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Publication numberUS20050093229 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/612,675
Publication dateMay 5, 2005
Filing dateJul 2, 2003
Priority dateJul 2, 2003
Publication number10612675, 612675, US 2005/0093229 A1, US 2005/093229 A1, US 20050093229 A1, US 20050093229A1, US 2005093229 A1, US 2005093229A1, US-A1-20050093229, US-A1-2005093229, US2005/0093229A1, US2005/093229A1, US20050093229 A1, US20050093229A1, US2005093229 A1, US2005093229A1
InventorsDennis Dewayne, Carolyn King
Original AssigneeDennis Dewayne, King Carolyn E.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Games with unique deck, dice or image
US 20050093229 A1
Abstract
A deck of cards/dice, real or simulated, characterized by a Master Joker, colored jokers, card suits and null cards. These suits are of any two, three, four or more fundamental colors, two or more suits of each color per joker under a designated Master Joker with an optional methodology to capture cards from opponents. Depending on the game, null cards can have very dramatic influence. The preferred form of this present invention is a deck of playing cards and related family of card games. Peg boards may be used to tally scores. Card backs are usually uniform. This deck has the “look and feel” of a traditional deck with more challenging and exciting options. For example, during the play, players may demand an opponent “Toss” (forfeit) a trick, then that opponent may “DoubleCross” and repossess the original cards plus additional cards. These decks and family of games are known as Toss.
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Claims(20)
1. Unique card decks for one or more players, comprising: a plurality of cards with a Boss (Master) Joker or replacement Boss Joker designated by indicia, name or other markings over all of the suits, over a plurality of named jokers, suits and nulls, wherein said named jokers are each named after one of the fundamental colors of the deck, among any different fundamental colors, wherein said named colors are the designated colors of a plurality of suits, two or more suits per fundamental color, each suit of said suit group being enveloped by a fundamental color, linked to a single, joker by indicia and/or suit color, wherein each suit has equal sets of distinct indicia and all suits display the hierarchical sequence and values of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King and Ace, with non-suited null cards having no designated color or value markings, wherein said assemblage of cards is used for playing, trick taking, melding, scoring, placing or collecting wagers.
2. Games of cards, dice, tiles or spinning reels for play by at least one player, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, comprising: game rules encompassing a plurality of cards, dice or computer images with suits grouped by color, constituting two, three or more groups of suits, each distinct suit of said suit group being enveloped by a single color of one of the fundamental colors of the deck, each group of suits being linked by fundamental color to a joker reflecting the group's different distinct suit indicia and color, with one Boss Joker or replacement Boss Joker, empowered by all of the fundamental colors and indicia of all suits, wherein said plurality of suits have a hierarchical sequence, with the Boss Joker above all cards in power with the assemblage of jokers, suits and null cards used for playing, trick taking, melding, scoring, placing or collecting wagers.
3. Board and peg devices for scoring by at least one player, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained to provide an ongoing method of scoring to a total of 800 or more points, comprising: said scoring is accomplished within a board, made of wood, plastic, or similar materials, or image thereof, with three columns of holes, ten holes designated for one values, ten holes designated for ten values, eight holes designated for hundred values, with additional holes designated for the upright storage of said pegs, exact size and shape of the boards and or pegs are not important.
4. The standard card deck derivative of claim 1, further comprising distinct indicia on a master joker asserting it is the “Boss Joker” over three other jokers, one joker for each of the three fundamental colors found within the groupings of the six distinct suits, with suit color and suit indicia linked to single jokers by distinct indicia and the color displayed on each of the three jokers, where each joker's color name precedes the word joker, for example, “Black” Joker, “Red” Joker, or “Blue” Joker respectively on each of the three different jokers with additional distinct indicia on the Boss Joker reflecting “Boss” Joker and all three fundamental colors (of any three fundamental colors) of the deck plus the six different sets of suit indicia (of any six sets of indicia) wherein the six suits of cards, of three fundamental suit colors, paired into two suits per color, each said suit of six said sets includes thirteen cards for a subtotal of 78 cards, increasing to 84 cards including the four jokers and two nulls, said suits each having a hierarchical sequence representing 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King, and Ace, with each standard deck comprising;
(a) two cards each having no indicia value or distinct color on their front face thereof, representing no suit or value other than null (no value or power);
(b) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 2 (two);
(c) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 3 (three);
(d) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 4 (four);
(e) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 5 (five);
(f) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 6 (six);
(g) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 7 (seven);
(h) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 8 (eight);
(i) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 9 (nine);
(j) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 10 (ten);
(k) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Jack;
(l) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Queen;
(m) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of King;
(n) six cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Ace;
(o) three joker cards each having two distinct suit indicia and color;
(p) one Boss Joker card over all six suits and all three colors;
(q) each of said cards in paragraphs (a) through (p) above wherein the rear face of said cards are identical.
5. The premium card deck derivative of claim 1, further comprising distinct indicia on a master joker asserting it is the eight-suited “Boss Joker” over a lesser, six-suited Boss Joker and over four other jokers, one joker for each of the four fundamental colors found within the groupings of the eight distinct suits, with suit color and suit indicia linked to single jokers by distinct indicia and the color displayed on each of the four jokers, where each joker's color name precedes the word joker, for example, “Black” Joker, “Red” Joker, “Blue” Joker or “Green” Joker respectively on each of the four different jokers with additional distinct indicia on the Boss Joker reflecting “Boss” Joker and all four fundamental colors (of any four fundamental colors) of the deck plus the eight different sets of suit indicia (of any eight sets of indicia) wherein the eight suits of cards, of four fundamental suit colors, paired into two suits per color, each said suit of eight said sets includes thirteen cards for a subtotal 104 cards, increasing to 113 cards including six jokers, (boss, replacement boss, plus four jokers of color) and three nulls, said suits each having a hierarchical sequence representing 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King, and Ace, with each premium deck comprising:
(a) three cards each having no indicia value or distinct color on their front face thereof, representing no suit or value other than null (no value or power);
(b) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 2 (two);
(c) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 3 (three);
(d) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 4 (four);
(e) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 5 (five);
(f) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 6 (six);
(g) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 7 (seven);
(h) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 8 (eight);
(i) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 9 (nine);
(j) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of 10 (ten);
(k) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Jack;
(l) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Queen;
(m) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of King;
(n) eight cards each having distinct indicia and identifiable color on the front face thereof representing the suit set and a second indicia set representing a rank of Ace;
(o) four joker cards each having two distinct indicia and colors;
(p) one Boss Joker card having the distinct indicia of six suits and all three colors;
(q) one replacement Boss Joker card over all eight suits and four colors;
(r) each of said cards in paragraphs (a) through (q) above wherein the rear face of said cards are identical.
6. Computerized/electro-mechanical sessions of the games of claim 2, further comprising, wherein scoring means keeping an ongoing display or calculation of the values of cards played, tricks taken and or melded as points, wherein said scoring can be done by a computer, an electromechanical device, or by the use of an image of a playing and scoring system, peg boards, pegs and or dice; said scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a card, hand or game.
7. The board and peg device of claim 3, further comprising, wherein a number of pegs are provided, in multiples of at least two each, for each of the fundamental colors of the card deck.
8. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a rummy-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
9. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a spades-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
10. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a hearts-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
11. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a poker-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards forming six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three or four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked, by fundamental color, to a joker of the same fundamental color, with one Boss Joker or replacement Boss Joker, empowered by all fundamental colors, wherein said plurality of cards have a hierarchical sequence with the Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits and null cards used for playing, trick taking melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
12. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a draw poker-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards forming six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three or four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked, by fundamental color, to a joker of the same fundamental color, with one Boss Joker or replacement Boss Joker, empowered by all fundamental colors, wherein said plurality of cards have a hierarchical sequence with the Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits and null cards used for playing, trick taking melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
13. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a blackjack-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards forming six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three or four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked, by fundamental color, to a joker of the same fundamental color, with one Boss Joker or replacement Boss Joker, empowered by all fundamental colors, wherein said plurality of cards have a hierarchical sequence with the Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits and null cards used for playing, trick taking melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
14. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein an acey-deucey-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
15. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a canasta-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
16. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a sheep's head-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
17. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a solitaire-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
18. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a cribbage-like card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and six to eight suits, constituting pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three to four fundamental colors of the deck, each pair of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
19. A card game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a “Toss The BOSS” card game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of cards formed by null cards, jokers and suits, constituting groups of suits, each of said suit group being enveloped by a single color of one of the fundamental colors of the deck, each group of suits being linked by a single fundamental color to a distinct joker with indicia representing two or more suits of the same fundamental color, with a Boss Joker above all in hierarchical succession of the sets of suits used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
20. A dice game of claim 2, further comprising, wherein a game is played, wherein rules are followed and scores maintained, scoring also pertaining to possible collecting or paying off wagers placed on the out come of a hand or game, using a plurality of dice forming two nulls indicated by the word “Toss” with said six suits of dice divided into fourteen (14) six-sided cubes which are divided equally among six suits, constituting three pairs of suits, each of said suit pair being enveloped by a single color of one of the three fundamental colors of the dice, each pair of suits being linked by fundamental color, to a joker of the same fundamental color, with one Boss Joker, empowered by all three of the fundamental colors, wherein said plurality of dice have a hierarchical sequence with the Boss Joker above all in the succession of the sets of dice, with all indicia, values and “suit” markings distributed in random order across the 84 flat surfaces of said cubes, linked by play, to other six-sided cubes wherein the set of dice, or portions thereof, are used for playing, trick taking, melding or scoring in a standard or deluxe format with the use of jokers and nulls being optional.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims precedence to and benefits of provisional patent application: Games With Unique Deck or Dice; EF354355402US, Jul. 7, 2002 submitted by Dennis D. King and Carolyn E. King.

1,448,441 March 1923 Haas 273/305
1,632,941 June 1927 Abell 273/303
4,006,906 February 1977 Gruber 273/292
5,106,100 April 1992 Yih 273/292
5,887,873 March 1999 Freeman 273/303
6,070,877 June 2000 Saint-Victor 273/303

Other Publications: Hoyle's, Rules of Games, ISBN 0-452-28313-2.

No federally sponsored research or development.

No reference to microfiche appendix.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention pertains and relates to card and dice games with either a true physical deck, set of dice, or images thereof, displayed by use of any electronic, image producing, mechanical and or electromechanical devices. Games have been played throughout history in which symbols and colors are assigned with a particular rank or relationship determining relative value or strength of a player's position within play of the game. Such games include games of chance with the use of instrumentality's such as, tiles, cards, spinning wheels and reels as in slot machines or any other devices with displayed images or mechanical devices. The advent of computers and associated monitors and their use within the gaming industry has provided essentially unlimited potential for the expansion of games into different instrumentality's as well as providing the older, traditional instrumentality's in different formats. Many different types of cards decks and card games have been proposed in an attempt to provide games that require skill and strategy yet fun to play. Most of these, however, require learning whole new sets of rules or players have to get used to new decks with strange and unfamiliar symbols and indicia.

In view of the previous disadvantages inherent in the known types of card, dice, slot machines and computer games now present in the prior art, this present invention provides improved card decks and games wherein more playing skill can be utilized. As such, the common purpose of the present invention, described subsequently in greater detail, is to provide new and improved decks of cards and games which have the advantages of prior art games plus many new and interesting features with few, if any, disadvantages.

Some scholars believe the traditional deck evolved from the tarot deck, which has four suits and auxiliary cards which may be found serving as a fifth suit. The number of cards, suits and colors in a “traditional” deck is arbitrary. This limits the kind of games and number of people or teams that can play and, often, alters the game play by adding or omitting certain cards to make the deal come out even for the different numbers of players.

There have been surprisingly few attempts at substantively changing the organization of a deck of cards. U.S. Pat. No. 1,448,441 to Haas (1923) shows four suits, two pairs distinguished by symbol and two distinguished by color. The intent was not to create functional color groups equivalent to, but independent from, suits. Instead, his patent uses multiple suit symbols, color, and two sets of values to create subsets and supersets of suits. In trick taking games, an obvious focus of the Haas patent, this construction allows trump to be a suit, two suits, or even half a suit. In melding, discarding, gambling, and solitaire games, there seems to be little usefulness to this configuration which is often confusing and uncoordinated. While his patent describes multiple suits and has cards of color groups, it is so different from both traditional decks and this present invention called the Toss & DoubleCross™ deck and card games that there is no apparent conflict of patent.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,632,941 to Abell (1927) discloses a specific game using a 60 card deck that separates color and suit but, as in the Haas patent, it fails to make them equivalent. Instead, color groups are suits, and “spot suits” are subsets of suits, whose primary purpose is perhaps to add complexity to a scoring system, but whose actual primary function complicated and confused card ranking. Within Abell's scheme, in which both “spot suits” and “color suits” are ranked or ordered (the former by geometric shape, the latter by an arcane system which even Abell has difficulty explaining), a five could be higher than a six but lower than a deuce and vice versa. This bizarre arrangement, confusing to one of average skill and baffling to most prospective players, is enough to discourage the player audience. Far from taking advantage of the benefits of separating color and suit, Abell's invention seems stratified and intractable.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,006,906 to Gruber (1977) discloses a specific game using a one hundred twenty and one (121) card deck that seems to split color and suit. The card game of the invention comprises a creator's card and one hundred twenty (120) other cards, which are divided into twelve groups each having ten cards numbered zero to nine. The one hundred twenty cards are divided into four groups, each having thirty cards of the same pattern. Thus, thirty cards have a bar pattern, thirty have an arc pattern, thirty have a point pattern, and the remaining thirty cards have a semicircle pattern. The one hundred twenty cards are divided into three groups, each having forty cards of the same color of one of three different colors. Thus, forty cards are red, forty cards are green and the remaining forty cards are blue. However, nothing in the patent specifies that suit, color, and rank must be genuinely autonomous, and their exact relationship remains obscure. While this patent has cards of three color groups it is so different from both traditional decks and this present invention that there is no apparent conflict of patent.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,106,100 to Yih (1992) is a deck of six sets of six suits with sixty four (64) total cards. Sixty of these cards, representing “Students, Farmers, Soldiers, Factory Workers, Clerks, Teachers, Doctors, Bureaucrats, Mayors and Generals” are of three colored suits, red, yellow and blue while one “Student leader” card is multi-suited and two “Vice-Premiers” have no color nor does the “Chairman.” This game is different from known card games in several respects. For example, rather than playing cards according to a particular suit, the card game requires players to play cards in a particular category. In playing the game, there are three major rules of ranking: 1. Color-when all numerical values are equal, color or suit ranks are, red (highest), yellow (second highest), blue (lowest); 2. Timing-first one down rule subsequent cards laid on a play cannot be exactly the same as the cards previously played, but must be of a higher rank. That is, a vice-premier cannot be played directly on another vice-premier already played. In the same manner, pairs cannot be played on pairs of exactly the same rank and color; and 3. Wild cards—a four-of-a-kind (gang of four), five-of-a-kind (gang of five), six-of-a-kind (gang of six), seven-of-a-kind (gang of seven) are always wild. It would seem that use and popularity would be gravely restricted because the Yih (1992) deck does not have the traditional “look and feel.” No claim therein is made relating to color or colors of cards, suits or jokers structured to three sets of same colored suits nor a Boss Joker nor null cards. While this patent has suit cards of three color groups it is so different from both traditional decks and this present invention that there is no apparent conflict of patent.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,070,877 to Saint-Victor (2000) is a deck of six sets of six suits multiplied by six symbols, i.e. birds, butterflies, flowers, horse, fish and turtles. The deck ends up with five hundred and four (504) cards containing 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, jack, queen, king, ace and 6 jokers. The unwieldy deck size, as well as the look and feel are limiting factors towards any popularity. No claim therein is made relating to color or colors of cards, suits or jokers structured to three sets of same colored suits nor a Boss Joker.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,887,873 to Freeman (1999) discloses a unique deck of playing cards of many strange and confusing symbols. It offers three suits of three colors (as opposed to six suits of three colors as claimed by one form of this invention) within a fifty four (54) card master deck and seventy two (72) cards within a member deck. Within these combinations there are multiple ruling jokers and regular jokers. Once again, limited use and popularity is severely restricted because this deck does not have the traditional “look and feel” of which the majority of card playing population is familiar with and willing to accept. While this patent has three suits of three color groups it is so different from both traditional decks and this present invention that there is no apparent conflict of patent.

Because of the disadvantages of traditional decks, other alternative games find wide spread use. A successful alternative game is PARKER BROTHERS™ popular ROOK™ card deck. See HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, pages 114 through page 116. This deck uses different colors for each of the four suits and moves dramatically away from the “look and feel” of the traditional deck. By assigning a different color to each of the four traditional suits, this approach is actually less flexible than having two colors and four suits, i.e. as used in most solitaire games, where one alternates the two colors from the four suits; with a Rook deck, they are equivalent.

Conventional, traditional four suit decks lack special or auxiliary cards many other games require. This forces other cards into “wild card” or “special power” engagements for which they are ill-suited. The result of confusing rules and asymmetrical rankings makes games harder to learn and dramatically limits their appeal. Although limiting factors of conventional decks of cards are often disguised by anamnesis and recognition, then sanctified by traditions, the standard, four suited, two colored deck can easily be improved.

As a consequence, there exists a need for card decks and games that require more strategy and skill but are not excessively complicated to play. This present invention and games offered for play will appeal to a wide audience looking for card games that are new and exciting, yet seemingly familiar in the “look and feel” like a the traditional deck. By adding the elements of unpredictability and surprise the games are much more challenging. Therefore, the new game deck(s) would appeal to an audience that includes children, teenagers, adults and senior citizens alike.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention, named Toss & DoubleCross™, is a deck or decks of cards, set of dice represented by physical cards and or electromechanical or displayed images having a plurality of fundamental colors, each fundamental color representing two or more suits, linked to a joker of the same fundamental color, under a Boss Joker. Each suit contains a plurality of cards. Also included are null cards, representing no suit, value or power.

The standard Toss & DoubleCross™, game deck customarily contains eighty four (84) cards representing six suits plus jokers and null cards. This standard deck is shown in figure one (FIG. 1). There is also a premium deck that has additional cards as shown in figure fifteen (FIG. 15). The premium deck has one hundred thirteen (113) cards comprised of the 84 cards of the standard deck plus the additional cards shown in figure fifteen (FIG. 15). The Toss & DoubleCross Premium DECK™ is exactly like the standard deck except it offers an eight-suited Boss Joker to replace the six-suited Boss Joker (when needed), two additional card suits, a joker of the same color as the two additional suits, and one more one null card.

However, for the majority of this document, the standard deck of 84 cards is employed as examples. Therein the three colors will be described as black, red and blue and the indicia and symbols used will be clubs, spades, hearts, diamonds, crosses, and shields (FIG. 4). For the purpose of this document the fundamental colors of this standard deck are described as black, red and blue while the indicia and symbols used will be identified here as clubs, spades, hearts, diamonds, crosses, and shields (FIG. 4). The physical size of the cards or dice is not important, Therefore not specified except that all cards within a deck be of the same size and that all die be of the same size and weight within each dice set.

Each standard deck consists of six suites, with three fundamental suit colors, two suits of each color and four jokers (FIGS. 1 to 12). The three fundamental colors of this deck, as well as the indicia and symbols used on the face of the cards may change from time to time but the deck will always contain three pairs of same colored suits, a “boss” joker (FIG. 2) reflecting all three colors of the six suits, plus three jokers, one for each pair of same colored suits (FIG. 3) and two null cards with no suit or value.

Most games represented herein by this present invention, offer two rule variations referred to as basic or deluxe. With deluxe games the number of cards in the standard deck usually remains the same, however the rules of said game(s) are more complex than the basic variation. The ancillary rules found within the details of the various card games claimed offer unique methodologies of capturing or “stealing” tricks and cards from your opponent during and after plays.

Each game and distinct deck has variations of rules and powers of the cards but the cards and identified card games should still be considered as a part of the Toss & DoubleCross™ family of games. The same kind of standard deck play action is also achieved with the dice game of fourteen, six-sided cubes. This game is called Toss & DoubleCross Dice™ (FIGS. 13 and 14).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a representative view of a standard Toss & DoubleCross™ deck of playing cards.

FIG. 2 shows, in close-up, a representation of a Boss Joker of a standard deck.

FIG. 3 shows, in close-up, all four jokers of a standard deck.

FIG. 4 shows, in close-up, the indicia and color of six suits of the standard deck.

FIG. 5 shows, in close-up, the spade and club suits under the Black Joker.

FIG. 6 shows, in close-up, the cross and shield suits under the Blue Joker.

FIG. 7 shows, in close-up, the heart and diamond suits under the Red Joker.

FIG. 8 shows, in close-up, six different cards from each of the six suits.

FIG. 9 shows, in close-up, three possible configurations of the Peg Board and pegs.

FIG. 10 shows, in close-up, two possible configurations of meld.

FIG. 11 shows, in close-up, two possible configurations of a meld using jokers.

FIG. 12 shows, in close-up, a front view of a null card and a typical card's back.

FIG. 13 shows, in close-up, a representative view of two dice from the fourteen dice set.

FIG. 14 shows, in close-up, a representative view of a cube “exploded” showing all six surfaces.

FIG. 15 shows, in close-up, the additional cards of the premium Toss & DoubleCross™ deck.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention, named Toss & DoubleCross™ standard and premium card decks, dice, peg boards and family of games, includes physical card decks, dice, tiles, spinning wheels or reels, peg boards and pegs or similar playing pieces, real or simulated on a computer, image producing device, or any electromechanical device showing a deck of cards having null cards and a plurality of fundamental colors within a plurality of suits, each different fundamental color accommodating two or more suits, each suit therein containing a plurality of cards with distinct indicia linked by color and indicia to a distinct joker, with a plurality of jokers under a Boss or Master Joker.

This invention is a substantial improvement over traditional decks and use thereof. The primary improvements are the use of additional fundamental colors for additional suits, with jokers linked to pair of suits of the same color, plus null cards and rules and methods for capturing opponent's cards. The standard card deck contains six (6) thirteen (13) card suites, two (2) suites for each of three (3) fundamental and distinct colors, four (4) jokers and two (2) or more null cards (FIGS. 1 to 12). The preferred form of this present invention is a series of related playing cards and games, utilizing six to eight suits, grouped as two suits each of the fundamental colors, with a joker for each color and a Boss Joker over all colors with null cards whose use is optional and methods of capturing cards from opponents.

Customarily the Toss & DoubleCross™ standard or premium decks would have the look and feel of a traditional deck of cards but it can be foreseen that a client or game corporation may commission decks to be produced with commercial type characters such as those found within STAR WARS™ movies or with indicia or markings other than those described herein. A client may order custom decks with fundamental colors not listed herein. Consequently, the exact configuration of the faces of the cards, colors and symbols used herein are, must be considered as an ancillary aspect and may change from time to time but color grouping and relationships to nulls and the jokers will always be similar to those groupings and relationship described herein.

Each card in the deck, except jokers, represents a unique combination of a single suit, a single color, and a single value even if that value is null. Each of the “regular” jokers normally play across two or more suits of common color and the Boss Joker plays on all colors and suits. Discarding or melding games allows players to match suit, color and or rank. Trick-taking games allow play by suits, and power value within on the game rules of choice. With the premium or standard deck the use of jokers and null cards is always subject to agreement among players or rules of the house. Some games dictate that null cards or cards of value be set a side to even the number of cards held in hand or distributed to a blind or widow.

Independent aspects of the suits, colors, jokers, face cards, numerical cards and null cards provide better card playing entertainment.

As previously stated, the three fundamental colors of standard decks, as well as the indicia and symbols used on the face of the cards may change from time to time but standard decks will always contain three pairs of same colored suits, a Boss Joker (FIG. 2) reflecting all colors of all suits, plus a joker for each suit color (FIG. 3) and two or more null cards. Each suit provides cards of this sequence: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King, and Ace.

Descriptions and operation of a Toss & DoubleCross™ standard deck of 84 cards (FIG. 1). This deck can be used to play a multitude of games in much the same fashion as conventional cards. It is particularly well suited to poker, draw poker, hearts, spades and other introductory games such as solitaire games. The inherent flexibility of this present invention makes it easy to tailor games for diverse levels of difficulty. In playing these games, skill, strategy and experience counts much towards the successful outcome of any game. An ability to remember which cards have been played or picked up contributes much toward success.

Through the use of imagination among players the “old and familiar” games can be played with more players and with more versatility than with traditional decks.

In use of standard decks determining the highest card in a trick is as easy as the traditional deck based on face value of the cards. A default scheme available to resolve conflicts of “ties” gives precedence to the last-played card of the same value.

This new standard deck serves many various functions better than most other card decks in existence. Games for six players or up to three teams of two players benefit from more cards than the traditional, 52 card, deck provides. Elaborate melding games can employ more wild cards or more exotic melds. In nontraditional fantasy games, that make heavy use of special rules and individualized powers, a variety of distinct nulls, picture cards and jokers work better than an increased plurality of number cards. In general, aces and picture cards play like those in traditional decks. Picture cards outrank number cards; jokers outrank picture cards and null cards may be played in a variety of new ways.

In trick-taking games, the regular jokers are the highest valued cards of their respective nontrump suits and color groups; the relative strength of a dual suit joker versus single suit jokers depends on whether a hand is played in suits or colors. The Boss Jokers, usually, is of the higher power.

All games can be played with a premium card deck of 113 cards or a standard deck of 84 cards. For ease of understanding the standard deck is employed as the example deck in most of the following unique game rules.

Toss & DoubleCross RUMMY™ rules and configurations; (as opposed to deluxe rummy explained later). This game is played in similar fashion to the rummy games described in HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, pages 117 through pages 148. Players of two, three, four, five, or six people can play with one standard deck of cards (FIG. 1). Each person may play and score individually or players are divided up into equal teams. Teams may consist of two or three players. Multiple teams may compete with one deck. If more teams or players wish to participate then additional standard decks or premium decks may be physically added or images thereof represented in computerized sessions.

The standard Toss & DoubleCross™ Deck Pack. Including the 4 jokers (FIG. 3), there are 84 cards in one deck with six (6) suits of three (3) colors (FIGS. 1, 4, 5, 6, & 7). Within this game, no suit is (customarily) of higher value or power than any other.

For additional clarification of the standard deck within the writing of this document the following indicia and colors are used: The club [

] and spade [] suits are both are black. The heart [♥] and diamond [♦] suits are both red. The cross [†] and shield [Ü] suits are both blue. {In showing the suit indicia above or shown elsewhere within this document, there are slight differences between the “typed” indicia the indicia shown in “figures” due to limitations within and between the graphic arts application and the word processing application.}

Cards in a suit; thirteen (13) A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3 and 2. Jokers are included, (four) they are the Boss Joker, Black Joker, Red Joker and a Blue Joker. The Boss Joker may be used as a wild card for any suit. All other jokers may be used as described in the “Object of the Game” and “The “DoubleCross” as mentioned in later portions of these rules. The two null cards are included in the deck but not usually used in this version of rummy.

The Start; The players draw or cut for deal and the player with the highest card deals first. In the case of a tie, all players draw again.

The Shuffle and Cut; Only the dealer shuffles. The player to the dealer's right may request to cut the cards at any time before the deal is finished. Since the deck is somewhat larger than a traditional deck, cutting is considered as a courtesy because the dealer will pick up only half the deck to begin dealing.

The Deal; The dealer distributes one card at a time, clockwise, face down, beginning with the player on their left. When two people play, each person gets 10 cards. When three, four, five or six people play, each receives seven cards. The remaining cards are placed face down in the center of the table, thus becoming the draw deck (sometimes referred to as the stock). The top card of the deck is turned face up and becomes the upcard. It is placed next to the draw deck as the start of the discard pile.

When two people play, the loser of the last hand deals the next. When more than two play, the deal passes to next the player on the left.

Object of the Game; Each player tries to group matched sets consisting of three or more of a kind (sets), or sequences (runs) of three or more cards of the same suit. This is called melding. It is up to you to chose how you will lay your meld down. Once meld is placed down and you have discarded you may not exchange them or add more meld.

Three Aces of different suits, A[†] A[

] A[♥] (FIG. 10), could be melded (as a set) in any order, as long as one ace is distinctly shown as the top card of that meld. So could a meld of a three cards, (FIG. 10) for a run in the cross suit be laid down as long as one card was distinctly on top. In a run, such as, 8[†] 7[†] 6[†], either the 8[†] or the 6[†] could be the top card but not the 7[†] nor any other seven.

Jokers can be used as meld in the following ways (FIG. 11). Any joker can be used as a card in a set of three or more of a kind, i.e., the A[

] [Boss Joker] and A[♥] can be melded as “three Aces.” When used in runs, as opposed to set melds, the joker must be of the same color as the suit (FIG. 11). For example, the Blue Joker can be used as a 7[†] in the run sequence of 8[†] [Blue Joker] and 6[†] but within this same run a Black Joker could not be used.

Melding to an opponent's matched set or run sequence; A player, in turn, may meld one or more cards that match any set or sequence already shown on the board. Thus, if three twos, 2[

] 2[†] 2[], are showing, in the player's meld or an opponent's meld, a fourth two 2[♥] could be melded as a single card. If the 10, 9, 8 of any one suit are showing, then a Jack, or a 7, of the same suit, could be placed down as meld. Also, a Jack and Queen as well as a 7 and a 6, of the same suit as the 10, 9, 8, could be melded. To help identify the value and or suit of a joker melded, against someone else's cards, jokers can only be melded in combination with at least one other card with the exception that a single joker can be melded to a set of the jokers. Any joker melded as a lower card (FIG. 11) still counts as a joker.

The Draw; Each player in turn, beginning with the player to the left of the dealer, either draws the top two cards of the draw deck or takes from the discard pile and adds this draw to their hand. Players may elect to select more than one card deep into the pile. That player must pick up the stack down to the deepest card used and set this portion of cards off to the side. Then the bottom card must be used within a meld by combining it with two or more cards from the player's hand. Once the bottom card has been used, the upper portion of the selected stack is placed in the hand or used as additional meld.

The Play; After the draw, that player may lay down on the board, face up, any qualifying meld. If the player does not wish to lay down meld, one card is discarded, face up, onto the discard pile. If the player has drawn only one card from the top of the discard pile, it may not be discarded on that same turn. Discarding a card to the pile ends that player's turn and no other changes are allowed.

The Toss; After any other player has melded cards to the board and discarded, other players, in turn, may draw from the deck or pile. After this draw, but before discarding, you may demand any top card from the display of any other player's meld. This action is referred to as a “Toss” demand.

To “Toss” you announce to concerned player's the card you desire and that player must hand over the desired card. In team play, one can even “Toss” demand a team mate's card. You may only choose a player's top melded card for the “Toss.” For example, compare the cards in FIGS. 10 and 11 (FIGS. 10 and 11). Within the cross suit sequence shown in as FIG. 10 (FIG. 10) you could demand the 8[†] but not the 7[†] or 6[†]. Within FIG. 11 (FIG. 11) you could demand the 6[†] but not the Blue Joker or 8[†].

You then must immediately meld the “Toss” card with at least two other cards from your hand. If the player asked the opponent for the top 10[♦] from a run of 10[♦] 9[♦] 8[♦], it is entirely legal to use the 10[♦] with a 10[

] and a 10[†] as a three of a kind matched set meld.

No joker is required to demand a “Toss,” just any combination of two or more cards from your hand to coordinate into a meld set or meld run. An appropriate joker, used correctly, can be used as one of the two required meld cards. If a player chooses to meld a joker as the top melded card in a sequence or run, it could also be demanded, in a later turn, as a “Toss” card to be matched with any other two jokers.

Any card exposed as the “top card” through a previous “Toss” may be demanded at a later turn. If any run sequence has had it's top card removed by a “Toss,” no other additions can be made to the top end of that run unless a wild card is used. Additions to the bottom end of that same run are still valid. After the play action and melding is finished, the player discards one card. The “next player's turn” reverts back to the player that was just tossed and had to give up a melded board card. This is true regardless of which position either player holds at the table.

The DoubleCross; Having just had a card taken away by a “Toss” demand, only this player may now be able to enact a “DoubleCross” if holding an applicable joker, which is like a wild card, matching the color suit of the card just tossed in the previous play. Suit jokers may play only on their respective suit colors. The Boss Joker can always “DoubleCross” any card. To “DoubleCross” you announce what you are doing, identify the card set you demand, lay down the correct joker, then have the player that took your “tossed” card must give you back your original card plus all the cards melded with it during the previous action.

If you do not have the correct joker or other card required to “DoubleCross,” you may draw two cards from the deck or take from the pile as with a normal turn. Should one of the two cards drawn from the deck be any joker needed to “DoubleCross” the “Toss” of last play, it must be played at once. After the player is finished melding and all action is finalized, one card is discarded.

Redoubled “DoubleCross”; Although it is supreme rarity, you may also redouble a “DoubleCross” any joker with the Boss Joker. When this is done, all cards played back to the original “Toss” card become part of your meld. After the player has finished melding all play action is finalized. The “next player's turn” reverts back to the last player that had to give up cards. This is true regardless of which position either player holds at the table. All “Toss,” “DoubleCross” and redoubled plays are complete when the when that next player draws.

The Steal; This comes into play if anyone places to the discard pile a card that can play anywhere else on the board. The first person to say “steal” and places their hand over the card gets to claim it and meld it immediately. In case of a tie while speaking “steal” the first one with their hand over the card gets it. When stealing, no discarding is required or allowed after the steal. Stealing does not affect the current or next players turn in anyway.

Turning the Pile; If the last card of the draw deck has been drawn and no player has gone out, the next player in turn may either take the top of the discard pile, or may turn the discard pile over to form a new draw deck (without shuffling it) and draw the top card. Play then proceeds as normal.

Completed Hand; The hand is over when one player plays all remaining cards held in hand. If all remaining cards match as meld sets or meld runs, the player may lay them down without discarding on the last turn. This ends the hand and there is no further play until after the next hand is dealt. Who wins the hand is not too important. It is the ongoing point totals that determines who or which team wins the game.

Scoring; After each hand is over, each player or team must verify their score. Cards are kept separate and face-up until all players are in agreement on all aspects of any score. Point values are as follows: Boss Joker=80, Jokers=40, Aces=20, Kings=10, Queens=10, Jacks=10, Tens=10, all other numbered cards=5.

Any cards melded to the board are tallied up and counted in favor of that player or team. Cards caught remaining in hand, whether the cards form matched sets or not, have negative value. All negative values are subtracted from your on going score. Exception; In team play when one team member goes out first, negatives are not counted from any other member of that team. Points may be tallied and kept by individuals or teams on paper or on peg boards (FIG. 9) or by an official scorer for all players or teams. The point totals of each hand are tallied and recorded whether they are positive or negative scores.

The Game; The game goal is 800 points. The 800 points equals the total number of points possible in a standard deck if all cards were melded. Players or teams with the most points scored, after all points are tallied, wins.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE RUMMY™ rules and configurations; The rules and scoring of this version vary slightly. With this game version, it is recommended that you use a peg board (FIG. 9) for scoring. These boards have three rows of peg holes representing the values of “Ones,” “Tens,” and “Hundreds.” Another row of peg holes is provided to store unused pegs during the play. Pegs are coordinated within the colors of the suits. When peg boards are used, each player or team picks a board for scoring.

Scoring; Points are scored as they are melded and then for the final tally at the end of each hand. Points are also scored during all play “Toss” actions. Players or teams must always verify their score with other players.

In Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE RUMMY™ all numbered card points equal their number. For example, four Sevens, 7[

] 7[†] 7[] 7[♥], melded would now equal 28 points when played and 28 points when tallied at the end of the hand. A meld of 7[] [Boss Joker] 7[] 7[♥] equals 101 points while a 7[] [joker] 7[] 7[♥] meld would only equal 61 points.

Unlike Toss & DoubleCross RUMMY™, the winner of this deluxe version could be the player or the team that “pegs out” during the play as opposed to tallying up the melded score at the end of each hand. At the end of each hand, cards remaining in hand, whether the cards form matched sets or not, have negative value unless a team mate has been the first to play out by discarding the last card held. The game still goes to 800 points. If no one pegs out during the play, then all player's cards are totaled and highest score wins. Points are scored during the play so the game could be won before a hand was completely over.

Jokers, within this version, are always “wild” and all jokers have the same power. You may “Toss” any joker with any other joker. You may “DoubleCross” back and forth with as many jokers playable in that cycle. The Boss Joker still is worth more points. Jokers are no longer restricted to only two color suits. Now any two joker combination can be used to demand a Boss Joker positioned as the top card, either as meld or as a card uncovered by a previous toss. Three or four jokers can be melded as a set. Once a set of jokers is placed in order, and you have discarded, you may not switch the order of the cards or add other meld.

When players wish to play eight-suited games, usually the complete premium deck is used with the exception that the replacement Boss Joker, representing all eight suits, is used and the other Boss Joker, representing six suits, is not used.

Toss & DoubleCross SPADES™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt, played and scored very similar to common Spade games rules found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, pages 161 through page 162. The standard 84 card deck is used. Jokers and null cards may either be discarded or used as wild cards within their respective suit colors. If jokers are used as wild cards, nulls must be used have an equal number of cards in each player's hand. Jokers must play as the high card within the “suit color conventions” but the Boss Joker is still the most powerful trick taking card. Variations of this game can be agreed upon by all players, for instance, if five players wish to compete, then one entire suit can be removed from the deck. No “Toss” and or “DoubleCross” actions apply unless you elect to play the following rules.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE SPADES™ rules and configurations; In Deluxe Toss & DoubleCross SPADES™ all cards are dealt until the deck is exhausted even though not all players receive equal amounts of cards from this deal. The standard 84 card deck is used.

Toss; Jokers are allowed to “Toss” (steal or capture) any one trick within accordance to their respective and corresponding colors. Once a trick has been played but before the next trick starts, any player holding the Boss Joker or any player holding a joker relating to the suit color of the last trick can announce a “Toss” and demand that trick from the person that would have won the trick. The joker and trick are transferred to the appropriate player's pile of tricks. The Boss Joker is the highest card of all suits and can “Toss” any single trick. The Black Joker can “Toss” any single trick of clubs or spades. The Red Joker can “Toss” any heart or diamond trick. The Blue Joker can “Toss” any cross or shield trick.

DoubleCross; After the demand of a “Toss” by a joker but on the same play action a player with the Boss Joker or any other joker could announce a “DoubleCross” taking the trick. Whoever finally captures the “Toss” trick, then leads the next card. The Boss Joker can never be “DoubleCrossed.” Jokers can “DoubleCross” jokers of a different color. Since all jokers are played after the trick has been completed they do not change the original suit in any way.

Because a player or players used jokers to demand a “Toss” or a “DoubleCross” after they had already played a card on the trick, they will be short card(s) near the last trick of the game. They are out and can not win that trick. If the last trick's lead card should have come from the hand of one of those player's, then the player to the immediate left leads any card of choice.

Toss & DoubleCross HIEARTS™ rules and configurations; This version of hearts is dealt, played and scored fairly close to the typical heart game rules found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, page 77 through page 83. The exceptions being that there are now jokers and null cards. The standard 84 card deck is used. Jokers and nulls may either be discarded or used. If jokers are used as wild cards, nulls must be used so each player has an equal number of cards. Jokers must play as the high card within the “suit color conventions” but the Boss Joker is still the most powerful trick taking card. The null cards may play on any suit even if you have that suit in your hand. Variations of this game can be agreed upon by all players, for instance, if five players wish to compete, then one entire suit can be removed from the deck.

All cards are dealt to all players, the exact number of cards dealt varies by the number of players involved. Power, rank and game point values then revert to the normal heart's game rules and conventions. A variation of game is, if five players wish to compete, then one entire suit can be removed from the deck. No “Toss” and or “DoubleCross” actions apply unless you elect to play by the following rules.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE HEARTS™ rules and configurations; In Deluxe Toss & DoubleCross HEARTS™ all cards are dealt until the deck is exhausted even though not all players may not receive equal amounts of cards from this deal. The standard 84 card deck is used.

Toss; Jokers are allowed to “Toss” (steal or capture) any one trick within accordance to their respective and corresponding colors. Once a trick has been played but before the next trick starts, any player holding the Boss Joker or any player holding a joker relating to the suit color of the last trick can announce a “Toss” and demand that trick from the person that would have won the trick. The joker and trick are transferred to the appropriate player's pile of tricks. The Boss Joker is the highest card of all suits and can “Toss” any single trick. The Black Joker can “Toss” any single trick of clubs or spades. The Red Joker can “Toss” any heart or diamond trick. The Blue Joker can “Toss” any cross or shield trick.

DoubleCross; After the demand of a “Toss” by a joker but on the same play action a player with the Boss Joker or any other joker could announce a “DoubleCross” taking the trick. Whoever finally captures the “Toss” trick, then leads the next card. The Boss Joker can never be “DoubleCrossed”. Jokers can “DoubleCross” jokers of a different color. Since all jokers are played after the trick has been completed they do not change the original suit in any way.

Because a player or players used jokers to demand a “Toss” or a “DoubleCross” after they had already played a card on the trick, they will be short card(s) near the last trick of the game. They are out and can not win that trick. If the last trick's lead card should have come from the hand of one of those player's, then the player to the immediate left leads any card of choice.

Toss & DoubleCross POKER™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt and played much like the many different variations and guidelines for poker found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, between pages 241 and 291. The standard 84 card deck is used. This game is best played with four to eight competing individuals. All or any jokers and null cards may or may not be used.

Though there are now six suits, as with any traditional poker hand of five or more cards, you may only declare your best five card combination. Even if additional cards are drawn, or held, you may only count five cards. There are no “six of a kind” hands that can be declared. Five of a kind (all natural) is the highest hand possible. Jokers may be added back into the deck if wild cards are to be used. Five of a kind (with one or more jokers) is the second highest hand possible. All jokers are wild only in sets of two-three-four and five of a kind hands. In flushes and straight flushes, the three regular jokers may only be a wild card within the respective color suit. You may never use more jokers than natural cards in within flushes and straight flushes but you can in threes, fours and five of a kind.

For example, holding the following five cards [A†] [Boss Joker] [Red Joker] [Blue Joker] [10†], your best hand is four aces not a royal straight flush. You would not have the royal flush for two reasons, one you may not use more wild cards than natural cards in flushes and straight flushes; and you could not play the [Red Joker] as a part of any blue flush. In case of “tie” among hands, the hand with the higher ranking natural cards win. Aces can be played on the high or low end of straights. With eight or more players, two Toss & DoubleCross™ decks are used providing 168 cards. Other methods of playing or other numbers of players could easily be adapted, for example, all players may agree to count all seven cards in a hand.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE POKER™ rules and configurations; The premium deck with two additional suits is recommended. In this game all cards up to seven cards in each hand may be counted. With the jokers wild option, one could have a hand of seven of a kind or a seven card straight. All or any jokers may or may not be used. Generally, the null cards are not used. Other methods of playing or numbers of players or cards in the deck could easily be adapted depending on the agreement of players or rules of the house.

Toss & DoubleCross DRAW POKER™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt and played much like the many different variations and guidelines for draw poker found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, between pages 249 and 251. The standard 84 card deck is used. It is best played with four to eight competing individuals. All or any jokers or null cards may or may not be used as agreed upon by the players or rules of the house. Other methods of playing, rules changes or numbers of players can easily be adapted.

In Five Card Draw you count your five best cards. In Six Card Draw you count your six best cards. Seven Card Draw is usually not played with the standard deck. In case of “tie” hands, the hand with the higher ranking natural cards win. Aces can play on the high or low end of straights and flushes.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE DRAW POKER™ rules and configurations; The premium deck with two additional suits is recommended. In Five Card Draw you count your five best cards. In Six Card Draw you count your six best cards, in Seven Card Draw you count your seven best cards. In case of “tie” hands, the hand with the higher ranking natural cards win. In this game all cards up to seven in each hand may be counted. Generally the two null cards are not used. Jokers are often wild. One could have a hand of seven of a kind or a seven card straight. In flushes and straight flushes the jokers can only be a wild card within each of their respective two suits. You may never use more jokers than natural cards in within flushes and straight flushes but you can in set of three or more of a kind. Two standard decks may be used with ten or more players, providing 168 cards. Other methods of playing with other numbers of players or cards in the deck could easily be adapted depending on the agreement of players or rules of the house.

Toss & DoubleCross BLACKJACK™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt and played much like the version and guidelines for blackjack found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©), third revised & updated edition, between pages 275 and 279. The standard 84 card deck is used. All or any jokers or null cards may or may not be used as agreed upon by the players or rules of the house. Other methods of playing, rules changes or numbers of players can easily be adapted.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE BLACKJACK™ rules and configurations; The premium deck with two additional suits is recommended. Jokers may be used in the player's hand and would then be valued as 10 (ten) points like a face card. If the “hit-me” card dealt to a player is a joker, the player has an opportunity to make and win a additional side bet against the dealer (or house). The house must accept any bet up to, or equal to the original bet and offer to pay “one to one” if the next card dealt face up does not bust (exceed twenty-one points) the player's hand. The house wins if the player's next card exceeds twenty-one or the next card up is another joker or null.

Toss & DoubleCross ACEY-DEUCEY™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt and played much like the version and guidelines for “acey-deucey” found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, between pages 332 and 333. The standard 84 card deck is used. Two to eight players may play with one deck. For more than eight players it is recommended that a premium deck be used to provide more cards. Each player antes up an equal amount as agreed upon (or set by rules of the house.) Two cards are dealt face up to all players, if a joker or a null card is dealt to a player at this time it is tossed back to the dealer who then sets it face up, out of play.

Each player, in turn bets how much of the “pot” they wish to play for. They win the bet if the next card dealt face up falls between their lowest value card and their highest value card. Suits have no significance. They lose the bet if the card that is dealt face up is equal to either of their two cards or falls higher or lower than their two cards and must place the amount of the bet into the center of the pot. If the “in between” card dealt to that player is a joker, the player has an opportunity to win an additional bet against the dealer (or house). This bet is not against the pot but an individual side bet against the dealer up to but not exceeding the amount of the original ante. The dealer must accept the bet and offer to pay “one to one” if the next card dealt face up falls between the lowest value card and the highest value card showing. The dealer wins if the card that is dealt face up is equal to either of the players two cards or falls higher or lower than those two cards. The dealer also wins if the next card up is another joker or a null card.

At any time during the play or deal if three or more jokers are revealed, all player's cards remain in front of the players, all “old” or unused cards are placed back to the deck and re-shuffled. In a “friendly” game the next player becomes the dealer to finish dealing the round, deals to the betters, or deals entirely new hands as the circumstances dictate. In casino play the deal does not rotate. The game proceeds in similar fashion until one player wins the total pot.

Toss & DoubleCross CANASTA™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt, played and scored much like the many variations of Canasta as found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, pages 158 through page 160. Two 84 card standard decks are used. This game is best played with competing partnerships of two or three players. Other methods of playing with other numbers of players could easily be adapted. Each of the deuce cards are worth twenty points. Other point values remain the same. All jokers are used. Null cards are not customarily used. Each player receives fifteen cards, dealt one at a time. The rest of the pack becomes the stock.

In regular Canasta all jokers and deuces are wild as in this version, but jokers are wild only within their respective suit color. Meld must be three or more cards of the same rank. Wild cards may never out number natural cards in any meld. The blue suited, cross and shield threes (3s) are the only threes (3s) that can be melded. Red threes (3s) and black threes (3s) are bonus cards, not melded in sets. The first team to reach 8000 points wins a game.

Toss & DoubleCross SHEEP'S HEAD™ (schafkopf) rules and configurations; This game is dealt and played much like the customary rules found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAME S©, third revised & updated edition, between pages 249 and 251. The exceptions accommodates the improved play with six suits. With the standard 84 card deck all jokers, nulls and the unused cards of six (6) and lower value are usually discarded from the deck. Depending on the amount of individual players, the deck is dealt out in twos and threes per person with at least three cards for the widow (blind). From time to time the widow may receive more than three cards depending on the number of players but never less than three cards. The trick (trump) power is: Q[

], Q[], Q[♥], Q[♦], Q[†], Q[Ü], J[], J[], J[♥], J[♦], J[†], J[Ü], A[♦], K[♦], 9[♦], 8[♦] and 7[♦]. As an option, null cards can be included to even out the trick in player's hands and to place enough cards into the widow.

There are 48 cards in this configuration of the deck. Point values remain the same. There are 180 total points in the deck. All Aces=11, Tens=10, Kings=4, Queens=3, and all Jacks=2 points. All players want to win a majority of 9.1 points by taking tricks but not all can. Game points are awarded by scoring points counted at the end of each hand. Taking 91 to 135 points in cards scores 2 game points, taking 136 to 179 points in cards scores 4 game points, taking all tricks scores 6 game points. The first player to score 80 game points wins. All diamonds and all queens and jacks are the trump cards as in traditional sheep's head. If all players decline to take the widow, a “Leaster” is played. Therein the object is to win as few points as possible. A good variation of the this game is that more players can compete. Winner of the “Leaster” scores 6 game points. You do not have to take a trick to win the “Leaster.”

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE SHEEP'S HEAD™ rules and configurations; In this game jokers and most null cards are used depending on the number of players. These and all regular playing cards seven (7) and above are dealt until the deck is exhausted and all players receive equal amounts of cards from this deal with at least four (4) cards going to the widow to be picked up.

Jokers are not used as high suit cards or wild cards during the play of a trick. However, once a trick has been played yet before the next trick starts, any player holding the Boss Joker or any player holding a joker relating to the suit color of the last trick can announce a “Toss” and demand that trick from the person that would have won the last trick. The joker and trick are transferred to the appropriate player's pile of tricks. This is a totally separate play action at the end of one trick but before the next trick starts. After the demand of a “Toss” by a regular joker on that same play, a player with the Boss Joker could announce a “DoubleCross” taking the trick. Whoever finally captures the “Tossed” trick then leads the next card. Jokers can be used for capturing tricks only in their respective suits except the Boss Joker takes any trick once.

Because a player or players used jokers to demand a “Toss” they will be one or more cards short near the end of the hand and are just out of the play. If the next lead card should have come from the hand of one of those players, then the player to the immediate left leads any card of choice. Jokers capture tricks but have no value towards the total of 180 points in a hand.

Null cards can play at any time but have no trick taking power or value. For example, if trumps were lead and your hand held trumps and a null card, you might elect to play your null card and save your trump card for later action. Also, if an opponent has a trick “locked-up” you could choose to play a null card so you did not add any point cards to that trick.

Toss & DoubleCross SOLITAIRE™ rules and configurations; This game is commonly played with the standard 84 card deck. Jokers and null cards may either be discarded or used as wild cards within their respective suit colors. Start by dealing twenty one (21) cards, face down, in six columns. The column on the far left has one card, the second column has two cards, progressing upward in like manner until the 6th column has six cards.

Turn over one top card from each column. In traditional solitaire games, the “face up” play of cards is alternated by two colors. With this game you must alternate the “face up” cards by three colors downwards from the top of the columns. You turn the deck (stock) cards from face down to face up by sets of three to see if the top card plays. A null card exposed face up may be or may not be discarded as deemed by the player. Early on in the game one might not want to discard a null card, yet later it could be discarded to change the order of the cards being turned.

A joker exposed may be played as a wild card on a column face up, or left within the stock. If used as a wild card, the joker must play only within alternating suit color conventions but of any value needed. Any time the “true” value card shows up (who's space is being held by a joker) it is playable. That card is substituted and the joker is placed to the side and can not be used in this particular hand again.

The Boss Joker can play anywhere once. When it is first turned over in the initial turn of the top card of the column, it may be used to start a seventh column. Any other card may now play on the Boss Joker. Once any joker is played to a face up position on a column, and covered by another card, it can not be moved or substituted for the original card unless, during normal play, it becomes uncovered. Once uncovered, it must be removed from play, face up, to the side. Once so removed, that joker may not be played again. When played with jokers, the game of solitaire is won only if you display all cards face up and in order. The “Boss Slam” of this solitaire game is getting down to just four jokers in the stock with all other cards played and displayed.

Toss & DoubleCross CRIBBAGE™ rules and configurations; This game is dealt, played and scored much like the version found within HOYLE'S RULES OF GAMES©, third revised & updated edition, pages 58 through page 66. One standard deck is used. This game is best played with six players or competing partnerships of two or three teams. Other methods of playing with diverse numbers of players could easily be adapted. All jokers and nulls are either discarded or, upon agreement, used only as nulls.

If used, jokers play as nulls. Nulls play as nulls. Null cards can be played as a “nothing” or passed to the crib to be a null card among the crib cards, depending on which rules are used. Jokers have no point values, nor can they be used as any set or sequence. Jokers and nulls can be used defensively, during the play, to stop straights, flushes, pairs and three or more of a kind sequences.

Each player receives seven cards, dealt face down one at a time. Each player selects one card or more from their hand to place face down to help form the crib. The final crib must have six cards even if there are less than six players. After a non-dealer cuts the rest of the pack, the dealer turns up the top card. This card is the starter. The play is the same as in normal cribbage. Scoring is different because there are now six cards of each value rather than four. Points progress similar to traditional cribbage, for example, scores could be “pair for two points,” “Three of a kind for six points,” “four of a kind for twelve points,” “five of a kind for twenty-four points,” or “six of a kind for forty-eight points.” The Toss & DoubleCross™ peg boards should be used for scoring. First player or team to reach 800 points wins.

Toss & DoubleCross Toss The BOSS™ rules and configurations; The standard 84 card deck is used will jokers and nulls. This game is totally unique but played much like bidding games won by naming trump and taking tricks. Frequently six people per game play as individuals yet they are teamed up with different players at the same table or Internet session on all most every hand. This adds mystery and excitement to each hand. Because there is no other source for rules and conventions, more detail is provided for this game than most of the previous games listed herein.

Object of the game; Each player tries win the bid in order to name a trump suit. Generally in a six player game there are 13 tricks, not counting the blind (widow) as a trick. Tricks are scored and bonus point are awarded. The game goes to 800 points as scored by individual players.

The winning bidder (hereafter called the bidder) picks up the blind (widow), exchanges cards in hand, throws away the discards and gets to declare trump. Also, the bidder gets to select an unknown partner by naming any joker as a partner. Only the player holding the declared joker could know who was on which team. Even the bidder can not know who is the partner at this time. Other players only know they are against the bidder and some other player at the table until the declared joker was played.

Also a bidder may wish to confuse everyone and go alone by naming a joker secretly held within his or her own hand. Then it would be one against all other players but none of the other players would know what was happening until the bidder played the joker called. The “teams” of players are always subject to the “call of the joker” and change with every deal.

The Deal; The first dealer is chosen by random draw of cards. High card deals. Thereafter, the dealing rotates clockwise. The cards are shuffled and then dealt by twos beginning with the player on dealer's left. Cards are also dealt in twos, randomly, to the blind. All 84 cards are dealt. The number of cards in the initial start of a game (hand) may vary if the number of players vary. The blind always has four to six cards.

The Bidding; Each player bids the amount of tricks they expect to take, based on their cards and who they might call as a partner. In Toss The BOSSY all players have a chance to bid and re-bid until no one bids higher. Once a player has passed, they are out of the bidding. If nobody bids, dealer reshuffles and deals.

One player may bid “Five Red.” The following player may bid or pass in turn. The subsequent player may bid “Six Blue” or any number higher than the last bid. Bidding may go around more than once and, for example, the bidder who started out as “Five Red” may later bid “Seven Black.” Bids, generally, go up numerically by at least one. The exception is that a “No Trump” bid can be of equal value as the last bid yet it is considered a higher bid. Therefore an “Eight Blue” bid is over bided by an “Eight No Trump” bid.

Once the bid is won, the number of tricks bid is then written down under the name of the bid winner. The bidder picks up the blind and exchanges them with cards in hand as desired. The blind is discarded off to the side and has no value or purpose for this hand. The bidder then declares the trump suit, i.e., clubs, spades, hearts, diamonds, crosses, shields or “No Trump.” The declared trump suit may or may not be the color of the wining bid as determined solely by the bidder. This is true unless the winning bid was “No Trump” which then must be declared and played “No Trump.” In either case, the number of tricks bid must be captured to win the hand.

Right after the bidder declares trump, the bidder calls a joker as the unknown partner by saying “Boss Joker!” or “Blue Joker!” No one is expected to, or allowed to, answer. Remember, the bidder may be going alone by calling a card within his/her hand. The bidder could announce “Going Alone” but there is a strategic disadvantage to informing the other players of this at this time.

The Play; The bid player leads any card. The sequential rank and power order are; Boss Joker, Jokers (3), 13 suit card sequences and null cards. In clockwise turns, each player, if able, must follow suit, play an appropriate joker or play a null card. If their hand does not contain the suit led, they may play trump, a joker, a null or simply throw off any other card. Any player, by choice, may play higher or lower than the previous card. A lead of the Boss Joker is a lead of “trump.” If a regular joker is lead, then the following players need only follow by color. For example if the Blue Joker is the lead card, then any card of the cross or shield suit could be played.

Null cards are used in play with any regular suit or trump. If a null is lead, any card may be played with the highest card or trump played taking the trick. With a null lead, when two or more cards of the same value are played, the last card of the highest value played wins. Nulls can be very dynamic to the outcome of the game. Should a null card be lead, following players may play any card and the highest card played takes that trick. If no trump is played, any trick is won by the highest card of the suit lead. Any trick containing a trump is won by the highest trump played. If trumps are lead and your partner has locked up the trick, you may save one of your trumps by playing a null. If any suit card is led, you may play a null even though you have other cards of that suit.

Tricks; The winner of each trick leads the next trick. Tricks won are stacked by each individual winner in such a manner that the tricks can be easily counted at the end of each hand and credited correctly.

Scoring; Individual scores are kept because each hand will frequently consist of a “team” of two players (bid winner and called joker) against the “team” of all other players. Occasionally it will be one player competing against the “team” of all other players. On every hand, each team constituent is awarded the total points of the team score.

Scoring points are achieved in several ways distinct ways:

    • 1. If a player goes “alone” taking as many tricks as the bid called for, he/she receives 20 points for each trick taken.
    • 2. Each person of a two person wining bid team, taking as many combined tricks as bid, receives 10 points for each trick taken.
    • 3. The team of players that did not win the bid receives 5 points for each trick taken whether or not the bid team won.
    • 4. When the bidder goes alone and does not make bid, 50 additional points are awarded to every other player.
    • 5. If the bid is not made when the bidder had a called partner, the winning players are each awarded 100 additional points.

The first player reaching or exceeding 800 points wins the game. Should the bidder and more players exceed 800 points in the last hand, the bidder is the winner. You need not win the last bid to win the game.

Toss & DoubleCross DELUXE Toss The BOSS™ rules and configurations; This game is played like the basic version of Toss The BOSS™, except jokers can be used two different ways; (1) Jokers are used normally, i.e., each joker is the highest card of each of its' two colored suites and the Boss Joker is the highest card of all played during a trick, or (2) Jokers are played after a trick within the “Toss” and “DoubleCross” conventions explained below. The jokers may be used after the trick was apparently won for “Toss” or “DoubleCross” actions.

Toss; Jokers are allowed to “Toss” (steal or capture) any one trick within accordance to their respective and corresponding colors. Once a trick has been played but before the next trick starts, any player holding the Boss Joker or any player holding a joker relating to the suit color of the last trick can announce a “Toss” and demand that trick from the person that would have won the trick. The joker and trick are transferred to the appropriate player's pile of tricks. The Boss Joker is the highest card of all suits and can “Toss” any single trick.

DoubleCross; After the demand of a “Toss” a player with the Boss Joker or any other joker could announce a “DoubleCross” taking the trick. Whoever finally captures the “Toss” trick, then leads the next card. The Boss Joker can never be “DoubleCrossed” but jokers can “DoubleCross” jokers of a different color.

Because a player or players used jokers to demand a “Toss” or a “DoubleCross” after they had already played a card on the trick, they will be short cards near the last trick of the game. They are out and can not win that trick. If the last trick's lead card should have come from the hand of one of those player's, then the player to the immediate left leads any card of choice. In this game the winner of the last trick gets to capture the blind (widow) which counts as an additional trick for the purposes of bid and score.

In either version of Toss The BOSS™ strategy continues with naming trump, calling a joker as your partner or going alone. If you null a bidder's trick are you just out of trump or are you the unknown partner. Can you interpret signals passed during the bidding and the play of cards correctly? Bidding may be truthful or not. Who is against who? Who is teamed with who? How can you get the top individual score and win the game?

The strategies which may be used during the play are unparalleled in most other card games. Jokers stealing tricks from other jokers and the play of null cards offer opportunities to confuse other players while demanding bidding skills and playing expertise to a level not found in other card games.

Toss & DoubleCross DICE™ rules and configurations; The same kinds of play action listed with the preceding card games is achieved with a dice game comprising fourteen, six-sided cubes of normal size, shape and weight (FIGS. 13-14). The combined 84 flat surfaces of the fourteen cubes accommodate the six suits, three fundamental colors and the A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 rank markings perfectly with the markings for the jokers and nulls. Suits and suit colors would be black clubs [

] and spades [], red hearts [♥] and diamonds [♦], blue crosses [†] and shields [Ü]. Only the indicia of the suit, rank and color is shown on each surface of the cubes. The Boss Joker would reflect all major colors. The two nulls are represented by the word “Toss.” The eighty-four different values found in this present invention are represented in a semi-random fashion throughout all surfaces of the dice, for example, no one cube would hold all six aces and no single cube would have all “blue” indicia, nor would a single cube have all the jokers and null values.

Players will place all dice into a container, shake them up, and reach in and withdraw as many cubes required for whichever particular game they are playing. These dice are then shaken and rolled out so all players can see the outcome of the roll. Some dice may be “held out” (as in draw poker) or all may be returned to the container for a re-draw of the dice. The Toss & DoubleCross Dice™ set can be used for “Liar's Dice” and “Poker Dice” and many other games.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

All possible forms of this present invention share these essential features in common: Multiple, distinctly colored suits, paired as two or more suits of each fundamental color, within one of the deck's fundamental colors, each group of suits linked to a joker of the same color, with a Boss Joker over all suits and colors, plus methodologies to play null cards and capture cards, tricks or dice from other players. The physical size of the cards or dice is not important, therefore not specified except that all cards within a deck be of the same size and that all die be of the same size and weight within each dice set.

Additional markings or changes in value indexes could be used to create additional categories or subcategorizes of cards or to further distinguish among cards of the same value. Alternative colors or suit symbols could be substituted for those shown and described, or color groups could be indicated by changing background color instead of the foreground indicia.

In any form, this present invention and the Toss & DoubleCross™ family of games provides a reasonable alternative to conventional card decks, capable of supporting a multitude of games, with numerous advantages, including greater flexibility, superior game play, plus adding more appropriate foundations for strategy and tactical decision making with a high degree of novelty.

It is understood that as used herein, the term “card game” is intended to include conventional table/board type games wherein one or more persons deals actual playing cards to one or more players, as well as any type of mechanical or electronic device which displays indicia of playing cards. The spirit of this present invention embraces any gaming device having keyboard (key pad) input, or electronic touch sensitive device input or screen input, to select, distribute, move and/or calculate values of images represented herein by a player or players. Also, any gaming device wherein input from a player is supplied even thought the “opponent” may be a computing device. A deck of cards, tiles, or pieces of any shape could be simulated on any image producing device, of any size, i.e., a home video game machine, a dedicated arcade machine, a hand-held device, or any electronic device (disk, tape, cable system, closed-circuit, etc.) connected to a conventional television or similar display.

The principles, preferred embodiments and modes of operation of the present invention have been described in the foregoing specification. However, the invention which is intended to be protected is not to be construed as limited to the particular embodiments disclosed. The embodiments are to be regarded as illustrative rather than restrictive. Variations, changes and revisions may be made by others without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Accordingly, it is categorically intended that all such variations, changes, and equivalents which follow in the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined in the claims be thereby embraced.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/146, 273/153.00J, 273/236, 273/292, 273/242, 273/304, 273/153.00R, 273/303
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F9/00, A63F3/00, A63F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F3/00157, A63F2011/0055
European ClassificationA63F3/00A32, A63F1/00