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Publication numberUS20050067866 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/677,819
Publication dateMar 31, 2005
Filing dateSep 30, 2003
Priority dateSep 30, 2003
Publication number10677819, 677819, US 2005/0067866 A1, US 2005/067866 A1, US 20050067866 A1, US 20050067866A1, US 2005067866 A1, US 2005067866A1, US-A1-20050067866, US-A1-2005067866, US2005/0067866A1, US2005/067866A1, US20050067866 A1, US20050067866A1, US2005067866 A1, US2005067866A1
InventorsMike Luong
Original AssigneeMike Luong
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pedicure chair entertainment center
US 20050067866 A1
Abstract
A pedicure spa chair having an entertainment center built into the pedicure spa chair which comprises modification of the pedicure spa chair arm and a media holder, having a tray with three upstanding sides, and a hollow arm mounted at its first end thereto, in communication with a cavity formed between an upper plate and a spaced lower plate of the media holder. The media holder arm is mounted at its second end to an opening in the side of a pedicure chair arm, which chair arm has a main section and an arm cap. A power cord is fed from a source for alternating current through an opening in the side of the pedicure chair arm up the arm to a cavity of the tray for exit through an access point in one of the tray sides for a connection to an entertainment device. An audio cable with a female jack mounted on the surface of one edge of the arm cap, extends from the cap through an opening in the chair arm, up the hollow arm of the media holder, through a cavity in the holder to an access point in the side wall of the media tray.
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Claims(17)
1. A pedicure chair having an entertainment center incorporated thereon, said chair comprising a seat cushion, a seat back and spaced arms, one of which chair arms is hollow and has a main section, an overlaid section with an outwardly facing bore therein and a removable arm cap, which arm cap has a generally rectangular configuration with five sides and one open side which fits over the pedicure chair arm, covering said outwardly facing bore, and overlaying said overlaid section of said chair arm,
said arm cap having a female audio jack mounted on one surface thereof, attached to an audio cable, which audio cable extends therefrom through said outwardly facing bore, up into a media holder, to an access point,
and a power cable attachable to a source of power extending up though said hollow arm of said media holder to a second access point.
2. The pedicure chair of claim 1 wherein said chair arm also has an inwardly facing bore in said overlaid section.
3. The pedicure chair of claim 1 wherein said media holder comprises a media tray and a hollow arm, one end of which is in communication therewith for the passage of wiring, and the other end of said hollow arm is in communication with the outwardly facing bore of said chair arm.
4. The pedicure chair of claim 3 wherein the media tray has an upper plate spaced from a lower plate, and sides enclose said plates to define a cavity there between, and said sides have slots therein to provide wiring access points.
5. A pedicure chair having a built-in entertainment section comprising a seat cushion, a seat back, and spaced chair arms, at least one of which has a main section and an upper overlaid section, said overlaid section having an inwardly facing bore, an outwardly facing bore and a top bore,
and a media holder in communication with said outwardly facing bore, comprising a hollow arm connected to a media tray, said holder communicating with said tray for the passage of wiring through said hollow arm from said chair arm to at lest one access point in said media tray.
6. The pedicure chair of claim 5 wherein an audio cable runs from a jack mounted on the arm cap through the outwardly facing bore of the overlaid section, up the hollow arm through the media tray for access.
7. The pedicure chair of claim 6 wherein the media tray can rotate slightly relative to said hollow arm to change the viewing of a when present personal electronic device.
8. The pedicure chair of claim 6 further including a power cord also running from said overlaid section of said chair arm up the hollow arm of said media holder for access on said media tray.
9. The pedicure chair of claim 1 further including a hook for the mounting of headphones, disposed on the side of said chair arm.
10. The pedicure chair of claim 6 further including a hook for the mounting of headphones, disposed on the side of said chair arm.
11. A pedicure spa chair with an entertainment center built in which chair comprises: a seat cushion, a set back and spaced arms, at least one of which arms has a main section and an upper overlaid scion and a removable arm cap for said overlaid section, which arm cap has a female audio jack mounted thereon for the receipt of a male headphone jack of a pair of headphones,
and a media holder in communication with the overlaid section of said chair arm for the passage of an audio cable from said female audio jack to and through said holder, to an access point for connection to a personal electronic device.
12. In the pedicure spa chair of claim 11 wherein the media holder has a media tray that comprises a pair of spaced plates defining a cavity, through which wiring can pass to a side of the tray for passage to an access point.
13. In the pedicure chair of claim 12 wherein the cavity of said media tray is in communication with at least one side of said holder, and said side of said tray has a slot in communication with said cavity for wire passage.
14. In the pedicure chair of claim 14 wherein both sides of said media tray are in communication with said cavity.
15. In the chair of claim 1 further including an operator call button disposed in said media tray.
16. In the pedicure chair of claim 11 wherein there are two power cords and two audio cables for enhanced compatibility with a multitude of personal electronic devices,
17. The pedicure spa chair of claim 17 further including an operator call button disposed in said tray.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This application relates to an audio-video entertainment center built into a pedicure spa chair.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Today, a modern woman, and modern man as well, seek certain health and beauty treatments that were not available in earlier decades. One such treatment is a pedicure, which is often accompanied by a manicure and massage. The pedicure chairs made by applicant's assignee allow the customer to have a manicure while seated. The chairs of applicant's assignee also include a massage function built into the back of the chair, but these treatments may take an hour or more. Women and men want a means of passing the time other than idle chatter with a salon technician. Many of the customers have personal digital assistants and want to do work, while others may want to be entertained by using CD/DVD players, and personal game machines. Most of the salon visitors would like to be entertained, while having a pedicure. This invention meets that desire.

The invention accordingly comprises a device possessing the features properties and the relation of components which are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the appended claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference should be made to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a left perspective view of a pedicure spa chair with the entertainment center of this invention incorporated thereon.

FIG. 2 is a closeup perspective view of the pedicure spa chair showing the left arm disassembly.

FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the media tray of this invention.

FIG. 4 is a front perspective view the component of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a front right perspective view of one portion of the media tray that forms part of this invention.

FIG. 6 is an exploded top perspective view of the media tray.

FIG. 7 is a left side view of the pedicure chair with the left arm disassembled and showing the path for the audio line.

FIG. 8 is a top perspective view of the media tray and showing both the audio and power connections.

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 7 but showing the left arm assembled.

FIG. 10 is a closeup view showing the cables connected to the audio jack.

FIG. 11 is a top perspective of the media tray portion of this invention with a portable DVD player disposed therein.

FIG. 12 is a minor variant of the invention with a different wiring scheme.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An entertainment center for the receipt of a CD player, DVD player, personal game machine, or even a portable radio, to be used by a patron utilizing a pedicure spa chair is presented. A media holder comprising a media tray mounted on a hollow arm is attached to the side of a pedicure below a removable arm cap. Audio wiring is connected from a female jack disposed on the back of the arm cap, through the hollow media holder arm to a convenient location on the media tray to permit connection between the electronic apparatus and a pair of earphones. A power cord is fed from the rear of the chair, where it is connected to a source of AC power, up beneath the back of the seat, through an unseen bore on the side of the chair arm, up the media holder arm, through the tray to permit an access point in a slot such that electronic apparatus need not run n batteries. A set of conventional earphones is mounted on a hook on the side of the chair arm and attaches to the female jack in the arm cap by a plug.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In FIG. 1, there is seen a pedicure chair having a seat cushion, a seat back, and spaced arms which have been modified to incorporate this invention. One arm, as will be seen, is made hollow and comprises a main section 13 and an upper overlaid section 12 and an arm cap 18, in order for the arm to have the ability to receive one or more wires utilized in this invention. Arm cap 18 is of a generally rectangular configuration having 5 surfaces and one open side. Device 10 includes media tray 20 having a distal upstanding side 21, spaced from a proximal mirror image side 23, with an upper flat plate preferably of metal, disposed between the two sides. A rear preferably hollow section 22 of a generally rectangular shape is formed by a first 90-degree upward bend at the rear edge of plate 24, followed by a hemispheric bend bent downwardly, to a point below the upper plate, at which point about ˝ below the surface of the upper plate, there is a forward bend to form a lower plate 30. This lower plate 30 connects to the upper plate 24 by an upward fold 30F at about ⅓rd the distance from the open end of the lower plate. This fold 30F bends upwardly to meet the underside of the upper plate 24 to form an enclosed cavity 31 that is open on its two sides while leaving a part of both surfaces of the upper plate exposed. See FIG. 6. Sides 21 and 23 engage the upper and lower plates as per FIG. 5 to enclose and hide the cavity 31. A second cavity 32 is formed between the spaced folded area of the rear wall 22. More about the distal and proximal side sections supra. While an arcuate top edge is shown for the rear wall, it need not be of this curvature. The front of the tray is open for a player of some type to be either slide into position between the two sides of the tray aspect of the media holder or merely placed on the upper plate to rest, if the shape such as of a radio is non-conforming to the space between the two side walls.

A hollow arm 25 threadedly engages a lower annular mount 26 which is attached to the chair side 11 by screws 27. The hollow arm 25 attaches at its upper end, as per FIG. 4, to an upper annular mount 29 by threaded engagement or welding. Mount 29 is also attached by screws 27 disposed within slots of said mount to attach the mount 29 to the lower plate 30 of the media tray 20. By placing the mounting screws 27 in slots, the tray is able to rotate slightly on the arm 25 to adjust for a better viewing angle for the user. The media holder of the tray, and its arm, is disclosed and claimed in U.S. Design application Ser. No. 29/178,879 filed Apr. 2, 2003.

Also see FIG. 1, as well as FIGS. 2 and 10, a pair of conventional earphones 50, having a headband 51 is disposed upon a hook 33 having a section 34 attached to a body section, 35. The hook 33 is deemed conventional and is retained by arm 36 that attaches the body to the chair arm using conventional screws.

The earphones 50 have a cable 52 that ends with a terminal 58 which may include a thumb wheel volume control, not shown. A compatible tip, 59 seen here such as mini plug inserts to engage the earphones 50 to the female jack 39 shown in FIG. 10 for audio pickup.

FIG. 2 is related to FIG. 1. Here, however the arm cap 18 has been removed. Arm 11 of the chair is a hollow plastic member having a main section 13 which is disposed below an overlaid section 12. Arm 11 is a generally rectangular member—though stylized in configuration, with interior and exterior side walls, spaced top and bottom walls, and spaced front and rear walls. Arm 11's overlaid section 12 has a bore 14 within the upper wall and an inwardly facing bore 15 in its interior side wall as well as unnumbered unseen bore 42 that communicates with the hollow arm of the media holder. See FIG. 7. Audio cable 52 from the headphones is seen coming from the earphones which are hidden in this drawing by their location, to the plug 53. The audio signal then continues on audio cable 37 of the invention article, through the interior side of the arm, down bore 14 which bore is positioned about 20% of the distance rearward from the front edge of the chair arm. The cable 37 moves out of the chair arm 11, through the unseen bore 42 in communication with the hollow arm of the media holder, up the arm 25 of the media holder 19 into the cavity 31 and out the slot 28A on the distal wall of the media tray 20. See FIG. 7.

The discussion now moves to FIG. 3. Here the media holder 19 comprising the media tray 20 and the attached hollow arm 25 is seen. Since arm 25 is hollow, wiring can pass up the arm and exit through an outwardly facing opening in said overlaid section, said opening not seen,—but located at the annular mount 29 used to attach the arm 25 to the underside of the tray 20—and pass eventually into slot 28A for the audio cable and slot 28B for the power cord as will be discussed below. See FIG. 6. The audio cable exits through opening 31 between the upper and lower plates 24 and 30 respectively into left slot 28A.

FIGS. 3 and 4 show the media holder 19 assembled, from the media tray 20 in communication with the hollow arm 25,but from different perspectives. The tray unit without its arm and minus the two side walls are seen in FIG. 5. In FIG. 5, the tray is seen to be formed from a flat top plate 24, such as of aluminum, joined to an integral upstanding rear wall 22 which is formed from an upward bend from the plate 24, and folded over and down a finite distance. A bottom plate 30 is formed integrally with the rear wall 22 plate 24.

The rear wall 22 is seen to be arcuately folded over to form a rear cavity 32 which communicates with lower cavity 31 between the two plates 24 and 30. These two cavities communicate, as is seen in FIG. 5, but are closed off by the presence of the two side walls 21,23 as is seen elsewhere herein, when the media tray 20 is assembled.

FIG. 6 is a top perspective exploded view of the tray 20.

This figure shows the path of the power cord 60 after it exits arm 25 at its junction with the tray at bottom wall 24. The interior the arm 25 communicates with cavity 31. Cord 60 is shown in dashed lines entering cavity 32 of the rear section 22 and, as shown is directed rightwardly through cavity 32 into the channel 23C, of proximal side 23 and then out of slot 28B of the right side end to media tray. Note particularly how the two slots 28A and 28B are elongated and in communication with the channels 21C and 23C respectively.

As an alternative if channels 21C and 23C are not present, that is, the sides 21 and 23 are formed without the channels 21C and 23C using solid material as by casting, then the power cable would negotiate a path shown in the line of (+) signs, in a rightward direction within cavity 31 to the point of egress at slot 28B Reference is made to FIG. 8 where the tip 61 of the power cord 60 is seen exiting slot 28B for use in a DVD or CD player or game machine.

Reference is made again to FIGS. 3 and 4 as well as FIG. 6. Whereas the power cord is shown in dashed line or a series of (+) signs in FIG. 6, the audio cable 37 is shown as a line of little circles. This audio cable 37 comes through cavity 31 upon exiting the arm per FIG. 4. The cable 37 travels through the channel 21C if present and if not present the audio cable runs straight out the slot 28A and terminates in a plug 53 seen in FIG. 7, for use with a DVD, game machines, etc.

The discussion now moves to FIG. 7. A cable 52, which is the audio cable of the earphones referred to previously, having a plug 53 plugs into a female connector 39 as is seen in FIG. 10. Connected to connector 39 within the arm cap 18 is the audio cable 37. This cable 37 extends from the connector,39, through the top bore 14 in the chair arm main section 13, down to the arm 25 of the media tray 20 which is mounted on the exterior surface of the chair arm and which arm 25 communists with the interior of the chair arm by a bore not seen that opens to the lower mount 26. See FIG. 1. Please note that in FIG. 6, the audio cable was shown as a series of circles to differentiate it from the power cable. In FIG. 7 where the power cable is not seen, the audio cable 37 is shown in dashed lines, the more conventional way of depicting an unseen item. Thus it is seen that the earphone audio cable was shown as a series of circles to differentiate it from the power cable. In FIG. 7 where the power cable is not seen, the audio cable 37 is shown in dashed lines, the more conventional way of depicting an unseen item. Thus it is seen that the earphone cable 52 can be unplugged and separated from the audio cable 37.

In FIG. 8, the audio and power cable tips are shown and have been discussed previously. Also seen is the top bore of the chair arm, for the audio cable 37 and the two cables 37 and 60.

In FIG. 9, the arm cap 18 has returned to its position nestled onto the seat arm 11's overlaid section 12, not seen in this view, but positioned upwardly from main section 13 of the arm 11.

A segment of the power cord 60 is seen tucked into the crevice between the seat cushion 17 and chair arm main section 13. This has been pulled up for viewing, but would normally be tucked down into the crevice. Arm 25 of the media holder 19 and top plate 24 are also visible in this view.

FIG. 10 has been discussed at length previously. The seat inclination adjuster and massager switch panel 65 form no part of this invention.

In FIG. 11, a personal DVD player 70 as made by various manufacturers is seen disposed with the media tray of the media holder. The power cord plugs into the right side of the DVD player and audio cable goes into the left side of the player 70. Of course it is within the skill of the art to reverse the positioning of the audio and power cables as may be required by the specific brand of DVD player, CD player or personal game player being utilized. Indeed, both cables may exit the same slot 28A or 28B as the case may necessitate, again dictated by brand employed.

Thus, in FIG. 12, a top plan view of the media tray, an audio cable and a power cord are both shown on each side to permit usage of the invention with a number of different brands of entertainment devices.

While the set of headphones is shown mounted on the left seat arm and the media holder is also positioned on the left seat arm, if the right seat arm is made in like fashion, a mirror image media holder with the arm tube 25 bent in reverse locations, can be utilized. While the two bores in the arm are shown one on the side, and one on top, other bore locations in the arm are within the scope of the invention.

It is also within the scope of the invention to incorporate a call button 63 into the media tray to serve as a signal for an attendant not present when needed. This call button would be wired in conventional fashion to a powered buzzer or bell, by passage of the wiring through the cavity 31, down the hollow arm 25 to a bell or buzzer mounted on the pedicure chair and a power source.

While the female jack for the audio cable is shown on the rear surface of the arm cap 18, it could as easily be placed on the outside surface of the arm cap, where access could easily be had.

While the media holder of this invention is sized primarily for a portable DVD player, or CD player, the physical size can be easily enlarge to accommodate a sub-notebook computer, or even a full laptop computer.

Should the personal electronic device of the user run on its own self-contained batteries, only the headphones will be used to ensure the privacy of others in the area. The power cord will remain unused.

The discussion above has specifically recited such items as DVD players, personal game machines, and CD-Rom players. There are also other current and future electrically operated apparatuses that can be placed on the upper plate of the media tray and connected to a power cord. One such item is the personal digital assistant and another is the sub-notebook computer. Previously, we have shown that two power cords can be present on the media tray one reason for doing so is to have access to different voltages as may be required such as 9 v and 12 v among many.

Since certain changes may be made in the described apparatus without departing from the scope of the invention herein involved, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7794014 *Feb 6, 2008Sep 14, 2010Ozio LlcMultimedia chair and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/217.3
International ClassificationA47C7/72, A47C15/00, A47C1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/11, A47C1/04, A47C7/72
European ClassificationA47C1/04, A47C7/72