coping or framework is formed from the same data that was used to form the die, i.e., data obtained from the mouth or from an impression taken, or data taken from the die itself, so that the coping or framework closely matches the contour of the die and fits appropriately on the die. After the coping or framework has been formed, it is placed on the die and the coping or framework is fully sintered to its final density. As the coping or framework is sintered to its final density, porosity is reduced and shrinkage occurs. The coping or framework is supported by the die, therefore there is little chance of warpage. The coping or framework will shrink onto the die, and will not warp or flare up.

Dental restorations manufactured using this process include, but are not limited to, orthodontic appliances, bridges, space maintainers, tooth replacement appliances, splints, crowns, partial crowns, dentures, posts, teeth, jackets, inlays, onlays, facing, veneers, facets, implants, abutments, cylinders, and connectors.

Alternatively, after the model or die is prepared, a framework, coping or other dental appliance is designed using computer assisted design software. The software used to design the dental appliance is any known available software, preferably that software which is supplied with the scanning machine, or that which is compatible with the scanning machine. The framework is designed and saved as a stereolithography (.STL) file. The .STL file is transferred to a computer interfaced with a rapid prototyping machine such as the Perfactory Mini available from Envision Technologies GmbH LLC. The machine uses photostereolithography to build the substrate for the framework based on the .STL file. The substrate/model/die is built using light curable (by visible or UV light) material, which may be in the form of a suspension, emulsion or mixture comprising any known material able to withstand the subsequent coating or deposition process, including but not limited to, gypsum, silica, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, zirconia, alumina, magnesia, hafnia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures, composites, polymers, plastics, metals, alloys and mixtures thereof.

In the preferred DLP method, the digital pixel-based mask is projected onto the layer of light curable material and causes selective polymerization of this material in the areas corresponding to pixels that are illuminated, whereas the areas corresponding to dark pixels remain uncured. Each group of illuminated pixels gives rise to the specific cross-section of the article built layer by layer. The process of photopolymerization can be aided by concurrent or subsequent action of other types of radiation such as heat (infrared radiation) and/or microwave radiation to strengthen the substrate.

After the substrate is built, the framework is formed thereon, preferably by gel casting, slip casting, slurry casting, pressure infiltration, dipping, colloidal spray deposition or electrophoretic deposition. Materials useful for the fabrication of the framework include, but are not limited to, any ceramic, polymeric, or metal material able to withstand the forces in the mouth, including but not limited to, zirconia, ytrria, hafnia, alumina, ceria, magnesia, titania, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitride, mullite, garnets, porcelain, or mixtures thereof. It is preferable that ceramic particulate material is used. It can be in the form of solid solutions, agglomerates, complexes or the like. A binder may be included with the ceramic material for maintaining the shape of the form prior to sintering. Binders may include but are not limited to inorganic and organic binders, or mixtures thereof. Organic binders include, but are not limited to, polyvinyl pyrrolidine, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl butryal and polystyrene, or mixtures thereof. Inorganic binders include, but are not limited to, magnesium oxide, ammonium phosphate, colloidal silica, calcium sulfate, magnesium phosphate, alkaline silicates, silica hydrosol, colloidal clays, or mixtures thereof.

After the framework is formed it is sintered at required times and temperature to provide a high strength dental restoration.

Reference is made to FIGS. 1 through 6. FIG. 1 depicts a cross-sectional view of a shell 10 that has been formed by a rapid prototyping method as described herein. Shell 10 was formed from data retrieved by the dentist during the scanning procedure of the patient's tooth. The data was input into a rapid prototyping device to obtain shell 10. A die or model 20 shown in FIG. 2 was then prepared by filling shell 10 with refractory material known in the art. FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of shell 10 with die 20 formed therein. FIG. 4 shows a plug 40 that may be fabricated of a wax, plaster, plastic or rubber material. Plug 40 may be used to maintain the refractory material in place during setting after it has been poured into shell 10. FIG. 5 depicts a cross-sectional view of a shell 50 used in a lost wax process. Shell 50 is made using rapid prototyping techniques, based on information scanned from the patient's mouth or the impression taken from the patient's mouth. Shell 50 is shown attached to sprue 52 and is encased in investment material 54. During the burn-out procedure, shell 50 and sprue 52 are burned away, leaving a space 60 as shown in FIG. 6, for casting of metal or pressing of a ceramic.

In another embodiment herein, rapid prototyping techniques are used to fabricate master models and working dies or models that are used in the fabrication of dental restorations. Techniques and procedures discussed above in regard to the rapid prototyping of dental restorations and shells apply hereto to the rapid prototyping of master models and working models and are hereby incorporated by reference. The techniques used to form the models and dies may include three-dimensional printing, selective area laser deposition or selective laser sintering (SLS), electrophoretic deposition, robocasting, fused deposition modeling (FMD), laminated object manufacturing (LOM), stereolithography, photostereolithography and digital light processing (DLP). U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,340,656, 5,490,882, 5,204,055, 5,518,680, 5,490,962, 5,387,380, 5,700,289, and 4,672,032 are directed to solid free-form fabrication methods and techniques and are hereby incorporated by reference.

Similar to the aforementioned techniques used to form shells and dental restorations, data received from scanning the patient's mouth or the impression of the patient's mouth is used to fabricate models using solid free-form fabrication methods. Materials useful for the manufacture of models include investment materials. Typical investment materials include gypsum for low temperature applications, and a refractory filler, such as silica in the form of cristobalite, quartz, or a mixture of the two, leucite, zirconia, hafnia, zircon, alumina, magnesia, zircon, aluminosilicate, cordierite, mica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, silica-alumina-nitrides, mullite, garnet, or mixtures thereof, in combination with a binder, for high temperature applications. Binders may include but are not limited to inorganic and organic binders, or mixtures thereof. Organic binders include, but are not limited to, polyvinyl pyrrolidine, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl butryal and polystyrene, or mixtures thereof. Inorganic binders include, but are not limited to, magnesium oxide, ammonium phosphate, colloidal silica, calcium sulfate, magnesium phosphate, alkaline silicates, silica hydrosol, colloidal clays, or mixtures thereof. The investment material is fed to the solid free-form apparatus which interprets the scanned data and produces a three-dimensional model with the investment material.

Alternatively, the model may be formed of a thermoplastic material as described above for the use of shells, and the wax model may be duplicated using standard techniques.

For all purposes and materials used herein, the hardening or curing step may involve gelation, heating, cooling, or the application to promote the integrity of the solid free-form structure.

FIG. 7 shows examples of models and dies which are created by CAD software and thereafter produced by rapid prototyping. A full model of teeth 70, a single coping 72 and a bridge unit 74 are shown. FIG. 8 shows a series of copings 80 that have been produced by rapid prototyping and are ready for application of a ceramic, polymeric, or metal material thereon.

FIG. 9 shows a series of copings 90 prior to placement in suspension of charged particles 92. The suspension may include any of the materials mentioned above for fabrication of the restoration including but not limited to high strength ceramic materials. The copings 90 are attached to copper electrodes 94. The process used is known as Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) which is an electroforming process in which charged particles dispersed in a stable suspension are driven by the applied electric field to move towards an oppositely charge electrode, upon which they ultimately deposit, to build up a particulate coating. The technique is used herein to fabricate green ceramic bodies and coatings with different shapes for applications ranging from ceramic/ceramic and metauceramic composites to thin/thick film coatings for electronic devices. This processing technique is especially useful for the preparation of uniform particulate coatings with high green densities (45%-75%) and controlled thickness.

FIG. 10 illustrates an alternative method for applying material onto the substrate to form the coping and shows a slip bath 100 of ceramic material in combination with a binder into which the series of copings 102 are inserted for application of the slip.

After the application of the ceramic or other material, the coping is cured or sintered to provide the dental restoration. The restoration is preferably veneered with a porcelain or composite material to provide the finished restoration. The porcelain should have a coefficient of thermal expansion up to about 񶕭0−6/C of the CTE of the sintered ceramic particulate material that is used to manufacture the core of the dental article or restoration.

The following examples illustrate the practice of the present invention.

EXAMPLE 1

Filament is prepared from Investment Casting Wax (ICW06, Stratasys) and thermoplastic ABS (P400, Stratasys) and equiaxed alumina powder of 5 to 10 microns particle size. The binder content is about 30 volume percent.

Using a CAD/CAM device and digitizer manufactured by CAD/CAM Ventures (Irving, Tex.), the model of a tooth preparation is digitized and the obtained CAD file is used in conjunction with an FDM2000 fused deposition modeling machine available from Stratasys Inc. (Eden Prairie, Minn.). Using the filament containing equiaxed alumina powder in a thermoplastic matrix, single and multiunit dental restorations are formed and then subjected to binder-removal and soft-sintering cycles. The resulting porous preforms are infiltrated with glass using materials supplied by Vita Zahnfabrick (Bad Sackingen, Germany) and glass infiltration techniques used for Vita In-Ceram Alumina restorations.

EXAMPLE 2

The same CAD file as used in Example 1 is used in conjunction with a three-dimensional printing machine such as the Z402 System available from Z Corporation (Mass.) to print on ceramic powder and on metal powder separately. The same powder-binder mixture used above is used herein as the powder layer. A binder mixed with finely dispersed pigments is printed on the powder layer. Successive layers are deposited to form a dental restoration based on the CAD file. After the restoration is fully formed, the binder is burned out and glass is then infiltrated into the interstices. The pigment is retained in interstitial sites between the alumina particles to impart a shade to the composite.

EXAMPLE 3

Using a CAD/CAM device and digitizer manufactured by CAD/CAM Ventures (Irving, Tex.), the model of a tooth preparation is digitized and the obtained CAD file is used to manufacture a shell. The CAD file is modified to provide a thickness in the shell great enough to support and withstand the refractory materials. The thickness of the shell varies from about 0.5 to about 10 mm in thickness. The shell produced is thinner near the margin and thicker near the apex. This information is fed into a computerized liquid wax dispensing machine. A green injection wax available from Romanoff Inc. is injected into the machine. The wax is delivered as tiny beads in liquid state that solidify shortly after dispensing. The internal surface of the shell is smooth. The support structure of the shell is in the form of a solid or void-containing structure, such as a honeycomb structure. Polyvest refractory material available from WhipMix corporation is poured into the shell and sets. After setting, a duplicate refractory die is retrieved and used for further processing of materials.

EXAMPLE 4

An optical scanner, ZFN D-21, available from ZFN (Zahntechnisches Fraszentrum Nord GmbH & Co. KG (Warin, Germany) is utilized to scan master models (dies) made from impressions comprising preparations for bridges and crowns. 3D CAD software provided with a ZFN D-21 scanner is used to design frameworks and copings corresponding to these master models (dies). 3D CAD files (solid models) of these frameworks and copings are enlarged using the linear shrinkage coefficient corresponding to the anticipated sintering shrinkage of the materials of the present invention, saved as stereolithography (.STL) files and transferred to a computer interfaced with an RP (Rapid Prototyping) machine such as Perfactory Mini available from Envision Technologies GmbH (Marl, Germany). This machine utilizes an approach known as photo-stereolithography to build 3D objects from a light curable resin. Fifteen units are built at the same time layer by layer with an individual layer thickness of about 50 microns. Individual units are separated, attached to copper wire electrodes and coated with conductive silver paint (silver lacquer) available from Gramm GmbH or Wieland Dental+ Technik GmbH & Co., KG (Pforzheim/Germany). An electroforming unit, such as, AGC Micro Plus (Wieland Dental+Technik GmbH & Co. KG) is used to deposit a rigid green layer of zirconia in the form of yttria-stabilized zirconia polycrystals (YTZP) from an ethanol-based suspension as described in Example 3 of U.S. Pat. No. 6,059,949, which is hereby incorporated by reference. An electroforming suspension is prepared by suspending commercial YTZP powder grade available as TZ-3Y-E from Tosoh USA, Inc. (USA representative of Tosoh Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) in pure ethanol with the addition of 0.05% vol. acetyl acetone dispersant and 0.1% vol. of 5% wt. of a polyvinyl butyral binder (PVB) in pure ethanol. The average thickness of the electrophoretic coating is 0.5-0.6 mm. Following electroforming of the powders on the substrates, sintering is carried out in a Deltech furnace at a rate of 1 C./min to 700 C. for approximately 2 hours followed by a rate of 1 C./min. to 1400 C. for approximately 2 hours. Resin substrates are completely burned out during the 2 hour soak at 700 C.

EXAMPLE 5

An optical scanner, ZFN D-21, available form ZFN (Zahntechnnisches Fraszentrum Nord GmbH & Co. KG (Warin, Germany) is utilized to scan master models (dies) made from impressions comprising preparations for bridges and crowns. 3D CAD software provided with a ZFN D-21 scanner is used to design frameworks and copings corresponding to these master models (dies). 3D CAD files (solid models) of these frameworks and copings are enlarged using the linear shrinkage coefficient corresponding to the anticipated sintering shrinkage of the materials of the present invention, saved as .STL files and transferred to a computer interfaced with an RP (Rapid Prototyping) machine, such as the Perfactory Mini machine available from Envision Technologies GmbH (Marl, Germany). This machine utilizes an approach known as photostereolithography to build 3D objects from a light curable resin. In this example, resin is filed with 30 vol % of a water soluble salt. Fifteen units are built simultaneously, layer by layer with each individual layer having a thickness of about 50 microns. Following rapid prototyping, the platform (shown in FIG. 10) having all substrates still attached to it, is immersed into water to wash out salt to create interconnected porosity in the substrates. Zirconia slip is prepared from commercially available powder such as TZ-3YS-E from Tosoh USA Inc. (USA representative of Tosoh Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Based on the total weight of the dry YTZP powder, Duramax B-1000 binder in an amount of 3% by weight and D-3005 dispersant in an amount of 0.4% by weight, both available form Rohm and Haas, are used to make aqueous slip containing 65 volume percent of solids. Copings are formed by simultaneous dipping of all the substrates still attached to the platform into the slip. Sintering is carried out in a Deltech furnace at a rate of about 1 C./min to about 700 C. and held for approximately 2 hours followed by heating at a rate of about 1 C./min. to about 1500 C. and held for approximately 2 hours. Resin substrates are completely burned out during the 2 hour soak at 700 C.

EXAMPLE 6

Substrates are fabricated as described in examples 4 and 5 above. Copings are formed simultaneously by sequential dipping and aging/drying. An alkaline casting slip with a pH of about 9-9.5 is prepared by adding 350 g zircon oxide (PSZ with 6 mole % Y2O3 Rhone-Poulenc, France) to a solution of 1.75 g acetic acid ethyl ester and 1.4 grams of an ammonium polyacrylate solution (Darvan C, Wanderbilt, USA) in 49.0 grams of deionized water. After deagglomeration and degassing, 500 units esterase (EC 3.1.1.1) are added as a solution with 2000 units/ml to the slip (viscosity ca. 500 mPas). The copings are thereafter sintered as in Example 5.

EXAMPLE 7

An optical scanner, ZFN D-21, available from ZFN (Zahntechnisches Fraszentrum Nord GmbH & Co. KG (Warin, Germany) is utilized to scan master models (dies) made from impressions comprising preparations for bridges and crowns. 3D CAD software provided with a ZFN D-21 scanner is used to design frameworks and copings corresponding to these master models (dies). 3D CAD files (solid models) of these frameworks and copings are enlarged using the linear shrinkage coefficient corresponding to the anticipated sintering shrinkage of the nanozirconia materials of the present invention, saved as stereolithography (.STL) files and transferred to a computer interfaced with an RP (Rapid Prototyping) machine such as a Perfactory Mini available from Envision Technologies GmbH (Marl, Germany). This machine utilizes a photostereolithography process also known as digital light processing (DLP) to build 3D objects from a light curable resin. Fifteen units are built simultaneously layer by layer with each individual layer having a thickness of about 50 microns. Individual units are separated and molded in liquid silicone rubber, such as commercially available Silastic M RTV Silicone Rubber (from Dow Corning Corporation) which is castable and easily demolded after curing of the PSZ to produce negative molds for low-pressure injection molding. It should be noted that instead of using silicone negative molds, the molds for Low-Pressure Injection Molding (LPIM) (also known as hot casting with a Peltsman Unit) can be designed and fabricated directly using the Perfactory Mini RP machine and the supplied software.

Feedstock for injection molding containing submicron zirconia powder is prepared from a binder comprised of 75 wt % of paraffin wax (melting point of 49-52 C.), 10 wt % of polyethylene wax (melting point of 80-90 C.), 10% of carnauba wax (melting point of 80-87 C.), 2 wt % of stearic acid (melting point of 75 C.) and 3 wt % of oleic acid (melting point of 16 C.) readily available from a number of suppliers. Commercially available TZ-3YS-E powder from Tosoh USA Inc. (USA representative of Tosoh Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) is used. The mixing is done directly in a low pressure molding (LPM) machine, (Model MIGL-33 available from Peltsman Corporation, Minneapolis, Minn.) at a temperature of 90 C. The feedstock mixture is comprised of about fifty percent (50%) by volume of a binder. Once the feed stock mixture is thoroughly mixed, it is injected into the cavity of the silicone rubber molds at a pressure of approximately 0.4 MPa and at a temperature of approximately 90 C. The injection-molded green part is then demolded from the silicone mold, which is done easily due to elasticity of the silicone. Green densities of approximately 50% were achieved. The green bodies were debinderized and sintered to nearly full density as described in Example 5 above.

EXAMPLE 8

Feedstock for injection molding containing submicron zirconia powder is prepared from a binder comprised of 75 wt % of paraffin wax (melting point of 49-52 C.), 10 wt % of polyethylene wax (melting point of 80-90 C.), 10 wt % of carnauba wax (melting point of 80-87 C.), 2 wt % of stearic acid (melting point of 75 C.) and 3 wt % of oleic acid (melting point of 16 C.) readily available from a number of suppliers. TZ-3YS-E powder, available from Tosoh USA Inc. (USA representative of Tosoh Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) is used. The mixing is done in a KitchenAid Professional 5 mixer (St. Joseph, Mich.) in a bowl continuously heated to 90 C., which is above the melting point of the binder. Heating is achieved using a high temperature heat tape available from McMaster-Carr (New Brunswick, N.J.). The heat tape is wrapped around the mixer bowl to provide heat to the bowl. After cooling to room temperature, the resulting mix is crushed into powder to a 60 mesh (250 μm) particle size using a mortar and pestle. This powder is then ready for injection into the cavity of a mold. Additionally, the mix can be cast into pellets by pouring into a metal 揷lam-shell mold, while still in the molten state.

Previously acquired stereolithography (*.STL) files of bridge frameworks and crown copings were sent to microTEC, Bismarckstrasse 142 b 47057 Duisburg, Germany) for production of the enlarged replicas using RMPD-mask technology via a toll rapid prototyping service available through microTEC's website. The replicas were fabricated in a layer thickness of twenty five microns (25 μm) from photo-curable resin.

The resulting replicas are invested in Universal Refractory Investment (available from Pentron Laboratory Technologies, LLC, Wallingford, Conn.). After the investment has hardened, the resin replicas inside are eliminated by placing it into a preheated furnace thereby burning off the resin, resulting in a mold cavity for forming the dental article. The injection molding feedstock, in free-flowing granule or pellet form, as described above, is then placed into the investment mold assembly, which is then transferred into the pressing unit. It is pressed into the investment ring using an AutoPressPlus furnace (Pentron Laboratory Technologies, LLC, Wallingford, Conn.) having an external alumina plunger. Pressing is done at approximately 90 C., and after cooling the pressed green part is then carefully divested by sand-blasting with glass beads at a pressure of 15 psi and the plunger and mold are disposed of. Green densities of approximately 50% were achieved. The green bodies were debinderized and sintered to nearly full density as described in Example 5 above. Some of the sintered copings and bridge frameworks were layered with 3G porcelain (available from (Pentron Laboratory Technologies, LLC, Wallingford, Conn.) to demonstrate the finishing steps typical in fabrication of aesthetic all-ceramic dental restorations.

Though not within the scope of the present invention which is directed towards sintering ceramic dental articles comprising nanopowders to nearly full density, nevertheless, it should be noted that the injection molding technology described in Examples 6 and 7 can be used to produce dental articles even if access to RP machines is not available. In the latter case, if is not possible to make enlarged replicas and green bodies fabricated therefrom as described in Examples 6 and 7, the articles will have to be presintered without shrinkage and glass infiltrated as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,772,436 and 5,910,273, which are hereby incorporated by reference. In the case of YTZP zirconia cores, 3G porcelain can be used for both glass infiltration and esthetic layering of the resulting glass-infiltrated cores.

While various descriptions of the present invention are described above, it should be understood that the various features can be used singly or in any combination thereof. Therefore, this invention is not to be limited to only the specifically preferred embodiments depicted herein.

Further, it should be understood that variations and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains. Accordingly, all expedient modifications readily attainable by one versed in the art from the disclosure set forth herein that are within the scope and spirit of the present invention are to be included as further embodiments of the present invention. The scope of the present invention is accordingly defined as set forth in the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7626448Sep 28, 2006Dec 1, 2009Hynix Semiconductor, Inc.Internal voltage generator
US7698014 *Aug 28, 2006Apr 13, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyLocal enforcement of accuracy in fabricated models
US7708929 *Mar 15, 2004May 4, 2010Evonik Degussa GmbhProcess for producing three-dimensional objects by means of microwave radiation
US7783371Apr 26, 2007Aug 24, 2010Envisiontec GmbhDevice and method for producing a three-dimensional object by means of mask exposure
US7790093May 9, 2005Sep 7, 2010Envisiontec GmbhA multiple illumination per layer is performed, which consists of a series of multiple images that are mutually shifted in the sub-pixel range in the image/construction plane, wherein a separate mask/bitmap is produced for each shifted image; photohardening material by mask illumination
US7831328Sep 22, 2008Nov 9, 2010Envisiontec GmbhMethod and device for producing a three-dimensional object, and computer and data carrier useful therefor
US7845930May 6, 2005Dec 7, 2010Envisiontec GmbhProcess for the production of a three-dimensional object with an improved separation of hardened material layers from a construction plane
US7851122Dec 23, 2008Dec 14, 2010Objet Geometries Ltd.Such as rapid prototyping and tooling; monofunctional acrylate monomers with glass transition temperature (Tg) higher than 60 degrees Celcius, and di-functional acrylate oligomers such as urethane diacrylates with Tg lower than 40 degrees Celcius; three-dimensional printing of complex structures
US7892474Nov 15, 2006Feb 22, 2011Envisiontec GmbhContinuous generative process for producing a three-dimensional object
US7894921Apr 26, 2007Feb 22, 2011Envisiontec GmbhDevice and method for producing a three-dimensional object by means of mask exposure
US8003040Oct 24, 2008Aug 23, 2011Envisiontec GmbhProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
US8034264May 18, 2007Oct 11, 2011Ivoclar Vivadent AgProcess for the preparation of colored blanks and dental shaped parts
US8048345 *Jun 3, 2005Nov 1, 2011Zv3-Zircon Vision GmbhZirconium oxide-based dental implant and method for producing said dental implant
US8048359Oct 20, 2008Nov 1, 20113D Systems, Inc.Compensation of actinic radiation intensity profiles for three-dimensional modelers
US8106107Dec 8, 2010Jan 31, 2012Objet Geometries Ltd.Compositions and methods for use in three dimensional model printing
US8110135 *Oct 24, 2008Feb 7, 2012Envisiontec GmbhProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
US8173562Jun 13, 2008May 8, 2012Ivoclar Vivadent AgShaded zirconia ceramics
US8178012Mar 13, 2007May 15, 2012Ivoclar Vivadent AgShaded zirconium oxide articles and methods
US8195320Mar 8, 2007Jun 5, 2012Juan Carlos Garcia-AparicioMethod for manufacturing digitally-designed removable dental prostheses and system required for this purpose
US8215956Feb 23, 2010Jul 10, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanyDental articulator with positioning key
US8231825May 28, 2008Jul 31, 2012Nobel Biocare Services AgMethod of producing a dental product
US8323429Jul 31, 2009Dec 4, 2012United States Gypsum CompanyMethod for preparing three-dimensional plaster objects
US8372330Oct 19, 2010Feb 12, 2013Global Filtration SystemsResin solidification substrate and assembly
US8394313Nov 1, 2010Mar 12, 2013Envisiontec GmbhProcess for the production of a three-dimensional object with an improved separation of hardened material layers from a construction plane
US8541329Sep 2, 2011Sep 24, 2013Ivoclar Vivadent AgProcess for the preparation of coloured blanks and dental shaped parts
US8658076Jul 8, 2011Feb 25, 2014Envisiontec GmbhProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
US8721938Sep 23, 2010May 13, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanyMethods for making layered dental appliances
US20090130449 *Oct 24, 2008May 21, 2009Envisiontec GmbhProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
US20090233258 *Oct 26, 2006Sep 17, 2009Ralph Gunnar LuthardtMethod for Producing a Tooth Replacement Having a Multi-Layer Structure
US20100268363 *Nov 20, 2008Oct 21, 2010Naimul KarimDigitally-machined smc dental articles
US20120107774 *Oct 28, 2011May 3, 2012Zv3-Zircon Vision GmbhZirconium oxide-based dental implant and method for producing said dental implant
USRE43955Sep 12, 2011Feb 5, 2013Envisiontec GmbhProcess for the production of a three-dimensional object with resolution improvement by pixel-shift
DE102005059922A1 *Dec 13, 2005May 16, 2007Hinz Labor Fachlaboratorium FuBehandlungsger鋞
DE102005059922B4 *Dec 13, 2005Mar 25, 2010Dr. Hinz Labor, Fachlaboratorium f黵 Kieferorthop鋎ie GmbH & Co. KGVerfahren zur Herstellung eines Retainers oder L點kenhalters
DE102009006173A1 *Jan 26, 2009Jul 29, 2010Ernst M黨lbauer Gmbh & Co. KgDentalmaterial
EP2000109A1 *Jun 7, 2007Dec 10, 2008Nobel Biocare Services AGA method of producing a dental product
EP2052693A1 *Nov 5, 2007Apr 29, 2009Envisiontec GmbHProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
EP2450003A2 *Nov 7, 2011May 9, 2012DeguDent GmbHMethod for manufacturing a blank and pre-sintered blank
EP2529694A1 *May 31, 2011Dec 5, 2012Ivoclar Vivadent AGMethod for generative production of ceramic forms by means of 3D jet printing
WO2007060142A1 *Nov 20, 2006May 31, 2007Herbst Bremer GoldschlaegereiMethod and system for producing a dental prosthesis
WO2007062139A2 *Nov 22, 2006May 31, 2007Lora BarbirImproved method for bonding dental veneers and restorations
WO2007101898A2 *Mar 8, 2007Sep 13, 2007Aparicio Juan Carlos GarciaMethod for manufacturing digitally-designed removable dental prostheses and system required for this purpose
WO2008021495A2Aug 17, 2007Feb 21, 2008Dmitri G BrodkinColoring of ceramics by atmosphere control
WO2008060451A2 *Nov 9, 2007May 22, 2008Univ New YorkGraded glass/zirconia/glass structures for damage resistant ceramic dental and orthopedic prostheses
WO2009053100A1 *Oct 24, 2008Apr 30, 2009Envisiontec GmbhProcess and freeform fabrication system for producing a three-dimensional object
WO2010015350A1 *Jul 29, 2009Feb 11, 2010Karlsruher Institut f黵 TechnologieMethod for the production of oxide dental ceramics
WO2010039910A1 *Oct 1, 2009Apr 8, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyDental appliance, process for producing a dental appliance and use thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/16, 264/222, 264/308, 264/401, 264/221, 264/497, 264/19, 264/17, 264/219
International ClassificationA61K6/087, A61K6/06, A61K6/083, A61C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61K6/09, A61K6/024, A61C13/0019, A61K6/0205, A61K6/087, A61K6/025, A61K6/033, A61C13/0004, A61K6/06, A61K6/0215, A61K6/0235, A61K6/083, A61C13/0003, B29C67/0081, A61K6/08, A61K6/04, B29C67/0077
European ClassificationA61K6/02A6, A61K6/02A9, A61K6/02A7, A61K6/02A2, A61K6/09, A61K6/04, A61K6/033, A61K6/08, A61C13/00C3P, B29C67/00R4B, B29C67/00R6, A61K6/02A, A61C13/00C1, A61K6/083, A61K6/06, A61C13/00C, A61K6/087
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 10, 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: IVOCLAR VIVADENT MANUFACTURING, INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SOMERSET DENTAL PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:028924/0638
Effective date: 20100423
Owner name: SOMERSET DENTAL PRODUCTS, INC., NEW JERSEY
Effective date: 20080527
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:PENTRON CERAMICS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:028924/0559
Effective date: 20120803
Owner name: IVOCLAR VIVADENT AG, LIECHTENSTEIN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:IVOCLAR VIVADENT MANUFACTURING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:028924/0654
Feb 28, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: PENTRON CERAMICS, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PENTRON LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC;REEL/FRAME:020571/0490
Effective date: 20050307
Owner name: PENTRON CERAMICS, INC.,NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PENTRON LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100203;REEL/FRAME:20571/490
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PENTRON LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100225;REEL/FRAME:20571/490
Oct 7, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: PENTRON LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BRODKIN, DMITRI;PANZERA, CARLINO;PRASAD, ARUN;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015897/0121;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040902 TO 20041006