Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050097199 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/683,564
Publication dateMay 5, 2005
Filing dateOct 10, 2003
Priority dateOct 10, 2003
Also published asUS8281019, WO2005036360A2, WO2005036360A3
Publication number10683564, 683564, US 2005/0097199 A1, US 2005/097199 A1, US 20050097199 A1, US 20050097199A1, US 2005097199 A1, US 2005097199A1, US-A1-20050097199, US-A1-2005097199, US2005/0097199A1, US2005/097199A1, US20050097199 A1, US20050097199A1, US2005097199 A1, US2005097199A1
InventorsKeith Woodard, Fernando Trias
Original AssigneeKeith Woodard, Fernando Trias
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and system for scanning network devices
US 20050097199 A1
Abstract
The present invention includes a method and system for scanning network devices connected to a network by detecting connection of a first network device to the network and performing remote scanning of the first network device in response to detection of the first network device.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(26)
1. A method for scanning network devices connected to a network, comprising:
(a) detecting connection of a first network device to the network; and
(b) performing remote agentless scanning of the first network device in response to detection of the first network device.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein step (a) further comprises inspecting data packets communicated over the network.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the detecting step further comprises querying a database.
4. The method of claim 3 further comprising continuously broadcasting pings on the network, continuously examining address resolution protocol tables, continuously monitoring event logs, transmitting a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) query, and transmitting a Domain Name System query.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises determining at least one of whether the first network device is plugged into a wall socket, whether the first network device is connecting to the network via wireless access, and whether the first network device is connecting to the network via a Virtual Private Network.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises determining a property of the first network device.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises determining identity of the first network device.
8. The method of claim 7 wherein the determining of the identity of the first network device further comprises at least one of querying a database where the type has been determined, examining network traffic, analyzing network behavior, probing the first network device for signature responses, attempting to log into the device using a series of protocols, logging into the first network device and querying data within the device.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises scanning at least one of a configuration, file, data, a software version, a patch, inventory, hardware, and a security vulnerability of the first network device.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises updating at least one of a configuration, file, data, a software version, inventory, and a security vulnerability of the first network device.
11. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises comparing at least one security setting of the first network device with a predetermined security setting.
12. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) further comprises at least one of installing a software patch on the first network device, installing anti-virus software on the first network device, and determining if the first network device is part of a windows domain.
13. The method of claim 1 further comprising at least one of enabling the first network device to have additional access to the network, denying the first network device access to the network, notifying another about the first network device based on results of the scan, and quarantining the first network device.
14. The method of claim 1 further comprising at least one of setting a security policy on the first network device, auditing the security policy of the first network device, ensuring compliance with a predetermined security policy, and reporting results.
15. An apparatus for remote agentless scanning of network devices on a network comprising:
(a) a detecting module that detects connection of a first network device to the network; and
(b) a scanning module that performs remote agentless scanning of the first network device in response to the detection of the first network device.
16. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the detecting module continuously polls a database for data corresponding to newly attached network devices.
17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein the scanning module remotely scans the first network device upon detecting data corresponding to the first network device in the database.
18. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising a history database storing scan results of a scan performed by the scanning module.
19. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the scanning module can at least one of enable the first network device to have additional access to the network, deny the first network device access from the network, notify another about the first network device based on results of the scan, and quarantine the first network device.
20. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising a security policy management module for at least one of setting a security policy on the first network device, auditing the security policy of the first network device, ensuring compliance with a predetermined security policy, and reporting results.
21. A method for examining a first network device connected to a network, comprising:
(a) querying a database for data representing connection of network devices to a network;
(b) determining connection of a first network device to the network by locating data about the first network device in the database;
(c) determining properties associated with the first network device to determine the identity of the first network device;
(d) determining items to scan based on at least one of the properties; and
(e) performing remote scanning of the first network device in response to the determination of the connection of the first network device to the network.
22. The method of claim 21 wherein step (c) further comprises determining at least one of credentials associated with the first network device and type of the first network device.
23. The method of claim 21 wherein step (c) further comprises at least one of querying a database where the identity has already been determined, examining network traffic, analyzing network behavior, probing the device for signature responses, and logging into the device to query data.
24. The method of claim 21 wherein step (e) further comprises selecting a set of security policy settings to audit.
25. The method of claim 21 further comprising at least one of allowing the first network device to have additional access to the network, denying access to the network, notifying another about the first network device based on results of the remote scanning, and quarantining the first network device.
26. A method for scanning network devices connected to a network, comprising:
(a) detecting connection of a first network device to the network; and
(b) performing remote scanning of the first network device in response to detection of the first network device.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to scanning one or more network devices. More specifically, the present invention relates to performing scans of network devices upon detecting their connection to the network.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The use of a computer to communicate over a network has become mainstream over the past decade. As a result, organizations and individuals typically rely on their networks to conduct business, communicate with others, and search for and retrieve data. In addition to helping businesses and individuals communicate and conduct business over a greater distance, the increased use of networks has also put computers at a greater risk. For example, the data stored on a computer communicating over a network such as the World Wide Web is vulnerable to viruses infecting the computer and destroying its data. Consequently, network security has become an item of paramount importance to organizations and individuals alike.
  • [0003]
    When configuring a network, a network security policy is often employed to ensure that each device communicating on the network is configured with specific and accepted security standards. For example, a corporation may have a security policy that states that all computers using the corporation's network must have a functioning virus scanner. This security policy may also specify the virus scanner that each device must have, such as by specifying that each device have Norton AntiVirus (manufactured by Symantec of Cupertino, Calif.).
  • [0004]
    As the number of devices communicating on the network increases, it usually becomes more difficult to make sure that each device communicating on the network meets the required security policy. Further, a breach in the security of the network may have a crippling effect, possibly resulting in down-time, computer repairs, and large costs to fix.
  • [0005]
    Traditionally, to lessen the risk of a security breach and ensure compliance with the security policy (e.g., having a functioning virus scanner), a security administrator or auditor uses a scanning application to scan a computer. The scanning application may be installed on each device communicating on the network to examine the device. This local scanning, however, introduces numerous problems. First, each individual device has the scanning application installed on the device. This may result in different devices having different versions of the scanning application. Moreover, the initiation of the scanning ordinarily occurs on the device itself. This may require a separate initiation sequence for each device. Further, the time required to deploy the scanning application on each device in the network is often too burdensome of a task to implement. Thus, local scanning is often too onerous to initiate and maintain.
  • [0006]
    Rather than using agent software to scan a device locally, a scanning application may instead periodically scan the networked computers remotely to locate any devices that do not follow the security policy. There are, however, numerous drawbacks associated with this scanning technique. One drawback is that the scan may not be comprehensive because some devices may have, for some reason, been turned off at the time of the scan and, consequently, may not have been scanned. Another shortcoming with periodic scanning is that there may be a significant delay between the time that a device attaches, or connects, to the network and the time that the scan occurs during the next scheduled scan. This time lag may result in a network being infected before a scan has occurred. Therefore, the periodic scanning, by its nature, does not enforce the security policy at all times.
  • [0007]
    A third weakness is that the periodic scan does not work well with computers that ordinarily connect to the network using transient means, such as with a virtual private network connection or using a wireless access point. In particular, the device may not be available at the time that the scan occurs because of the transient nature of the connection.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    The present invention addresses the weaknesses of the scanning techniques described above and enables enforcement of a network security policy in a more robust and comprehensive manner. The present invention also increases scalability, coverage, and responsiveness of scanning while decreasing the implementation time. In one aspect, the invention includes a method for scanning network devices connected to a network by detecting connection of a first network device to the network and performing remote, agentless scanning of the first network device in response to detection of the first network device.
  • [0009]
    In one embodiment, the detecting module detects connection of the first network device by inspecting data packets communicated over the network. The detecting module can also detect connection of the first network device by querying a database. For example, the detecting module can continuously broadcast pings over the network, continuously examine address resolution protocol (ARP) tables, continuously monitor event logs, transmit a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) query (e.g., poll an LDAP server or execute a persistent LDAP search), and/or transmit a Domain Name System (DNS) query.
  • [0010]
    The method can also include determining whether the first network device is connecting to the network via wireless access, determining whether the first network device is connecting to the network via a Virtual Private Network (VPN), and/or determining whether the first network device is plugged into a wall socket.
  • [0011]
    In another embodiment, the remote agentless scanning step includes the steps of finding properties (e.g., credentials) associated with the first network device and determining the identity (e.g., type) of the first network device. Further, determining the identity of the first network device can include querying a database where the identity (e.g., type) has been determined, examining network traffic, analyzing network behavior, probing the first network device for signature responses, attempting to log into the device using a series of protocols, logging into the first network device and/or querying data within the device. In another embodiment, the remote agentless scanning also includes scanning, on the first network device, one or more of a configuration, a file, data, a software version, a patch, inventory, hardware, and/or a security vulnerability. The scanning step can also include updating one or more of these items, such as installing a software patch on the first network device. The scanning step can also include installing anti-virus software on the first network device and/or determining if the first network device is part of a windows domain.
  • [0012]
    In another embodiment, the method includes the step of comparing a security setting of the first network device with a predetermined security setting. In yet another embodiment, the method includes the step of enabling the first network device to have additional access to the network, denying the first network device some or all access to the network, notifying another (e.g., authorities) about the first network device based on results of the scan, and/or quarantining the first network device.
  • [0013]
    In another embodiment, the method also includes the steps of setting a security policy on the first network device, auditing the security policy of the first network device, ensuring compliance with a predetermined security policy, and/or reporting results (e.g., of a scan).
  • [0014]
    In another aspect, an apparatus for remote agentless scanning of network devices connected to a network includes a detecting module that detects connection of a first network device to the network and a scanning module that performs remote agentless scanning of the first network device in response to the detection of the first network device.
  • [0015]
    In one embodiment, the detecting module continuously polls a database for data corresponding to newly attached (connected) network devices. Further, the scanning module remotely scans the first network device upon detecting data corresponding to the first network device in the database. The apparatus can also include a history database to store scan results of a scan. In another embodiment, the scanning module can enable the first network device to have additional access to the network, can deny the first network device some or all access to the network, can notify another (e.g., authorities) about the first network device based on results of the scan, and/or can quarantine the first network device.
  • [0016]
    The apparatus can also include a security policy management module for setting a security policy on the first network device, auditing the security policy of the first network device, ensuring compliance with a predetermined security policy, and/or reporting results (e.g., of a scan).
  • [0017]
    In yet another aspect, a method for examining a first network device connected to a network includes querying a database for data representing connection of network devices to a network, determining connection of a first network device to the network by locating data about the first network device in the database, determining properties (e.g., credentials, identity) of the first network device, determining the items to scan based on the properties (e.g., based on the identity of the first network device), and performing remote scanning of the first network device in response to the determination of the connection of the first network device to the network.
  • [0018]
    In one embodiment, the properties of the first network device include credentials of the first network device and/or the identity of the first network device. The identity of the first network device can include the type of the first network device. In one embodiment, the network device's type can be determined by querying a database where the type has already been determined, by examining network traffic, by analyzing network behavior, by probing the first network device for signature responses, and/or by logging into and querying the first network device. Moreover, a set of security policy settings can be selected for an audit.
  • [0019]
    In yet another aspect, a method for scanning network devices connected to a network includes detecting connection of a first network device to the network and performing remote scanning of the first network device in response to detection of the first network device.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0020]
    The advantages of the invention described above, together with further advantages, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference characters generally refer to the same parts throughout the different views. Also, the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead generally being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a security system having a detecting module and a scanning module constructed in accordance with the invention.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 2 is a more detailed block diagram of an embodiment of the detecting module and the scanning module of FIG. 1.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating an embodiment of a security policy management module.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating an embodiment of the steps performed by the detecting module and the scanning module of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0025]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of an embodiment of a security system 100. The security system 100 includes a first network device 110 communicating with a server 115. The first network device 110 can be any personal computer, smart or dumb terminal, network computer, wireless device (e.g., cellular telephone or personal digital assistant), information appliance, workstation, minicomputer, mainframe computer or other computing device. The first network device 110 can also include a network infrastructure device, such as a router, switch, or firewall.
  • [0026]
    The first network device 110 is in communication with the server 115 over a first network device-server communication channel 120. Example embodiments of the communication channel 120 include standard telephone lines, LAN or WAN links (e.g., T1, T3, 56 kb, X.25), broadband connections (ISDN, Frame Relay, ATM), and wireless connections. The connections over the communication channel 120 can be established using a variety of communication protocols (e.g., HTTP, HTTPS, TCP/IP, IPX, SPX, NetBIOS, Ethernet, RS232, messaging application programming interface (MAPI) protocol, real-time streaming protocol (RTSP), real-time streaming protocol used for user datagram protocol scheme (RTSPU), the Progressive Networks Multimedia (PNM) protocol developed by RealNetworks, Inc. of Seattle, Wash., manufacturing message specification (MMS) protocol, and direct asynchronous connections).
  • [0027]
    In one embodiment, the first network device-server communication channel 120 is established over a network 125. Exemplary embodiments of the network 125 include the World Wide Web (i.e., “web”), the Internet, and a Virtual Private Network (VPN). In one embodiment, the first network device 110 includes a web browser 128, such as INTERNET EXPLORER developed by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash., to connect to the network 125. Moreover, the security system 100 can include any number of network devices, such as the first network device 110 and a second network device 110′. Although described above and below with respect to the first network device 110, the description also applies to the second network device 110′.
  • [0028]
    The server 115 can be any of the devices (e.g., wireless device, personal computer, etc.) described above for the first network device 110. The server 115 includes a detecting module 130 and a scanning module 135. Although shown as modules 130, 135 that are executing on the server 115, one or both of the modules 130, 135 may also execute on another device that is separate from the server 115. For example, the detecting module 130 can execute on another device (not shown) and communicate with the scanning module 135 on the server 115. In another embodiment, the detecting module 130 and the scanning module 135 are incorporated into a single software module, such as a network examining module 137.
  • [0029]
    The detecting module 130 and the scanning module 135 can be plug-in modules or stand-alone modules. Further, the detecting module 130 and/or the scanning module 135 can be downloaded to the server 115 over the web (e.g., from a web site), can be installed via portable means (e.g., disk, CD-ROM, etc.), can be received in an email (e.g., an email attachment), and the like.
  • [0030]
    The detecting module 130 detects connection of the first network device 110 to the network 125 when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125. In one embodiment, attachment (or connection) to the network 125 occurs when the first network device 110 communicates with any other device or node of the network 125. The scanning module 135 performs remote scanning of the first network device 110 in response to the detection of the first network device 110. In particular, the scanning module 135 performs remote, agentless scanning of the first network device 110. Therefore, the scanning module 135 scans the first network device 110 without the use of software loaded on the first network device 110. The remote agentless scan can include a vulnerability scan and/or an audit scan. A vulnerability scan includes, for instance, a port scan and/or probing the first network device 110 against a large list of known vulnerabilities. An audit scan can include comparing current settings to a security policy or group of expected results. In one embodiment, the scanning module 135 takes an inventory of the first network device 110. For example, the scanning module 135 can determine which software is loaded onto or executing on the first network device 110, how frequently each software module or program executes or is accessed, the first network device's security policy, and the like.
  • [0031]
    In a further embodiment, the server 115 is a member of a server farm 140, or server network, which is a logical group of one or more servers that are administered as a single entity. In one embodiment, a server farm 140 includes multiple servers 115, 115′, 115″ (generally 115). Although the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 has three servers 115, the server farm 140 can have any number of servers. In other embodiments, the server farm 140 is a protected network that is inaccessible by unauthorized individuals, such as corporate Intranet, VPN, or secure extranet. Additionally, the servers 115 making up the server farm 140 may communicate over any of the networks described above (e.g., WAN, LAN) using any of the protocols discussed. Although described above and below as operating within a client-server network 125, the detecting module 130 and/or the scanning module 135 can alternatively be implemented in any type of network (e.g., peer-to-peer network).
  • [0032]
    FIG. 2 shows a more detailed block diagram of the detecting module 130 and the scanning module 135. The detecting module 130 includes a detection action module 210 that performs one or more actions to detect when the first network device 110 attaches to the network 125. The scanning module 135 includes a scanning action module 215 that performs one or more actions upon the detection of the first network device's connection to the network 125.
  • [0033]
    To detect the first network device's connection to the network 125, the detection action module 210 can, for instance, continuously poll a database for data about connections to the network 125. In one embodiment, continuous polling of the database can be an unending repetition of checking the database at an extremely short frequency. In one embodiment, the first network device 110 registers with a database (e.g., a registration database) when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125. Registration includes, for instance, sending particular data (e.g., network address) about the first network device 110 to the registration database when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125. In one embodiment, the detection action module 210 continuously polls a LDAP server (e.g., a Directory System Agent (DSA)) in order to determine when the first network device 110 attaches to the network. In another embodiment, the registration database (e.g., on a DSA) is triggered (e.g., using a Structured Query Language trigger) when a new network device (e.g., the first network device 110) registers with the database. The detection action module 210 can communicate with the registration database when the database is triggered.
  • [0034]
    In another embodiment, the detection action module 210 can communicate with a browser service to detect when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125. In yet another embodiment, the detection action module 210 communicates with a DNS server to determine when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125. The detection action module 210 can also perform indirect queries, such as using an LDAP persistent search, to detect the first network device 110 when the device connects to the network 110.
  • [0035]
    When the detection action module 210 determines that the first network device 110 has connected to the network 125, the detection action module 210 notifies the scanning module 135 of the new attachment. The scanning module 135 then automatically and remotely scans the first network device 110 without using an agent (i.e., agentless).
  • [0036]
    The scanning module 135 can take an inventory of the first network device 110. In one embodiment, the scanning action module 215 scans the first network device 110 for all software programs loaded on and/or executing on the first network device 110. The scanning action module 215 can also scan the first network device 110 for particular software programs (e.g., programs loaded before a specific date, programs created by a particular developer, a specific virus (e.g., Blaster worm), etc.). Moreover, the scanning action module 215 can also interrogate the first network device 110 with a query about a particular item (e.g., program).
  • [0037]
    For example, the scanning module 135 can scan the first network device 110 for the latest patches, to determine if anti-virus software is installed, to determine whether firewall software is installed (and what kind), to determine if the first network device 110 belongs to an appropriate windows domain, and/or the privileges of the users of the first network device 110 (e.g., which users have administrative privileges). The scanning module 135 can also scan the first network device 110 to determine how the first network device 110 communicates with the network 125 and/or how the first network device 110 receives power (e.g., whether the first network device 110 is plugged into a wall socket (e.g., if the first network device 110 is a laptop), if the first network device 110 connects to the network 125 via a wireless access, or connects to the network 125 via a VPN).
  • [0038]
    The scanning module 135 can also perform maintenance, such as by fixing/updating software on the first network device 110. The scanning module 135 can perform these fixes automatically (e.g., periodically), as part of a manually invoked scan, or through a scheduled scan. With respect to the first network device's security policy, for example, the scanning module 135 can assign priority to items and fix individual items, groups of items, or global problems in the security policy. For example, the scanning module 135 can fix deviations in the security policy of the first network device 110 relative to a predetermined security policy. In another embodiment, the scanning module 135 applies a software patch to the first network device 110. The scanning module 135 can apply this patch automatically, can first notify the first network device 110 and wait for the device's response, can only notify the first network device 110 that the particular patch is needed to update the first network device's software, etc. Additionally, the scanning module 135 can also enable a rollback of the fix if the fix causes unexpected side effects.
  • [0039]
    The scanning module 135 can also detect anomalies. For example, if the first network device 110 is a server that always services requests from other devices, an anomaly occurs when the server begins making requests. If the scanning module 135 determines that this is occurring, the server is likely a security risk and/or infected with a virus. The scanning action module 215 can then perform one or more of the actions described above or below (e.g., quarantine the first network device 110, report the anomaly, ensure compliance with a security policy, etc.). Another example of an anomaly that warrants maintenance is if the first network device 110 maintains and has maintained (e.g., for years) a particular load (e.g., 5% load) and then unexpectedly maintains a load of approximately 95%. This load increase can be a sign of an infected device that may need to be quarantined or fixed.
  • [0040]
    In further embodiments, the scanning module 135 enables a user to view the scans (i.e., scan results) in real-time for substantially immediate feedback and early detection and response planning. Alternatively, the scanning module 135 saves scans to one or more files or databases for offline analysis and reporting. Moreover, the scanning module 135 can follow a schedule for the timing of its scans. The scanning module 135 can also scan the first network device 110 as the first network device 110 attaches to a quarantined network. The first network device 110 can then switch to the corporate network if the first network device 110 passes an agentless scan.
  • [0041]
    In one embodiment, the scanning module 135 archives the results of scans in a history database. The history database can be part of the scanning module 135 or may communicate with the scanning module 135. The scanning module 135 can also cache the type of device that the scanning module 135 scanned.
  • [0042]
    In some embodiments, the scanning module 135 quarantines (or enables quarantining of) software on the first network device 110. For example, if the scanning module 135 locates a particular virus within a program on the first network device 110, the scanning module 135 may quarantine the program having the virus or the first network device 110. The scanning module 135 can quarantine the program to enable subsequent analysis of the program, such as to enable the disinfecting of the program, in a “closed” environment (i.e., not connected to a network). Moreover, the quarantining of the software program having a virus bolsters security by further ensuring that the virus does not affect other network devices (e.g., the second network device 110′) or other programs executing or loaded onto the first network device 110 (e.g., other user's software executing on the first network device 110). The scanning module 135 can also quarantine the first network device 110 that failed a scan by turning off the router port for the first network device 110 (e.g., at the switch). The scanning module 135 may also perform security functions for the first network device 110.
  • [0043]
    Although shown as separate modules 210, 215, the detection action module 210 and/or the scanning action module 215 can be incorporated into the detecting module 130 and/or the scanning module 135. Moreover, the scanning module 135 and the detecting module 130 can be incorporated into a single module.
  • [0044]
    In one embodiment and referring to FIG. 3, the scanning module 135 includes a security policy management module 305. The security policy management module 305 performs security policy management functions to the security policy of the first network device 110. For example, the security policy management module 305 can set the security policy of the first network device 110 (step 310). In one embodiment, the security policy management module 305 sets the first network device's security policy as a security policy that is an industry standard, such as, for example, a security policy developed by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash., System Administration, Networking, and Security (SANS) Institute, National Security Agency (NSA), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Center for Internet Security (CIS), and the Department of U.S. Navy. Additionally, the security policy management module 305 can also enable customization of the security policy. This customization can be, for instance, expression based.
  • [0045]
    The security policy management module 305 can also audit the security of the first network device 110 (step 315). In one embodiment, the auditing step includes a data collection process that gathers data from each device (e.g., the first network device 110) over the network 125. The security policy management module 305 stores the collected data in, e.g., a database. The amount of and type of data that the security policy management module 305 collects can vary depending on, for example, the function of the first network device 110 (e.g., if the first network device 110 is a web server, a database, a file server, etc.) and the platform of the first network device 110 (e.g., UNIX (developed by Bell Laboratories of Murray Hill, N.J.) or WindowsXP® (developed by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash.)).
  • [0046]
    In one embodiment, the security policy management module 305 enables multiple levels of settings, multiple patches (e.g., for applications and the operating system), software and/or hardware inventory, complete and/or sparse audits, and can also enable a user (e.g., an auditor) to view their rights and/or responsibilities. These rights/responsibilities are associated with the user's role and scope of the project. The rights/responsibilities can be associated with the first network device 110, specific security policy files, scanning, and the like. Moreover, the security policy management module 305 can also audit a group of devices (e.g., the first and second network devices 110, 110′), can fix security settings on the first network device 110 (or any number of additional network devices), and/or can audit on-demand or on a schedule.
  • [0047]
    The security policy management module 305 can also identify missing patches and identify unauthorized software (e.g., software with back doors), delete unlicensed or unauthorized software, identify unauthorized hardware (e.g., modems, wireless access points), eliminate unused system administration passwords on distributed systems, and/or provide control of external auditors' rights and responsibilities.
  • [0048]
    The security policy management module 305 can also automatically ensure that the first network device 110 complies with the requisite security policy (previously set) (step 320). For example, the security policy management module 305 can configure the first network device 110 with the correct security settings, can identify, manage, and/or update patches that the first network device 110 needs or has, and/or can add/delete software and/or hardware.
  • [0049]
    In more detail, the security policy management module 305 can verify and/or change, for instance, passwords, system level settings, users, groups, rights, account policies, key permissions, file permissions, registry settings, and/or weak passwords. Moreover, the security policy management module 305 can detect, for example, an operating system, software inventory, the version level of the software, hardware devices, and/or unauthorized modems. Additionally, the security policy management module 305 can be scalable to any device or enterprise and enables remote, agentless auditing and reporting. In other embodiments, the security policy management module 305 restores any or all system settings, files, or file attributes of the first network device 110.
  • [0050]
    The security policy management module 305 can also address additional security vulnerabilities of the first network device 110. Particular examples include assuring password compliance, discovering and configuring unauthorized modems, managing licensed software and revisions, and/or verifying virus detection software and updates.
  • [0051]
    The security policy management module 305 can also report the security policy information (step 325) or transmit the report to the first network device 110 (or any other device). The report can include detailed reports, such as reports with item-by-item and device-by-device listings, roll-up reports with device summaries for finding problem areas, executive summary reports with overall status reporting and high level charts, and trend reports that can be used to graph progress over time.
  • [0052]
    Although described above with a particular order (e.g., step 310, step 315, etc.), the functions that the security policy management module 305 performs can occur in any order and at any time. Further, these steps can be implemented in any of the modules (e.g., scanning module 135) described above and below.
  • [0053]
    Referring to FIG. 4, the detecting module 130 detects the first network device 110 when the first network device 110 connects to the network 125 (step 410). In one embodiment, the detecting module 130 intercepts data packets transmitted by the first network device 110 to detect the first network device 110 (step 415). The detecting module 130 may also inspect data packets that are communicated over the network 125 for any data packets associated with the first network device 110 (step 420).
  • [0054]
    As part of the interception (step 415) and/or inspection (step 420) of data packets over the network 125, the detecting module 130 can perform one or more of a Network Basic Input/Output System (NetBios) broadcast, an ARP request or broadcast, a dynamic DNS registration, a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) request, a Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) request, a Windows Domain Registration, a DNS query, and a “first packet seen” determination. The detection step 410 can also include port authentication.
  • [0055]
    The detection step 410 can also include continuous queries of, for example, a data source such as a database. These include broadcasting pings (step 425) to all network devices connected to the network 125 to detect any network devices that have not yet been detected, querying one or more ARP tables of one or more network communication devices (e.g., router and/or switch) to determine if an address associated with a new network device (e.g., the first network device 110) is located on the table (step 430), monitoring event log/syslog (step 435), a Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) query (e.g., to a router), LDAP query (e.g., to an Active Directory) (step 440), DNS query (step 440), switch port or Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) status, and/or “sniffing” the network 125.
  • [0056]
    In response to detecting the first network device 110, the scanning module 135 remotely scans the first network device 110. In one embodiment, the detecting module 130 communicates the detection to the scanning module 135 upon the detection of the first network device 110.
  • [0057]
    To scan the first network device 110, the scanning module 135 can determine properties (e.g., credentials) associated with the first network device 110 (step 445) so that the scanning module 135 can perform the scan on the first network device 110. The properties can come from a database (e.g., a “credentials store”), or the properties of the process performing the scan may enable a scan. The properties can include, for instance, a user name and password to log into the first network device 110.
  • [0058]
    In one embodiment, the scanning module 135 then determines the identity (e.g., type) of the first network device 110 (step 450). The scanning module 135 determines the identity of the first network device 110 to determine the protocols and/or application program interfaces (APIs) to use in the scanning of the first network device 110. To determine the identity of the first network device 110, the scanning module 135 can query a database where the identity has already been determined (e.g., querying an Active Directory or Structured Query Language (SQL) Server), examine network traffic, analyze network behavior, probe the device 110 for “signature” responses (i.e., responses known to be unique to that type of device 110), and/or attempt to log into the first network device 110 using a series of protocols (e.g., Windows Networking Protocol (developed by Microsoft of Redmond, Wash.), Secure Shell (SSH) logged in, the scanning module 135 can query the first network device 110 for data, such as by looking for the presence of the file/etc/passwd to deduce a UNIX computer, or perform a Registry query on a Windows computer. Further, the determination of the properties of the first network device can also include the determining of the identity of the first network device 110 (i.e., steps 445 and 450 can be combined into a single step).
  • [0059]
    The scanning module 135 then determines what to scan (step 455). As described above and depending on the identity of device 110 and user preferences, the scanning module 135 can determine which policy settings to audit. For example, on a Microsoft Windows computer 110, the scanning module 135 may scan for missing Windows Hotfixes. On a Solaris® computer (developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif.), the scanning module 135 can scan for missing Solaris® patches.
  • [0060]
    The scanning module 135 can also execute and/or remove software from the first network device 110 as part of its scan. The scanning module 135 can additionally compare security settings of the first network device 110 with predefined security settings to, e.g., ensure compliance with the predefined security settings. For instance, a template may be followed for a group security policy. In one embodiment, if the scanning module 135 determines that three settings in the first network device's policy are different than the template, the scanning module 135 may change the settings to match the template or may take another action as a result of the difference. Alternatively, the scanning module 135 reports the difference as a result of the comparison.
  • [0061]
    In some embodiments, the scanning module 135 enables the first network device 110 to have additional access to the network 125 or denies the first network device's access to the network 125. In one embodiment, enabling additional access to the network 125 includes enabling access to new areas of the network 125, such as if the network 125 is segmented by firewalls or filtering routers (e.g., it is in a limited quarantine). Further, the scanning module 135 may also notify another (e.g., the authorities) when data obtained from the scan poses a security threat. For example, the scanning module 135 can compare the scan results to a list of predetermined security terms and notify the authorities if a match is found.
  • [0062]
    In one embodiment, the scanning module 135 and/or the detecting module 130 can notify the customer (e.g., the user of the first network device 110) when a security setting changes. This notification can be with a phone call, e-mail, or directly with another software application. In another embodiment, the scanning module 135 is integrated into a software application's help desk software so that a help desk ticket is automatically opened when a failed scan occurs. The help desk ticket can result in a network administrator visiting the first network device 110 to interrogate the device 110. Although illustrated with particular steps (e.g., steps 415-460), the detecting module 130 and/or the scanning module 135 can perform any combination of these steps in any order.
  • [0063]
    Although the present invention has been described with reference to specific details, it is not intended that such details should be regarded as limitations upon the scope of the invention, except as and to the extent that they are included in the accompanying claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6324656 *Jun 30, 1998Nov 27, 2001Cisco Technology, Inc.System and method for rules-driven multi-phase network vulnerability assessment
US6546493 *Nov 30, 2001Apr 8, 2003Networks Associates Technology, Inc.System, method and computer program product for risk assessment scanning based on detected anomalous events
US6802009 *Dec 17, 1999Oct 5, 2004International Business Machines CorporationOperating system security checking system, method, and program
US6993448 *Apr 2, 2001Jan 31, 2006Telos CorporationSystem, method and medium for certifying and accrediting requirements compliance
US20010047407 *Apr 23, 2001Nov 29, 2001Moore Timothy M.Systems and methods for determining the physical location of a computer's network interfaces
US20020046260 *Sep 23, 1999Apr 18, 2002Michael D. Day IiManaging networked directory services with auto field population
US20020161908 *Feb 14, 2001Oct 31, 2002Benitez Manuel EnriqueIntelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
US20020174010 *May 25, 2001Nov 21, 2002Rice James L.System and method of permissive data flow and application transfer
US20030065936 *Aug 16, 2002Apr 3, 2003Wray Michael JohnMethod of performing a data processing operation
US20030182414 *Nov 19, 2001Sep 25, 2003O'neill Patrick J.System and method for updating and distributing information
US20030212779 *Apr 29, 2003Nov 13, 2003Boyter Brian A.System and Method for Network Security Scanning
US20040039827 *Apr 8, 2003Feb 26, 2004Neoteris, Inc.Method and system for providing secure access to private networks with client redirection
US20040193918 *Mar 28, 2003Sep 30, 2004Kenneth GreenApparatus and method for network vulnerability detection and compliance assessment
US20040234056 *Jun 17, 2004Nov 25, 2004Securelogix CorporationTelephony security system
US20040264435 *Jun 24, 2003Dec 30, 2004Amalavoyal ChariMethod of wireless accessing
US20040268145 *Jun 24, 2003Dec 30, 2004Nokia, Inc.Apparatus, and method for implementing remote client integrity verification
US20050015760 *Jul 16, 2003Jan 20, 2005Oleg IvanovAutomatic detection and patching of vulnerable files
US20050050335 *Oct 9, 2003Mar 3, 2005Trend Micro Incorporated, A Japanese CorporationAutomatic registration of a virus/worm monitor in a distributed network
US20060010492 *Jun 10, 2002Jan 12, 2006Axcelerant, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring computer network security enforcement
US20070094378 *Dec 20, 2006Apr 26, 2007Baldwin Duane MStorage Area Network Methods and Apparatus with Centralized Management
US20070162965 *Mar 20, 2007Jul 12, 2007Cisco Technology, Inc.Query data packet processing and network scanning method and apparatus
US20070261121 *May 2, 2007Nov 8, 2007Jacobson Andrea MNetwork Policy Management And Effectiveness System
US20090320135 *Aug 31, 2009Dec 24, 2009Deep Nines, Inc.System and method for network edge data protection
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7487136 *Oct 7, 2004Feb 3, 2009Sharp Laboratories Of AmericaIntelligent discovery of shares
US7509676 *Jul 30, 2004Mar 24, 2009Electronic Data Systems CorporationSystem and method for restricting access to an enterprise network
US7669237Aug 27, 2003Feb 23, 2010Trust Digital, LlcEnterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US7720031Oct 15, 2004May 18, 2010Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and devices to support mobility of a client across VLANs and subnets, while preserving the client's assigned IP address
US7730481 *May 7, 2004Jun 1, 2010Trend Micro IncorporatedMethod, apparatus and system of anti-virus software implementation
US7752671 *Sep 15, 2005Jul 6, 2010Promisec Ltd.Method and device for questioning a plurality of computerized devices
US7793338 *Oct 21, 2004Sep 7, 2010Mcafee, Inc.System and method of network endpoint security
US7865938May 26, 2006Jan 4, 2011Mcafee, Inc.Enterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US7877786 *Oct 21, 2004Jan 25, 2011Alcatel-Lucent Usa Inc.Method, apparatus and network architecture for enforcing security policies using an isolated subnet
US7912940 *Jul 30, 2004Mar 22, 2011Microsoft CorporationNetwork system role determination
US7945955Sep 11, 2007May 17, 2011Quick Heal Technologies Private LimitedVirus detection in mobile devices having insufficient resources to execute virus detection software
US8005049Apr 12, 2010Aug 23, 2011Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and devices to support mobility of a client across VLANs and subnets, while preserving the client's assigned IP address
US8006301 *May 17, 2005Aug 23, 2011Computer Associates Think, Inc.Method and systems for computer security
US8065712 *May 25, 2005Nov 22, 2011Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and devices for qualifying a client machine to access a network
US8146072Jul 30, 2004Mar 27, 2012Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.System and method for updating software on a computer
US8176158 *Aug 9, 2006May 8, 2012Tripwire, Inc.Information technology governance and controls methods and apparatuses
US8180850 *Sep 17, 2008May 15, 2012Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc.Data transmission device, data transmission system and address registration method
US8244761Oct 18, 2007Aug 14, 2012United Services Automobile Association (Usaa)Systems and methods for restricting access to internal data of an organization by external entity
US8245293Mar 30, 2007Aug 14, 2012Huang Evan SMethods and apparatuses for securely operating shared host computers with portable apparatuses
US8259568Oct 23, 2007Sep 4, 2012Mcafee, Inc.System and method for controlling mobile device access to a network
US8272058 *Jul 29, 2005Sep 18, 2012Bit 9, Inc.Centralized timed analysis in a network security system
US8341693Dec 17, 2010Dec 25, 2012Mcafee, Inc.Enterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US8369312 *Oct 3, 2007Feb 5, 2013Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc.Method and system for retrieving log messages from customer premise equipment
US8434152Mar 19, 2009Apr 30, 2013Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.System and method for restricting access to an enterprise network
US8484725 *Oct 26, 2005Jul 9, 2013Mcafee, Inc.System, method and computer program product for utilizing a threat scanner for performing non-threat-related processing
US8495700Feb 28, 2006Jul 23, 2013Mcafee, Inc.Mobile data security system and methods
US8544099 *May 21, 2010Sep 24, 2013Promisec Ltd.Method and device for questioning a plurality of computerized devices
US8565726Nov 6, 2009Oct 22, 2013Mcafee, Inc.System, method and device for mediating connections between policy source servers, corporate repositories, and mobile devices
US8566939 *Apr 4, 2006Oct 22, 2013Promisec Ltd.Method and device for scanning a plurality of computerized devices connected to a network
US8572676Nov 6, 2009Oct 29, 2013Mcafee, Inc.System, method, and device for mediating connections between policy source servers, corporate repositories, and mobile devices
US8583792Feb 13, 2012Nov 12, 2013Mcafee, Inc.Probe election in failover configuration
US8590043Aug 22, 2011Nov 19, 2013Ca, Inc.Method and systems for computer security
US8590046 *Jul 28, 2010Nov 19, 2013Bank Of America CorporationLogin initiated scanning of computing devices
US8595822Dec 29, 2011Nov 26, 2013Mcafee, Inc.System and method for cloud based scanning for computer vulnerabilities in a network environment
US8635661Dec 22, 2004Jan 21, 2014Mcafee, Inc.System and method for enforcing a security policy on mobile devices using dynamically generated security profiles
US8671181Oct 6, 2009Mar 11, 2014Mcafee, Inc.Host entry synchronization
US8695099 *Nov 30, 2012Apr 8, 2014Bank Of America CorporationLogin initiated scanning of computing devices
US8745224 *Dec 28, 2005Jun 3, 2014Intel CorporationMethod and apparatus for dynamic provisioning of an access control policy in a controller hub
US8750108Apr 29, 2012Jun 10, 2014Mcafee, Inc.System and method for controlling mobile device access to a network
US8850530Sep 28, 2012Sep 30, 2014Mcafee, Inc.Enterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US8856311 *Mar 17, 2006Oct 7, 2014Nokia CorporationSystem coordinated WLAN scanning
US8862730 *Mar 28, 2006Oct 14, 2014Symantec CorporationEnabling NAC reassessment based on fingerprint change
US8898774 *Jun 25, 2009Nov 25, 2014Accenture Global Services LimitedMethod and system for scanning a computer system for sensitive content
US8914341Jul 3, 2008Dec 16, 2014Tripwire, Inc.Method and apparatus for continuous compliance assessment
US8924721Oct 6, 2009Dec 30, 2014Mcafee, Inc.Nonce generation
US8931063 *Jul 10, 2012Jan 6, 2015Evan S. HuangMethods and apparatuses for securely operating shared host computers with portable apparatuses
US8935384May 6, 2011Jan 13, 2015Mcafee Inc.Distributed data revocation using data commands
US8949482 *May 3, 2012Feb 3, 2015Ricoh Company, Ltd.Device management apparatus, device management system, information management method, information management program and recording medium storing the program therein
US9027084Jul 10, 2012May 5, 2015Evan S. HuangMethods and apparatuses for securely operating shared host devices with portable apparatuses
US9043920Oct 17, 2012May 26, 2015Tenable Network Security, Inc.System and method for identifying exploitable weak points in a network
US9049118Nov 11, 2013Jun 2, 2015Mcafee, Inc.Probe election in failover configuration
US9088606Dec 3, 2012Jul 21, 2015Tenable Network Security, Inc.System and method for strategic anti-malware monitoring
US9117069Dec 21, 2013Aug 25, 2015Securityprofiling, LlcReal-time vulnerability monitoring
US9118708Sep 28, 2014Aug 25, 2015Securityprofiling, LlcMulti-path remediation
US9118709 *Sep 28, 2014Aug 25, 2015Securityprofiling, LlcAnti-vulnerability system, method, and computer program product
US9197633May 25, 2014Nov 24, 2015Evan S. HuangMethods and apparatuses for securely operating shared host computers with portable apparatuses
US9209996Mar 19, 2012Dec 8, 2015Tripwire, Inc.Data processing environment change management methods and apparatuses
US9225686Mar 16, 2015Dec 29, 2015Securityprofiling, LlcAnti-vulnerability system, method, and computer program product
US9256841May 7, 2012Feb 9, 2016Tripwire, Inc.Information technology governance and controls methods and apparatuses
US9391858Oct 6, 2009Jul 12, 2016Mcafee, Inc.Host information collection
US9467464Apr 8, 2013Oct 11, 2016Tenable Network Security, Inc.System and method for correlating log data to discover network vulnerabilities and assets
US9473355Mar 14, 2013Oct 18, 2016Amazon Technologies, Inc.Inferring application inventory
US9489652 *May 30, 2012Nov 8, 2016Crimson CorporationObtaining and running a local query on a computing device
US9514024Sep 29, 2010Dec 6, 2016Oracle International CorporationAgentless data collection
US9516451Apr 10, 2012Dec 6, 2016Mcafee, Inc.Opportunistic system scanning
US9516586Dec 11, 2014Dec 6, 2016Nokia Technologies OySystem coordinated WLAN scanning
US9531747 *Sep 10, 2014Dec 27, 2016George Mason Research Foundation, Inc.Malware detector
US9554327Jul 2, 2014Jan 24, 2017Nokia Technologies OySystem coordinated WLAN scanning
US20050125526 *May 7, 2004Jun 9, 2005Tsun-Sheng ChouMethod, apparatus and system of anti-virus software implementation
US20050149480 *Oct 7, 2004Jul 7, 2005Sachin DeshpandeIntelligent discovery of shares
US20050262559 *May 17, 2005Nov 24, 2005Huddleston David EMethod and systems for computer security
US20060004830 *Jun 7, 2004Jan 5, 2006Lora Brian MAgent-less systems, methods and computer program products for managing a plurality of remotely located data storage systems
US20060026283 *Jul 30, 2004Feb 2, 2006Trueba Luis Ruben ZSystem and method for updating software on a computer
US20060026686 *Jul 30, 2004Feb 2, 2006Trueba Luis R ZSystem and method for restricting access to an enterprise network
US20060041534 *May 24, 2004Feb 23, 2006Atwell Micah ERemote infrastructure management
US20060069805 *Jul 30, 2004Mar 30, 2006Microsoft CorporationNetwork system role determination
US20060075128 *Sep 15, 2005Apr 6, 2006Promisec Ltd.Method and device for questioning a plurality of computerized devices
US20060101409 *Oct 21, 2004May 11, 2006Bemmel Jeroen VMethod, apparatus and network architecture for enforcing security policies using an isolated subnet
US20060112427 *Aug 27, 2003May 25, 2006Trust Digital, LlcEnterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US20060149408 *Aug 16, 2005Jul 6, 2006Speeter Thomas HAgent-less discovery of software components
US20060184682 *Apr 4, 2006Aug 17, 2006Promisec Ltd.Method and device for scanning a plurality of computerized devices connected to a network
US20060195566 *Feb 25, 2005Aug 31, 2006Hurley Mark EMethod and system for taking remote inventory in a network
US20060224742 *Feb 28, 2006Oct 5, 2006Trust DigitalMobile data security system and methods
US20070004406 *Mar 17, 2006Jan 4, 2007Nokia CorporationSystem coordinated WLAN scanning
US20070028302 *Jul 29, 2005Feb 1, 2007Bit 9, Inc.Distributed meta-information query in a network
US20070043674 *Aug 9, 2006Feb 22, 2007Tripwire, Inc.Information technology governance and controls methods and apparatuses
US20070143824 *Dec 22, 2004Jun 21, 2007Majid ShahbaziSystem and method for enforcing a security policy on mobile devices using dynamically generated security profiles
US20070150559 *Dec 28, 2005Jun 28, 2007Intel CorporationMethod and apparatus for dynamic provisioning of an access control policy in a controller hub
US20070250932 *Apr 20, 2006Oct 25, 2007Pravin KothariIntegrated enterprise-level compliance and risk management system
US20080137593 *Oct 23, 2007Jun 12, 2008Trust DigitalSystem and method for controlling mobile device access to a network
US20080148407 *Sep 11, 2007Jun 19, 2008Cat Computer Services Pvt LtdVirus Detection in Mobile Devices Having Insufficient Resources to Execute Virus Detection Software
US20080244063 *Mar 26, 2007Oct 2, 2008Vinayak RisbudAutomatically detecting managed servers in a network
US20090031403 *Mar 30, 2007Jan 29, 2009Huang Evan SMethods and Apparatuses for Securely Operating Shared Host Computers With Portable Apparatuses
US20090083439 *Sep 17, 2008Mar 26, 2009Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc.Data transmission device, data transmission system and address registration method
US20090092126 *Oct 3, 2007Apr 9, 2009Verizon Data Services Inc.Method and system for retrieving log messages from customer premise equipment
US20090106828 *Oct 8, 2008Apr 23, 2009Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc.Device administration apparatus, device administration method and recording medium
US20090183233 *Mar 19, 2009Jul 16, 2009Electronic Data Systems CorporationSystem and Method for Restricting Access to an Enterprise Network
US20100005107 *Jul 3, 2008Jan 7, 2010Tripwire, Inc.Method and apparatus for continuous compliance assessment
US20100115582 *Nov 6, 2009May 6, 2010Trust DigitalSystem, method, and device for mediating connections between policy source servers, corporate respositories, and mobile devices
US20100195620 *Apr 12, 2010Aug 5, 2010Wen-Chun ChengMethods and devices to support mobility of a client across vlans and subnets, while preserving the client's assigned ip address
US20100218235 *Feb 24, 2010Aug 26, 2010Ganot AsafMethod and system for temporarily removing group policy restrictions remotely
US20100235920 *May 21, 2010Sep 16, 2010Promisec Ltd.Method and device for questioning a plurality of computerized devices
US20100333199 *Jun 25, 2009Dec 30, 2010Accenture Global Services GmbhMethod and system for scanning a computer system for sensitive content
US20110055381 *Oct 6, 2009Mar 3, 2011Mcafee, Inc.Host information collection
US20110055382 *Oct 6, 2009Mar 3, 2011Mcafee, Inc.Host entry synchronization
US20110055580 *Oct 6, 2009Mar 3, 2011Mcafee, Inc.Nonce generation
US20110055907 *Oct 6, 2009Mar 3, 2011Mcafee, Inc.Host state monitoring
US20110078108 *Sep 29, 2010Mar 31, 2011Oracle International CorporationAgentless data collection
US20110093954 *Dec 15, 2009Apr 21, 2011Electronics And Telecommunications Research InstituteApparatus and method for remotely diagnosing security vulnerabilities
US20110162049 *Dec 17, 2010Jun 30, 2011Mcafee, Inc., A Delaware CorporationEnterprise-wide security system for computer devices
US20110191817 *Nov 4, 2010Aug 4, 2011Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Host apparatus, image forming apparatus, and method of managing security settings
US20120030757 *Jul 28, 2010Feb 2, 2012Bank Of America CorporationLogin initiated scanning of computing devices
US20120221752 *May 3, 2012Aug 30, 2012Hisashi IshiharaDevice management apparatus, device management system, information management method, information management program and recording medium storing the program therein
US20120278866 *Jul 10, 2012Nov 1, 2012Huang Evan SMethods and apparatuses for securely operating shared host computers with portable apparatuses
US20130091569 *Nov 30, 2012Apr 11, 2013Bank Of America CorporationLogin initiated scanning of computing devices
US20130152196 *Jun 21, 2012Jun 13, 2013Microsoft CorporationThrottling of rogue entities to push notification servers
US20140244839 *Feb 28, 2014Aug 28, 2014Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for monitoring internet connection status in wireless communication system
US20150033351 *Sep 28, 2014Jan 29, 2015Securityprofiling, LlcAnti-vulnerability system, method, and computer program product
US20150264059 *Sep 10, 2014Sep 17, 2015George Mason Research Foundation, Inc.Malware detector
WO2013101386A1 *Nov 29, 2012Jul 4, 2013Mcafee, Inc.System and method for cloud based scanning for computer vulnerabilities in a network environment
WO2013155236A1 *Apr 10, 2013Oct 17, 2013Mcafee, Inc.Opportunistic system scanning
WO2014160204A1 *Mar 13, 2014Oct 2, 2014Amazon Technologies, Inc.Inferring application inventory
Classifications
U.S. Classification709/223, 709/224
International ClassificationG06F, G06F15/173
Cooperative ClassificationH04L67/125
European ClassificationH04L29/08N11M
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 8, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: PEDESTAL SOFTWARE, INC., MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WOODARD, KEITH;TRIAS, FERNANDO;REEL/FRAME:014791/0853
Effective date: 20031112
Aug 31, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: SYMANTEC CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PEDESTAL SOFTWARE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019772/0715
Effective date: 20070828
Sep 6, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: SYMANTEC CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PEDESTAL SOFTWARE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019790/0082
Effective date: 20070905