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Publication numberUS20050082284 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/689,830
Publication dateApr 21, 2005
Filing dateOct 20, 2003
Priority dateOct 20, 2003
Publication number10689830, 689830, US 2005/0082284 A1, US 2005/082284 A1, US 20050082284 A1, US 20050082284A1, US 2005082284 A1, US 2005082284A1, US-A1-20050082284, US-A1-2005082284, US2005/0082284A1, US2005/082284A1, US20050082284 A1, US20050082284A1, US2005082284 A1, US2005082284A1
InventorsDennis Ouyang
Original AssigneeOuyang Dennis Z.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible cargo container
US 20050082284 A1
Abstract
The present invention, the collapsible cargo container consisting of component frame panels, is directed to the empty cargo container repositioning in the logistics industry. The empty cargo container repositioning involves operations similar to the loaded one during its transportation from one location to another; therefore is costly. A collapsible cargo container is consisted of six component frame panels. Through a machinery that is capable of holding, lifting, moving and positioning collapsible cargo container component frame panels, the collapsible cargo container can be effectively dissembled and assembled during the course of the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning. Disassembled 20-foot collapsible cargo container panels can be connected through special connectors to form 40 foot equivalent disassembled collapsible cargo container panels, then loaded into 40-foot collapsible cargo containers as cargo to reduce the empty cargo container repositioning more efficiently.
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Claims(7)
1. A collapsible cargo container consists of six-component frame panels: a floor frame panel, a ceiling frame panel, a left frame panel, a right frame panel, a front frame panel, a back frame panel; each of said six component frame panels is composed of metal beams, also there are two metal posts in said right and left frame panels; said six component frame panels are assembled together through their female pin base connectors, male pin base connectors, joint T pin holders, and joint T pins; said female pin base connector and said male pin base connector are used to assemble said floor frame panel, said front/back frame panels, and said ceiling frame panel together; said joint T pin holder and said joint T pin are used to assemble said right/left frame panels and said floor/ceiling frame panels together.
2. Base parts (shown in FIG. 37 and FIG. 38) support “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” (shown in FIG. 36A, FIG. 36B, FIG. 36C and FIG. 36D), thereby said “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” displaces its carried load at four corner points of “shipping floor frame panel” (shown in FIG. 39A/C/D and FIG. 39B); which minimizes said load impact on said “shipping floor frame panel”; thus makes it possible for a collapsible cargo container loaded with component frame panels to operate normally despite its front/back frame panels replaced by vertical posts (FIG. 1A, FIG. 1B, FIG. 1C and FIG. 1D); which has been proved by said collapsible cargo container frame structure analysis result.
3. Through connectors (shown in FIG. 53C and FIG. 53D), connect two 20-foot floor/ceiling frame panels into a 40-foot equivalent frame panel (shown in FIG. 49C, FIG. 49D, FIG. 51C and FIG. 51D), thus keeps the load impact from disassembled 20-foot collapsible container frame panels to behave the same as disassembled 40-foot collapsible container frame panels; therefore, said 40-foot equivalent frame panels can be load into 40-foot collapsible container to reduce 20-foot collapsible cargo container repositioning more effectively.
4. A 40-foot collapsible cargo container and a 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo container in accordance with claim 1 and claim 2 consists of six component frame panels; said six component frame panels are a floor frame panel, a ceiling frame panel, a front frame panel, a back frame panel, a right frame panel where the doors located and a left frame panel; said empty 40 foot collapsible cargo container is disassembled into six component frame panels during its empty repositioning; said component frame panels from said disassembled collapsible cargo container are loaded into “shipping collapsible cargo container”, and shipped to a destination; said collapsible cargo container disassembled will remain disassembled until needed which can reduce the space demand in container yards.
6. A 20-foot collapsible cargo container in accordance with claim 1, claim 2 and claim 3 consists of six component frame panels; said six component frame panels are a floor frame panel, a ceiling frame panel, a front frame panel, a back frame panel, a right frame panel where the doors located and a left frame panel; said empty 20 foot collapsible cargo container is disassembled into six component frame panels, then assembled into 40 foot equivalent component frame panels during its empty repositioning; said 40 foot equivalent component frame panels from said disassembled collapsible cargo container are loaded into 40 foot “shipping collapsible cargo container”, and shipped to a destination; said collapsible cargo container disassembled will remain disassembled until needed which can reduce the space demand in container yards.
7. Through a machinery that is capable of holding, lifting, moving and positioning collapsible cargo container component frame panels, said collapsible cargo container related disassembling, loading, unloading, and assembling process can be automated to meet said logistics industry needs.
8. Fourteen 40-foot collapsible cargo containers in accordance with claim 6, when disassembled, can be loaded into five 40-feet collapsible containers, thus reduce the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning by 73%; two 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo containers in accordance with claim 7, when disassembled, can be loaded into a 40-feet high cube collapsible containers, thus reduce the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning by 66%; fourteen 20-foot collapsible cargo containers in accordance with claim 8, when disassembled, can be loaded into four 40-feet collapsible containers, thus reduce the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning by 82%; thirteen 20-foot high cube collapsible cargo containers in accordance with claim 9, when disassembled, can be loaded into four 40-feet collapsible containers, thus reduce the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning by 76%.
Description
    STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0001]
    Not Applicable
  • REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX
  • [0002]
    Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0004]
    The present invention is directed to the empty cargo container repositioning in the logistics industry.
  • [0005]
    2. Prior Art
  • [0006]
    Trades among different continents create the need for the empty cargo container repositioning. Take the trade between North America and Asia as an example; cargo containers are fully loaded with goods manufactured in Asia when transported from Asia to North America; however, most of those cargo containers are empty when transported from North America back to Asia. The empty cargo container repositioning is fairly costly because it involves similar operations as the loaded one during its transportation from one location to another. Therefore, it is in the logistics industry's interest to have a container, which can be disassembled into component parts, the component parts can be converted to cargo during its empty repositioning. To this end, many forms of collapsible containers have been proposed in the past, and a selection of the most pertinent prior art is embodied in the following patent specifications: U.S. Pat. No. 3,398,850, U.S. Pat. No. 3,529,741, U.S. Pat. No. 3,570,698, U.S. Pat. No. 3,765,556, U.S. Pat. No. 3,796,342, U.S. Pat. No. 4,177,907, U.S. Pat. No. 4,214,669, U.S. Pat. No. 4,388,995, U.S. Pat. No. 4,577,772, U.S. Pat. No. 5,190,179 and AU-A-68129/87.
  • [0007]
    For the logistics industry to accept a collapsible container, however, a container structure must be proved to be sound; the container disassembling and assembling process has to be simple and can be automated easily; the empty container repositioning reduction has to be effective. All those prior art containers are consisted of too many component parts, as a result, the containers could not meet the rigid structure requirement. Furthermore, all those prior art containers entirely overlooked the dissembling and assembling process automation which is an important key for a collapsible container acceptance. That is why there is no collapsible container has been endorsed by the logistics industry so far.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    The present invention designs a collapsible cargo container consisting of six component frame panels; the six component frame panels are a floor frame panel, a ceiling frame panel, two identical front and back frame panels, a right frame panel where the doors located and a left frame panel. Through connectors attached to each component frame panel, the collapsible cargo container can be effectively dissembled and assembled. During empty cargo container repositioning, each empty collapsible cargo container is disassembled into six component frame panels, and the component frame panels are loaded into shipping collapsible cargo containers, then shipped to a destination. After the shipping collapsible cargo containers arrive at the destination, the disassembled component frame panels will remain in the shipping collapsible cargo containers until needed. Furthermore, disassembled 20-foot collapsible cargo container panels can be connected through special connectors to form equivalent disassemble 40-foot collapsible cargo container panels, then loaded into 40-foot collapsible cargo containers as cargo to increase the empty cargo container repositioning efficiency
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING
  • [0009]
    The foregoing summary and the following detailed description may be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. Various embodiments are shown for the purpose of illustrating the invention. It is understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements shown. A drawings identification is based on the cargo container type, that is, FIG. 3A represents a 40 foot cargo container drawing; FIG. 3B represents a 40 foot high cube cargo container drawing; FIG. 3C represents a 20 foot cargo container drawing; FIG. 3D represents a 20 foot high cube cargo container drawing; FIG. 33A/B represents a drawing for 40 foot cargo container and 40 foot high cube cargo container; FIG. 33C/D represents a drawing for 20 foot cargo container and 20 foot high cube cargo container; FIG. 39A/C/D represents a drawing for 40 foot cargo container, 20 foot cargo container and 20 foot high cube cargo container; FIG. 54 represents a drawing for all type container. Furthermore, a floor frame panel coat, a ceiling frame panel coat, a front frame panel coat, a back frame panel coat, a left frame panel coat and two right frame panel doors are not presented in drawings in order to show the invention clearly.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1A (“Drawings” page 1) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with three disassembled 40 foot collapsible cargo container frames. This container is referred as “shipping collapsible cargo container”.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2A (“Drawings” page 2) shows a detailed isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with three disassembled 40 foot collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 3A (“Drawings” page 3) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 4A (“Drawings” page 4) shows an enlarged isometric view of the left end of a 40 foot collapsible cargo container.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 5A (“Drawings” page 5) shows an opaque isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 6A (“Drawings” page 6) shows a basic isometric view of the floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0016]
    FIG. 7A (“Drawings” page 7) shows an opaque isometric view of the floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container)
  • [0017]
    FIG. 8A (“Drawings” page 8) shows an isometric view of the left end of the floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0018]
    FIG. 9A (“Drawings” page 9) shows a top view of the left end of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0019]
    FIG. 10A (“Drawings” page 10) shows a front view of the left end of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0020]
    FIG. 11A (“Drawings” page 10) shows a left view of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0021]
    FIG. 12A (“Drawings” page 11) shows an isometric view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0022]
    FIG. 13A (“Drawings” page 12) shows a top view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0023]
    FIG. 14A (“Drawings” page 13) shows a front view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0024]
    FIG. 15A (“Drawings” page 13) shows a right view of a floor frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0025]
    FIG. 16A (“Drawings” page 14) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0026]
    FIG. 17A (“Drawings” page 15) shows an isometric view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0027]
    FIG. 18A (“Drawings” page 16) shows a top view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0028]
    FIG. 19A (“Drawings” page 17) shows a front view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0029]
    FIG. 20A (“Drawings” page 17) shows a left view of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0030]
    FIG. 21A (“Drawings” page 18) shows an isometric view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0031]
    FIG. 22A (“Drawings” page 19) shows a top view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0032]
    FIG. 23A (“Drawings” page 20) shows a front view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0033]
    FIG. 24A (“Drawings” page 20) shows a right view of a ceiling frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0034]
    FIG. 25A (“Drawings” page 21) shows isometric views of a left frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0035]
    FIG. 26A (“Drawings” page 22) shows an Isometric internal view of the corner of a left frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0036]
    FIG. 27A (“Drawings” page 23) shows an internal view of a left frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0037]
    FIG. 28A (“Drawings” page 24) shows an external view of a left frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0038]
    FIG. 29A (“Drawings” page 25) shows isometric views of a right frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0039]
    FIG. 30A (“Drawings” page 26) shows an isometric internal view of the corner of a right frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0040]
    FIG. 31A (“Drawings” page 27) shows an internal view of a right frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0041]
    FIG. 32A (“Drawings” page 28) shows an external view of a right frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0042]
    FIG. 33A/B (“Drawings” page 29) shows an isometric view of the front/back frame (40 foot and 40 foot high cube cargo containers).
  • [0043]
    FIG. 34A/B (“Drawings” page 30) shows an isometric view of the top corner of a front/back frame (40 foot and 40 foot high cube cargo containers).
  • [0044]
    FIG. 35A (“Drawings” page 31) shows an isometric view of a floor frame that contains a front frame and a back frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0045]
    FIG. 36A (“Drawings” page 32) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame stacked on top of a floor frame that contains a front frame and a back frame (40 foot collapsible cargo container), which is referred as “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly”.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 37 (“Drawings” page 33) shows an isometric view of the base part, which is used to prevent the direct contact between “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” and “shipping floor frame panel”, which is defined in FIG. 39A/C/D and FIG. 39B.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 38 (“Drawings” page 34) shows an enlarged front view of a loaded collapsible cargo container that is also referred as shipping container. The shaded lines indicate the base part. The base parts are placed on top of the shipping container's floor frame base at both ends to support the disassembled frame panels
  • [0048]
    FIG. 39A/C/D (“Drawings” page 35) shows a 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container floor frame panel referred as “shipping floor frame panel”, related front and back frame panels are stored in “shipping floor frame panel”, a base part is placed on each end of “shipping floor frame panel”.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 40A/C/D(“Drawings” page 36) is an enlarged view based on FIG. 39A/C/D to show the base part position indicated by shaded lines.
  • [0050]
    FIG. 41A(“Drawings” page 37) shows that first “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 42A(“Drawings” page 38) shows that second “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 43A(“Drawings” page 39) shows that third “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 44A(“Drawings” page 40) shows that left and right frames from 2 disassembled cargo containers are stacked on top of the previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 45A(“Drawings” page 41) shows that left frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 46A(“Drawings” page 42) shows that right frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0056]
    FIG. 47A(“Drawings” page 43) shows that ceiling frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0057]
    FIG. 48A(“Drawings” page 44) shows that six vertical beams are assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 1B (“Drawings” page 45) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container loaded with two disassembled 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frames. This container is referred as “shipping collapsible cargo container”.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 2B (“Drawings” page 46) shows a detailed isometric view of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container loaded with two disassembled 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0060]
    FIG. 3B (“Drawings” page 47) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame.
  • [0061]
    FIG. 4B (“Drawings” page 48) shows an enlarged isometric view of the left end of a 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container.
  • [0062]
    FIG. 5B (“Drawings” page 49) shows an opaque isometric view of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0063]
    FIG. 6B (“Drawings” page 50) shows a basic isometric view of the floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0064]
    FIG. 7B (“Drawings” page 51) shows an opaque isometric view of the floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0065]
    FIG. 8B (“Drawings” page 52) shows an isometric view of the left end of the floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0066]
    FIG. 9B (“Drawings” page 53) shows a top view of the left end of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0067]
    FIG. 10B (“Drawings” page 54) shows a front view of the left end of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0068]
    FIG. 11B (“Drawings” page 54) shows a left view of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0069]
    FIG. 12B (“Drawings” page 55) shows an isometric view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0070]
    FIG. 13B (“Drawings” page 56) shows a top view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0071]
    FIG. 14B (“Drawings” page 57) shows a front view of the right end of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0072]
    FIG. 15B (“Drawings” page 57) shows a right view of a floor frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0073]
    FIG. 16B (“Drawings” page 58) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0074]
    FIG. 17B (“Drawings” page 59) shows an isometric view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0075]
    FIG. 18B (“Drawings” page 60) shows a top view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0076]
    FIG. 19B (“Drawings” page 61) shows a front view of the left end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0077]
    FIG. 20B (“Drawings” page 61) shows a left view of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0078]
    FIG. 21B (“Drawings” page 62) shows an isometric view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0079]
    FIG. 22B (“Drawings” page 63) shows a top view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0080]
    FIG. 23B (“Drawings” page 64) shows a front view of the right end of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0081]
    FIG. 24B (“Drawings” page 64) shows a right view of a ceiling frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0082]
    FIG. 25B (“Drawings” page 65) shows isometric views of a left frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0083]
    FIG. 26B (“Drawings” page 66) shows an Isometric internal view of the corner of a left frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0084]
    FIG. 27B (“Drawings” page 67) shows an internal view of a left frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0085]
    FIG. 28B (“Drawings” page 68) shows an external view of a left frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0086]
    FIG. 29B (“Drawings” page 69) shows isometric views of a right frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0087]
    FIG. 30B (“Drawings” page 70) shows an isometric internal view of the corner of a right frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0088]
    FIG. 31B (“Drawings” page 71) shows an internal view of a right frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0089]
    FIG. 32B (“Drawings” page 72) shows an external view of a right frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0090]
    FIG. 35B (“Drawings” page 73) shows an isometric view of a floor frame that contains a front frame and a back frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0091]
    FIG. 36B (“Drawings” page 74) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame stacked on top of a floor frame that contains a front frame and a back frame (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container), which is referred as “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly”.
  • [0092]
    FIG. 39B (“Drawings” page 75) shows that front and back frames of the shipping collapsible cargo container are stored in its own floor frame, and a base part is placed at each end during disassemble and load process. And this 40 foot high cube shipping collapsible cargo container floor frame panel is now referred as “shipping floor frame panel”.
  • [0093]
    FIG. 40B(“Drawings” page 76) is an enlarged view based on FIG. 39B to show the base part position indicated by shaded lines.
  • [0094]
    FIG. 41B(“Drawings” page 77) shows that first “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0095]
    FIG. 42B(“Drawings” page 78) shows that second “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0096]
    FIG. 43B(“Drawings” page 79) shows left and right frames from 2 disassembled cargo containers are stacked on top of the previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0097]
    FIG. 44B(“Drawings” page 80) shows that left frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0098]
    FIG. 45B(“Drawings” page 81) shows that right frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0099]
    FIG. 46B(“Drawings” page 82) shows that ceiling frame of the shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0100]
    FIG. 47B(“Drawings” page 83) shows that six vertical beams are assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0101]
    FIG. 1C (“Drawings” page 84) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with six disassembled 20 foot collapsible cargo container frames. This container is referred as “shipping collapsible cargo container”.
  • [0102]
    FIG. 2C (“Drawings” page 85) shows a detailed isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with six disassembled 20 foot collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0103]
    FIG. 3C (“Drawings” page 86) shows a basic isometric view of the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame.
  • [0104]
    FIG. 4C (“Drawings” page 87) shows an enlarged isometric view of the left end of a 20 foot collapsible cargo container.
  • [0105]
    FIG. 6C (“Drawings” page 88) shows a basic isometric view of the floor frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0106]
    FIG. 12C (“Drawings” page 89) shows an isometric view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0107]
    FIG. 13C (“Drawings” page 90) shows a top view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0108]
    FIG. 14C (“Drawings” page 91) shows a front view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0109]
    FIG. 15C (“Drawings” page 91) shows a right view of a floor frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0110]
    FIG. 16C (“Drawings” page 92) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0111]
    FIG. 21C (“Drawings” page 93) shows an isometric view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0112]
    FIG. 22C (“Drawings” page 94) shows a top view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0113]
    FIG. 23C (“Drawings” page 95) shows a front view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0114]
    FIG. 24C (“Drawings” page 95) shows a right view of a ceiling frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0115]
    FIG. 25C (“Drawings” page 96) shows isometric views of a left frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0116]
    FIG. 26C (“Drawings” page 97) shows an Isometric internal view of the corner of a left frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0117]
    FIG. 27C (“Drawings” page 98) shows an internal view of a left frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0118]
    FIG. 28C (“Drawings” page 99) shows an external view of a left frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0119]
    FIG. 29C (“Drawings” page 100) shows isometric views of a right frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0120]
    FIG. 30C (“Drawings” page 101) shows an isometric internal view of the corner of a right frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0121]
    FIG. 31C (“Drawings” page 102) shows an internal view of a right frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0122]
    FIG. 32C (“Drawings” page 103) shows an external view of a right frame (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0123]
    FIG. 33C/D (“Drawings” page 104) shows an isometric view of the front/back frame (20 foot and 20 foot high cube cargo containers).
  • [0124]
    FIG. 34C/D (“Drawings” page 105) shows an isometric view of the top corner of a front/back frame (20 foot and 20 foot high cube cargo containers).
  • [0125]
    FIG. 35C (“Drawings” page 106) shows an Isometric view of connected floor frame that contains two front frames and two back frames (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0126]
    FIG. 36C (“Drawings” page 107) shows an Isometric view of connected ceiling frames stacked on top of connected floor frames. Each connected floor frame contains two front frames and two back frames (20 foot collapsible cargo container). This assembly is referred as “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly”.
  • [0127]
    FIG. 41C (“Drawings” page 108) shows that first “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly shown in FIG. 39A/C/D during disassemble and load process.
  • [0128]
    FIG. 42C (“Drawings” page 109) shows that second “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0129]
    FIG. 43C (“Drawings” page 110) shows that third “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0130]
    FIG. 44C (“Drawings” page 111) shows that left and right frames from 2 disassembled 20 foot collapsible cargo containers are stacked on top of the previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0131]
    FIG. 45C (“Drawings” page 112) shows that left frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0132]
    FIG. 46C (“Drawings” page 113) shows that right frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0133]
    FIG. 47C (“Drawings” page 114) shows that ceiling frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0134]
    FIG. 48C (“Drawings” page 115) shows that six vertical beams are assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0135]
    FIG. 49C (“Drawings” page 116) shows that two connectors connect two ceiling frame panels during the shipping process (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0136]
    FIG. 50C (“Drawings” page 117) shows a detail view based on FIG. 49C.
  • [0137]
    FIG. 51C (“Drawings” page 118) shows that two connectors connect two floor frame panels during the shipping process (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0138]
    FIG. 52C (“Drawings” page 119) shows a detail view based on FIG. 51C.
  • [0139]
    FIG. 53C (“Drawings” page 120) shows two connectors used to connect two floor frame panels as well as two ceiling frame panels (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0140]
    FIG. 1D (“Drawings” page 121) shows a basic isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with four disassembled 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frames. This container is referred as “shipping collapsible cargo container”.
  • [0141]
    FIG. 2D (“Drawings” page 122) shows a detailed isometric view of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container loaded with four disassembled 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frames.
  • [0142]
    FIG. 3D (“Drawings” page 123) shows a basic isometric view of the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame.
  • [0143]
    FIG. 4D (“Drawings” page 124) shows an enlarged isometric view of the left end of a 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container.
  • [0144]
    FIG. 6D (“Drawings” page 125) shows a basic isometric view of the floor frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0145]
    FIG. 12D (“Drawings” page 126) shows an isometric view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0146]
    FIG. 13D (“Drawings” page 127) shows a top view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0147]
    FIG. 14D (“Drawings” page 128) shows a front view of the right end of a floor frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0148]
    FIG. 15D (“Drawings” page 128) shows a right view of a floor frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0149]
    FIG. 16D (“Drawings” page 129) shows an isometric view of a ceiling frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0150]
    FIG. 21D (“Drawings” page 130) shows an isometric view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0151]
    FIG. 22D (“Drawings” page 131) shows a top view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0152]
    FIG. 23D (“Drawings” page 132) shows a front view of the right end of a ceiling frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0153]
    FIG. 24D (“Drawings” page 132) shows a right view of a ceiling frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0154]
    FIG. 25D (“Drawings” page 133) shows isometric views of a left frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0155]
    FIG. 26D (“Drawings” page 134) shows an Isometric internal view of the corner of a left frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0156]
    FIG. 27D (“Drawings” page 135) shows an internal view of a left frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0157]
    FIG. 28D (“Drawings” page 136) shows an external view of a left frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0158]
    FIG. 29D (“Drawings” page 137) shows isometric views of a right frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0159]
    FIG. 30D (“Drawings” page 138) shows an isometric internal view of the corner of a right frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0160]
    FIG. 31D (“Drawings” page 139) shows an internal view of a right frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0161]
    FIG. 32D (“Drawings” page 140) shows an external view of a right frame (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0162]
    FIG. 35D (“Drawings” page 141) shows an Isometric view of connected floor frame that contains two front frames and two back frames (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0163]
    FIG. 36D (“Drawings” page 142) shows an Isometric view of connected ceiling frames stacked on top of connected floor frames. Each connected floor frame contains two front frames and two back frames (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container). This assembly is referred as “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly”.
  • [0164]
    FIG. 41D (“Drawings” page 143) shows that first “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of the shipping frame panel (shown in FIG. 39A/C/D) during disassemble and load process.
  • [0165]
    FIG. 42D (“Drawings” page 144) shows that second “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” is stacked on top of previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0166]
    FIG. 43D (“Drawings” page 145) shows that left and right frames from 2 disassembled 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo containers are stacked on top of the previous assembly during disassemble and load process.
  • [0167]
    FIG. 44D (“Drawings” page 146) shows that left frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0168]
    FIG. 45D (“Drawings” page 147) shows that right frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0169]
    FIG. 46D (“Drawings” page 148) shows that ceiling frame of the 40 foot shipping collapsible cargo container is assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0170]
    FIG. 47D (“Drawings” page 149) shows that six vertical beams are assembled during disassemble and load process.
  • [0171]
    FIG. 49D (“Drawings” page 150) shows that two connectors connect two ceiling frame panels during the shipping process (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container)
  • [0172]
    FIG. 50D (“Drawings” page 151) shows a detail view based on FIG. 49D.
  • [0173]
    FIG. 51D (“Drawings” page 152) shows that two connectors connect two floor frame panels during the shipping process (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0174]
    FIG. 52D (“Drawings” page 153) shows a detail view based on FIG. 51D.
  • [0175]
    FIG. 53D (“Drawings” page 154) shows two connectors used to connect two floor frame panels as well as two ceiling frame panels (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0176]
    FIG. 54 (“Drawings” page 155) is the female pin base that is part of the floor/ceiling frame panel; it is used to connect with the male pin base that is part of the front/back frame panel.
  • [0177]
    FIG. 55 (“Drawings” page 155) is the male pin base; it locks the front/back frame panel and the floor/ceiling frame panel together.
  • [0178]
    FIG. 56 (“Drawings” page 155) is the joint T pin holder that is part of the right/left frame panel; it is used to connect with the joint T pin that is part of the floor/ceiling frame panel.
  • [0179]
    FIG. 57 (“Drawings” page 155) is the joint T pin; it locks the floor/ceiling frame panel and the right/left frame panel together.
  • [0180]
    FIG. 58A/B (“Drawings” page 156) shows the frame panel structure model (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0181]
    FIG. 59 (“Drawings” page 156) shows those I-Beams, [-Beams and [ ]-Beams used to construct the collapsible cargo container frame panel structure.
  • [0182]
    FIG. 60A/B (“Drawings” page 156) shows the front/back frame panel structure model (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0183]
    FIG. 61A/B (“Drawings” page 157) shows the modified front/back frame panel structure model consisted of only three vertical columns (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0184]
    FIG. 62 (“Drawings” page 157) shows the collapsible cargo container left frame vertical column section view.
  • [0185]
    FIG. 63 (“Drawings” page 157) shows the collapsible cargo container right frame vertical column section view.
  • [0186]
    FIG. 64A/B (“Drawings” page 158) shows the floor frame panel structure model (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0187]
    FIG. 65A/B (“Drawings” page 158) shows the ceiling frame panel structure model (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0188]
    FIG. 66A/B (“Drawings” page 158) shows the frame panel structure load conditions (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0189]
    FIG. 67A/B (“Drawings” page 159) shows the frame panel under the centralized load at the four floor longitude beam corners as well as its weight load (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0190]
    FIG. 68A (“Drawings” page 159) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 3,088 kg weight (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0191]
    FIG. 69A (“Drawings” page 160) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 29,871 distributed load and 3,088 kg weight (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0192]
    FIG. 70A (“Drawings” page 160) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor corners and 3,088 kg weight load (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0193]
    FIG. 71A (“Drawings” page 161) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 3,088 kg weight (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four ceiling corners).
  • [0194]
    FIG. 72A (“Drawings” page 161) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 29,871 distributed load and 3,088 kg weight (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four ceiling corners).
  • [0195]
    FIG. 73A (“Drawings” page 162) shows the frame panel structure deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor corners and 3,088 kg weight load (40 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four ceiling corners).
  • [0196]
    FIG. 68B (“Drawings” page 162) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 3,117 kg weight (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0197]
    FIG. 69B (“Drawings” page 163) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 distributed load and 3,117 kg weight (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0198]
    FIG. 70B (“Drawings” page 163) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor corners and 3,117 kg weight load (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0199]
    FIG. 71B (“Drawings” page 164) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 3,117 kg weight (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0200]
    FIG. 72B (“Drawings” page 164) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 kg distributed load and 3,117 kg weight (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0201]
    FIG. 73B (“Drawings” page 165) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor corners and 3,117 kg weight load (40 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0202]
    FIG. 58C/D (“Drawings” page 165) shows the frame panel structure model (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0203]
    FIG. 60C/D (“Drawings” page 166) shows the front/back frame panel structure model (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0204]
    FIG. 61C/D (“Drawings” page 166) shows the modified front/back frame consisted only by one vertical column (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0205]
    FIG. 64C/D (“Drawings” page 166) shows the floor frame panel structure model (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0206]
    FIG. 65C/D (“Drawings” page 167) shows the ceiling frame panel structure model (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0207]
    FIG. 66C/D (“Drawings” page 167) shows the distributed load and weight load (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0208]
    FIG. 67C/D (“Drawings” page 168) shows the frame under a centralized load at the four floor beam corners as well as its weight load (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0209]
    FIG. 68C (“Drawings” page 168) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 1891 kg weight (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0210]
    FIG. 69C (“Drawings” page 169) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 kg distributed load and 1891 kg weight (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0211]
    FIG. 70C (“Drawings” page 169) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor beam corners and 1891 kg weight load (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0212]
    FIG. 71C (“Drawings” page 170) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 1891 kg weight (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0213]
    FIG. 72C ( “Drawings” page 170) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 distributed load and 1891 kg weight (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0214]
    FIG. 73C (“Drawings” page 171) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor beam corners and 1891 kg weight load (20 foot collapsible cargo container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0215]
    FIG. 68D (“Drawings” page 171) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 1936 kg weight (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0216]
    FIG. 69D (“Drawings” page 172) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 distributed load and 1936 kg weight (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0217]
    FIG. 70D (“Drawings” page 172) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor beam corners and 1936 kg weight load (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four floor corners).
  • [0218]
    FIG. 71D(“Drawing” page 173) shows the frame deformation graph under 44,452 kg distributed load and 1936 kg weight (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0219]
    FIG. 72D (“Drawings” page 173) shows the frame deformation graph under 29,871 kg distributed load and 1936 kg weight (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0220]
    FIG. 73D (“Drawings” page 174) shows the frame deformation graph under 22,221 kg load at the four floor beam corners and 1936 kg weight load (20 foot high cube collapsible container simply supported at the four top corners).
  • [0221]
    FIG. 74 (“Drawings” page 174) shows the joint T pin holder and its load condition.
  • [0222]
    FIG. 75 (“Drawings” page 175) shows the floor level joint T pin holder stress contour graph.
  • [0223]
    FIG. 76 (“Drawings” page 175) shows the ceiling level joint T pin holder stress contour graph.
  • [0224]
    FIG. 77 (“Drawings” page 176) shows the joint T pin holder detail analysis.
  • [0225]
    FIG. 78 (“Drawings” page 177) shows the joint T pin holder detail stress contour graph at the floor level.
  • [0226]
    FIG. 79 (“Drawings” page 177) shows the joint T pin holder detail stress contour graph at the ceiling level.
  • [0227]
    FIG. 80 (“Drawings” page 178) shows the male pin base.
  • [0228]
    FIG. 81 (“Drawings” page 178) shows the male pin base finite element model and load.
  • [0229]
    FIG. 82 (“Drawings” page 179) shows the male pin base stress contour graph.
  • [0230]
    FIG. 83 (“Drawings” page 179) shows the male pin base deformation graph of X-orientation.
  • [0231]
    FIG. 84 (“Drawings” page 180) shows the male pin base deformation graph of Y-orientation.
  • [0232]
    FIG. 85 (“Drawings” page 180) shows the female pin base.
  • [0233]
    FIG. 86 (“Drawings” page 181) shows the female pin base finite element model and load.
  • [0234]
    FIG. 87 (“Drawings” page 181) shows the female pin base stress contour graph.
  • [0235]
    FIG. 88 (“Drawings” page 182) shows the female pin base deformation graph of X-orientation.
  • [0236]
    FIG. 89 (“Drawings” page 182) shows the female pin base deformation graph of Y-orientation.
  • [0237]
    Table 1A (“Drawings” page 183) shows the inner force of the cross beams in the front/back frame panel structure as shown in FIG. 60A/B (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0238]
    Table 1B (“Drawings” page 183) shows the inner forces of the cross beams in the front/back frame panel structure as shown in FIG. 60A/B (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0239]
    Table 1C (“Drawings” page 184) shows the inner forces of the cross beams in the front/back frame panel structure as shown in FIG. 60C/D (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0240]
    Table 1D (“Drawings” page 184) shows the inner forces of the cross beams in the front/back frame panel structure as shown in FIG. 60C/D (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0241]
    Table 2A (“Drawings” page 184) shows the inner forces of the vertical beams as shown in FIG. 61A/B (40 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0242]
    Table 2B (“Drawings” page 185) shows the inner forces of the vertical beams as shown in FIG. 61A/B (40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • [0243]
    Table 2C (“Drawings” page 185) shows the inner forces of the vertical beams as shown in FIG. 61C/D (20 foot collapsible cargo container).
  • [0244]
    Table 2D (“Drawings” page 185) shows the inner forces of the vertical beams as shown in FIG. 61C/D (20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container).
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0000]
    1. The Collapsible Cargo Container
  • [0245]
    The collapsible cargo container consists of six-component frame panels:
      • Floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6A, FIG. 6B, FIG. 6C and FIG. 6D.
      • Ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16A, FIG. 16B, FIG. 16C and FIG. 16D.
      • Left frame panel as shown in FIG. 25A, FIG. 25B, FIG. 25C and FIG. 25D.
      • Right frame panel as shown in FIG. 29A, FIG. 29B, FIG. 29C and FIG. 29D.
      • Front panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 33C/D.
      • Back panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 33C/D.
        Each of the six component frame panels is composed of steel beams. Additionally, there are two steel columns in the right and left frame panels, and a steel plate in the 40 foot cargo container floor frame panel. The characteristics of the steel beam, steel column and steel plate are described in detail in the next section titled ‘The collapsible cargo container frame panel structure analysis’.
  • [0252]
    The six component frame panels of the collapsible cargo container are assembled together through their connectors:
      • The female pin base connector as shown in FIG. 54
      • The male pin base connector as shown in FIG. 55
      • The joint T pin holder as shown in FIG. 56
      • The joint T pin as shown in FIG. 57
        The female pin base connector and male pin base connector are used to assemble the floor frame panel, the front/back frame panels, and the ceiling frame panel together. The joint T pin holder and joint T pin are used to assemble the right/left frame panels and the floor/ceiling frame panels together.
  • [0257]
    For the 40 foot collapsible cargo container, 10 female pin base connectors are attached to the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6A, FIG. 8A and FIG. 12A. 10 female pin base connectors are attached to the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16A, FIG. 17A and FIG. 21A. 10 male pin base connectors are attached to the front frame panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 34A/B. 10 male pin base connectors are attached to the back frame panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 34A/B. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the left frame panels as shown in FIG. 25A and FIG. 26A. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the right frame panels as shown in FIG. 29A and FIG. 30A. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6A, FIG. 8A and FIG. 12A. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16A, FIG. 17A and FIG. 21A. The complete 40 foot collapsible cargo container assembly is shown in FIG. 3A.
  • [0258]
    For the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container, 10 female pin base connectors are attached to the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6B, FIG. 8B and FIG. 12B. 10 female pin base connectors are attached to the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16B, FIG. 17 B and FIG. 21B. 10 male pin base connectors are attached to the front frame panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 34A/B. 10 male pin base connectors are attached to the back frame panel as shown in FIG. 33A/B and FIG. 34A/B. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the left frame panels as shown in FIG. 25B and FIG. 26B. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the right frame panels as shown in FIG. 29B and FIG. 30B. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6B, FIG. 8B and FIG. 12B. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16B, FIG. 17B and FIG. 21B. The complete 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container assembly is shown in FIG. 3B.
  • [0259]
    For the 20 foot collapsible cargo container, 6 female pin base connectors are attached to the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6C, and FIG. 12C. 6 female pin base connectors are attached to the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16C, and FIG. 21C. 6 male pin base connectors are attached to the front frame panel as shown in FIG. 33C/D and FIG. 34C/D. 6 male pin base connectors are attached to the back frame panel as shown in FIG. 33C/D and FIG. 34C/D. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the left frame panels as shown in FIG. 25C and FIG. 26C. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the right frame panels as shown in FIG. 29C and FIG. 30C. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6C, FIG. 12C. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16C, and FIG. 21C. The complete 20 foot collapsible cargo container assembly is shown in FIG. 3C.
  • [0260]
    For the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container, 6 female pin base connectors are attached to the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6D, and FIG. 12D. 6 female pin base connectors are attached to the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16D, and FIG. 21D. 6 male pin base connectors are attached to the front frame panel as shown in FIG. 33C/D and FIG. 34C/D. 6 male pin base connectors are attached to the back frame panel as shown in FIG. 33C/D and FIG. 34C/D. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the left frame panels as shown in FIG. 25D and FIG. 26D. 8 joint T pin holders are attached to the right frame panels as shown in FIG. 29D and FIG. 30D. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the floor frame panel as shown in FIG. 6D, and FIG. 12D. There are 4 joint T pins on each side of the ceiling frame panel as shown in FIG. 16D, and FIG. 21D. The complete 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container assembly is shown in FIG. 3D.
  • [0261]
    During empty cargo container repositioning, an empty collapsible cargo container is disassembled into six component frame panels; those component frame panels are loaded into “shipping collapsible cargo container” (show in FIG. 1A, FIG. 1B, FIG. 1C and FIG. 1D), “shipping collapsible cargo container” is then shipped to its destination. After “shipping collapsible cargo container” arrives at its destination, the disassembled component frame panels will remain in “shipping collapsible cargo container” until needed.
  • [0262]
    By contacting base parts only (show in FIG. 37 and FIG. 38), “collapsible cargo container frame panel assembly” (show in FIG. 36A, FIG. 36B, FIG. 36C and FIG. 36D) displaces its carried load at four corner points of “shipping floor frame panel” (show in FIG. 39A/C/D and FIG. 39B), which reduces said load impact on said “shipping floor frame panel” to the minimal.
  • [0263]
    Through connectors (show in FIG. 53C and FIG. 53D), connect two 20-foot floor/ceiling frame panels into a 40 foot equivalent frame panel (show in FIG. 49C, FIG. 49D, FIG. 51C and FIG. 51D), which keeps load impact created by disassembled 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panels behavior same as disassembled 40 foot ones.
  • [0264]
    A machinery that is capable of holding,lifting, and positioning collapsible cargo container frame panels will be used to automate the collapsible cargo container disassembling, assembling, loading, and unloading process. 40-foot collapsible cargo containers are disassembled and loaded into a 40-foot collapsible cargo container as shown in FIG. 1A. 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo containers are disassembled and loaded into a 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo container as shown in FIG. 1B. 20-foot collapsible cargo containers are disassembled, connected as 40-foot equivalent (show in FIG. 49C and FIG. 51C) and loaded into a 40-foot collapsible cargo container as shown in FIG. 1C. 20-foot high cube collapsible cargo containers are disassembled, connected as 40-foot equivalent(show in FIG. 49D and FIG. 51D) and loaded into a 40-foot collapsible cargo container as shown in FIG. 1D.
  • [0265]
    FIG. 39A/C/D, FIG. 41A-FIG. 48A show the detailed step-by-step procedure to load disassembled 40 foot collapsible cargo container component frame panels into 40 foot collapsible cargo containers.
  • [0266]
    FIG. 39B, FIG. 41B-FIG. 47B show the detailed step-by-step procedure to load disassembled 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container component frame panels into 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo containers.
  • [0267]
    FIG. 39A/C/D, FIG. 41C-FIG. 48C show the detailed step-by-step procedure to load disassembled 20 foot collapsible cargo container component frame panels into 40 foot collapsible cargo containers. FIG. 49C and FIG. 50C show two 20 foot ceiling frame panels connected into a 40 foot equivalent ceiling frame panel through the connector as shown in FIG. 53C. FIG. 51C and FIG. 52C show two 20 foot floor frame panels connected into a 40 foot equivalent floor frame panel through the connector as shown in FIG. 53C.
  • [0268]
    FIG. 39A/C/D, FIG. 41D-FIG. 47D show the detailed step-by-step procedure to load disassembled 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container component frame panels into 40 foot collapsible cargo containers. FIG. 49D and FIG. 50D show two 20 foot high cube ceiling frame panels connected into a 40 foot equivalent ceiling frame panel through the connector as shown in FIG. 53D. FIG. 51D and FIG. 52D show two 20 foot high cube floor frame panels connected into a 40 foot equivalent floor frame panel through the connector as shown in FIG. 53D.
  • [0269]
    Compared to all those prior art cargo containers, the collapsible cargo container is simply consisted of six component frame panels; consequently the collapsible cargo container dissembling and assembling processes could be easily automated. Through special connectors, connect two 20-foot floor/ceiling frame panels into a 40-foot equivalent frame panel, load these 40-foot equivalent frame panels into 40-foot collapsible cargo container, it further reduces the empty collapsible cargo container repositioning cost. Furthermore, in the next structure analysis section, the analysis result shows (1) a 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo container can stand up load on its top which is 82 times of the container maximum gross weight, (2) loaded with 1.5 time container maximum weight (100,000 LB), a 40-foot high cube collapsible cargo container maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is just 0.584cm, the collapsible cargo container structure is proved to be as rigid as a traditional container.
  • [0000]
    2. The Collapsible Cargo Container Structure Analysis
  • [0000]
    2.1 Overview
  • [0270]
    JIFEX developed by Dalian University of Technology, is software providing the analysis and optimization of general finite elements, which is similar to ANSYS and NASTRAN. Dr. Guozhong Zhao, a Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics, has used JIFEX to conduct the collapsible cargo container structure analysis, provided the structure analysis result including deformation and stress graphs. The analysis result proves that the collapsible cargo container has a rigid and reliable structure, can meet the logistics industry needs.
  • [0000]
    2.2 The Collapsible Cargo Container Structural Model
  • [0271]
    The 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is modeled as shown in FIG. 58A/B.
  • [0272]
    Its sizes are defined as follows:
      • L=40 feet, L′=2.5 feet, H=8 feet 6 inches, W=8 feet, W2=41 inches, W1=27.5 inches.
  • [0274]
    The 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is modeled as shown in FIG. 58A/B. Its sizes are defined as the followings:
      • L=40 feet, L′=2.5 feet, H=9.5 feet, W=8 feet, W2=41 inches, W1=W3=27.5 inches.
  • [0276]
    The 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is modeled as shown in FIG. 58C/D. Its sizes are defined as the followings:
      • L=20 feet, L′=1.25 feet, L″=2.5 feet, H=8.5 feet, W=8 feet
  • [0278]
    The 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is modeled as shown in FIG. 58C/D. Its sizes are defined as the followings:
      • L=20 feet, L′=1.25 feet, L″=2.5 feet, H=9.5 feet, W=8 feet
        2.3The Material Property
  • [0280]
    Material: Steel
    Young's module: E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m 2=212×107 kg/(s 2 cm)
    Density: ρ=7860 kg/m 3=0.007860 kg/cm3
    μ=0.288
    σs=235 Mp
    τp=140 MP
    2.4 The I-Beam, [-Beam and [ ]-Beam
  • [0281]
    The collapsible cargo container frame panel structure consists of l-beams, [-beams and [ ]-beams as shown in FIG. 59.
  • [0282]
    The I-Beam is available in the following sizes:
      • I-Beam(1): H=10 cm, W=6.8 cm, Th=0.76 cm, Tw=0.45 cm
      • I-Beam(2): H=12.6 cm, W=7.4 cm, Th=0.84 cm, Tw=0.5 cm
  • [0285]
    The [-Beam is available in the following sizes:
      • [-Beam(1): H=6.3 cm, W=4 cm, Th=0.75 cm, Tw=0.48 cm
  • [0287]
    The [ ]-Beam is available in the following sizes:
      • [ ]-Beam(1): H=3 cm, W=3 cm, T=0.4 cm
      • [ ]-Beam(2): H=18 cm, W=10 cm, T=0.8 cm
      • [ ]-Beam(3): H=20 cm, W=10 cm, T=0.8 cm
        2.5 The 40 Foot Collapsible Cargo Container Frame Panel Structures
  • [0291]
    Reference: FIG. 60A/B
  • [0292]
    [-Beam(1) is the cross beam specified in the labels 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 and 12. [ ]-Beam(1) is the vertical beam specified in the labels 4, 7 and 10. Four [-Beams(1) specified in each of the labels 14 and 15 reinforce the stability of the surrounding [-Beams(1). The vertical columns labeled as 1 and 13 are specially manufactured.
  • [0293]
    The specific size of these vertical columns is specified in FIG. 62 and FIG. 63.
  • [0294]
    Reference: FIG. 64A/B
  • [0295]
    [ ]-Beam(3) is the longitudinal beam specified in the labels 1 and 2. I-Beam(2) is the transverse beams specified in the labels 3, 7, 11, 15, 18 and 19. I-Beam(1) is the transverse beams specified in the labels 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10,12, 13 and 14. I-Beam(1) is the short transverse beams specified in the labels 16, 17, 20-25. The plate with its wall thickness equal to 0.3 cm is labeled as 26.
  • [0296]
    Reference: FIG. 65A/B
  • [0297]
    [ ]-Beam(2) is the longitudinal beam specified in the labels 1 and 2. I-Beam(2) is the edge transverse beams specified in the labels 3 and 7. [-Beam(1) is the edge transverse beams specified in the labels 4-6.
  • [0000]
    2.6 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure
  • [0298]
    Reference: FIG. 60C/D
  • [0299]
    [-Beam(1) is the cross beam specified in the labels 2, 3, 5 and 6. [ ]-Beam(1) is the vertical beam specified in the label 4. Four [-Beams(1) specified in each of the labels 8 and 9 reinforce the stability of the surrounding [-Beams(1). The vertical columns labeled as 1 and 7 are specially manufactured. The specific size of these vertical columns is specified in FIG. 62 and FIG. 63.
  • [0300]
    Reference: FIG. 64C/D
  • [0301]
    [ ]-Beam(3) is the longitudinal beam specified in the labels 1 and 2. I-Beam(2) is the transverse beams specified in the labels 3, 9 and 15. I-Beam(1) is the transverse beams specified in the labels , 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14.
  • [0302]
    Reference: FIG. 65C/D
  • [0303]
    [ ]-Beam(2) is the longitudinal beam specified in the labels 1 and 2. I-Beam(2) is the edge transverse beams specified in the labels 3 and 5. [-Beam(1) is the edge transverse beams specified in the label 4.
  • [0000]
    2.7 The Numerical Result
  • [0000]
    2.7.1 The 40 Foot Cargo Container structure Simply Supported at the Floor Corners
  • [0304]
    The first load condition for the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0305]
    The 100,000 LB-distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2 □where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (30560761 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without an open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (13891255 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0306]
    For each column, 83,750 LB-centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0307]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2
  • [0308]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 68A. The maximum displacement 1.6760 cm is located in the floor. The maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.529 cm.
  • [0309]
    The second load condition for the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0310]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0311]
    For each column, 83,750 LB-centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0312]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80 m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2
  • [0313]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 69A. The maximum displacement 1.1619 cm is located in the floor. The maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.378 cm.
  • [0314]
    The third load condition for the modified 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0315]
    As shown in FIG. 61A/B and FIG. 67A/B, the front and back frames of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by six vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams. The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67A/B,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0316]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80 m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2
  • [0317]
    The deformation graph of the modified 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 70A. The maximum displacement 1.1360 cm is located in the floor. The maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 1.1360 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.2 The 40 Foot Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Ceiling Corners
  • [0318]
    The first load condition for the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0319]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2 □where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (30560761 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (13891255 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0320]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0321]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80 m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2 and
  • [0322]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 71A, the maximum displacement 1.6869 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.500 cm.
  • [0323]
    The second load condition for the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0324]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B,
    67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, in which, {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and 5/16 of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg·cm/S2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0325]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0326]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80 m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2
  • [0327]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 72A, the maximum displacement 1.1750 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.355 cm.
  • [0328]
    The third load condition for modified the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0329]
    As the FIG. 61A/B and FIG. 67A/B shown, the front and back frames of the 40 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by six vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0330]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67A/B,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0331]
    The weight load is 6,947 LB or 3,088 kg,
    3088 kg×9.80 m/s2=30262.4N=3026240 kg·cm/s2 and
  • [0332]
    The deformation graph of the modified 40 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 73A, the maximum displacement 1.1408 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 1.1408 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.3 The 40 Foot High Cube Cargo Container Structure Simply supported at the Floor Corners
  • [0333]
    The first load condition for the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0334]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2 □where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (30560761 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without an open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (13891255 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0335]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0336]
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0337]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 68B, the maximum displacement 1.7046 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.584 cm.
  • [0338]
    The second load condition for the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0339]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, where the {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0340]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0341]
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0342]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 69B, the maximum displacement 1.1823 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.414 cm.
  • [0343]
    The third load condition for the modified 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0344]
    As the FIG. 61A/B and FIG. 67A/B shown, the front and back frames of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by six vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0345]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67A/B,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0346]
    The deformation graph of the modified 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 70B, the maximum displacement 1.1501 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 1.1501 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.4 The 40 Foot High Cube Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Ceiling Corners
  • [0347]
    The first load condition for the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0348]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2 □where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (30560761 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (13891255 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0349]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0350]
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0351]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 71B, the maximum displacement 1.7020 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.556 cm.
  • [0352]
    The second load condition for the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0353]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66A/B, 67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, in which, {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open.
  • [0354]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0355]
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0356]
    The deformation graph of the 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 72B, the maximum displacement 1.1841 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.392 cm.
  • [0357]
    The third load condition for the modified 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0358]
    As the FIG. 61A/B and FIG. 67A/B shown, the front and back frames of the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by six vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0359]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67A/B,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0360]
    The weight load is 7,012 LB or 3,117 kg,
    3117 kg×9.80 m/s2=30546.6N=3054660 kg·cm/s2
  • [0361]
    The deformation graph of the modified 40 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 73B, the maximum displacement 1.1558 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 1.1558 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.5 The 20 Foot Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Four Floor Corners
  • [0362]
    The first load condition for the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings: The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D,
  • [0363]
    100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2
  • [0364]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0365]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0366]
    The first load deformation graph of the 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 68C, the maximum displacement 1.5682 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.475 cm.
  • [0367]
    The second load condition for the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0368]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D, 67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, where the {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0369]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0370]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0371]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 69C, the maximum displacement 1.0703 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.331 cm.
  • [0372]
    The third load condition for the modified 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0373]
    As the FIG. 61C/D and FIG. 67C/D shown, the front and back frames of the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by two vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0374]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67C/D,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0375]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0376]
    The deformation graph of the modified 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 70C, the maximum displacement 0.21378 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 0.21378.
  • [0000]
    2.7.6 The 20 Foot Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Ceiling Corners
  • [0377]
    The first load condition for the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0378]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D, 100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2 □where {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (30560761 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (13891255 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open gap.
  • [0379]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0380]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0381]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 71C, the maximum displacement 1.5608 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.489 cm.
  • [0382]
    The second load condition for the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0383]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D, 67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2, in which, {fraction (11/16)} of the distributed load (20536831.5625 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor without the open gap, and {fraction (5/16)} of the distributed load (9334923.4375 kg·cm/s2) is on the part of the floor with the open.
  • [0384]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0385]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0386]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 72C, the maximum displacement 1.0650 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.345 cm.
  • [0387]
    The third load condition for the modified 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0388]
    As the FIG. 61C/D and FIG. 67C/D shown, the front and back frames of the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by two vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0389]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67C/D,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0390]
    The weight load is 4,254 LB or 1981 kg,
    1891 kg×9.80 m/s2=18531.8N=1853180 kg·cm/s2
  • [0391]
    The deformation graph of the modified 20 foot cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 73C, the maximum displacement 0.21922 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 0.21922 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.7 The 20 Foot High Cube Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Floor Corners
  • [0392]
    The first load condition for the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0393]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D,
    100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2
  • [0394]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0395]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80 m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0396]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 68D, the maximum displacement 1.5712 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.486 cm.
  • [0397]
    The second load condition for the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0398]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D,
    67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2
  • [0399]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the ceiling end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2 and
  • [0400]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0401]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 69D, the maximum displacement 1.0735 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.339 cm.
  • [0402]
    The third load condition for the modified 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0403]
    As the FIG. 61C/D and FIG. 67C/D shown, the front and back frames of the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by two vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0404]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67C/D,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0405]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0406]
    The deformation graph of the modified 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 70D, the maximum displacement 0.22369 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 0.22369 cm.
  • [0000]
    2.7.8 The 20 Foot High Cube Cargo Container Structure Simply Supported at the Ceiling Corners
  • [0407]
    The first load condition for the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0408]
    The 100,000 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D,
    100,000 LB=444520.16N=44452016 kg·cm/s2
  • [0409]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0410]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0411]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 71D, the maximum displacement 1.5678 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.500 cm.
  • [0412]
    The second load condition for the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame is defined as the followings:
  • [0413]
    The 67,200 LB distributed load on the floor is shown in FIG. 66C/D,
    67,200 LB=298717.55N=29871755 kg·cm/s2
  • [0414]
    For each column, 83,750 LB centralized loads applied at the floor end,
    83750 LB=372285.634N=37228563.4 kg·cm/s2
  • [0415]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80 m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0416]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot high cube cargo container frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 72D, the maximum displacement 1.0719 cm is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is 0.354 cm.
  • [0417]
    The third load condition for the modified 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is defined as the followings:
  • [0418]
    As the FIG. 61C/D and FIG. 67C/D shown, the front and back frames of the 20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure have been replaced by two vertical columns, [ ]-Beam(1), which connect the floor and ceiling longitude beams.
  • [0419]
    The total 50,000 LB centralized loads on the four floor corners are also shown in FIG. 67C/D,
    50000 LB=222260.08N=22226008 kg·cm/s2, each corner has 5556502 kg·cm/s2.
  • [0420]
    The weight load is 4,355 LB or 1936 kg,
    1936 kg×9.80 m/s2=18972.8N=1897280 kg·cm/s2
  • [0421]
    The deformation graph of the 20 foot high cube cargo container modified frame panel structure is shown in FIG. 73D, the maximum displacement 0.22979 is located in the floor; the maximum displacement in the floor longitudinal beams is also 0.22979.
  • [0000]
    2.8 The Inner Force of the Crossbeams
  • [0422]
    40 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure:
      • The inner forces of the crossbeams in the front/back frame panels are listed in Table 1A. Each beam in the front/back frame panels is labeled in FIG. 65A/B.
  • [0424]
    40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure:
      • The inner forces of the crossbeams in the front/back frame panels are listed in Table 1B. Each beam in the front/back frame panels is labeled in FIG. 65A/B.
  • [0426]
    20 foot collapsible cargo container frame panel structure:
      • The inner forces of the crossbeams in the front/back frame panels are listed in Table 1C. Each beam in the front/back frame panels is labeled in FIG. 65C/D.
  • [0428]
    20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container frame panel structure:
      • The inner forces of the crossbeams in the front/back frame panels are listed in Table 1D. Each beam in the front/back frame panels is labeled in FIG. 65C/D.
        2.9 The Inner Force of the Vertical Beams
  • [0430]
    40 foot collapsible cargo container:
      • The inner forces of the vertical beam in the front/back frame panels are listed in Table 2A. Each beam is labeled in FIG. 61A/B.
  • [0432]
    For the 40 foot high cube collapsible cargo container, the inner forces of the vertical beam in the front/back frame panels are listed in the Table 2B, each beam is numbered as the FIG. 61A/B shown.
  • [0433]
    For the 20 foot collapsible cargo container, the inner force of the vertical beam in the front/back frame panels is listed in the Table 2C, each beam is numbered as the FIG. 61C/D shown.
  • [0434]
    For the 20 foot high cube collapsible cargo container, the inner force of the vertical beam in the frontback frame panels is listed in the Table 2D, each beam is numbered as the FIG. 61C/D shown.
  • [0000]
    2.10 Column and Beam Stability Analysis
  • [0435]
    The formula used to compute the stability of column/beam simply supported at two ends: P l = k π 2 E I l 2 , k = 1.0
    Where: E—young's modulus I—inertia moment l—Length
    2.10.1 Stability Analysis for Column (Height=8 Foot 6 Inch)
  • [0436]
    The critical load of the column with the cross section as shown in FIG. 62
    E=212 Gp=212×109N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    I x=2.485e+003 cm4
    l=259 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 2.485 × 10 3 259 2 = 7.7432 e + 008 kg · cm / s 2 = 7.7432 e + 006 N = 1.7422 e + 006 LB
    Based on the maximum gross weight 67,400 LB for the structure, the column critical load is 103 times of the maximum gross weight.
  • [0437]
    The critical load of the column with the cross section as shown in FIG. 63
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    I x=2.300e+003 cm4
    l=259 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 2.300 × 10 3 259 2 = 7.1668 e + 008 kg · cm / s 2 = 7.1668 e + 006 N = 1.6125 e + 006 LB
    Based on the maximum gross weight 67,400 LB for the structure, the column critical load is 95 times of the maximum gross weight.
    2.10.2 Stability Analysis for Column (Height=9 Foot 6 Inch)
  • [0438]
    The critical load of the column with the cross section as shown in FIG. 62
    E=212 Gp=212×109N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    I x=2.485e+003 cm4
    l=289.56 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 2.485 × 10 3 289.56 2 = 6.1950 e + 008 kg · cm / s 2 = 6.1950 e + 006 N = 1.3939 e + 006 LB
    Based on the maximum gross weight 67,400 LB for the structure, the column critical load is 82 times of the maximum gross weight.
  • [0439]
    The critical load of the column with the cross section as shown in FIG. 63
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    I x=2.300 e+003 cm4
    l=289.56 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 2.300 × 10 3 289.56 2 = 5.7338 e + 008 kg · cm / s 2 = 5.7338 e + 006 N = 1.2901 e + 006 LB
    Based on the maximum gross weight 67,400 LB for the structure, the column critical load is 76 times of the maximum gross weight.
  • [0440]
    The above analysis shows that four columns of the collapsible cargo container and high cube collapsible cargo container will be able to bear extremely large vertical loads.
  • [0000]
    2.10.3 Stability Analysis for the Crossbeams when l=100 cm
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    Ix=11.9 cm4
    l=100 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 11.9 100 2 = 2.4874 × 10 7 kg · cm / s 2 = 2.4874 × 10 5 N = 5.5966 × 10 4 LB
    The values for crossbeam 3 and 11 specified in Table 1A and Table 1B are below the maximum limit defined by Pl. Therefore, crossbeam 3 and 11 meet the stability requirement. The values for crossbeam 3 and 5 specified in Table 1C and Table 1D are below the maximum limit defined by Pl. Therefore, crossbeam 3 and 5 meet the stability requirement.
    2.10.4 Stability Analysis for the Crossbeams when l=200 cm
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212'107 kg/(s2 cm)
    Ix=11.9 cm4
    l=200 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 11.9 200 2 = 6.2184 × 10 6 kg · cm / s 2 = 6.2184 × 10 4 N = 1.3992 × 10 4 L B
  • [0441]
    The values for crossbeam 6 and 8 specified in Table 1A and Table 1B are below the maximum limit defined by Pl. Therefore, crossbeam 6 and 8 meet the stability requirement.
  • [0000]
    2.10.5 Stability Analysis for the Vertical Beam when =259 cm
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    Ix=4.8 cm4
    l=259 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 4.8 259 2 = 1.4957 × 10 6 kg · cm / s 2 = 1.4957 × 10 4 N = 3.3653 × 10 3 L B
    The value for vertical beam 2 specified in Table 2A and Table 2B is below the maximum limit defined by Pl. Therefore, vertical beam 2 meets the stability requirement.
    2.10.6 Stability Analysis for the Ceiling Longitudinal Beam Simply Supported at Two Ends when l=1219 cm
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212'107 kg/(s2 cm)
    Ix=651.132 cm4
    l=1219 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 651.132 1219 2 = 9.1592 × 10 6 kg · cm / s 2 = 9.1592 × 10 4 N = 2.0608 × 10 4 L B
    When the collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is simply supported at four floor corners with only six vertical beams in the front and back frames to connect the floor and ceiling longitudinal beams, the ceiling longitudinal beam inner force is
    −2.5964e+004 N=−5.8419e+003 LB
  • [0442]
    The value for ceiling longitudinal beam inner force is below the maximum limit defined by Pl. Therefore, the ceiling longitudinal beam meets the stability requirement.
  • [0000]
    2.10.7 Stability Analysis for the Ceiling Longitudinal Beam when l=609.6 cm and it is Simply Supported at Two Ends
    E=212 Gp=212×109 N/m2=212×107 kg/(s2 cm)
    Ix=651.132 cm4
    l=609.6 cm
    P l = 1.0 × 3.14 2 × 212 × 10 7 × 651.132 609.6 2 = 3.6625 × 10 7 kg · cm / s 2 = 3.6625 × 10 5 N = 8.2406 × 10 4 L B
    When the collapsible cargo container frame panel structure is simply supported at four floor corners with only two vertical beams in the front and back frames to connect the floor and ceiling longitudinal beams, the ceiling longitudinal beam inner force is
    −9.5011e+003N=−2.1377e+003 LB
  • [0443]
    Comparing Pl value with the ceiling longitudinal beam inner force value above, the ceiling longitudinal beam certainly meets the stability requirement.
  • [0000]
    3 Joint Connector Part Analysis
  • [0000]
    3.1 Joint T Pin Holder Analysis
  • [0444]
    The joint T pin holder is shown in FIG. 74, where variable, X is in the range 5 cm to 7 cm. Its related load condition is also as shown in FIG. 74.
  • [0445]
    Under 100,000 LB load condition, assuming the load is evenly distributed on the joint T pin holder surface:
  • [0446]
    For the joint T pin holder at the floor level, the load Px is 4.6971 e+004N (10438 LB), and the load Pz is 5.4e+004N (12000 LB).
  • [0447]
    For the joint T pin holder at the ceiling level, the load Px is 1.4446e+004N (3210 LB), and the load Pz is 3.0713e+004N (6813 LB).
  • [0448]
    From the stress contour graph FIG. 75 and FIG. 76, the results show that the floor level joint T pin holder maximum Mises stress is 148.13MP and the ceiling level joint T pin holder maximum Mises stress is 75.37 MP.
  • [0449]
    Finite element analysis is conducted for the shaded part of the joint T pin holder as shown in FIG. 77. The load Px for the floor level and ceiling level shadowed part are 4.6971 e+004N (1 0438 LB) and 1.4446e+004N (3210 LB) respectively. The finite element analysis results show the floor level joint T pin holder maximum Mises stress is 166.56 MP in FIG. 78 and the ceiling level joint T pin maximum Mises stress is 55.55 MP in FIG. 79.
  • [0000]
    3.2 Male Pin Base and Female Pin Base Analysis
  • [0450]
    The male pin base is shown in FIG. 80, where
    x1=1.75 cm, x2=2.5 cm, d=3.0 cm, y1=y2=1.75 cm
  • [0451]
    Less than 100,000 LB load, the load Px for the male pin base is 14050.825N (3122 LB), and the load Py is 15572.25N (3460 LB), as shown in FIG. 81. From the stress contour graph FIG. 82, the results show that the male pin base maximum Mises stress is 115.62 MP.
  • [0452]
    FIG. 83 and FIG. 84 show the male pin base deformation in X and Y orientation respectively.
  • [0453]
    The female pin base is shown in FIG. 85, where
    x1=1.75 cm, x2=2.5 cm, d=3.0 cm, y1=y2=1.75 cm, w1=4 cm
  • [0454]
    Less than 100,000 LB load, the load Px for the female pin base is 7025.4125N (1561 LB), and the load Py is 7786.125N (1730 LB), as shown in FIG. 86. From the stress contour graph FIG. 87, the results show that the female pin base maximum Mises stress is 77.55 MP. FIG. 88 and FIG. 89 show the female pin base deformation in X and Y orientation respectively.
  • [0000]
    3.3 Pin Analysis
  • [0455]
    The stress analysis of the pin, which is used to connect the male pin base and female pin base, is based on the following formula τ = 4 F l π D 2 Z a .
    where
    Fl=85000N, D=3.5 cm=0.035 m, Z=2,
  • [0456]
    Based on the material properties defined in section 2.3,
    τ<45 Mp
    τ<τp<140 Mp
  • [0457]
    Therefore the pin is suitable.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8006855Jan 18, 2006Aug 30, 2011Wrangler CorporationInternal truss system for semi-rigid containers
US8960468Sep 19, 2008Feb 24, 2015Norduyn Inc.Collapsible container
US20070164023 *Jan 18, 2006Jul 19, 2007Lapoint John IiiInternal truss system for semi-rigid containers
US20080073353 *Sep 27, 2006Mar 27, 2008Lapoint John HVertical support and single-wrap collapsible container
US20090078700 *Sep 19, 2008Mar 26, 2009Mathieu BoivinCollapsible container
EP1840037A1 *Mar 28, 2007Oct 3, 2007Gruppo Barbieri & Tarozzi S.p.A.Apparatus structure for manufacturing articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/1.5
International ClassificationB65D88/52, B65D88/12, B65D90/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/123, B65D88/528, B65D88/121, B65D90/006
European ClassificationB65D90/00E6, B65D88/12B1, B65D88/52C1, B65D88/12A