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Publication numberUS20050102949 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/934,661
Publication dateMay 19, 2005
Filing dateSep 3, 2004
Priority dateSep 5, 2003
Publication number10934661, 934661, US 2005/0102949 A1, US 2005/102949 A1, US 20050102949 A1, US 20050102949A1, US 2005102949 A1, US 2005102949A1, US-A1-20050102949, US-A1-2005102949, US2005/0102949A1, US2005/102949A1, US20050102949 A1, US20050102949A1, US2005102949 A1, US2005102949A1
InventorsRobert Whitson
Original AssigneeBend Industries, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interlocking masonry wall block
US 20050102949 A1
Abstract
Single masonry units mate with like units to build straight walls, inside curves, outside curves and most any angle corners and maintains finish on all exposed surfaces. The interlocking fastening system provides simple construction and automatic wall alignment.
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Claims(30)
1. A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising:
a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls, each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core having a width, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and
first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body, the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall, the core having a width less than 1.25 times the width of the projection,
the first and second projections being adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall.
2. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the outside surface of the front wall is of a linear configuration.
3. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the outside surface of the rear wall is of a linear configuration.
4. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein core is of a non-tapered width.
5. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
6. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein core is centered between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
7. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the first and second projections are offset between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.
8. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.
9. A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising:
a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls,
each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and
first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body,
the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall, the first and second projections being adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall,
at least one of the first and second side walls including a score line between the cavity and the respective first or second projection, the score line extending from the front wall outer surface to the rear wall outer surface.
10. A masonry wall block as in claim 9,
wherein the core is spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
11. A masonry wall block as in claim 9,
wherein the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
12. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the first and second projections are offset between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.
13. A masonry wall block as in claim 1,
wherein the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.
14. A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising:
a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls, each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and
first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body, the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall,
the first and second projections being spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces and adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall so as to provide essentially no setback dimension between the block and the underlying block.
15. A masonry wall block as in claim 14,
wherein there is essentially no setback dimension when the first and second projections are placed within the cavity of the underlying block in an abutting relation to the front wall inside surface of the underlying block.
16. A masonry wall block as in claim 14,
wherein there is essentially no setback dimension when the first and second projections are placed within the cavity of the underlying block in an abutting relation to the rear wall inside surface of the underlying block.
17. A masonry wall block as in claim 14,
wherein the core is spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
18. A masonry wall block as in claim 14,
wherein the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.
19. A masonry wall block as in claim 14,
wherein the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall outside surfaces.
20. A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising:
a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls extending from the front wall to the rear wall, the front wall having a length greater than the length of the rear wall such that the first and second side walls converge toward one another as they extend from the front wall toward the rear wall, each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and
first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body, the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall, the first and second projections being adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall, the front wall of the block being configured to lie adjacent the rear wall of a laterally adjacent block in the retaining wall such that the cavity of the block is positioned to receive the first projection of an overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the front wall of the bock and the cavity of the laterally adjacent block is positioned to receive the second projection of the same overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the rear wall of the laterally adjacent block.
21. A masonry wall block as in claim 20,
wherein the front wall and the rear wall are of equal width.
22. A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising:
a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls extending from the front wall to the rear wall, the front wall having a length greater than the length of the rear wall such that the first and second side walls converge toward one another as they extend from the front wall toward the rear wall, each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and
first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body, the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall, the first and second projections being adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall, the front wall of the block being configured to lie adjacent the rear wall of a laterally adjacent block in the retaining wall such that the cavity of the block is positioned to receive the first projection of an overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the rear wall of the bock and the cavity of the laterally adjacent block is positioned to receive the second projection of the same overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the front wall of the laterally adjacent block.
23. A masonry wall block as in claim 22,
wherein the front wall and the rear wall are of equal width.
24. A retaining wall comprising:
a lower tier of individual blocks, each block having a cavity, and
an upper tier of individual blocks, each block comprising a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls, each of the walls having inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces, the inside surfaces of the walls forming an open core, the upper surfaces of the walls forming an upper surface of the body, and the lower surfaces of the walls forming a lower surface of the body, and first and second projections extending from the lower surface of the body, the first projection extending from the lower surface of the first side wall and the second projection extending from the lower surface of the second side wall, the first and second projections being spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces and adapted for placement within a cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall so as to provide essentially no setback dimension between the block and the underlying block.
25. A retaining wall as in claim 24,
wherein the retaining wall is arranged in a linear configuration.
26. A retaining wall as in claim 24,
wherein the retaining wall is arranged in a curvilinear configuration.
27. A retaining wall as in claim 24,
wherein the lower tier of blocks are positioned laterally in the same direction.
28. A retaining wall as in claim 22,
wherein the upper tier of blocks are positioned laterally in the same direction.
29. A retaining wall as in claim 22,
wherein the lower tier of blocks are positioned laterally in an alternating direction.
30. A retaining wall as in claim 22,
wherein the lower tier of blocks are positioned laterally in an alternating direction.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 60/500,492, filed Sep. 5, 2003, and entitled “Interlocking Masonry Wall Block.”

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a masonry block for stacking on other like-shaped blocks in a staggered, interlocking and offset manner to form a wall that is particularly well-suited for use as a vertical seating wall around patios, pool decks, walkways, and the like.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A variety of masonry block designs have been developed for building vertical seating walls. Wall block designs require a mechanism for securing the blocks together to produce a stable wall structure. Conventional interlocking masonry wall blocks are heavy and difficult to handle. In addition, several different block shapes must be combined to form the straight and curved sections of a serpentine wall. The need remains for masonry wall blocks that are cost-efficient to manufacture and easily assembled into a stabile and durable wall.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Each block in an upper course of blocks is laid in a staggered manner relative to a lower course so that the upper block is placed atop two lower blocks. Single block units mate with like units to build straight walls, inside curves, outside curves and angle corners. Laterally adjacent blocks may be similarly aligned. Alternatively, laterally adjacent blocks may be inversely aligned so that the front wall of one block lies adjacent the rear wall of the adjacent block.

According to one aspect of the invention, a masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprises a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core having a width. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The core has a width less than 1.25× the width of the projections. The projections are adapted for placement within the core of an underlying block in the retaining wall.

In one embodiment, the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces. In another embodiment, the core is centered between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.

In one embodiment, the first and second projections are offset between the front and rear wall inside surfaces. In another embodiment, the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.

According to another aspect of the invention, a masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprises a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core having a width. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The projections are adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall. At least one of the first and second side walls includes a score line between the cavity and the respective first or second projection that extends from the front wall outer surface to the rear wall outer surface.

In one embodiment, the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces. In another embodiment, the core is centered between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.

In one embodiment, the first and second projections are offset between the front and rear wall inside surfaces. In another embodiment, the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces.

According another aspect of the invention, a masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprises a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core having a width. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces and adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall so as to provide essentially no setback dimension between the block and the underlying block.

In one embodiment, there is essentially no setback dimension when the first and second projections are placed within the cavity of the underlying block in an abutting relation to the front wall inside surface of the underlying block.

In another embodiment, there is essentially no setback dimension when the first and second projections are placed within the cavity of the underlying block in an abutting relation to the rear wall inside surface of the underlying block.

In one embodiment, the core is offset between the front and rear wall outer surfaces. In another embodiment, the core is centered between the front and rear wall outer surfaces.

In one embodiment, the first and second projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall outside surfaces.

According to another aspect of the invention, a masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprises a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls that extend from the front wall to the rear wall. The front wall has a length greater than the length of the rear wall such that the first and second side walls converge toward one another as they extend from the front wall toward the rear wall. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The first and second projections are adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall. The front wall of the block is configured to lie adjacent the rear wall of a laterally adjacent block in the retaining wall such that the cavity of the block is positioned to receive the first projection of an overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the front wall of the bock and the cavity of the laterally adjacent block is positioned to receive the second projection of the same overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the rear wall of the laterally adjacent block.

In one embodiment, the front wall and the rear wall are of equal width.

A masonry wall block for forming a retaining wall comprising a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls that extend from the front wall to the rear wall. The front wall has a length greater than the length of the rear wall such that the first and second side walls converge toward one another as they extend from the front wall toward the rear wall. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The first and second projections are adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall. The front wall of the block is configured to lie adjacent the rear wall of a laterally adjacent block in the retaining wall such that the cavity of the block is positioned to receive the first projection of an overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the rear wall of the bock and the cavity of the laterally adjacent block is positioned to receive the second projection of the same overlying block in the retaining wall in an abutting relation to the inside surface of the front wall of the laterally adjacent block.

In one embodiment, the front wall and the rear wall are of equal width.

According to yet another aspect of the invention, a retaining wall comprises a lower tier of individual blocks, each block having a cavity, and an upper tier of individual blocks. Each block in the upper tier comprises a body having a front wall, a rear wall, and first and second side walls. Each of the walls has inside and outside surfaces and upper and lower surfaces. The inside surfaces of the walls form an open core having a width. The upper surfaces of the walls form an upper surface of the body. The lower surfaces of the walls form a lower surface of the body. A first projection extends from the lower surface of the first side wall and a second projection extends from the lower surface of the second side wall. The projections are spaced equidistant between the front and rear wall inside surfaces and adapted for placement within the cavity of an underlying block in the retaining wall so as to provide essentially no setback dimension between the block and the underlying block.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a bottom perspective view of a masonry block unit.

FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a front plan view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a masonry seating wall formed from like-shaped blocks.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view illustrating a series of laterally-adjacent blocks inversely aligned to form a straight wall.

FIG. 9 is a top plan view illustrating the arrangement of a series of inversely-aligned laterally-adjacent blocks to form an angular wall.

FIG. 10 is a top plan view illustrating an alternative arrangement of a series of inversely-aligned laterally-adjacent blocks to form an angular wall.

FIG. 11 is a top plan view illustrating an angular wall constructed by alternating courses arranged as in FIG. 9 with courses arranged as in FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a top plan view illustrating the arrangement of a series of similarly aligned laterally-adjacent blocks to form a straight or linear wall.

FIG. 13 is a top plan view illustrating the arrangement of a series of similarly aligned laterally-adjacent blocks to form a curved wall.

FIG. 14 is a top plan view illustrating the arrangement of a series of similarly aligned laterally-adjacent blocks to form a wall having straight portions and curved portions.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

An individual masonry block 10 for use in constructing vertical seating walls around patios, pool decks, walkways, etc. is shown in FIGS. 1-6. The block 10 has a main body 12 having a front wall 14 having an outside surface 16 and an inside surface 18, a rear wall 20 having an outside surface 22 and an inside surface 24, and first and second side walls 26 each having an outside surface 28 and an inside surface 30. The inside surfaces 18/24/30 of the walls 14/20/26 define an open core 32.

The upper surfaces of walls 14, 20, and 26 define an upper surface 34 of the body 12. The lower surfaces of walls 14, 20, and 26 define a lower surface 36 of the body 12. The upper and lower surfaces 34 and 36 are generally parallel to each other. When laid in place on a horizontal supporting surface, the upper and lower surfaces 34 and 36 are horizontal as well.

The front wall 14 has a length LF and the rear wall 20 has a length LR. Each side wall 26 converges toward the other at an angle A as it extends toward the rear wall 20 such that LF>LR, thereby providing the block 10 a generally trapezoidal shape. The front and rear walls 14 and 20 are generally parallel (i.e., both walls 14 and 20 are of an essentially straight or linear configuration), and generally perpendicular to upper and lower surfaces 34 and 36. It is contemplated, however, that either or both of front and rear walls 14 and 20 may be of a curvilinear configuration, e.g., convex, arcuate, or serpentine configuration (not shown). Front and rear walls 14 and 20 are desirably both finished (split, soft split or textured). The block 10 has a width WB.

Desirably, at least one score line 38 is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of opposing score lines 38 are provided. In the illustrated embodiment, the score lines 38 take the form of a V-shaped grooves G. The score lines 38 are generally parallel and extend from the front wall 14 to the rear wall 20. A block 10 may be split along a score line 38 to form an end block 40 presenting a flat end surface 42, as will be explained in detail later (see FIGS. 9-11).

Two opposing integral lug projections 44 extend from the lower surface 36 of the block 10. In the illustrated and preferred embodiment, a first projection 44 extends from the lower surface 36 of the first side wall 26 and the second projection 44 extends from the lower surface 36 of the second side wall 26. Each projection 44 is desirably positioned between the score line 38 and the outside surface 28 of the respective side wall 26. The projections 44 are generally rounded or convex, having a radius RL, a height HL, and a width WL. It is contemplated that the projections 44 may take on a variety of other configurations, e.g., rectangular or square, to accommodate specific needs. In a preferred embodiment, each lug projection 44 is generally centered equidistant between the front wall inside surface 18 and the rear wall inside surface 24 such that distance D1 and distance D2 are essentially equal.

The open interior or core 32 extends completely through the block 10 from the upper surface 34 to the lower surface 36. The open core 32 does not present a trapezoidal shape as does the block body 12, but instead has a generally elongated, rounded shape having a length LC, width WC and radius RC. Desirably, the width of the core 32 is only slightly larger than the width of the projection 44, such that WC is only slightly greater than WL. This arrangement allows for easy placement of the projections 44 within the core 32 of an adjacent-tiered block 10 and provides a tolerance allowing for expansion, contraction, or settling movement of the blocks 10. This arrangement also provides sufficient tolerance for orientating the blocks 10 in various configurations, e.g., curved walls, as will be described later. In addition, this arrangement permits minimal forward or reverse movement of the blocks 10 within the retaining wall, thus providing additional stability to the wall. For example, the core 32 may have a width WC that is less than twice the width of the projections WL (WC<2×WL), and preferably WC is less than 1.25 times WL (WC=1.25×WL). In a preferred embodiment, the core 32 has a width of 1½ inches and each lug projection 44 has a width of 1⅜ inch.

With reference to FIG. 3, the core 32 is desirably slightly offset between the front and rear walls 14 and 20. For example, in one embodiment, the rear wall 20 is of a slightly greater width than the width of the front wall 14 such that distance D3>distance D4. In this arrangement, there is no or zero setback when the projections 44 are placed in an abutting relation with the inside surface 24 of the rear wall 20 within the core 32 of a similarly-aligned adjacent-tiered block 10. In an alternative embodiment, the front wall 14 is of a slightly greater width than the width of the rear wall 20 such that distance D4>distance D3. In this embodiment, there is no or zero setback when the projections 44 are placed in an abutting relation with the inside surface 18 of the front wall 14 within the core 32 of a similarly-aligned adjacent-tiered block.

In an alternative embodiment, the core 32 is not offset, i.e., the front and rear walls 14 and 20 are of equal width, such that D3=D4. In this embodiment, there is no or zero setback when the projections 44 are placed equidistant between the front and rear inside wall surfaces 18 and 24 within the core 32 of a similarly-aligned adjacent-tiered block 10. In this case, it may be desirable to slightly offset the projections 44 with respect to the core 32 (i.e., such that D1≠D2) so as to provide zero offset when the projections 44 abut the front wall inside surface 18 or the rear wall inside surface 24 of an adjacent-tiered block 10.

One of ordinary skill in the art should readily appreciate that the volume of the core 32 can vary, but is preferably maximized to decrease the weight and material cost of the block 10 without impairing the strength, integrity and manufacturability of the block 10. Similarly, the actual shape and dimensions of the core 32 can vary, provided the core 32 maintains the ability to receive the lug-shaped projections 44 of another block 10, as will be described later.

Table 1 lists dimensions for a representative embodiment:

TABLE 1
Length LF of front wall 12 inches
Length LR of rear wall 9 inches
Width W of block 7 inches
Angle A 12°
Lug height HL {fraction (5/16)} inch
Lug width WL 1⅜ inch
Radius of lug RL ¼ inch
Length of core LC 6 inches
Width of core WC inches
Radius of core Rc ¾ inch
D1 ¾ inch
D2 ¾ inch
D3 inches
D4 inches
Groove G inch

The block 10 configuration enables a fastening system that provides simple construction and automatic wall alignment. The like-shaped blocks 10 are sized and configured to be laterally aligned in an abutting side-by-side engagement, and vertically aligned in a staggered, stacked manner so that one block 10 rests atop two other blocks 10.

When arranged in this manner, the blocks form a multi-tiered wall (W), such as the wall W shown in FIG. 7. With reference to FIG. 8, the wall W is typically constructed one tier or course at a time. Once a lower course 46 (represented in phantom lines in FIG. 8) is set in place, an upper course 48 (represented in solid lines in FIG. 8) is placed on top of it. The blocks 10 forming the lower course 46 form a generally horizontal platform upon which the upper course 48 can be stacked.

An interlocking fit is achieved between the like-shaped blocks 10 in adjacent upper and lower courses 48 and 46. Each block 10 in the upper course 48 is laid in a staggered manner relative to the lower course 46 so that the upper block 10 is placed atop two lower blocks 10. Each block 10 is also placed such that one of its lug projections 44 extends into and is received by the open core 32 of an adjacent block 10 in an adjacent course 46 or 48. This interlock limits forward or backward movement of blocks 10 in one course 46 or 48 relative to the blocks 10 of an adjacent course 46 or 48. This arrangement also limits sideways or lateral movement of blocks 10 in one course 46 or 48 relative to the blocks 10 of the adjacent course 46 or 48.

The first course may be laid such that the lower surface 36 and projections 44 are positioned facing upward (i.e., with upper surface 34 facing downward). Upward positioning of the projections 44 may be desirable if the first course is to be laid on a hard or finished surface, e.g., on a patio or deck 50, as shown in FIG. 7. In this embodiment, the subsequent courses may all be similarly laid with the lower surface 36 and projections 44 facing upward, such that each projection 44 extends into and is received by the open core 32 of an adjacent upper block 10. That is, the upper surface 34 of each block 10 in each stacked, upper course 48 is placed on and rests on the lower surfaces 36 of the blocks 10 in the lower course 46 upon which it is placed.

Alternatively, subsequent courses may all be laid with the projections 44 facing downward, such that each projection 44 extends into and is received by the open core 32 of an adjacent lower block 10. That is, the lower surface 36 of each block 10 in each stacked, upper course 48 is placed on and rests on the upper surfaces 34 of the blocks 10 in the lower course 46 upon which it is placed. The final course is desirably laid with the projections 44 facing downward regardless of whether the previous courses were laid with the projections 44 facing upward or downward to present the flat or smooth upper surfaces 34 of the blocks 10 forming the top course, thereby eliminating the need to cut or otherwise remove the projections 44 from the blocks 10 forming the top course.

Alternatively, the first course may be laid with the lower surface 36 and projections 44 positioned facing downward (i.e., with upper surface 34 facing upward). Downward positioning of the projections 44 may be desirable if the first course is to be laid on soil or other surface in which the projections 44 may be extended to further anchor the first course blocks 10. If the first course is laid with the projections 44 facing downward, the subsequent courses are preferably all laid with the projections 44 facing downward. This arrangement also presents the flat or smooth upper surfaces 34 of the blocks 10 forming the top course.

With reference again to FIG. 8, in each course, adjacent like-shaped blocks 10 may be laterally inversely aligned so that the front wall 14 of one block 10 lies adjacent the rear wall 20 of the adjacent block 10. The core 32 of a block 10 is positioned to receive the first projection 44 of an overlying block 10 and the laterally adjacent block 10 is positioned to receive the second projection 44 of the same overlying block 10. The placement of the projections 44 and the core 32 with respect to the front and rear wall outside surfaces 22 and 28 can be varied to provide no offset dimension and to permit construction of an essentially straight or linear wall or wall portion WL, as shown in FIG. 8.

When the core 32 is spaced essentially equidistant between the front and rear wall outside surfaces 22 and 28, the core 32 of a block 10 is positioned to receive the first projection 44 of an overlying block 10 in the retaining wall W in an abutting relation to the inside surface 24 of the front wall 14 of the bock 10 and the core 32 of an inversely-aligned and laterally-adjacent block 10 is positioned to receive the second projection 44 of the same overlying block 10 in an abutting relation to the inside surface 24 of the rear wall 20 of the laterally adjacent block 10. Alternatively, when the core 32 is spaced essentially equidistant between the front and rear wall outside surfaces 22 and 28, the core 32 of the block 10 is positioned to receive the first projection 44 of an overlying block 10 in the retaining wall W in an abutting relation to the inside surface 24 of the rear wall 20 of the bock 10 and the core 32 of an inversely-aligned and laterally-adjacent block 10 is positioned to receive the second projection 44 of the same overlying block 10 in an abutting relation to the inside surface 18 of the front wall 14 of the laterally adjacent block 10.

As seen in FIGS. 9-11, laterally inversely-aligned blocks 10 may also be arranged to construct a wall W having an essentially 90° angle. Laterally-adjacent blocks 10 may be broken along a score line 38 (with broken away sections represented in phantom in FIGS. 9 and 10) to form an end block 40 presenting a flat side end surface 42. FIG. 9 illustrates one arrangement (C1) of blocks 10 suitable for forming an angle. FIG. 10 illustrates another arrangement (C2) of blocks 10 suitable for forming an angle. Beginning with either a C1 or a C2 course, C1 and C2 courses can be alternated and staggered as shown in FIG. 11 (with the C1 course represented in solid lines and the C2 course represented in phantom lines) to construct an angular wall W of a desired configuration.

As shown in FIG. 12, in each course 46 and 48, like-shaped blocks 10 may also be laterally similarly or uniformly aligned so that the front wall 14 of one block 10 lies adjacent the front wall 14 of the adjacent block 10. This arrangement permits the construction of an essentially straight or linear wall or wall portion WL in which the side walls 26 of laterally adjacent blocks 10 define an angle B, as FIG. 12 also shows.

To accommodate a variety of landscapes and individual design plans, it is often desirable to construct a wall W in which at least a portion is of a curved or arcuate configuration. As seen in FIGS. 13 and 14, like-shaped blocks 10 may also be laterally similarly or uniformly aligned to form a curved wall portion WC by decreasing angle B. As illustrated in FIG. 13, each side wall 26 of a block 10 can be placed so as to contact or abut along its entire length a side wall 26 of a laterally adjacent block 10. In this arrangement, angle B=0° and the curved portion WC will have a minimum radius R1.

Alternatively, as illustrated in FIG. 14, blocks 10 can be placed such that the side walls 26 of laterally adjacent blocks are not in contact along the entire length of the laterally adjacent side walls 26. In this arrangement the curved portion WC will have a radius R2 greater than the minimum radius R1, such that R2>R1. It will be readily apparent to one of skill in the art that angle B may be selected and varied so as to provide a desired degree of curvature.

Curved portions WC may be arranged in either a convex or a concave manner. The degree of curvature may also be selected to provide a low radius curve, a medium radius curve, or a high radius curve. In addition, the blocks 10 can be arranged to gradually or rapidly increase or decrease the radius of the curvature to accommodate a specific setting, landscape or purpose. It is contemplated that blocks 10 may be aligned to form a wall W having both straight portions and curved portions WL and WC (see FIG. 14).

With reference again to FIG. 7, the top course of blocks 10 in the wall W is preferably capped by a series of cap stones 52 to cover the open cores 32 of the blocks 10 that form the top course or portion of the top course. The cap stones 52 may be of similar size and configuration to blocks 10, but without a core 32. Alternatively, the cap stones 52 may be of an alternative size and/or configuration otherwise adapted for placement over the top course. The cap stones 52 can be glued or otherwise adhered to the upper surface 34 of the top course of blocks 10, e.g., by masonry adhesive.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8667759Mar 14, 2012Mar 11, 2014Westblock Systems, Inc.Wall block system
US20130067845 *Sep 19, 2012Mar 21, 2013Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcSlant wall block and wall section including same
WO2010076716A2 *Dec 10, 2009Jul 8, 2010Universidade De AveiroConstruction method and non-reinforced concrete blocks for building arch-shaped civil engineering structures
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/596
International ClassificationE04B2/02, E04C1/39
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/0215, E04B2002/0265, E04B2002/026, E04B2002/0263, E04C1/395
European ClassificationE04C1/39B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 18, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: BEND INDUSTRIES, INC., WISCONSIN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WHITSON, ROBERT L.;REEL/FRAME:016156/0685
Effective date: 20050110