Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050028711 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/873,777
Publication dateFeb 10, 2005
Filing dateJun 22, 2004
Priority dateJun 23, 2003
Also published asWO2005000071A2, WO2005000071A3
Publication number10873777, 873777, US 2005/0028711 A1, US 2005/028711 A1, US 20050028711 A1, US 20050028711A1, US 2005028711 A1, US 2005028711A1, US-A1-20050028711, US-A1-2005028711, US2005/0028711A1, US2005/028711A1, US20050028711 A1, US20050028711A1, US2005028711 A1, US2005028711A1
InventorsMartin Neunzert, Thayne Haney, Robert Astle, L. Strong
Original AssigneeMartin Neunzert, Haney Thayne B., Astle Robert A., Strong L. Curtis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cover for a brace
US 20050028711 A1
Abstract
A slotted brace may be used, for example, to connect a table leg to a table and the slotted brace may allow the table leg to be moved between a collapsed position and an extended position relative to the table. The slotted brace may include a body with an elongated slot and a guide at least partially disposed within the elongated slot. The slotted brace may also include a first position in which the table leg is retained in a generally fixed position relative to the table top and a second position in which the table leg is movable relative to the table. A cover may be connected to the slotted brace and the cover may include an indicator that is sized and configured to indicate to a user that a force should be applied to the indicated portion to allow the slotted brace to be released from the first position and into the second position to allow the table leg to be moved relative to the table. The cover may also include a second indicator that may indicate, for example, a pivotal connection of the slotted brace to the table or table leg.
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(18)
1. A cover for a slotted brace that is connected to a table and a table leg, the slotted brace being sized and configured to allow the table leg to be moved between a collapsed position and an extended position relative to the table, the slotted brace including a body with an elongated slot and a guide at least partially disposed within the elongated slot, the slotted brace including a first position in which the table leg is retained in a generally fixed position relative to the table top and a second position in which the table leg is movable relative to the table, the cover comprising:
an elongated body including a first end, a second end, a top and a bottom;
a cavity disposed in the bottom of the elongated body, the cavity being sized and configured to receive at least a portion of a brace; and
an indicator on the top of the elongated body that is sized and configured to indicate to a user that a force should be applied to the indicated portion to allow the slotted brace to be released from the first position and into the second position to allow the table leg to be moved relative to the table.
2. The cover as in claim 1, further comprising a second indicator on the top of the elongated body, the second indicator indicating a pivotal connection of the slotted brace.
3. The cover as in claim 1, further comprising a tab disposed in the top of the elongated body, the tab including an upper surface and a lower surface, the lower surface of the tab including a generally downwardly extending portion that is sized and configured to engage the guide when the guide is near a locking portion.
4. The cover as in claim 3, wherein the upper surface of the tab protrudes from the top of the cover when the guide is proximate the locking portion to indicate that the slotted brace is not in the locked position; and wherein the upper surface of the tab is generally aligned with the top of the cover when the guide is in the locking portion to indicate that the slotted brace is in the locked position.
5. The cover as in claim 1, wherein the cover is constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure.
6. The cover as in claim 1, wherein the cover is constructed from injection molded plastic.
7. The cover as in claim 1, wherein the indicator on the top surface of the elongated body is a depression.
8. The cover as in claim 1, wherein the indicator includes an opening in the top surface of the elongated body.
9. An apparatus for connecting a table leg to a table, the table leg movable between an extended position relative to the table top and a fixed position relative to the table top, the apparatus comprising:
a slotted brace including a first end, a second end and a guide track, the first end being sized and configured to be pivotally connected to a table;
a guide being sized and configured to be connected to a table leg, the guide being at least partially disposed within the guide track; and
a cover connected to the slotted brace, the cover including an indicator that is sized and configured to indicate to a user that a force should be applied to the indicated portion to allow the slotted brace to be released from a first, locked position and into a second, movable position to allow the table leg to be moved relative to the table.
10. The apparatus as in claim 9, further comprising a second indicator that indicates a pivotal connection of the slotted brace to the table.
11. The apparatus as in claim 9, further comprising a tab disposed in the cover, the tab including an upper surface and a lower surface, the lower surface of the tab including a generally downwardly extending portion that is sized and configured to engage the guide when the guide is near the lock position.
12. The apparatus as in claim 11, wherein the upper surface of the tab protrudes from the top of the cover when the guide is proximate the lock position to indicate that the slotted brace is not in the locked position; and wherein the upper surface of the tab is generally aligned with a top surface of the cover when the guide is in the locked position to indicate that the slotted brace is in the locked position.
13. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the cover is constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure.
14. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the slotted brace and the cover are constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure.
15. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the slotted brace is at least partially disposed within a cavity in the cover, the slotted brace being retained within the cavity by an interference fit.
16. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the cover is constructed from injection molded plastic.
17. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the indicator on the top surface of the elongated body is a depression.
18. The apparatus as in claim 9, wherein the indicator includes an opening in the top surface of the elongated body.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. design patent application Ser. No. 29/185,177 which was filed on Jun. 23, 2003, entitled SLOTTED BRACE COVER, and this application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/480,870, which was filed on Jun. 23, 2003, entitled SLOTTED BRACE COVER, each of which are incorporated by reference in their entireties.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is generally directed towards a brace and, in particular, to a cover for a brace.

2. Description of Related Art

Numerous types of tables are well known and have been used for many years. For example, individual-sized tables that are intended to be used by a single person and large banquet-sized tables that are intended to be used by multiple persons for meetings and conferences are well known. It is also well known to construct these tables from a variety of materials such as wood, metal and plastic. Further, it is well known that these conventional tables often come in a wide variety of designs and configurations.

One type of table that is well known and commonly used is a card table. A card table is typically designed to seat up to four people at one time and the table can be used to play games such as cards. Conventional card tables typically have a square tabletop and the tables are generally sized to allow a person to sit along each side of the table. Conventional card tables are very lightweight to allow the tables to be quickly set up and removed.

Conventional card tables typically include a tabletop that is constructed from lightweight materials such as cardboard, particleboard, fiberboard or pressboard. The tabletop is also often very thin in order to reduce the weight and cost of the card table. The thin, lightweight tabletop of conventional card tables is often not very sturdy or rigid, and it may easily deform, warp or break. In addition, because the thin, lightweight tabletops of conventional card tables can only support only a minimal amount of force or weight, the tabletops are frequently damaged or broken. Disadvantageously, if the tabletop fails, the entire table must often be replaced because it is generally difficult, if not impossible, to repair the broken tabletop. Further, because conventional card tables often require a covering to provide smooth and aesthetically pleasing appearance, this adds to the cost of conventional card tables.

Many conventional card tables include a covering that covers the upper surface of the tabletop to provide a smoother surface for purposes such as writing, working or playing games. Additionally, the covering may provide a more pleasing aesthetic appearance that the cardboard, particleboard, fiberboard or pressboard tabletop. The covering is often constructed from materials such as vinyl, plastic or cloth. Disadvantageously, the covering may be easily torn, frayed, ripped, soiled or otherwise damaged, and the covering may be very difficult to repair or replace.

Conventional card tables typically include a frame that is attached to the lower surface of the tabletop. The frame typically extends about the outer perimeter of the tabletop and is generally aligned with the outer edges of the tabletop. The frame is often constructed from very thin gauge metal to reduce the weight of the card table and the frame is often stamped or machined into the desired shape. In addition, the frame may be painted to help prevent rusting and/or provide a more pleasing appearance. Disadvantageously, the thin metal frame is often unable to provide adequate support for the tabletop and the frame may easily collapse or fail if excessive force or weight is applied to the frame. If the frame is damaged or fails, it often cannot be repaired and a new card table must be purchased.

Conventional card tables typically include four legs that are independently and pivotally attached to the frame to allow the legs to be moved between an extended position in which the tabletop is supported above a surface such as the ground and a collapsed position in which the legs are disposed near or adjacent to the lower surface of the tabletop. A slotted or sliding type brace is often used to guide the legs between the extended and collapsed positions, and to lock the legs in the extended position. In particular, a slotted brace is typically attached to each of the legs and each slotted brace includes a body portion with a generally rectangular-shaped configuration and an elongated slot. One end of the slotted brace is pivotally connected to the frame and the other end of the slotted brace is slidably connected to the table leg by attaching a rivet or pin to the table leg and disposing the rivet within the elongated slot. The rivet remains within the elongated slot because the rivet includes an enlarged head that has a diameter that is larger than the width of the slot. The rivet slides within the elongated slot when the leg is moved between the first and second positions.

In greater detail, a conventional card table typically includes a leg pivotally connected to the frame near each comer of the table. One end of the slotted brace is pivotally connected to the frame several inches away from the pivotal connection of the leg to the frame. The slotted brace is also connected to the table leg by disposing the rivet connected to the table leg through the elongated slot. In the collapsed position, the slotted brace and the table leg are generally positioned adjacent to each other and the lower surface of the table-top. In addition, the rivet is typically disposed towards the end of the slotted brace that is pivotally connected to the frame when the leg is in the collapsed position. When the leg is moved from the collapsed position to the extended position, the rivet slides within the elongated slot and table leg move away from the lower surface of the tabletop. In the extended position, the table leg extends outwardly from the tabletop, the slotted brace is disposed at an angle relative to the frame and the table leg, and the rivet is now disposed away from the end of the slotted brace that is pivotally connected to the frame.

Conventional slotted braces may include an enlarged portion of the elongated slot that is sized and configured to receive the head of the rivet when the leg in the extended position. When the head of the rivet is disposed within the enlarged portion of the elongated slot, this holds or locks the leg in the extended position. This enlarged portion of the elongated slot is typically located at the end of the slot disposed away from the end of the brace that is pivotally connected to the frame. In addition, the slotted brace is typically curved or bent so that the head of the rivet is biased into the enlarged portion of the slot when the leg is in the extended position. However, if the enlarged head of the rivet is not disposed within the enlarged portion of the elongated slot, then the table leg may not be secured in the extended position. This may allow the table leg to be inadvertently moved into the collapsed position.

In order to release the table leg from the extended position, the user must push on a portion of the slotted brace such that the head of the rivet is no longer disposed within the enlarged portion of the slot. Frequently, the user pushes on the end of the slotted brace near the rivet to release the leg from the locked position. Disadvantageously, this portion of the brace may be very small and it may be difficult to only push on this portion of the brace and not contact the head of the rivet. In order to release the table leg from the locked position, the user may also push on either or both sides of the elongated slot. This portion of the slotted brace, however, is generally very weak and it may easily bend or be deformed. This may make it difficult to remove the head of the rivet from the enlarged opening. In addition, pushing on either the end of the slotted brace or the sides of the elongated slot may allow the user's fingers to be caught within the elongated slot or between the rivet and the slot, which may pinch the user's fingers.

Conventional slotted braces often include an elongated body that is curved or bent to bias the head of the rivet into the enlarged opening in the slot, which may help ensure that the leg is held in the fixed position. The curved or bent slotted brace, however, may create additional forces and stresses on the brace that may cause it to weaken or fail.

In addition, conventional slotted braces are typically constructed from metal and, in particular, the braces are often stamped or formed from relatively thin-gauge pieces of metal. Disadvantageously, the braces are often not very strong and can easily be damaged or bent. For example, if excessive weight is placed on the table or too much force is placed on the brace, then the brace may undesirably bend or deflect. This may allow the brace to fail and the table leg to collapse. Similarly, if the user applies excessive force or force on the wrong portion of the brace when they are attempting to release the leg from the locked position, then the brace may be bent or otherwise damaged. If the brace is bent or damaged, it may be very difficult, if not impossible, to repair or replace. If the damaged slotted brace cannot be repaired or replaced, the user may be required to purchase an entirely new table.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A need therefore exists for a cover for a brace that eliminates the above-described disadvantages and problems.

One aspect of the present invention is a cover for a brace. Advantageously, the cover may provide protection for the brace and the cover may improve the aesthetics or appearance of the brace. In particular, the cover may be designed to enhance the look of the brace and allow the brace to have various designs and configurations.

Another aspect is a cover for a brace, such as a slotted or sliding brace, and the brace could be used in connection with a table. In particular, the cover could be used in connection with a slotted brace that allows a table leg to be moved between extended and collapsed positions. The cover, for example, may be sized and configured to allow the brace to form a part of the design of the table. Thus, the brace can be an integral part of the design of the table. The cover may also be styled so that the brace is aesthetically pleasing in combination with the leg and/or tabletop. In addition, the cover may be sized and configured to help hide or conceal the brace from view. The cover could also be used with other types of braces, brackets and supports, and these components may be used with a wide variety of different structures or devices.

Yet another aspect is a cover for a brace that may increase the strength and/or rigidity of the brace. For example, the cover may be directly connected to the brace and the cover may provide additional strength and/or rigidity to the brace. Thus, the brace may now be stronger and be able to support a larger force or load because of the cover. In addition, because the cover may provide extra strength and support for the brace, this may allow the brace may be constructed from lighter weight, less rigid and/or less costly materials. Thus, the cost of the brace may be decreased without decreasing the strength of the brace or a stronger brace may be created.

Still another aspect is a cover for a brace and the brace may contain an elongated guide or track and a receiving or locking portion. The track is preferably sized and configured to allow a pin or rivet to move within the track and the receiving portion is preferably sized and configured to hold the pin in a fixed or locked position. Advantageously, the cover may be sized and configured so that it does not interfere with the operation or use of the brace.

A further aspect is a cover for a brace that may be used in a wide variety of circumstances and environments. In particular, the brace may be used to support a variety of types of objects and structures in different positions or configurations. For example, the brace may be used in conjunction with a table to support a table leg in an extended position in which the table leg extends outwardly from the tabletop or a collapsed position in which the table leg is positioned near or adjacent to the lower surface tabletop. The brace may also be used to assist in moving the table leg between the extended and collapsed positions. Additionally, the brace may be used to secure the table leg in the extended position and/or collapsed positions.

A still further aspect is a cover for a brace that may be sized and configured to improve the use and/or functionality of the brace. For example, the cover may be used with a brace that is used to secure a table leg in a fixed position and the brace may have to be displaced or moved, or a force applied to a certain portion of the brace, to allow the table leg to be released from the fixed position. Advantageously, the cover may be designed to allow a user to push on a portion of the cover to release the brace form the fixed position. Significantly, the cover may be user friendly and improve the user interface because the cover may identify where the force should be applied to release the brace, which may help prevent damage to the brace and/or allow less force to be used to release the brace. In particular, the cover may include one or more labels, indications, indicia and/or instructions on where a user should push or apply a force on the cover to release the brace.

Another aspect is a cover for a brace that may be designed to provide a predetermined force or load on a brace. For example, the cover may be designed to provide a predetermined amount of load or force on the brace so that the brace is biased to move into a locked position. This may make the brace more rigid and improve the reliability of the brace because the brace does not have to be bent or curved.

Yet another aspect is a cover for a brace that may remove the need for all or a portion of the slot or guide in a brace. For example, all or a portion of the slot or guide may be formed in the cover and not in the brace. On the other hand, a portion of the slot or guide may be formed in the brace and another portion of the slot or guide may be formed in the cover. The cover may also include a receiving hole or opening that may be sized and configured to maintain the brace in a fixed position. Advantageously, these and other features may allow the strength and reliability of the brace to be increased.

Advantageously, as indicated above, the cover may be used in connection with a wide variety of different types of braces. For example, while the cover is preferably used in connection with slotted or sliding type braces, the cover could also be used with other types of braces such as scissor-type braces, slide collar-type braces, fixed braces, and the like. In addition, the cover can be used in connection with a wide variety of types of structures and devices because the brace may be used in connection with a wide variety of types of structures and devices.

Importantly, the cover may provide improved aesthetics because the appearance of the brace the may be improved. In addition, the cover may form part of the design of the object or structure. The cover may also be used to hide or conceal all or a portion of the brace. Further, the comfort and convenience of the user may be enhanced, for example, because the cover may clearly indicate to the user how the brace should be released from the fixed position.

Still another aspect is a cover for a brace that may provide direct access to all or a portion of the brace. For example, the cover may be attached to or positioned proximate to the brace and the cover may include an opening or cutout that allows access to the brace. This may allow the brace to move independently from the cover. The opening may also allow the user to release the brace from the fixed position without contacting or moving the cover.

A further aspect is a cover for a brace that may be integrally formed with the brace as a one-piece structure. The cover and the brace could also be two or more separate structures that are interconnected. The cover, however, does not have to be connected to the brace. Instead, the cover could be spaced apart from the brace, if desired. In addition, the cover and brace could be constructed from the same materials or different materials.

A still further aspect is a cover for a brace that may be constructed from a relatively strong and lightweight material such as plastic. In particular, the cover may be made from injection molded plastic, but the cover may be made from other suitable materials and processes.

Advantageously, the cover may be quickly, easily and relatively inexpensively manufactured, and the cover may be quickly and easily attached to the brace. In addition, the cover may be permanently or removably attached to the brace.

Another aspect is a cover for a brace that may be generally straight, curved or have other suitable shapes or configurations. For example, the cover may have generally the same size and configuration as the brace. Thus, if the brace is generally straight, then the cover may also be generally straight. Of course, if the brace is curved or has another shape, then the brace may also have the same shape. While the cover may have generally the same shape and configuration as the brace, the cover could have other suitable shapes and configurations.

Yet another aspect is a cover for a brace that may positively indicate that the brace is in the locked position. For example, the cover may include a tab or other portion of the brace that extends outwardly from the brace if the brace is not locked into position. The cover could also include other aspects and/or features that indicate that the brace is not in the locked position. In addition, the cover could include one or more aspects and/or features that indicate that the brace is in the locked position. Thus, the cover could confirm that the brace is in the locked or unlocked position, if desired.

A further aspect is the cover can be used with a slotted brace that is connected to a table and a table leg. The slotted brace is preferably sized and configured to allow the table leg to be moved between a collapsed position and an extended position relative to the table. The slotted brace may include a body with an elongated slot and a guide at least partially disposed within the elongated slot. The slotted brace may also include a first position in which the table leg is retained in a generally fixed position relative to the table top and a second position in which the table leg is movable relative to the table. The cover may include an elongated body including a first end, a second end, a top and a bottom; a cavity disposed in the bottom of the elongated body, the cavity being sized and configured to receive at least a portion of a brace; and an indicator on the top of the elongated body that is sized and configured to indicate to a user that a force should be applied to the indicated portion to allow the slotted brace to be released from the first position and into the second position to allow the table leg to be moved relative to the table.

Advantageously, the cover may also include a second indicator on the top of the elongated body indicating a pivotal connection of the slotted brace. In addition, the cover may include a tab disposed in the top of the elongated body, the tab including an upper surface and a lower surface, the lower surface of the tab including a generally downwardly extending portion that is sized and configured to engage the guide when the guide is near a locking portion. The upper surface of the tab may protrude from the top of the cover when the guide is proximate the locking portion to indicate that the slotted brace is not in the locked position, and the upper surface of the tab may be generally aligned with the top of the cover when the guide is in the locking portion to indicate that the slotted brace is in the locked position. Further, the cover is constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure and the cover is constructed from injection molded plastic. Finally, the indicator on the top surface of the elongated body may be a depression and/or the indicator may include an opening in the top surface of the elongated body.

Still another aspect is an apparatus for connecting a table leg to a table. The table leg is preferably movable between an extended position relative to the table top and a fixed position relative to the table top. The apparatus desirably includes a slotted brace with a first end, a second end and a guide track, the first end being sized and configured to be pivotally connected to a table; a guide being sized and configured to be connected to a table leg, the guide being at least partially disposed within the guide track; and a cover connected to the slotted brace, the cover including an indicator that is sized and configured to indicate to a user that a force should be applied to the indicated portion to allow the slotted brace to be released from a first, locked position and into a second, movable position to allow the table leg to be moved relative to the table.

Significantly, the apparatus may include a second indicator that indicates a pivotal connection of the slotted brace to the table. The apparatus may also include a tab disposed in the cover, the tab including an upper surface and a lower surface, the lower surface of the tab including a generally downwardly extending portion that is sized and configured to engage the guide when the guide is near the lock position. The upper surface of the tab may protrude from the top of the cover when the guide is proximate the lock position to indicate that the slotted brace is not in the locked position and the upper surface of the tab may be generally aligned with a top surface of the cover when the guide is in the locked position to indicate that the slotted brace is in the locked position. Additionally, the cover is constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure and/or the slotted brace and the cover are constructed from a unitary, one-piece structure. Desirably, when the slotted brace is at least partially disposed within a cavity in the cover, the slotted brace is retained within the cavity by an interference fit. Further, the cover may be constructed from injection molded plastic. Finally, the indicator on the top surface of the elongated body may be a depression and/or the indicator may include an opening in the top surface of the elongated body.

These and other aspects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The appended drawings contain figures of preferred embodiments to further clarify the above and other aspects, advantages and features of the present invention. It will be appreciated that these drawings depict only preferred embodiments of the invention and are not intended to limits its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a top view of an exemplary embodiment of a cover for a brace, illustrating the cover in connection with an exemplary embodiment of a slotted or sliding brace for a table;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the cover for a brace, the brace and the table shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an upper perspective view of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a lower perspective view of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a top view of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is an end view of a first end of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is an end view of a second end of the cover for a brace shown in Figure

FIG. 9 is bottom view of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a top view of another exemplary embodiment of a cover for a brace;

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional side view of a portion of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 10 and a cross-sectional side view of a portion an exemplary embodiment of a rivet or pin, illustrating the brace in the locked or engaged position;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional side view of a portion of the cover for a brace shown in FIG. 10 along line 12-12 and a cross-sectional side view of a portion of an exemplary embodiment of a rivet or pin; and

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional side view of a portion of the cover for a brace and rivet shown in FIG. 11, illustrating the brace in the unlocked or disengaged position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention is generally directed towards a cover for a brace. The principles of the present invention, however, are not limited to a cover for a brace. It will be understood that, in light of the present disclosure, the cover disclosed herein can be successfully used in connection with other types of supports, struts, brackets and the like.

Additionally, to assist in the description of the cover for a brace, words such as top, bottom, front, rear, right and left are used to describe the accompanying figures. It will be appreciated, however, that the cover for a brace can be located in a variety of desired positions—including various angles, sideways and even upside down. A detailed description of the cover for a brace now follows.

As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, a cover 10 is attached to an exemplary embodiment of a brace 12 such as a slotted or sliding brace. Advantageously, slotted or sliding braces 12 can be used in a wide variety of situations such as helping to connect a table leg to a table 14. In particular, the slotted brace 12 may be used to allow a table leg to be moved between extended and collapsed positions, and the slotted brace may be used to secure the table leg in a fixed or locked position. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the cover 10 could be used in connection with any suitable type of brace, support, strut, bracket and the like such as a slide collar or scissor-type base.

The cover 10 and the brace 12 may be used in connection with various types of suitable tables 14 such as individual-sized tables, card tables, utility tables, banquet tables, conference tables, round tables and the like. Thus, while the cover 10 is described below and shown in the accompanying figures as being used in connection with a brace 12 for a card table 14, it will be appreciated that the cover may be used in connection with any suitable type of brace and the brace may be used in connection with any suitable type of table. Moreover, the cover 10 does not have to be used with a brace 12 for a table 14. In contrast, the cover 10 may be used in connection with any appropriate type of brace 12, whether or not the brace is used in connection with a table or other suitable type of device or structure.

As best seen in FIG. 1, the card table 14 includes a tabletop 16 with an upper surface 18, lower surface 20 and perimeter 22. The tabletop 16 is preferably generally square and it is sized and configured to allow a person to sit along each side or edge of the tabletop. It will be appreciated that the tabletop 16 may have any desired shape, size and configuration depending, for example, upon the intended use of the table 14. Thus, the tabletop 16 could also be rectangular, circular, oval and the like. The tabletop 16 could also be smaller, such as an individual-sized table, or larger, such as a conference or banquet table, and the tabletop may be used in connection with any suitable type of table 14.

The tabletop 16 is preferably constructed from lightweight materials, such as plastic. The plastic is preferably blow-molded into the desired size and shape because that allows a strong, lightweight and rigid tabletop 16 to be constructed. Advantageously, the blow-molded plastic tabletop 16 is lightweight because it is substantially hollow and it has relatively thin outer walls. In addition, the tabletop 16 is preferably constructed from blow-molded plastic because blow-molded plastic tabletops are relatively durable, weather resistant, temperature insensitive, corrosion resistant and rust resistant. Blow-molded plastic tabletops 16 also generally do not deteriorate over time. One of ordinary skill in the art, however, will appreciate that the tabletop 16 does not have to be constructed from plastic and other suitable materials can be used to construct the tabletop such as other types of plastics, polymers and synthetic materials. In addition, the tabletop 16 may be constructed from other materials with sufficient strength and desirable characteristics such as plywood, particle board, solid wood, wooden slates, metals, alloys, fiberglass and the like. Further, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the tabletop 16 does not have to be constructed by blow-molding and other suitable process and methods could be used to make the tabletop such as injection molding, extrusion molding, rotary molding, compression molding and the like.

The upper surface 18 and the lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16 are spaced apart a given distance and these two spaced apart surfaces help create a rigid and strong tabletop 16. Preferably, the upper surface 18 and the lower surface 20 are separated by a generally constant distance so that the surfaces are generally aligned in parallel planes. The upper and lower surfaces 18, 20 of the tabletop 16 may also be interconnected by one or more tack-offs, kiss-offs, depressions and/or other reinforcement structures, which may be sized and configured to further increase the strength and rigidity of the tabletop 16. Advantageously, the depressions and/or other reinforcement structures can be integrally formed as part of a unitary, one-piece tabletop 16 during the blow-molding process. The tabletop 16, however, does not require any depressions and/or other reinforcement structures and the depressions and/or other reinforcement structures, if any, do not have to be integrally formed in the tabletop.

The depressions are preferably located in the lower surface 20 of tabletop 16 and the depressions are preferably sized and configured to increase the strength and structural integrity of the tabletop. The depressions preferably extend towards the upper surface 18 of the tabletop and the ends of the depressions may contact or engage the upper surface of the tabletop 16, or the ends of the depressions may be spaced from the upper surface of the tabletop. The depressions preferably cover substantially the entire lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16, but it will be appreciated that the depressions may cover only a portion of the tabletop. Additionally, while the depressions are described as being located in the lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16, it will be appreciated that the depressions could be formed in any desired portion of the tabletop. For example, it will be appreciated that one or more depressions may be formed in the upper surface 18 of the tabletop 16 and one or more depressions may be formed in the lower surface 20 of the tabletop, and these opposing depressions may be generally aligned. At least a portion of these opposing depressions may contact or engage each other, but the opposing depressions do not have to touch or engage.

The depressions are preferably arranged into a predetermined pattern or array in order to increase the strength and structural integrity of the tabletop 16. In particular, the depressions are preferably spaced closely together in a predetermined pattern such that the distance between the depressions is minimized. Advantageously, minimizing the distance between the depressions may minimize the unsupported areas of the upper surface 18 of the tabletop 16, which may increase the smoothness of the upper surface of the tabletop. In addition, minimizing the distance between the depressions may increase the structural integrity and strength of the tabletop 16. Thus, the depressions are desirably closely spaced on the lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16 such that the depressions are separated by a minimum distance in order to create a tabletop with greater strength, structural integrity, and an upper surface 18 with increased smoothness.

Advantageously, the increased structural integrity and strength of the tabletop 16 may allow the outer wall thickness of the tabletop to be decreased, which may allow less plastic to be used to construct the tabletop 16. Because less plastic may be required to construct the tabletop 16, that may allow the cost of the tabletop to be decreased. In addition, the blow-molded tabletop 16 may cool more quickly during the manufacturing process because of the thinner outer wall. This allows the tabletop 16 to be removed from the manufacturing mold more quickly and it may allow the tabletop to be removed at a higher temperature because it dissipates heat much more rapidly. Significantly, because the cycle time required to construct the tabletop 16 may be decreased, the manufacturing efficiency may be increased.

The depressions are also preferably arranged in a predetermined pattern with a generally constant and uniform spacing so that the tabletop 16 has generally uniform characteristics. In particular, the depressions are preferably arranged into a uniform pattern across the entire surface of the tabletop 16 so that the strength, structural integrity and/or other characteristics of the tabletop are generally uniform throughout the tabletop. Thus, the tabletop 16 has fewer, if any, weak or unsupported portions which decrease the strength and structural integrity of the tabletop. Thus, the depressions may be used to create a tabletop 16 with generally uniform characteristics throughout the tabletop.

Desirably, other features formed in the tabletop 16 are sized and configured such that they do not significantly disturb or disrupt the desired pattern of depressions. In addition, the depressions are preferably integrally formed in the tabletop 16 as part of a unitary, one-piece structure. Advantageously, the depressions can be integrally formed in the tabletop 16 during the blow-molding process. Additional details regarding the size, shape and configuration of depressions that are suitable for use in connection with the tabletop 16 are disclosed in Assignee's co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/490,000, which was filed on Apr. 8, 2003, entitled High-Strength, Lightweight Blow-molded Plastic Structures, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

A frame 30 is preferably attached to the lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16 and the frame desirably extends about or is located proximate to the perimeter 22 of the tabletop. In particular, the frame 30 is preferably generally aligned with the outer edges of the tabletop 16, but the frame could also be spaced inwardly from the edges of the tabletop. The frame 30 preferably extends generally or completely about the perimeter 22 of the tabletop 16 and the frame is preferably a one-piece component that is attached to the tabletop 16. The frame 30, however, could consist of one or more different segments and the segments do not have to be interconnected. The frame 30 may include one or more flanges, if desired, to facilitate attachment of the frame to the tabletop 16. The frame 30 may also include one or more curves, bends, arcs, turns, etc., that are intended, for example, to increase the strength of the frame and/or to provide a particular design or appearance for the table 14 or frame.

The frame 30 is preferably constructed from metal, such as steel, and the metal frame can be stamped or machined into any desired shape. The frame 30 is also preferably powder-coated and/or painted to protect the frame from damage, to improve the appearance of the frame, and/or to match the color of the tabletop 16. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the frame 30 could have any desired size and configuration depending, for example, upon the size and type of table 14 and/or table top 16. Additionally, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the frame 30 could be constructed from other materials with suitable characteristics and properties, and the frame could also be manufactured by other suitable methods and/or processes.

The table 14 may include four legs 32 and the legs are preferably movable between an extended position in which the legs extend outwardly from the tabletop 16 and a collapsed position in which the legs are positioned near or adjacent to the lower surface 20 of the tabletop 16. In particular, the legs 32 are preferably independently and pivotally attached to the frame 30. The legs 32, however, could be attached to any desired portion of the table 14.

Each of the legs 32 are preferably generally aligned with an outer edge of the tabletop 16 when the leg is in the collapsed position, but the leg could be angled inwardly if desired. Advantageously, when the legs 32 are in the collapsed position, the table 14 may be easily stacked and/or stored. In addition, while the legs 32 may be independently attached to the table 14 and/or table top 16, two or more of the legs may be connected if desired. For example, two legs 32 at one end of the table 14 may be connected by a brace and the two legs at the other end of the table may be connected by another brace. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the table 14 could include any suitable number of legs 32 and the legs could be attached to the table in any suitable positions, orientations and arrangements.

The legs 32 are preferably constructed from generally straight, hollow, circular, metal tubes to create strong and lightweight legs. The legs 32 may be painted or power-coated, for example, for aesthetic reasons and/or to protect the legs from damage. The legs 32 could also be constructed from other suitable materials and the legs could have other shapes and cross-sections, such as oval, square, rectangular, etc. In addition, the legs 32 could have other desirable configurations such as curved, rounded, arched, etc., depending, for example, upon the intended use of the table 14.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, a first end 34 of the leg 32 is preferably pivotally attached to the frame 30 by a fastener 36. The fastener 36 can be any suitable type of fastener that allows the pivotal connection of the legs 32 to the frame 30 such as a bolt, screw, pin, rivet and the like. It will be appreciated that the leg 32 may also be pivotally attached to the tabletop 16, but the legs do not have to be pivotally connected to either the frame 30 or the tabletop.

An exemplary embodiment of a brace 12, as shown in the accompanying figures, may be used to connect the leg 32 to the tabletop 16 and/or guide the leg between the extended and collapsed positions. In particular, a first end 38 of the brace is pivotally connected to the frame 30 by any suitable type of fastener 40 such as a bolt, screw, pin, rivet and the like. As best seen in FIG. 2, the brace 12 includes a body 44 with an elongated slot 42 that preferably extends at least a majority of a length of the body, but the slot could have any desired length. The slot 42 preferably forms a track, path or guide in the body 44 of the brace. While the slot 42 preferably extends completely through the body 44 of the brace 12, the slot does not have to extend through the body of the brace and it could be a groove or other suitable type of conduit or path. The slot 42 preferably includes an enlarged opening or locking portion 46 disposed towards a second end 48 of the brace 12.

As seen in FIG. 2, a guide pin is connected to the table leg 32 and the guide pin sized and configured to be at least partially disposed within the track 42. As discussed in greater detail below, the guide pin 50 is preferably sized and configured to move within the track 42 as the leg 32 is moved between the extended and collapsed positions. In addition, when the leg 32 is in the fully extended position, the guide pin 50 is preferably held within the locking portion 46 to secure the leg in the extended position.

The guide pin 50 may consist of a rivet that extends outwardly form the table leg 32. The guide pin 50, however, could also be any suitable type of pin, guide or projection that extends outwardly from the table leg 32. The guide pin 50 preferably consists of a body 52 with a first diameter and a head 54 with a second diameter. The diameter of the head 54 is preferably larger than the diameter of the body 52 such that the guide pin 50 has an enlarged head or end. Additionally, the body 52 and the head 54 are preferably sized and configured such that only the body 52 of the guide pin 50 fits within elongated slot or track 42 and the head 54 does not fit within the elongated slot. The head 54, however, is sized and configured to fit securely within the locking portion 46 of the elongated slot 42.

The brace 12 is preferably biased such that when the leg 32 is in the extended position, the head 54 of the guide pin 50 is disposed within the locking portion 46 so that the leg is secured in the extended position. In order to release the leg 32 from the extended position, the head 54 of the guide pin 50 must be displaced from the locking portion 46 of the guide track 42 and that allows the body 52 of the guide pin 50 to be inserted into the elongated portion of the track 42. This allows the leg 32 to be moved into the collapsed position. It will be appreciated that the brace 12 may include a second locking position that is sized and configured to secure the leg 32 in the collapsed position, if desired. It will also be appreciated that the brace 12 may be pivotally connected to the leg 32 and the guide pin 50 may be connected to the frame 30 or the tabletop 16, if desired.

As shown in the accompanying figures, the track 42 is disposed in the body 44 of the brace 12. It will be appreciated that all or a portion of the track 42 could also be disposed in the cover 10. For example, a portion of the track 42 could be disposed in the body 44 of the brace 12 and another portion of the track could be disposed in the cover. Thus, the guide pin 50 could move within the portion of the track 42 formed in the body 44 of the brace 12 and the other portion of the track formed in the cover. In greater detail, for example, the locking portion 46 could be disposed in the body 44 of the brace 12 and the other portion of the track 42 could be disposed in the cover 10. Therefore, the guide pin 50 would move within the track 42 in the cover 10, but the guide pin would be held in the locking portion 46 formed in the brace when the brace is in the locked position. Alternatively, for example, the locking portion 46 could be disposed in the cover 10 and the other portion of the track 42 may be disposed in the brace 12. Thus, the guide pin 50 would move within the track 42 in the brace 12 and the guide pin would be held in the locking portion 46 in the cover 10 when the brace is in the locked position. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the cover 10, brace 12, track 42 and/or locking portion 46 may have other suitable configurations or arrangements depending, for example, upon the intended use of the table, cover and/or brace.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the cover 10 is preferably connected to the brace 12. For example, the cover 10 preferably has a generally rectangular-shaped configuration with a first end 60, a second end 62, a first side 64, a second side 66, a top 68 and a bottom 70. It will be appreciated that the cover 10 could have any desired shape and configuration depending, for example, upon the size and type of brace 12 or the desired style or design of the cover. Additionally, while the cover 10 is preferably connected to the brace 12, the cover and brace could also be an integral, one-piece component. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the cover 10 and brace 12 could also include multiple components that are interconnected and the cover does not have to be connected to the brace. For example, the cover 10 could be spaced apart or disposed away from the brace 12. In addition, the cover 10 could be connected to the tabletop 16, frame 30 or leg 32, if desired. This may allow, for example, the cover 10 to move independently of the brace 12.

Advantageously, the cover 10 may be used to improve the aesthetics, design and/or appearance of the brace 12 and/or table 14. For example, the cover 10 may hide, conceal or obscure all or a portion of the brace 12 from view. The cover 10 may also be sized and configured to match the design, color, etc. of the tabletop 16 or legs 32, if desired. In addition, the cover 10 may be used to accent or emphasize a particular design or portion of the table 14. Thus, the cover 10 may be an integrated portion of the design of the table 14, if desired. The cover 10, however, does not have to be part of the design of the brace 12 or table 14.

The cover 10 includes a first indicator, label, marker and/or indicia 72 that is preferably located on the top 68 of the cover 10. The first indicator 72 preferably identifies the location where a user should apply a force to the cover 10 so that the brace 12 is released from a locked position. In particular, the indicator 72 may indicate that the user should push on that portion of the cover 10 to release the leg 32 from the locked position. This may allow, for example, the leg 32 to move from the extended position to the collapsed position. Thus, the first indicator 72 may be used as a guide to show a user how to quickly and easily unlock the brace 12 from the locked position. Significantly, the cover 10 may be very user friendly because it may immediately indicate where a force should be applied to the cover to allow the brace 12 to be unlocked. In addition, the first indicator 72 may be located where a minimum amount of force is required to unlock the brace 12, which may create a brace that is easy to use. Further, the cover 10 may improve the operability and functionality of the brace 12 because, for example, it is relatively simple and straightforward to operate, may help protect the brace from damage, may help prevent items from being inserted or stuck in the track 42, and may help prevent items from being pinched or caught between the guide pin 50 and the track.

The first indicator 72 may be a depression formed in the top 68 of the cover 10 and the depression may be sized and configured to receive a thumb and/or finger of the user. It will be appreciated that the indicator 72 could also be a groove, channel or other type of indication in the top 68 of the cover 10. The indicator 72 could also be a raised portion or simply one or more markings on the cover 10 to identify a particular portion of the cover. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the indicator 72 may be any suitable type of structure, marking, label, indicia, instructions and the like that identifies a particular portion of the cover 10. One of ordinary skill in the art will also appreciate that the cover 10 does not require the indicator 72.

The first indicator 72 is preferably disposed at, near or towards the second end 62 of the cover 10 to allow the brace 12 to be released from a locked position. It will be understood, however, that the indicator 72 may be positioned in any suitable portion of the cover 10. It will also be understood that the indicator 72 may have any suitable size, shape and configuration such as a generally oval or oblong shape that is sized and configured to receive the thumb or finger of the user. The indicator 72 could also have an arched, semi-circular or other suitable shape. The indicator 72, of course, could have any suitable shape and size such as circular, square, and the like depending, for example, upon the intended use and design of the cover 10. The indicator 72 could also include an opening, cutout or the like to allow, for example, the brace 12 to be viewed and/or touched, if desired.

The cover 10 may allow the user to unlock the brace 12 without the user touching the brace. This allows, for example, the brace 12 to be lubricated with oils or other suitable materials and the user does not have to worry about getting oil or grease on their hands. It will be understood, however, that the indicator 72 could also consist of an opening or cutout in the cover 10 that allows the user to contact the brace 12, if desired.

The cover 10 may also include a second indicator 74 that may identify another desired portion of the cover or indicate another portion of the cover that a force may be applied to, for example, to unlock the brace 12. For example, the second indicator 74 may identify the pivot point upon which the brace is pivotally connected to the leg 32, frame 30 or the tabletop 16. Thus, the second indicator 74 may identify where an end of the brace is pivotally connected to another structure. The second indicator 74 may also identify another location where a user may apply a force to the cover 10 to release the brace 12 from a locked position. In addition, the second indicator 74 may facilitate attachment of the cover 10 to the brace 12 and/or help distinguish one end of the cover from the other end of the cover. Further, the second indicator 74 may be for aesthetic or design reasons, if desired, and the cover 10 could include multiple indicators depending, for example, upon the type of brace 12 used in connection with the cover or the desired design of the cover. Finally, it will be appreciated that while the cover 10 may include a second indicator 74, the second indicator is not required.

The cover 10 is preferably constructed from plastic such polypropylene, polyethylene or other suitable types of plastic, synthetic or man-made materials. The cover 10 may be formed into the desired shape and size by any suitable method such as injection molding, vacuum forming, blow molding, compression molding, rotary molding and the like. The cover 10, however, could also be constructed from other types of materials with the desired characteristics, such as steel or aluminum, and these materials may be formed into the desired shape by any appropriate process or method. Additionally, the cover 10 could be constructed from multiple types of materials and/or different portions of the cover could have different characteristics or properties. For example, the first and/or second indicators 72, 74 could be constructed from a flexible or elastic material and the other portions of the cover could be constructed from a more rigid material, if desired.

As shown in the accompanying figures, the cover 10 may have a generally rectangular-shaped configuration with rounded or curved first and second ends 60, 62. The first and second sides 64, 66 of the cover 10 may be generally straight and the top 68 may be slightly rounded or curved. Additionally, the transitions from the ends 60, 62 and the sides 64, 66 to the top 68 may be beveled or curved. The cover 10, however, may have other suitable shapes, contours, configurations and arrangements, for example, depending upon the type of brace 12 used in connection with the cover and/or the intended design or purpose of the cover. That is, the cover 10 may also have curved, arc-shape, circular, polygonal or other suitable shape and configurations.

As shown in the accompanying figures, the bottom portion 70 of the cover 10 may include an opening or cavity 80 that is at least partially defined by a downwardly extending sidewall or flange 82. The cavity 80 and sidewall 82 are preferably sized and configured to receive at least a portion of the brace 12. In addition, the cavity and sidewall may be sized and configured to help connect the cover 10 and the brace 12. For example, the cavity 80 and the sidewall 82 may be sized and configured to connect the cover 10 to the brace 12 by a snap, friction, or interference fit. This may allow the cover 10 to be quickly and easily attached to the brace 12, and it may also allow the cover to be removed from the brace, if desired. It will be appreciated that the cover 10 could also be attached to the brace 12 using other suitable methods or devices such as adhesives, fasteners, or the like. It will also be appreciated that the cover 10 may be selectively connected to the brace 12 or the cover may be permanently attached to the brace.

The bottom portion 70 of the cover 10 may also be sized and configured to facilitate movement of the guide 50 within the track 42. For example, the bottom portion 70 of the cover 10 may help prevent items from interfering with the operations of the brace 12 or interfering with the movement of the guide 50 within the track 42. The bottom portion 70 of the cover 10 may also help ensure that the guide 50 remains within and/or aligned with the track 42.

Advantageously, as discussed above, the cover 10 may be used to strengthen and/or increase the rigidity the brace 12. This may allow, for example, the brace 12 to support a larger force or load, and/or allow the brace to be constructed from different materials or with different properties and characteristics. In addition, because the cover 10 may quickly and easily identify where the user should apply a force to release the brace 12 from a locked position, the brace may be easier to use. Further, the cover 10 may be used to improve the aesthetics, design and/or appearance of the brace 12 and/or table 14. The cover 10 may also be used to hide, conceal or obscure the brace 12, if desired. Additionally, the cover 10 may be rapidly installed, removed and/or replaced because, for example, the cover 10 may be attached to the brace 12 by a friction, interference or snap fit connection. This may allow for easy repair, replacement and maintenance of the cover 10. Further, the cover 10 may be relatively quickly, easily and efficiently manufactured, and relatively quickly, easily and efficiently attached to the brace 12. Moreover, the cover 10 may be used in connection with either new or existing braces. Therefore, the cover 10 may provide a number of advantages, improvements and the like.

The cover 10 may also be designed to provide a force or load on the brace 12. For example, the brace 12 may be curved, bent or pre-loaded so that the guide pin 50 is biased to move into the locked position when the guide pin is disposed in the locking portion 46 of the track. The cover 10 may also be used to provide a force or load on the brace 12 so that the brace is locked in position with the guide pin 50 is disposed in the locking portion 46 of the track 42. Thus, instead of the brace 12 being configured to bias the guide pin 50 into the locked position, the cover 10 may be used to bias the guide pin into the locked position. Significantly, the cover 10 may improve the reliability and/or functionality of the brace 12 by providing this force or load on the brace. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the cover 10 and/or brace 12 may be used to bias the guide pin 50 into the locked position. The cover 10 and brace 12, however, do not have to bias the guide pin 50 into the locked position.

The cover 10 and/or brace 12 may also have other configurations and arrangements. For example, the cover 10 and the brace 12 could be integrally formed as a tube or cylinder in which the track 42 and locking portion 46 are located on one side of the tube and the first and second indicators 72, 74 are located on the other side of the tube. The tube could be constructed as an integral, one-piece component, if desired, or the tube could be constructed from two or more components that are connected together. In addition, the tube could be constructed from different materials. For example, one portion of the tube may be constructed from plastic and the other portion of the tube may be constructed from metal. Of course, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the various components of the cover 10 and brace 12 can be constructed from any suitable type of materials with the desired characteristics.

As shown in FIGS. 10 to 13, another exemplary embodiment of the cover 100 for a brace 14 includes a tab portion 102 that may be used to confirm that the brace is in the locked or unlocked positions. For example, the tab 102 may include a curved surface 104 that is sized and configured to engage the guide pin 50 when the guide pin is near the locking portion 46 of the track 42. In particular, the curved surface 104 is preferably curved downwardly such that as the guide pin 50 approaches the locking portion 46, the tab 100 is pushed upwardly so that at least a portion of the tab protrudes outwardly and away from the cover 100. This may provide a physical and visual indication that the brace 12 is not in the locked position. When the brace 12 is in the locked position, the head 54 of the guide pin 50 is disposed in the locking portion 46 of the track 42 and the tab 102 no longer protrudes outwardly and away from the cover 100. This may provide a physical and visual indication that the brace is in the locked position.

Advantageously, for example, the sides of the tab 102 may include contrasting colors and/or textures to help show that the brace 12 is either in the locked or unlocked positions. In addition, the entire tab 102 could be different colors and/or textures to help show that the brace 12 is either in the locked or unlocked positions. The tab 102 could also be transparent to show that the brace 12 is either in the locked or unlocked positions. Thus, the cover 100 may be sized and configured to confirm that the brace 12 is in the locked or unlocked positions. One of ordinary skill in the art will also appreciate that the cover 100 could include other features or aspects to help show that the brace 12 is either in the locked or unlocked positions.

Although this invention has been described in terms of certain preferred embodiments, other embodiments apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art are also within the scope of this invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is intended to be defined only by the claims which follow.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7905185Feb 8, 2007Mar 15, 2011Lifetime Products, Inc.Table top with integral alignment members
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/125, 108/160, 108/129
International ClassificationA47B95/04, A47B13/00, A47B, A47B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B95/04, A47B3/0911
European ClassificationA47B3/091B, A47B95/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 22, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC., UTAH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NEUNZERT, MARTIN;HANEY, THAYNE B.;ASTLE, ROBERT A.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015283/0127;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040923 TO 20041012
Oct 21, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC., UTAH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NEUNZERT, MARTIN;HANEY, THAYNE B.;ASTLE, ROBERT A.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015278/0823;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040923 TO 20041012