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Publication numberUS20050103736 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/715,158
Publication dateMay 19, 2005
Filing dateNov 17, 2003
Priority dateNov 17, 2003
Also published asUS20070187349
Publication number10715158, 715158, US 2005/0103736 A1, US 2005/103736 A1, US 20050103736 A1, US 20050103736A1, US 2005103736 A1, US 2005103736A1, US-A1-20050103736, US-A1-2005103736, US2005/0103736A1, US2005/103736A1, US20050103736 A1, US20050103736A1, US2005103736 A1, US2005103736A1
InventorsMichael Calleja
Original AssigneeCalleja Michael J.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inexpensive cable pallet stop
US 20050103736 A1
Abstract
A material shelving comprises a basic shelving unit with vertical frame supports inter-tied with lateral load beams. At the rear of each shelf, between each pair of vertical frame supports, a backing cable is strung between two offset brackets just above the lateral load beams. Any pallets and material on pallets placed on the load beams of the shelving will be stopped from being pushed through by the backing cable.
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Claims(6)
1. A pallet shelving system, comprising:
a pallet shelving bay providing for a storage space for palleted material, and having a front for loading and loading and at a rear an open back;
a set of lateral support beams disposed in the pallet shelving bay and providing a foundation on which to load said palleted material;
a set of vertical posts disposed in the pallet shelving bay and interconnected with the set of lateral support beams above ground level; and
a cable stop stretched between pairs of the set of vertical posts above each rear ones of the set of lateral support beams in the pallet shelving bay, and for preventing said palleted material from hanging or dropping out said open back.
2. The pallet shelving system of claim 1, further comprising:
a pair of offset brackets each attached to opposite ones of the set of vertical posts above rear ones of the set of lateral support beams in the pallet shelving bay, and providing an anchor for each of the cable stop.
3. A pallet stop cable system, comprising:
a set of vertical frame posts between which are strung lateral loading support beams;
a set of rear cable brackets; and
a corresponding set of rear-stop cables attached to the cable brackets and that act to prevent pallets and material from being pushed out the rear of a pallet bay, and that are strategically placed just above said lateral loading support beams.
4. The pallet stop cable system of claim 3, wherein:
the set of rear cable brackets position the corresponding set of rear-stop cables at a selectable distance away from the rear of said pallet bay to allow an overhang of pallets placed on said lateral loading support beams.
5. A pallet shelving system, comprising:
a first pallet shelving bay providing for a storage space for palleted material, and having a first front for loading and loading and at a first rear with an open back;
a first set of lateral support beams disposed in the first pallet shelving bay and providing a foundation on which to load said palleted material;
a first set of vertical posts disposed in the first pallet shelving bay and interconnected with the set of first lateral support beams above ground level;
a first cable stop stretched between pairs of the first set of vertical posts above each first rear ones of the first set of lateral support beams in the first pallet shelving bay, and for preventing said palleted material from hanging or dropping out first said open back;
a flue space;
a second pallet shelving bay providing for a storage space for palleted material, and having a second front for loading and loading and at a second rear with an open back, and that is oriented back-to-back with the first pallet shelving bay on opposite sides of the flue space;
a second set of lateral support beams disposed in the second pallet shelving bay and providing a foundation on which to load said palleted material;
a second set of vertical posts disposed in the second pallet shelving bay and interconnected with the set of second lateral support beams above ground level; and
a second cable stop stretched between pairs of the second set of vertical posts above each second rear ones of the second set of lateral support beams in the second pallet shelving bay, and for preventing said palleted material from hanging or dropping out second said open back.
6. A method for maintaining a flue space between back-to-back shelving bays, comprising:
arranging first and second shelving bays with open backs to be back-to-back;
separating said first and second shelving bays to create a flue space between them;
stringing a cable stop across said open backs of said shelving bays to prevent palleted material loaded on corresponding shelves from obstructing said flue space.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to material-handling systems, and more particularly to inexpensive safety systems that prevent pallets from pushing in too far on their shelves.

2. Description of Related Art

Shelves and racks are a convenient way to store items, and can maximize floor space when palleted material is stored many levels high. A typical warehouse retail store, e.g., The Home Depot, has material racks that are two, three, and four levels high. Heavy items, like backup store inventory on a pallet, are placed and fetched from high above by a forklift. These heavy items can weigh anywhere from ten to two hundred pounds.

Heavy items placed 10-20 feet high above aisles in material racks and on shelves can present a significant and not-so-rare personal injury risk. Shaking, bumping, and poorly stacked items can come tumbling down and hurt people below, or at a minimum damage the product. In particular, when shelves are arranged back-to-back, pallets loaded from one side can push through and disturb pallets behind on the adjacent shelves.

In jurisdictions like California, very rigid rules have been developed that require particular spacings and seismic tie-togethers of pallet shelving placed back-to-back. A six inch flue space between back-to-back shelves is typical. Such flue space is important to maintain so fire sprinkler systems can get down to the lower levels of material on the shelves. But if nothing is in place to prevent it, material placed on one shelf can push out material on the shelf to the rear. The flue space can also be closed up or blocked by material or pallets protruding too far into this space.

Cost is a major concern in any commercial business and material handling setup. Struts or solid walls have conventionally been placed across the backs of shelves to prevent material pushing through, but the per-shelf cost of these solutions can be too high.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, a material shelving embodiment of the present invention comprises a basic shelving unit with vertical frame supports inter-tied with lateral load beams. At the rear of each shelf, between each pair of vertical frame supports, a backing cable is strung between two offset brackets just above the lateral load beams. Any pallets and material on pallets placed on the load beams of the shelving will be stopped from being pushed through by the backing cable.

An advantage of the present invention is that a shelving safety system is provided that prevents material from being pushed through the backside.

Another advantage of the present invention is that a safety cable is provided that is easy to install.

A further advantage of the present invention is that safety cable systems are provided that are inexpensive to install.

The above and still further objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of specific embodiments thereof, especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a safety netting system installed on a material rack shelving unit using offset brackets;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a pallet stop cable system embodiment of the present invention installed on a material rack shelving unit like that of FIG. 1 and using offset brackets like those detailed in FIGS. 4A-4D and 5A-5F;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of several shelves arranged back-to-back and using the pallet stop cable system embodiment of the present invention like that of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 4A-4D are, respectively, perspective, top, end, and side view diagrams of an offset bracket like that used in the systems of FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIGS. 5A-5F represent an assembled offset bracket system in which an offset bracket is attached to a vertical pallet rack extension. In FIG. 5A, the offset bracket is attached at its minimum offset position, wherein the front part where the netting attaches is at the left. In FIG. 5B, the offset bracket is at a next offset position. In FIG. 5C, the offset bracket is attached at another more extreme offset position. In FIG. 5C, the offset bracket is at its most extreme offset position. In FIG. 5E, a perspective view diagrams the vertical pallet rack extension slipped over a front frame part of a pallet rack and is secured with bolts. In FIG. 5F, the vertical pallet rack extension is shown being secured with an alternative arrangement of bolts to a plate bar.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a pallet-rack safety-netting system, referred to herein by the reference numeral 100. The pallet-rack safety-netting system 100 comprises a number of extension brackets 101-109 that are bolted to three respective pallet rack vertical frame sections 110-112. A set of suspension cables 114-125 are strung taut between the offset brackets 101-109 and support safety nets at their perimeters. For example, a safety net 126 is suspended away from the pallet rack framing by vertical cables 117 and 122, and horizontal cables 121 and 123; and a safety net 128 is suspended between vertical cables 120 and 124, and horizontal cables 123 and 125. The nets can be attached to the cables every few inches by nylon cable ties or metal snap-hooks.

Embodiments of the present invention permit the safety nets to be positioned at a variety of clearances from the face of the pallet rack framing. Such clearance is needed when the pallets loaded on the pallet rack have oversized material on them. The netting itself is provided to protect people in the aisleways from heavy material that might fall off the pallets in the racks. The offset brackets can be attached to either vertical frame sections of the pallet rack or to extensions of the vertical frame sections.

FIG. 2 illustrates a pallet stop cable system embodiment of the present invention, and is referred to herein by the general reference numeral 200. The system 200 is based on a shelving unit like that of FIG. 1. The pallet stop cable system 200 includes a set of vertical frame posts 201-206 between which are strung lateral loading beams 208-219. In FIG. 2, the lateral loading beams 208-219 are configured for three shelves each in two bays. In the front, as in FIG. 1, a safety netting is supported by front cable brackets 220-228, and netting cables 230-241.

Embodiments of the present invention have a set of rear cable brackets 242-250, that support rear-stop cables 252-257. These prevent pallets and material from being pushed out the rear of system 200. The rear cable brackets 242-250 and rear-stop cables 252-257 are strategically placed just above lateral support beams 209, 211, 213, 215, 217, and 219.

In FIG. 3, looking at the top plan view of six shelving system placed back-to-back, a group 300 includes shelving systems 301-306. Such are each similar to that of FIG. 2. A set of rear-stop cables 307-312 is shown respectively attached to the rears of each of shelving systems 301-306.

FIGS. 4A-4D represent an offset bracket embodiment of the present invention, and is referred to herein by the general reference numeral 400. The offset bracket 400 can be used for offset brackets 101-109, FIG. 1. The preferred construction is generally in the form of a U-channel open at one end, as can be seen in FIG. 4B. The open end slips around the vertical frame sections 110-112, FIG. 1, and is just wide enough to accommodate the width of the frame section. For example, 3″ inside. A pair of bolts is used to secure each bracket on the pallet rack at particular heights above the floor.

The offset bracket 400 comprises a first arm 402, a second arm 404, and an end-plate 408. A typical height is 2″ and a typical length is 15⅝″. Such form a box-section at the closed end and is very rigid and stiff so that the bracket can well-support and anchor the set of suspension cables 114-125 strung taut between the offset brackets 101-109, FIG. 1. The box section is suggested in the drawings as being separate steel sheetmetal pieces that interlock with tabs. Alternatively, the section could be welded.

Two horizontal suspension cables can be accommodated by a pair of right-side holes 410 and 411 and their counterparts on the left side of bracket 400. One could anchor and run left to support a netting on the left, and the other cable could anchor at the bracket and run to the right.

In the bracket 400 illustrated in FIGS. 4A-4D, there are four pairs of bolt holes 412-419 provided on the left and right arms for mounting the bracket to the vertical frame parts of a pallet rack. Only the ones on the right arm 404 are called out in FIGS. 4A-4D. Theses bolts holes 412-419 are horizontally spaced to provide a range of offset adjustments, e.g., 3″, 6″, 9″, and 12″. Other spacings are possible and will be dictated by the applications.

Two vertical suspension cables can be accommodated by a pair of top-side holes 420 and 421 and their counterparts on the bottom side of bracket 400. One could anchor and run up to support a netting above, and the other cable could anchor at the bracket and run down toward the floor.

The pairs of holes 410 and 411 for the horizontal suspension cables are offset slightly differently from the pairs of holes 420 and 421 for the vertical suspension cables, e.g., so the cables do not interfere at their points of criss-cross inside the box end of bracket 400.

FIGS. 5A-5F show an assembled offset bracket system 500 in which an offset bracket 502 is attached to a vertical pallet rack extension 504. In FIG. 5A, a pair of bolts 506 and 507 are used to attach the offset bracket 502 at its minimum offset position, e.g., 5″ offset. The front part where the netting attaches is at the left. In FIG. 5B, bolts 506 and 507 attach the offset bracket 502 at a next offset position, e.g., 6″ offset. In FIG. 5C, bolts 506 and 507 attach the offset bracket 502 at another more extreme offset position, e.g., 9″ offset. In FIG. 5C, bolts 506 and 507 attach the offset bracket 502 at its most extreme offset position, e.g., 12″ offset. In FIG. 5E, the vertical pallet rack extension 504 is shown slipping over a front frame part 508 of a pallet rack and is secured with bolts 510 and 511. In FIG. 5F, the vertical pallet rack extension 504 is shown being secured with an alternative arrangement of bolts 512 and 513 to a plate bar 514.

Although particular embodiments of the present invention have been described and illustrated, such is not intended to limit the invention. Modifications and changes will no doubt become apparent to those skilled in the art, and it is intended that the invention only be limited by the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7059573 *Jul 13, 2005Jun 13, 2006Calleja Michael JOffset bracket
US7150361 *Mar 10, 2004Dec 19, 2006Calleja Michael JM-divider material-bay restraining cable system
CN101810414A *Mar 23, 2010Aug 25, 2010朱建华Compact shelving body for hanging animal skins
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/189, 211/187
International ClassificationA47B47/02, A47B96/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B96/00, A47B47/021
European ClassificationA47B47/02R, A47B96/00