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Publication numberUS20050090303 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/936,729
Publication dateApr 28, 2005
Filing dateSep 9, 2004
Priority dateFeb 21, 2002
Publication number10936729, 936729, US 2005/0090303 A1, US 2005/090303 A1, US 20050090303 A1, US 20050090303A1, US 2005090303 A1, US 2005090303A1, US-A1-20050090303, US-A1-2005090303, US2005/0090303A1, US2005/090303A1, US20050090303 A1, US20050090303A1, US2005090303 A1, US2005090303A1
InventorsRichard Dillhoff
Original AssigneeRichard Dillhoff
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Card game for learning
US 20050090303 A1
Abstract
A card game for learning entails competitive play between players. As the game proceeds, the winner of a match must recite out loud the facts of learning on the playing cards. The game repetitively exposes the players to facts in a given subject area such as math, history, science, geography, literature, etc. The learning experience may be geared to different age brackets by tailoring the subject facts to different age brackets. Audible and visual cues help players to associate information for memory retention. The game may be played electronically.
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Claims(2)
1. A method of playing a computer based card game for learning, the method comprising the steps of:
providing a virtual deck of cards that includes at least one fact area on every card, the fact area containing information being at least one of a complete factual statement and a complete equation;
dealing the cards to players to provide each player a hand and to begin the card game;
displaying at least one fact area associated with the card during the course of the card game so that an opportunity for learning the information associated with the fact area occurs, and
wherein the deck of cards includes at least any one of a suit, a rank, and an identifier.
2. A method of learning using a card game, the method comprising the steps of:
providing a deck of cards that includes at least one fact area on every card, the fact area containing information being at least one complete equation;
dealing the cards to players to provide each player a hand and to begin the card game;
displaying at least one fact area associated with the card during the course of the card game so that an opportunity for learning the information associated with the fact area occurs, and
wherein the deck of cards includes at least any one of a suit, a rank, and an identifier and the fact of information is related to the suit or rank.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/368,350, filed Feb. 20, 2003 which claims priority to the following provisional applications: application No. 60/386,550 filed Jun. 5, 2002, application No. 60/372,350 filed Apr. 12, 2002, application No. 60/357,861 filed Feb. 21, 2002, application No. 60/393,910 filed Jul. 1, 2002, application No. 60/393,913 filed Jul. 1, 2002, application No. 60/410,043 filed Sep. 12, 2002 and application No. 60/393,912 filed Jul. 1, 2002. This application also claims benefit of provisional applications: application No. 60/501,380 filed Sep. 9, 2003, application No. 60/507,893 filed Oct. 1, 2003, application No. 60/515,529 filed Oct. 29, 2003, application 60/501,392 filed Sep. 9, 2003 and application No. 60/519,749 filed Nov. 13, 2003, all of these applications are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety.

DESCRIPTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention generally relates to card games and, more particularly to a card game for learning by including facts on the card which become part of the game proceedings.

2. Background Description

The process of learning new information by children, juveniles and adults has been via varying methods and techniques. For young children many types of techniques have been in use such as books, books with pictures, board games, computer games, and some card games. Learning is a human process, which has many different avenues. Learning techniques depend on the individuals and the type of subject information to be learned. Simple tools as books and pictures have been the mainstays of learning. Computers and electronic representation of books and card games have also come into existence. Computer based games have been very popular and most often focus on entertainment and competition. Some computer games attempt to impart a learning experience of new information.

An aspect of learning is retention. The final result of learning is whether the information has been remembered and retained. This result is often linked to the method of the initial learning itself and often the repetition factor involved. Various techniques give different retention results for various age brackets. Every individual person has different abilities to learn and retain information and respond differently to various presentations of information for a given age bracket.

Expense of the learning tool is a factor in choice of methods to use for learning a subject. Computer based tools are typically more expensive than books and books typically more expensive than board games or card games. The venues for learning can also influence what tools are employed to learn. For example, traveling in a car or airplane may prohibit use of an electronic device, but use of a simple card game may be satisfactory.

Different age brackets generally relate to the type of learning that may be appropriate. For example, young children are more inclined to be learning the alphabet or numbers. As the bracket age increases, the nature of the subject material would vary.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,333,656 discloses a deck of playing cards with an alphabet. The goal of the game is to spell words by aligning the cards. This is a type of learning card game but has no visual repetition factor and little audio re-enforcement.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In embodiments, this invention addresses several aspects of learning in a simple and direct manner while being of low cost. The invention is a card game, which provides a means of delivering basic information for learning in a fun setting while offering the excitement of competition. The game uses a deck of fifty-two cards composed of four suits, clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades. Clubs and spades are black suits; diamonds and hearts are red suits. Each suit having face values on the cards of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King, and Ace. This arrangement still permits traditional games such as poker and rummy to be played in addition to this invention. Additionally, on the face of each card are one or more facts of information. For example, for a young child age bracket interested in learning basic math, the deck of cards would bear essential math facts such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division equations or representations. As the game progresses according to the rules of the game as discussed below, the contestants play individual hands and the players simply verbally recite (speak to the opponent) one of the facts of information (such as a math equation, literature fact, foreign language vocabulary, science property, bible/religion facts, or world geography fact, or the like) on the card in order to claim the trick or win a match. Decks of cards are constructed so that facts of information on the cards are geared or scaled to age brackets. The fact areas that include the information may be color coded to aid in visual reinforcement.

Over time, the repetitiveness of reciting the facts out loud will give audio and visual re-enforcement to memory retention and the learning process while at the same time, a competitive social event is transpiring between the players which places the learning in an environment of enjoyment and leisure. In embodiments, basic facts of information are seen and heard over and over again, giving rise to learning by rote and memory etching. In embodiments, the game may be provided and played electronically using computing devices with displays and the electronic represented cards bearing facts of information for learning opportunities.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention can better be understood from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment of the invention and by referring to the illustrative drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a playing card representative of the fifty two cards in an exemplary deck bearing the name of a card game embodiment;

FIG. 2 shows a representative obverse side of each card of a representative game deck showing one suit of four;

FIGS. 3A and 3B shows an illustrative layout of cards;

FIGS. 3C and 3D shows a layout of a typical card deck package, top and bottom and sides;

FIG. 4A shows exemplary multiplication and division tables and possible card assignments;

FIG. 4B shows exemplary addition and subtraction tables and possible card assignments;

FIG. 5 shows another exemplary addition and subtraction tables for an older age bracket and possible assignments;

FIG. 6A shows a categorization of information by suits and rank; and

FIG. 6B shows a categorization by suit of languages;

FIGS. 7A-7F are flowcharts showing steps of playing embodiments of the invention;

FIGS. 8A-8C are flowcharts showing steps of playing embodiments of the invention;

FIG. 9A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a graphical user interface (GUI);

FIG. 9B is a flow diagram of an embodiment of the invention showing steps of playing a game;

FIG. 10A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 10B is a flow diagram of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 11A is an illustrative embodiment of a game showing a GUI;

FIG. 11B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 12A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 12B is a flow diagram of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 13A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 13B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 14A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 14B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 15 is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 16A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 16B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 17A is an illustration of an embodiment of the invention showing a GUI;

FIG. 17B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 18A is an illustrative embodiment showing a GUI of the invention;

FIG. 18B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention;

FIG. 19A is an illustration of an embodiment showing a GUI; and

FIG. 19B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a card playing game of fifty-two cards of four suits. FIG. 1 is an illustration of one side of one of the fifty two cards and shows an exemplary name of a game. On the other side of the cards are the suits of clubs, diamonds, hearts and spades. FIG. 2 shows an example of clubs 100. Each suit has thirteen ranks with face values of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King, and Ace.

FIGS. 3A, 3B, 3C, and 3D show representative examples of the six sides of a card deck box suitable for packaging the present invention.

A particular deck is typically targeted to a particular subject area such as math, language, geography, science, literature, history or mythology, however mixing subjects is feasible. Any subject area can be scaled to age brackets and a unique deck created for that bracket and given subject area. For example (the following are examples of a very wide range of possible information facts, which should not be a limiting factor of the present invention), a young child would have the math subject area geared to addition and subtraction. A slightly older age bracket would have a unique deck geared to multiplication and division as shown in FIG. 4A. FIG. 4B shows another possible exemplary card assignment pattern by suits and rank. The equations are placed in various “fact areas” 110 of the card suitable for reading. These areas are known as “fact areas” and can be placed at various places on the face of the playing card depending on the subject areas of the deck and a card may have several “fact areas”. The fact areas typically express a complete thought, which may include a complete math equation either in symbolic math or a verbal sentence, complete chemistry equation, complete physics equation, or a complete sentence thought such as, for example, “Carbon has a symbol of C”, or “George Washington was the first President”, or the like. Multiple sentences or equations may occur.

FIG. 5 shows yet another assignment of math equations for a different age bracket with two equations per fact area. The two equations may be separated on a card in two distinct fact areas. Multiple equations and multiple facts may occur on a card.

FIG. 6A shows an exemplary categorization of information. Addition facts are associated with spades, subtraction facts are associated with hearts, multiplication facts are associated with diamonds, and division facts are associated with clubs. Any association is possible. Further, an association may be made with the rank of a card. For example, the ordinal number one (and associated operations across the suits) is associated with the card rank of ace (A). The ordinal number of two (and associated math operations across the suits) is associated with the card rank of two and the pattern continues throughout the deck. The suits 120, 121, 122 and 123 can be printed in different colors and categories associated with a color. Colors can also be associated with rank and categories.

FIG. 6B shows an exemplary categorization by language. In this example, the fact areas 110 are arranged so that German related facts are associated with the suit of spades, French related facts are associated with hearts, Spanish related facts are associated with Diamonds and clubs with another language (not shown). Also, the rank may have a categorization across the languages. For example, the rank of Ace across the suits refers to appropriate country capitals for the suit's language category. The rank of King is associated with the phrase “please” in each respective language category. This type of pattern categorization can be applied to nearly any type of fact categorization by subject areas. Relationships between facts, and facts themselves, are easier to master when visual associations exist (e.g., card suits and rank) and re-enforced by audio repetition (e.g., as in a card game). Categorization and relationships can occur at nearly any level, i.e., close relationships or broad relationships, as shown by the different language relationships of FIG. 6B.

Algebra or geometry facts would be suitable for junior high or high school age students, and a unique deck would exist for this subject and age bracket. It's “fact areas” would then contain algebra or geometry facts or equations such as, for example, x+x=2x, and area=length×height. Science decks may include chemistry equations, physics equations, electrical equations, or other science equations.

Science decks would be geared by age brackets with basic science facts for young children such as “water is a liquid”, “ice is a solid”, “air is a gas” in the “fact areas”. For older age brackets, a deck could contain elements of the periodic table such as “Carbon has an atomic weight of 12”, for advanced ages more sophisticated equations would comprise the deck such as chemical equations or equations such as PV=nRT representing the equation for partial pressures. Any equation of chemistry, physics, geology, or the like could be feasible.

In history, for a young child, simple facts about States of the Union would be feasible. For older students, countries of the world with capitals would be appropriate.

If the deck is geared to astronomy then facts might be “Earth has one moon”, Jupiter has “X” moons (“X” being correct to reflect new moon discoveries), or “Moon has a 29½ day period”. The facts should preferably be short and succinct to aid the rapid progress of the game, however if the subject area requires longer recitations of facts, then this can be accommodated.

For languages, simple vocabulary, which may include noun declensions or verb conjugations, could be printed on the cards in the “fact areas”, for example “amo means I love.” in Latin and may be included in an all-Latin deck of cards, for example. Spelling facts can be learned in a similar fashion. Languages could be bracketed so that multiple decks could exist for a given language, each deck increasing in depth of vocabulary or difficulty. Playing the card game would help expose and familiarize the players with the language or information facts. Additionally, for certain subjects such as languages, careful crafting of the decks could also aid the subliminal memory in subtle ways. For example, noun declensions would appear only on red suits (hearts and diamonds) and verb conjugations would appear only on black suits. Various associations can exist. Color coded information does have a subtle role in remembering and retaining information. Even more refinement could occur, for example, nouns only on hearts, verbs on clubs, adjectives on spades, and pronouns on diamonds.

Organization of facts into categories along visual cues can aid learning, either in suits, card rank, or by differing colors. For math, it is reasonable for the same reasoning to place “addition facts” on particular color suits and “subtraction facts” in the other color suits. When information can be categorized in some logical manner and associated with some element of a game, such as segregating the information by color, suit or card rank, gives more associative impetus to remembering the facts. Human memory has unique ways of association, much of which is not clearly understood, but using colors, audio, and visual cues enhances the potential for remembering facts.

Providing a package of decks in a given subject area with levels of increasing difficulty is also an aspect of the present invention. For example, in a Spanish language area, there may be a dozen or more decks in a package, each deck progressively more difficult. There may even be several packages to provide different age brackets with multiple decks for each bracket. If players choose to combine decks to expand the learning breadth and subject material, the following rules will accommodate them.

A given deck of cards (for a particular subject and age bracket) has a simple set of rules for playing the game itself. Examples of basic sets of rules are as follows and a deck may include multiple sets of rules:

In an embodiment, the rules are as follows, for one or more players, typically two:

    • a) Shuffle the deck and deal all the cards facedown to the players. Do not look at the cards.
    • b) Each player turns up the top card of their stack and places it on the center of the table. The higher rank of card tentatively wins each match.
    • c) The winning player must correctly state either the math equation or statement of fact on any faceup card in each match to collect all of the cards (usually two) and place them on their pile. If the player does not correctly state one of the equations or statement of fact, the opponent wins the match.
    • d) If the two cards are the same rank (referred to as a showdown), each player places one more card facedown on the table and yet another card faceup. The higher faceup card wins the match and the player scores a showdown.
    • e) A player reshuffles their pile as necessary when they run out of cards. Play continues until the game winner scores a total of three showdowns (or a predetermined number).

In another embodiment of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two or more players:

    • a) The object of the game is to score points by memorizing information on cards drawn from the stack. A player may draw three cards (or predetermined number) per turn, then memorize each one and place them facedown on their pile. Each fact may be spoken up to three times (or a predetermined number) to help memorization.
    • b) Shuffle the deck and place the stack facedown on the center of the table. The player left of the dealer draws the top card. The player states the complete fact of information at the top of the card, and then places it facedown on the table to form their pile.
    • c) Players may draw up to three cards (or predetermined number) and then begin restating the information from memory. Cards may not be drawn after a player has begun to restate a fact, and the restatement cannot be corrected. A fact is restated and the top card of their pile is turned over. A player places the card in their score area if the restatement matches a fact on the top card. The rest of their pile is placed on a discard pile when a player does not correctly restate information on the top card. A player has a time limit of 15 seconds (or other predetermined time) to restate the facts.
    • d) Play continues to the left in the same manner until the stack runs out cards. Score 10 points for each individual card in a rank, 50 points for a pair, 100 points for three of a kind, and 500 points for four of a kind. If players are tied for the highest score, the discard pile is reshuffled for the leading players, and one card is drawn per turn until the stack runs out of cards. Scoring may be modified by a predetermined point system.

In another embodiment, of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two to five players:

    • a) The object of the game is to collect the most “books”. A book is four different suits of the same rank.
    • b) Deal seven cards one at a time for two or three players, or deal five cards each for four to five players. The remainder of the deck becomes the stack, which is placed facedown on the center of the table.
    • c) The player left of the dealer looks at an opponent and asks for any rank of cards. The seeking player must have at least one card of the requested rank. The questioned player must surrender all of the cards in that rank and the seeking player takes another turn. If they do not have one, they say, “Draw it”. Then the seeking player draws two cards from the top of the stack to end their turn.
    • d) If the drawn cards complete a book, or if the book is completed by the aid of an opponent, the player places the four cards faceup in their score area, and then states a math equation (e.g., 5×5=25) or statement of fact on each card. The player may also make a brief remark (optional) such as “the sky is blue” or “table is spelled “t-a-b-l-e”.
    • e) The next player to the left takes their turn. Play continues in the same manner after the stack is gone. The winner of the game is the player who has collected the most books at the time any player runs out of cards.

In another embodiment of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two to twelve players:

    • a) The object of the game is to collect the most pairs of cards of the same rank, such as two kings or two tens. The winner is the player who matches the most pairs.
    • b) Shuffle the deck and place all of the cards facedown on the table. The player left of the dealer turns over two cards (or predetermined number) and places them in a location for viewing. If the cards do not match, all of the players view them for about three seconds (or predetermined time), then the player places them facedown in the same position.
    • c) The next player to the left turns over two cards (or predetermined number). The player may collect the cards and take another turn each time there is a match. The player must look at the cards and state one of the facts of information on each card before placing them on their score pile, or the cards are returned to the playing area. Play continues in the same manner until all of the cards have been matched.

In another embodiment of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two to four players:

    • a) The object of the game is to score points by forming a spread. A spread is formed by matching three or four cards of the same rank, or by acquiring a sequence of three or more cards of the same suit. The point value of each card is typically 5 points for Ace to nine and 10 points for ten to king (or other predetermined values).
    • b) Shuffle the deck and deal seven cards one at a time to all of the players. Place the remaining stack of the deck on the center of the table and turn over the top card to form the discard pile.
    • c) The game begins when the player left of dealer draws the top card from the stack, or draws the faceup card from the pile. If a spread is not formed in the hand, the player discards one card onto the pile to end the turn. Play continues clockwise with other players in the same manner.
    • d) The players may observe and draw any amount of cards from the top of the discard pile, but if more than one card is drawn, the last card of those acquired in succession must be formed into a spread and placed faceup in their score area. A player may likewise pick up a fragment of a spread from the pile and place it in their score area if the card(s) can be added to any previously scored spread or fragment on the table to form an expansion. A player must state one of the equations or facts on each card in a spread or fragment while placing them in their score area, or the cards remain in their hand until their next turn.
    • e) Play ends when a card(s) is scored and the last unplayable card in a hand is discarded onto the pile. The cards are then tallied and reshuffled. A player that scores with the last card in their hand may not draw an unplayable card from the pile on their next turn. Add 25 points to the score of a player who makes the final discard in a round. The player with the highest number of points (e.g., over 500 points or other pre-agreed number) may be declared the winner. Scoring may be modified using a predetermined point system.

In another embodiment of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two to four players:

    • a) The object of the game is to be the first player to remove all of the cards from your hand by matching the suit or rank of the top card on the pile. A player may remove one card from their hand per turn, or must draw one card from the stack if a match is not made. A drawn card may be discarded if it is playable.
    • b) Shuffle the deck and deal eight cards one at a time to all players. Place the remaining stack of cards on the center of the table and turn over the top card to form the discard pile.
    • c) The game begins when the player left of the dealer attempts to discard from their hand by matching the face value of the pile card. If a player changes the suit by matching a rank or playing a wild eight (or other predetermined wild card), they must state one of the equations or other facts of information on their discard before the next player starts their turn or it remains in the hand and a card is drawn from the stack. Play continues to the left in the same manner until a player runs out of cards.
    • d) A player may change the top card of the pile to a suit of choice by playing any wild eight (or predetermined wild card). The direction of the play is reversed when a four is discarded (or predetermined reverse card). When a two is discarded (or a predetermined draw card), the following player must draw two cards (or a predetermined number) from the stack before taking their turn. A player must announce the “last card” as they are playing their second to last card, or they must draw another card from the stack. The discard pile is reshuffled if the stack runs out of cards.

In another embodiment of the card game, the rules are as follows, for two or more players:

    • a) An object of the game is to be the first player to remove all of the cards from your hand by matching the suit of the card led in each round of play. All of the players removes either one or no cards from their hand per trick or round of play.
    • b) Shuffle the deck and deal seven cards one at a time to all the players. Place the remaining stack of cards on the center table.
    • c) The game begins when the player left of the dealer leads the play with any card from their hand. All of the players must follow suit of the card led in each round of play. If a play cannot be made on the suit led, the player must draw two cards (or a predetermined number) from the stack. A drawn card may likewise be played.
    • d) The player with the highest card of the suit led wins each trick and leads any card in the new round of play. They must state one of the facts of information on any card in the trick, or forfeit the lead on the next round of play. The game continues in the same manner. If the stack runs out of cards, a player passes on their turn when they do not have a playable card.

In another embodiment of the game, the rules are as follows for one player:

    • a) Arrange the layout by turning the top card of the stack faceup and the next six cards face down in a row to form seven columns. Start another row by placing the next card faceup on the first face-down card and place one card face down on each of the five remaining cards in the first row. Repeat the process to complete more rows until there are seven cards in the last column. The first card in every column is positioned faceup. The player states one fact of information on each face-up card prior to beginning play.
    • b) The bases are started in a row above the layout with Aces as they come into play. The Aces are built up in sequence to Kings by suit. Face-up cards in the layout may be built down in sequence by alternating colors. Any layout card may be connected in sequence to another. All face-up cards on top of the connector must be moved together. An exposed face-down card is turned faceup. The player states one of the facts of information on this card.
    • c) An empty column may be replaced by a King or sequence with a King at the bottom. The top card of any column may be moved to the bases but only Aces are required to be immediately transferred.
    • d) Turn up three cards from the stack and place them on a pile. The top card of the pile may be played on the layout or bases. Turn up three more cards when a play cannot be made. Do not shuffle the pile at the end of a stack. Continue the game in the same manner until no plays can be made. The player completes all of the bases to win the game.

In another embodiment of the invention, steps of a game may be conveyed by the following rules:

    • a) Shuffle the deck and deal all of the cards face down to all of the players. The players match their cards in pairs (cards bear designations in pairs such as, 1Aa-1Aa, 1Bb-1Bb, etc.) and place them faceup on their score pile.
    • b) The player left of the dealer begins play by picking a card from any opponent's hand. If the drawn card makes a match in their hand, the player states either the numbers, letters, colors, or shapes or other facts of information on the two cards. The cards are placed on their score pile and the player takes another turn.
    • c) The drawn card is shown to all of the opponents before placing it into the receiving player's hand. The player takes another turn each time a match is made.
    • d) The next player to the left may pick a card from either of two opposing players who seem to have the most cards remaining in their hand, or may ask any opponent for a specific number/letter card. If that opponent has the specific card, it is surrendered. The player's turn ends if that opponent does not have the specific card. Play continues in the same manner until one player is left with only the “Z” card.
    • e) A player that runs out of cards is out of the play and waits until the game is over to total their score. The player with the “Z” card at the end of the game may add two points to their total. Score one point for each pair. The winner is the player with the highest number of points. If there is a tie in the highest number of points, the player with the “Z” card wins the game.

The above Rules of Play would be applicable to any subject area or age bracket. The wording may change to reflect the subject area as necessary. The concept of placing information facts on another established 52 playing card standard deck game or traditional card game is also possible.

The invention provides opportunities to learn by seeing and hearing facts of information as presented on the cards of the invention by playing embodiments of the game. Visual and audio cues to aid in the learning process are provided by the layout of the cards, rules of the game, or by categorization of the information in relation to the card suits, card ranks, and colors.

FIGS. 7A-7F illustrates steps of performing embodiments of the invention. The process begins at 150 of FIG. 7A, and continues at step 152 with providing a deck of cards that includes at least one fact area on every card, the fact area containing a complete factual statement (i.e., a correctly punctuated sentence) or a complete equation. In step 154, the cards are dealt providing each player a hand to begin a game and non-dealt cards forming a stack. In step 156, at least one fact area is recited during the game to provide an opportunity to learn information associated with the fact area.

FIG. 7B shows steps of an embodiment of the invention beginning at step 158. At step 160, each player turns up a top card of their hand and the player with the highest-ranking card wins a match. At step 162, the player winning the match recites the fact area information and if recited correctly places all the top cards on a pile associated with the winning player. If the recitation is incorrect, the non-winner places the top cards on their pile. If the top cards are the same rank, each player places one additional card from their hand face down and another card turned faceup. The player with the higher additional card turned faceup scores a showdown and wins the match and all the turned-up cards. At step 164, a player's pile may be reshuffled when the player's hand is empty to create a new hand. At step 166, play continues until one player scores a pre-determined number of showdowns.

FIG. 7C shows steps of another embodiment of the invention beginning at step 170. At step 172, a player requests any rank of card from another player and the player must have a card of the same rank in their hand. At step 174, the another player whom the player asked, surrenders all cards of the requested rank from their hand and if the another player has no card of that rank, telling the asking player to draw a predetermined number of cards from the stack. This ends the player's turn. At step 176, a completed book is placed faceup wherein the book comprises four cards of the same rank obtained from either previous step e.g., step 174 or step 154. At step 178, fact area information is recited from each card in the completed book when a completed book is placed faceup. At step 180, the game continues with a next player taking their turn as the player (i.e., the asking player) and performs steps 172, 174, 176, and 178 as necessary according to the rules of the embodiment. At step 182, the game finishes when any player runs out of cards in their hand. A winner has the most books.

FIG. 7D shows the steps of another embodiment beginning at step 184. At step 186, a top card is turned over from the stack and placed faceup to form a discard pile. At step 188, a player taking a turn by drawing one of another top card from the stack and at least one card from the discard pile to add to their hand. At step 190, a spread may be formed and placed in a scoring area the spread comprising one of three cards of a rank, four cards of a rank, and a sequence of at least three cards of the same suit. At step 192, a player discards a card from their hand when a spread cannot be formed during the player's turn. At step 194, the turn is finished when one or more cards are placed in the player's scoring area by the player forming at least one of the spread, another spread, and an expansion of an existing spread. At step 196, a winner is determined by counting a predetermined point association with each card in the scoring area of each player, any player with the highest point tally being the winner. At step 198, adding to an already formed spread by placing one or more cards faceup forming an expansion of the already formed spread. At step 200, fact area information is recited from the card forming the expansion of the already formed spread.

FIG. 7E is shows steps of another embodiment of the invention beginning at step 202. At step 204, a top card is turned over from the stack forming a discard pile. At step 206, a player may choose to perform one of:

    • a) matching by rank the top card of the discard pile with a card in their hand and placing the matching card in their hand onto the discard pile thereby creating a new top card in the discard pile and changing suits. The player recites the fact area on the matching card;
    • b) matching by suit the top card of the discard pile from their hand and placing the matching card by suit onto the discard pile thereby creating a new top card in the discard pile and changing rank.
    • c) playing a predetermined wild card thereby changing suits;
    • d) reversing direction of play when a reverse card is played on the discard pile; and
    • e) drawing a predetermined amount of cards when a draw card is played on the discard pile by a previous player.

At step 208, a player announces “last card” (or equivalent indication) when a player plays a next to last card from their hand and drawing another card from the stack if the announcement is omitted. At step 210, the game finishes when any player removes all cards from their hand. The game may be played by two or more players.

FIG. 7F shows the steps of an embodiment beginning at step 212. At step 214, a player plays a card of a suit from their hand. At step 216, each remaining player in turn plays a card of like suit from their hand to complete a round. At step 218, a predetermined number of cards are drawn from the stack when a card of like suit cannot be played and playing a drawn card if the drawn card matches the suit previously played. At step, 220, a winner of a round is determined and is the first player that played the highest card of rank. At step 222, the winner of the round recites at least one fact of information from at least one played card during the round. At step 224, the game continues whereby the winner of the round leads a card to begin a next round. At step 226, the game finishes when any player removes all the cards from their hand.

FIG. 8A show the steps of an embodiment starting at step 228. At step 230 a deck of cards is provided that includes at least one fact area on every card and the fact area including one of a complete factual statement and a complete equation. At step 232, the deck of cards is shuffled and placed facedown to create a stack and to begin the game. At step 234, reciting at least one fact area during the course of the game so that the recitation provides an opportunity for learning the information.

FIG. 8B shows steps of another embodiment of the present invention beginning at step 236. At step 238, a player draws up to three cards (or predetermined number) from the stack during a turn. They attempt to memorize the information on the cards drawn and place the cards facedown on a player's pile. The player then recites the information on the drawn cards up to three times (or predetermined number) to aid memorization. At step 240, the player may restate the information in the fact area, in sequence, from memory. At step 242, the player turning over each of the up to three cards (or predetermined number) from the player's pile and if the restating of the information matches the information on each of the up to three cards (or predetermined number), in sequence, the player places the up to three cards (or predetermined number) in a score area and placing any incorrectly stated cards on a discard pile. At step 244, the game continues with a next player until the stack runs out. At step 246, a winner is determined by counting predetermined points for the cards in the scoring areas.

FIG. 8C shows steps of another embodiment beginning at step 250. At step 252, a player turns over a predetermined number of cards from the stack maintaining a same position. At step 254, the player takes a turn by matching each of the predetermined cards with any card from any player's hand and moving any card from any player's hand and moving any matched cards to the player's score area and taking another turn. The player may temporarily turn over any one of another player's cards to determine a match. At step 256, any unmatched card is turned over and the unmatched card remaining in the player's hand. The player's turn ends when the player fails to make a match. At step 258, the game continues with a next player until all cards have been matched. A winner is the player having the most pairs of cards. Whenever a match is made, the player recites information in at least one fact area on each matched card, otherwise the matched cards are returned to the pile and the amount of time to view any unmatched cards is predetermined, for example about three seconds.

A card kit may also be made that includes at least one card deck with cards as described above that includes facts of information or equations. The kit may include multiple decks arranged by age brackets, subject areas, or both. The kit may also include rules for at least one embodiment of the card game for learning. The rules may be in one or more languages.

FIG. 9A is an embodiment showing a graphical user interface (GULI), generally denoted by reference numeral 900. The GUI 900 may be generated by one or more software components that provide game controls and feedback for two players (one of which may be played by the game, itself) and may include representations of a card(s) 905 a, 905 b that may include one or more facts of information as described previously in reference to FIGS. 2 and 4A-6B. The GUI 900 also includes areas for piles 910 a, 910 b, a stack area 915 a, 915 b, total score areas 920 a, 920 b for each player, player information area 925 a, 925 b for displaying persons names or identities which may be inputted on another GUI (not shown). Also provided is a activation zone 930 for learning facts of information on the card during the game and a review control 935 for activating and displaying all the facts of information in the game, as described below.

FIG. 9B is a flow diagram showing steps of playing the game, beginning at step 950. FIG. 9B (and also FIGS. 10B, 11B, 12B, 13B, 14B, 15, 16B, 17B, 18B, and 19B) may equally represent a high-level block diagram of components of the invention implementing the steps thereof. The steps of FIG. 9B (and also FIGS. 10B, 11B, 12B, 13B, 14B, 15, 16B, 17B, 18B, and 19B) may be implemented on computer program code in combination with the appropriate hardware. This computer program code may be stored on storage media such as a diskette, hard disk, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM or tape, as well as a memory storage device or collection of memory storage devices such as read-only memory (ROM) or random access memory (RAM). Additionally, the computer program code can be transferred to a workstation over the Internet or some other type of network.

The facts of information as previously describe may be present in all the virtual card representations in all the electronic embodiments including the various relational aspects of the information to the suits and/or ranks on the card. In electronic versions, the facts of information may be temporarily hidden during stages of the game to achieve learning moments during the game, such as, for example, when a player memorizes facts of information and repeat the information.

The steps of FIG. 9B may be viewed in reference to the exemplary GUI of FIG. 9A. At step 955, an order of play is agreed upon by the players and a player may enter their names or identities for display during the game. At step 960, two stacks 915 a, 915 b of cards may be dealt by the game. At step 965, each player clicks on the top of their respective stack to turn over the top card onto the pile 910 a, 910 b. If the game is playing as a player, then the game automatically turns over a card. The higher rank of card wins the match.

At step 970, the game tallies the score and moves the face-up cards into the activation zone 930 for the winner of the match. The facts(s) of information on each card may appear on the screen when activated (either in the activation zone or on each card 905 a, 905 b) and may flash a predetermined number of times and also may audibly announce the facts associated with the cards as they appear on the screen. Optionally, additional points may be achieved by clicking on the review control 935 which displays a list of all the facts in the game for a player to view. A player may select the facts of information from the list that matches the facts of information in the activation zone or pile (the facts of information are no longer visible in the pile or activation zone) of a match.

At step 975, when a showdown (tie in face value) occurs an additional card may be turned over by each player to determine a winner of the match. The player with the higher card clicks and drags each card to the activation zone 930 to resume play. At step 980, the game replaces each player's stack when empty. The winner of the game may be determined when a player wins “x” (e.g., a pre-agreed number) matches or reaches a pre-agreed total score. At step 985, the game ends.

FIG. 10A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1000. The GUI 1000 may be generated by one or more software components to provide game controls and feedback and includes virtual representations of card(s) 1007 as described previously in reference to FIGS. 2 and 4A-6B. In embodiments, more than 52 cards may be used in the game. The GUI 1000 includes areas for a discard pile 1005, one or more players (in this example, 1-8 players) score totals 1010, a stack area 1015, one or more player piles 1020 (in this example, 1-8), a fact entry control 1030, a review control 1035 and a soft keyboard 1040 for entering textual information during the course of the game. The soft keyboard 1040 may take on any character input variations as required to reflect any characters in fact areas associated with the cards. In embodiments, a hardware keyboard may be used.

FIG. 10B is a flow diagram of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, starting at step 1050. At step 1055, players may enter their names, number of players, and other preliminary details on a first screen (not shown). The game may be designated as player #1 (alternatively, the game may be designated as player #2) if there is only one person playing and may deal out the appropriate layout for the number of players. The object of the game is to score points by memorizing fact(s) of information on cards drawn from the stack.

At step 1058, the stack of cards may be provided by the game in random fashion with an equal amount of cards distributed to each player (e.g., player piles 1020) to begin the game. At step 1060, the game turns over the top card to form the discard pile. At step 1065, the game begins when the first player draws the top card of the stack by clicking on it. The card remains turned over until the game places it into the respective player's pile. The fact(s) of information on the card(s) appears on the display and flashes on and off a predetermined number of times. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the display. At step 1070, optionally, additional points may be scored by clicking on the review control which displays all the facts in the game, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information thereby matching the facts of information on the turned over card(s), the facts of information are no longer visible.

At step 1072, players may draw up to “x” (any predetermined number) amount of cards from the stack in order to prepare to enter the fact of information on the card(s) using the soft keyboard (or alternatively, a hardware keyboard when present), typically starting with the last card first. Cards may not be drawn after a player has begun to enter a fact of information, in one implementation. At step 1075, a fact may be entered by clicking on the “fact” button, then clicking on appropriate buttons in the “fact zone”, i.e., soft keyboard to enter the fact information as appearing on the card(s). At step 1080, the cards may be tallied in the respective players score total if an entry matches the fact on the top card. The rest of their pile is placed on the discard pile when a player does not correctly enter the fact on the top card. A time limit to enter facts may be set for a player to complete their turn. At step 1085, a check is made whether the stack is empty and if so, the game ends at step 1090. Otherwise, play continues with a next player at step 1065.

FIG. 11A is an illustrative embodiment of a game showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1100. The GUI 1100 may be generated by one or more software components that provide game controls and feedback and include a plurality of player hands 1105. In this example, hands for players 1-5 are shown. In embodiments, the game itself may play as one of the players. Included also are scoring zones 1110 for each player (e.g., players 1-5) and likewise, a total score 1115 for each player. Optionally the players' hands and/or score zones may be color coded to reflect a player, thus making it easier to view a particular players hand and/or score. For example, player 1 may be red color coded (perhaps the background colors or outline of the hands) and the other players a different color. A card area 1120 is also provided arranged by suit (i.e., spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs) and rank (i.e., 2 through Ace), as shown. A stack 1125 is also provided from which players may draw cards during the course of the game. A view control 1130 is also provided to view hands along with a review control 1135 for reviewing all facts of information during the game.

FIG. 11B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, beginning at step 1150. The steps of FIG. 11B may be considered in relation with exemplary FIG. 11A. At step 1155, players may enter their names, number of players, and other preliminary details on another GUI screen (not shown). At step 1160, the game displays the game GUI (e.g., 1100) and deals out a hand of seven cards for two and three players or five cards for four and five players. The game may designate itself as player #1 and turns up the opponent's hand if only one person is playing. At step 1165, a player may click on view then click on their respective hand (e.g., one of the hands 1-5) to view the contents of their hand.

At step 1170, the first player (determined typically by mutually agreed upon order) may click on any opponent's hand to highlight the opponent's hand (i.e., one of the other hands of hands 1105) then click on a card in the card area (alternatively, a player may click and drag a card to the card area to make a play) to make a request to complete a “book” of four suits of the same rank. At step 1175, if the requested rank is not contained in the highlighted opponent's hand or does not complete a book, the player draws two cards from the stack and the player's turn is over. The top card of the stack may be drawn by clicking on it and dragging it to the hand. The drawn card may not typically be turned over until dragged into the hand.

At step 1180, if a drawn card completes a book, or if a book is completed by the aid of an opponent, the four matching rank cards are automatically moved into the player's respective score zone and tallied in the respective total score. At step 1185, the facts of information may appear on the screen individually and flash on and off a predetermined number of times. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen. At step 1190, the drawn card is “turned-over” to hide the fact area. Optionally, at step 1195, bonus turns and additional points may be scored by clicking on review, which displays all or a subset of all the facts involved in the game. By clicking on the displayed fact(s) to match a fact(s) of information that appeared on the last drawn card within a preset time period (e.g., 4 seconds), the player may receive an extra turn or points for correct answers. This reinforces learning of the facts of information.

At step 1197, a check is made whether the stack is exhausted. If not, play continues with the next player at step 1165. If, however, the stack is exhausted, the winner of the game may be the player who has scored the most points at the time any player runs out of cards and at step 1199, the game ends.

FIG. 12A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1200. The GUI 1200 may be produced by one or more software components that provides game controls and feedback and provides a layout area 1205 for representing a 52 card deck for learning, as previously discussed. A review control 1210 may also be provided for reviewing facts of information during a game. Also provided is a score zone 1215, for showing score totals for each player in the game. In this example, totals for twelve players are shown, but any number of players from 1-12 may play, the number of score totals being adjusted accordingly.

FIG. 12B is a flow diagram of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, beginning at step 1250. The steps of FIG. 12B may be considered in conjunction with exemplary FIG. 12A. At step 1255, players may enter their names, number of players, and other preliminary details on another screen (not shown). The game may be designated as a player if there is only one person playing. At step 1257, the game displays the GUI (e.g., GUI 1200) and randomly distributes the cards face down in the layout area 1205. At step 1260, each player takes a turn by clicking on any two cards (or other predetermined number) in the layout area to turn them over. At step 1265, if the face value of the turned over cards do not make a match, the game turns the cards face down, then the next player takes a turn at step 1260.

If, however, the cards match in face value, then at step 1270, the player clicks on both cards and drags those cards into their respective score zone to collect points (i.e., the points are tallied). The number of points may be associated with the rank of the cards, or alternative, fixed points. The fact(s) of information on each card appears on the screen and may flash on and off a predetermined number of times. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen. In embodiments, bonus turns and additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review which displays all the facts of information in the game, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information that match the information on the two matching cards. At step 1275, a check is made if all cards have been matched. If so, the game ends at step 1280, else the game continues with the current player at step 1260. A winner is typically a player who has scored the most points at the time all of the cards have been matched.

FIG. 13A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1300. The GUI may be produced by one or more software components that provides game controls and feedback and includes a card area 1305 for organizing and presenting cards by suits and ranks as shown. Facts of information are associated with individual cards to provide opportunities of learning, as previously discussed. The GUI 1300 also provides a plurality of players' hands 1310, one for each player in the game, in this illustration, four hands (the amount of cards shown in each hand is illustrative and is not meant to be limiting). Also provided is a pile 1315 for discarding and may vary in number of cards during the course of a game. Cards in the pile may be placed overlapping so that the rank and suit of all (or a subset) of the cards in the pile may be viewed. Also provided are scoring zones 1325 for each player in the game which records cards acquired by each player as described below, also typically arranged so that card rank and suit may be viewed. Also included are score total areas 1330, one for each player. The score areas and/or players' hands may be color coded (or other visual identifiers such as a player's initials or name near each hand) for easier recognition by players and the color codes may be assigned prior to starting the game.

The GUI 1300 also provides a review option 1332 for reviewing facts of information during the course of the game and a discard control 1335 in order to permit a player to discard cards. Also included are a spread control 1340 for controlling a spread, described below, and a view control 1345 for viewing a player's hand. One of ordinary skill in the art would recognize that the order/placement of objects of the GUI layout may take on various arrangements and are not limited to the exemplary GUI arrangement as shown in any illustrative GUI herein.

FIG. 13B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, starting at step 1350. The steps of FIG. 13B may be considered in reference to the GUI of exemplary FIG. 13A. At step 1355, the players may enter their names, number of players, and other preliminary details on another GUI screen. The game, itself, may be designated as a player and may turn the opponent's hand up if only one person is playing. The object of the game is to score points by forming a spread. A spread may be formed by matching three or four cards of the same rank, or by acquiring a sequence of three or more cards of the same suit.

At step 1360, the game displays the GUI (e.g., 1300) and turns up a hand of seven cards for each player. The remaining cards are placed in the stack and the top card is turned over to form the discard pile. At step 1365, the game begins when the first player draws the top card from the stack, or draws the face-up card from the pile. At step 1370, if a spread is not formed in the player's hand, then at step 1373, the player discards one card onto the pile by clicking on the discard button then clicking on a card in the card area (alternatively, a player may click and drag a card to make a play) to end the turn. The next player continues in the same manner, at step 1365.

If, however, a spread is formed, then at step 1375, a player may draw any amount of cards from the top of the discard pile, but if more than one card is drawn, the last card of those acquired in succession may typically be formed into a spread and placed faceup in their score area. Alternatively, a player may likewise pick up a fragment of a spread from the pile and place it in their corresponding score area if the card(s) can be added to any previously scored spread or fragment “on the table” (i.e., any spread), including any opponent's spread.

At step 1380, a player discards then may draw one card at the end of each turn. The player draws one card only if a discard cannot be made. The cards may be drawn from the pile by clicking on a playable card. The top card of the stack may be drawn by clicking on it; the game may turn the clicked card over if there is only one player, then places it in the player's hand.

At step 1385, when a card(s) is scored, a check for the last card in a hand being discarded onto the pile is made, and if so, play ends at step 1399. If not, play continues with step 1365. A player that scores with the last card in their hand must draw one card from the stack on their next turn. Typical point value of each card is “x” points (predetermined) for Ace to nine and “2x” points for ten to king. Also, “5x” points may be added to the score of a player who makes the final discard in a round. Also, players may subtract the amount of points remaining in their hand to adjust the score. Typically, the player with the highest total number of points over “100x” wins the game.

During play, the fact(s) of information associated with a scored card(s) may appear on the screen and flash on and off a specified number of times. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen. Bonus turns and additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review, which displays all or a subset of all the facts in the game, and clicking on the correct fact(s) of information associated with a scored card(s).

FIG. 14A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1400. The GUI 1400 may be produced by one or more software components that provides controls and feedback and includes a card area 1405 for arrangement of cards by suit and rank as shown. Also included are players' hands 1410 (one for every player in the game), a stack 1415, a pile 1420 and a score area 1425 for total scores (one for every player in the game.) Further included are a review control 1430 for reviewing facts of information in the game and a discard control 1435.

FIG. 14B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, beginning at step 1450. The steps of FIG. 14B may be viewed in conjunction with exemplary FIG. 14A. At step 1455, players may enter their names, number of players, and other preliminary details on the first screen. The game may be designated as a player and may turn the opponent's hand up if only one person is playing. Opponents typically may not view another player's hand. An object of the game is to score points while removing all of the cards from your hand by matching the suit or rank of the top card on the pile and also to learn new facts of information. A player may remove one card from their respective hand per turn, or draws one card from the stack, if a match is not made. A drawn card may be discarded if it is playable.

At step 1457, the game generates and displays the GUI (e.g., GUI 1400). Each player receives a random hand of eight cards (or other predetermined number of cards). The remaining cards are placed in the stack and the top card is turned over to form the discard pile.

At step 1460, the game begins when the first player (and thereafter the next player) attempts to match the face value of the pile card with a card in their hand. At step 1465, a check is made if there is a match, and if so, then at step 1475, the player discards on the discard pile. If by discarding, a player changes the suit of the top pile card by matching the rank or playing a “wild” card, the fact(s) of information on the card (i.e., associated with the card) may appear on the screen and may flash on and off a specified number of times with “x” (i.e., predetermined, which may be preset prior to starting the game) amount of points being tallied. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen. Bonus turns and additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review control, which may display all the facts or subset of all the facts in the game. The player may then click on the correct facts(s) of information that matches the fact of information associated with the last played card. The play may be made by clicking on the discard button then clicking on a appropriate matching card in the card area (alternatively, a player may click and drag a card to make a play).

At step 1480, a check is made if the last card in a hand is played. If so, then at step 1485, the game ends. If the last card not played, the next player continues play at step 1460. If, however, at step 1465, there is no match, a card may be drawn from the stack and play continues with the next player at step 1460.

Alternatively, at step 1475, a player may change the top card of the pile to a suit of choice by playing a designated wild card(s). The direction of play is reversed when a four (or pre-designated card), for example, is discarded. When a two (or pre-designated card) is discarded the following player receives two cards from the stack. The discard pile is automatically reshuffled by the game whenever the stack runs out of cards.

FIG. 15 is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, starting at step 1500. The steps of FIG. 15 may be viewed in conjunction with exemplary FIG. 14A. At step 1505, a player(s) may enter their name and other preliminary details on another screen. At step 1510, the game displays the GUI (e.g., GUI 1400) and accepts input for playing the game. The game may be designated as a player if there is only one person playing and deals out a face-up hand of seven cards to each player to form one or more player hands. The remaining cards form a pile and the top card is turned over to form the discard pile.

One object of the game is to score points while removing all of the cards from a player's hand by matching the suit of a card led in each round or play. Each of the players removes one or no cards from their hand per trick or round of play by clicking on the discard control button then clicking on the card in the card area (optional). Alternatively, a player may click and drag a card to make a play.

At step 1515, play begins when a player leads any card from their hand. At step 1520, a check is made if the next player can follow suit. If not, at step 1525, the next player draws two cards (if the stack has cards) from the stack by clicking on it and play continues with step 1520. If a play is made, then at step 1530, the player discards a card from their hand.

At step 1535, the player with the highest card of the suit lead wins each trick and leads any card in the new round of play. At the end of each trick, a fact(s) of information associated with one or more of the played card(s) in the trick appears on the screen and may flash on and off a predetermined number of times. This flashing of the fact of information provides a learning moment. The game may also audibly announce the fact(s) of information as they appear on the screen. At step 1540, the game tallies points for each player in the score zone. Optionally, bonus turns and additional points may be scored by clicking on review control, which displays all (or a subset of) the facts information in the game. A player may then select one or more fact information that matches a played card by clicking on the correct fact(s) of information.

If the stack runs out of cards, the player passes on their turn when they do not have a playable card. At step 1545, a check is made if a player is out of cards and if so, the game ends at step 1550, otherwise the play continues at step 1520. The first player to run out of cards will receive “x” (i.e., predetermined) amount of points.

FIG. 16A is an illustrative embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1600. The GUI 1600 may be produced by one or more software components that provides controls and feedback that includes one or more player's hands 1605 (four shown in this example), a stack 1610, a pile 1615, and a score total 1620 for every player (likewise, four in this example). A card area 1625 is also provided for discarding cards.

FIG. 16B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, starting at step 1650. The steps of FIG. 16B may be viewed in conjunction with exemplary FIG. 16A. At step 1655, a player may enter their name and other preliminary details on another GUI screen. The game displays the GUI (e.g., GUI 1600) and may be designated as a player if there is only one person playing and deals out a hand of seven cards to each player. At step 1660, the remaining cards form the stack, and the top card is turned over to form the discard pile.

At step 1665, play begins when a player leads any card from their hand. At step 1670, a check is made if the next player is able to follow suit and, if not, at step 1675 the same next player draws two cards from the stack by clicking on it. A drawn card is typically not turned over by the game until the player drags it to their hand. A drawn card may also be played. If, however, the player is able to follow suit then, at step 1680, the player may click on the discard control and then click in the card area for the appropriate location in matching the card identity to make a play; alternatively, a player may click and drag a card to make a play.

At step 1685, the player with the highest card of the suit led wins the trick and leads any card in the new round of play. At the end of each trick a fact(s) of information appears on the screen and may flash on and off a predetermined number of times to create a learning moment. The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen to reinforce the learning. At step 1690, the game tallies points for the current player. Bonus turns and additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information as displayed which matches the information on the played card. This also creates a learning moment for learning the information on the card.

At step 1695, a check is made if a player has played all cards in their hand, and if so, the game stops at 1699, otherwise, play continues at step 1670. If the stack runs out of cards, a player may pass on their turn when they do not have a playable card. The first player to run out of cards will receive “x” (i.e., predetermined) amount of points and the game ends.

An object of the embodiment is to score points while removing all of the cards from your hand by matching the suit of card led in each round or play. Each of the players removes either one or no cards from their hand per trick or round of play by clicking on the discard button then clicking on the card in the card area.

FIG. 17A is an illustration of an embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by reference numeral 1700. The GUI (e.g., GUI 1700) may be produced by one or more software components and includes one or more player hands 1705, a dealer's hand 1710, a stack 1715, an activation zone 1720, and one or more player totals 1725 (in this example, eight for eight players). A review control 1730 may also be provided. An object of the game is to add up more points than the dealer without acquiring over twenty-one points in each round of play. Aces are either one point or eleven points, court cards (e.g., jack, queen, king) are ten points, and all other cards are face value.

FIG. 17B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, starting at step 1750. The steps of FIG. 17B may be considered in relation to exemplary FIG. 17A. At step 1755, a player may enter their name and other preliminary details on another GUI screen (not shown). The game may be designated as the dealer if there is only one person playing and deals out a hand of two cards to the one or more players.

At step 1760, the game displays the GUI 1700 and deals out two face-up cards to the one or more players to create a hand per player (e.g., 1705) and a hand to the dealer (i.e., 1710). At step 1765, one additional card is dealt face down per player and one additional card faceup for the dealer, expanding each hand accordingly. At step 1770, a player may receive more cards by clicking on the stack (“hit”), or optionally a “hit” control button may be provided for obtaining a “hit”.

At step 1775, a player loses the round if they have an equal or lesser amount of points than the dealer or if their total is over twenty-one. The game tallies a score and activates all of the faceup cards on the table each time the dealer wins. Cards may be activated by being moved into the activation zone. At step 1780, the fact(s) of information on the card(s) may flash on or off a predetermined number of times on the screen. Additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information. At step 1785, a check is made whether the players are finished and, if so, then at step 1790 the game ends. Otherwise play continues at step 1760. The game may end when the players agree.

In another embodiment of the invention, steps of a game may be conveyed by the following rules:

    • a) An object of the game may be to add up more points than the dealer without acquiring over twenty-one points in each round of play.
    • b) Each player receives one card face down and one card faceup. Play begins by a player “left of the dealer.” A player may request an additional card (“hit”), which is turned faceup.
    • c) A player may request more hits but loses the round if the player has an equal or lesser amount of points than the dealer, or if the total is over twenty-one. The dealer may not “hit” with a total of seventeen or more points.
    • d) Each time a card is tuned up, the player must state one fact of information on the card to qualify to win the round. Each player is the dealer one time per game. The player who wins the most rounds may be declared the winner.

FIG. 18A is an illustrative embodiment showing a GUI of the invention, generally denoted by reference numeral 1800. The GUI 1800 may be produced by one or more software components and provides seven columns of cards 1805, each column with varying amount of cards, as described below, four bases 1810 four “holding” aces, a stack 1815, a pile 1820, a total points area 1825, a review control 1830 and an activation zone 1835.

FIG. 18B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, beginning at step 1850. The steps of FIG. 18B may be viewed in relation to exemplary FIG. 18A. At step 1855, the player may enter their name and other preliminary details/identities on another GUI screen (not shown). The game may be designated as the dealer since there is typically only one person playing. At step 1860, the game displays the GUI (e.g., GUI 1800) and arranges seven columns 1805 of cards (randomly shuffled) to begin play; each column increasing in card count from one to seven. At step 1865, the player activates a card by clicking and dragging it into the activation zone. At step 1870, the fact(s) of information associated with the card appears on the screen for learning the fact(s) of information and the card returns to the original position in the columns.

At step 1875, optionally, the bases may be created when Aces come into play, i.e., when turned over by the player from the stack or the columns. The Aces form a base whereby cards may be moved in sequence by suit matching Ace's suit. At step 1877, a check is made if all the bases are complete. If so, then the game finishes at step 1879. Otherwise, at step 1880, face-up cards in the layout may be built down in sequence by alternating colors. Any layout card may be connected in sequence to another in another column. At step 1885, an exposed (i.e., at the end of a column) face-down card may be turned faceup. The face-up card may be activated to continue play.

At step 1890, optionally, an empty column may be replaced by a King or a sequence with a King at the bottom. The top card of any column may be moved to the bases but only Aces may be immediately transferred. The game tallies the score when a card is moved to a base. Additional points (optional) may be scored by clicking on review which displays all facts of information, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information matching a currently moved card.

At step 1895, the player may click on the stack to turn over the top card which may be played on the layout (i.e., a column) or base. At step 1897, a check is made to see if any play may be made. If not, then the game ends at step 1899. Otherwise, the game continues at step 1865.

The game may also audibly announce the facts of information as they appear on the screen. The review zone may include facts of information contained in all of the cards pertaining to the game. Facts of information in the review zone may also be audibly announced as they appear on the screen.

FIG. 19A is an illustration of an embodiment of the invention showing a GUI, generally denoted by 1900. The GUI 1900 may be produced by one or more software components and includes a card area 1905 arranged with logically related labels as shown. The labels may be text or color schemes in addition to or alternative to the text labels. The GUI 1900 also includes one or more player's hands 1910, a respective score area 1915 per player, a respective score total 1920 per player, a draw control 1930 and a review control 1935.

FIG. 19B is a flow chart of an embodiment showing steps of the invention, beginning at step 1950. The steps of FIG. 19B may be considered with reference with exemplary FIG. 19A. At step 1955, the game provides the GUI (e.g., GUI 1900). Players may enter their name, number of players and other preliminary details on a first screen (not shown). The game deals out all of the cards face down to all of the players and displays the appropriate layout for players using computers or other visual devices. The game may be designed as one or more players and turns up the opponents(s) cards if only one person is playing. A player may click on view then click on their hand to view their hand.

At step 1960, the first player may pick a card by clicking on any card in any opponent's hand. At step 1965, a check is made to determine if the drawn card makes a match on their own hand. If not, the next player takes a turn at step 1960. If there is a match, then at step 1870, the player clicks on a button in the card area matching the identifier on the two cards. There are two cards in the deck that have the same identifiers. By clicking on the card area, the game recognizes the match and thus knows the point counts. At step 1875, the game tallies the cards and places them into the score area for the appropriate respective player. The player may then take another turn.

At step 1980, when a drawn card makes a match, a fact(s) of information (optional) may appear on the screen and flash on and off a predetermined number of times to promote learning the fact of information. The game may optionally announce the fact(s) of information as they appear on the screen. Bonus turns and additional points (optionally) may be scored by clicking on review which displays all the facts of information in the game, then clicking on the correct fact(s) of information.

At step 1982, a check is made whether the current player still has a card. If not, at step 1990, the player is out of the game, and play continues at step 1960. Otherwise, if the player still has a card, then at step 1985, a check is made whether the player has only one card and whether the card is a specially marked “Z” card. If so, then the game finishes with the “Z” holder the winner. Otherwise, play continues at step 1960.

Alternatively, when a player picks a card from another player, it is typically a player with the most cards. Alternatively, a winner may be the player with the most points. A player who may run out of cards is out of the play until the game is over. The player with the “z” card (a uniquely marked card) at the end of the game receives an “x” (i.e., predetermined) amount of bonus points. The wording of the fact areas may change to reflect the subject area as necessary.

Sound and visual effects, additional graphics, music, and other particulars may be added to enhance play in any of the electronic embodiments by turning on these options. Also, a “block” may be included to deter copying the software. This invention may be used and played on telephones, hand held devices, personal digital assistants, and any other computing devices capable of providing displays.

While the invention has been described in terms of preferred embodiments, those skilled in the arts will recognize that the invention can be practiced with modification within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8162734 *Aug 30, 2005Apr 24, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationCard gaming machine
WO2007091080A1 *Feb 9, 2007Aug 16, 2007Ronald William GoodmanNumeracy game with playing pieces
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/13
International ClassificationG09B19/02, A63F1/02, A63F3/04, G09B19/22
Cooperative ClassificationG09B19/02, A63F2001/027, G09B19/22, A63F3/0478, A63F3/0402, A63F2003/046, A63F1/02
European ClassificationA63F3/04B, G09B19/22, A63F1/02, G09B19/02, A63F3/04L