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Publication numberUS20050109726 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/985,852
Publication dateMay 26, 2005
Filing dateNov 10, 2004
Priority dateNov 10, 2003
Publication number10985852, 985852, US 2005/0109726 A1, US 2005/109726 A1, US 20050109726 A1, US 20050109726A1, US 2005109726 A1, US 2005109726A1, US-A1-20050109726, US-A1-2005109726, US2005/0109726A1, US2005/109726A1, US20050109726 A1, US20050109726A1, US2005109726 A1, US2005109726A1
InventorsKenneth Alley
Original AssigneeAlley Kenneth A.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure assembly
US 20050109726 A1
Abstract
A single-piece closure for a container having an inner cap substantially concentrically located with a larger diameter outer cap, and a relatively thin flexible membrane sandwiched between the caps so that the outer cap can move relative to the inner cap. The container has an opening with threads located closest to the opening and a ring with a sawblade-like periphery located proximate the threads. The inner cap has a skirt with mating threads on the interior surface of the skirt. The treads on the inner cap's skirt mate with the treads on the container so that the cap can seal the opening on the container. The outer cap also has a skirt with a plurality of engagement means on the inner surface of the outer cap's skirt that are designed to cooperate with the sawblade ring on the container. The closure is applied to the container by twisting it onto the container so that the threads of the inner cap mate with the threads of the container. When the closure is screwed onto the container, the engagement means slide over and eventually lock into position about the sawblade-shaped ring. The closure can be released by depressing the outer cap (which moves axially and independently with respect to the inner cap thereby moving the engagement means below the saw-shaped ring and unlocking the closure) while simulataneously twisting the cap.
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Claims(3)
1. A container assembly for storing and securing a product, the assembly comprising:
a container for storing the product, the container having a threaded open end;
a ledge that projects radially outward from the outer surface of the container proximate said open end, the perimeter of the ledge having a sawblade shape;
a one-piece closure for closing the open end of the container, the closure having an inner top portion concentrically located with an outer top portion, the inner top portion having a smaller diameter than the outer top portion;
an outer skirt depending from the perimeter of the outer top portion;
an inner skirt depending from the perimeter of the inner top portion, said inner skirt having threads that mate with said threaded open end of the container, the inner skirt being slightly shorter in length than the length of the outer skirt;
a flexible, movable membrane positioned between at least both top portions, said membrane connecting said inner top portion to said outer top portion so that when the outer top portion is rotated, the inner top portion also rotates, but when axial pressure is placed on said outer top portion, the outer top portion and outer skirt move in an axial direction with respect to the inner top portion and inner skirt;
an engagement means attached to the inner side of said outer skirt and that communicates with the sawblade portion of the ledge for securing and preventing the opening of the container assembly by preventing the closure from unscrewing from the container;
said engagement portion releases from the sawblade portion of the ledge when axial pressure is applied to the closure so that when the closure is rotated with respect to the container, the threads on the inner skirt are able to unscrew from the threads of the open end.
2. The container assembly of claim 1 wherein said engagement portion is a plurality of lugs.
3. The container assembly of claim 2 further comprising a flexible membrane skirt that depends from the top membrane and positioned between said inner skirt and said outer skirt for improving the communication between said inner top portion and said outer top portion, and for allowing a degree of movement in the horizontal direction for the outer top portion and outer skirt portion and inner skirt.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims the benefits under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/518,575 filed Nov. 10, 2003, titled, “Alley Flexible Membrane Closure Technology and Child Resistant Closure and Senior Friendly” in the name of Kenneth A. Alley.

U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/518,575 filed Nov. 10, 2003, is hereby incorporated by reference as if fully set forth herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to child-resistant closures and, more specifically, to a specialized closure mechanism that restricts access by children to the contents of a container. Unlike other child-resistant closures the present invention is a single-piece closure that incorporates living hinges and a flexible membrane that provides multi-plane operation.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Child-resistant closures are very important for the safety of children; they provide a physical means for denying access to the contents of a container by a child or other person who cannot physically manipulate the cap or who cannot determine the proper sequence of manipulations. A child's lack of strength, manual dexterity, or thinking processes/experience deters access to the contents of the container.

There are presently many different child-resistant closure designs. Of the most common closures, those which have proven to work well are caps which require two or more concurrent motions in order to open them. For example, one such design is the “push-and-turn” closure. Generally, such closures can only be opened by simultaneously pushing downward on the cap while turning it. These cap designs tend to work well because children lack the strength, cognitive ability, dexterity and/or motor skills to make the required motions simultaneously.

Push- and turn closures utilize a ramp and lug assembly wherein a lug must disengage the ramp and then slide “down” the ramp. There are numerous two-piece and/or multiple piece closure designs that rely on a ramp and lug. Essentially the closure comprises an inner cap and an outer cap which are rotateably attached to one another; that is, an inner cap and outer cap are concentrically located and each can rotate axially with respect to the other cap. A plurality of lugs on one cap project towards a plurality of corresponding ramps on the opposite cap, thereby engaging each other when turned in a fastening direction such that the two caps rotate in opposite directions with respect to each other. When removed, the lugs will slip without the addition of a downward force to counteract the tendency of slipping over the opposing ramp. An example of this approach is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,206,216 issued to Stalions on Mar. 27, 2001.

In addition, single-piece child-resistant closures have been developed. For example U.S. Pat. No. 6,168,035 issued to McLelland on Jan. 2, 2001 teaches a closure cap for use in combination with a container outlet configured with a child-resistant feature, involving a pair of abutment projections formed as part of the container outlet and a pair of abutment ribs formed as part of the closure cap. In McLelland's design, the abutments and corresponding ribs are offset, therefore improving the prior art of similar single-piece design. (See, for example U.S. Pat. No. 3,989,152 which issued Nov. 2, 1976 to Juilian, child-resistant locking means are provided as part of a twist-action cap for a container, the locking means having two cooperating parts 180 degrees from one another.)

McLelland teaches that the upper and lower teeth of a young child, when placed around the diameter of the closure, are roughly 180 degrees apart and accordingly would likely be aligned with the oppositely-disposed child-resistant features on the closure. It is therefore a possibility that a young child could unintentionally release the abutment or engagement of the closure from the container when using the teeth to try and remove the closure from the container. There are numerous improvements and child-resistant closures that rely on the multiple, and or the single-piece systems, although they all have one thing in common; they rely on pressing inward on the side wall of the closure (or a tab) to bypass an abutment or they utilize a ramp and slide mechanism (two cap systems) that engages to operate the system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention, incorporates a totally new feature that consist of a movable and flexible membrane and living hinges. The following invention also provides a unique single-piece closure that operates in multiple planes and simultaneously takes advantage of the proven method (a two-step sequenced removal procedure) to assure child resistance and simultaneously making it senior friendly. The following invention is also distinctively unique from any art therefore, providing additional advantages and qualities.

Unlike other Child-resistant Closures the present invention is a single-piece closure that incorporates living hinges and or a flexible and moveable membrane that provides multi-plane function and operation within the scope/use of a single-piece closure.

A unique and great advantage of this invention is the incorporation of a flexible and movable membrane feature (technology). This membrane technology provides the means to manufacture a single-piece closure, (unlike all of the other caps) that take advantage of the well proven, two-step (push-and-turn), screw-thread child-resistant closures that have been successful in preventing young children from accessing the contents of a container. The prior art requires a two-piece cap (a cap inside of a cap) in-order to utilized the push-and-turn concurrent motions.

The present invention consists of a distinctively unique closure cap and a container with a distinctive neck finish that communicates with the cap/closure to provide a child-resistant feature.

The closure cap of the present invention incorporates a flexible, movable membrane that is built into the closure cap. The introduction of a movable, flexible membrane provides the means to manipulate (in a vertical plane) the closures features with respect to a container's features.

(Note: A flexible membrane could be adapted to the side wall of a closure as well, providing a movable membrane in the horizontal direction as well)

The closure cap of the preferred embodiment consists of an inner skirt and an outer skirt. The inner diameter of the inner skirt has means to communicate with a container's threaded screw neck finish. The outer skirt includes means that are designed to communicate with the container's child-resistant features.

Both the outer and inner skirts are connected by a flexible, movable membrane that is built into the closure cap surface (top-mainly flat). The flexible membrane forms a bridge between the inner skirt that is attached to the container's screw neck and extends outward towards the outer skirt. The flexible membrane may be tapered and angled slightly upward. (Note: the angle may be upward, downward or straight, depending on the desired direction and range of motion required to communicate with a specific container.)

The inner skirt is closed off at the top end forming a screw neck closure over a container's exit/entry port. In the preferred embodiment the inner skirt will be fixed or attached to a container and therefore unable to move in the vertical direction unless the closure is rotated to unscrew it. The outer skirt is attached to the inner skirt by a flexible, movable membrane. The membrane is designed to bend and or flex when a downward (or upward) force is applied to the outer skirt. The outer skirt will move relative to the inner skirt. (Note: Depending on which skirt is fixed the other will move relative to it when a force is applied. In the preferred embodiment, at this time the outer skirt will move relative to the fixed inner skirt. Although, it could be desired to fix the outer skirt to a container and flex the inner diameter of a cap for example a pump or valve gate or plug, etc.) A closure may also be designed to incorporate more than one flexible membrane and/or a membrane that operates in the x, y and z planes.

At the lower end of the outer skirt are specially designed abutment features that are circumferentially positioned around the interior of the outer skirts inner diameter. These abutment features are designed to communicate with the child-resistant features on the container.

The abutment features include tapered and rounded leading edge surfaces on all of the abutments sides with the exception of the back edge/end (when rotating clockwise). The back surface of the abutment features are designed to lock or engage onto the container's child-resistant features when rotating the closure counterclockwise (off).

The container's child-resistant features consist of circular sawblade geometry. The feature may be built into the lower portion of the container's neck finish thus, below the screw threads or may be adapted directly into the shoulder of a container. Note: In the case of a non-threaded container finish the flexible membrane may still be utilized and the abutment features on both the closure and container may be designed so that they lock when pushed and turned in one direction and unlock when pushed and turned in the opposite direction. The key feature is the flexible membrane, thus the container's finish and the type of abutment feature may be changed to fit many different bottle configurations (for example a non-screw-neck prescription vial).

The container's child-resistant features/geometry are designed to allow the abutment features of the closure/cap to slide over the container's geometry (sawblade feature) when rotated in the clockwise (on) direction. When rotating the closure in the counterclockwise direction (unscrewing) the back edge of the closures abutment feature will engage with the sawblade geometry of the container's child-resistant features and prevent movement.

In order to unscrew the closure, the outer skirt of the closure, must be pushed downward (or upward) thus, flexing the flexible, movable membrane between the inner and outer skirts and simultaneous moving the abutment features of the closure with respect the fixed container's child-resistant features.

In the static position the child-resistant features of the container will be aligned with the closures abutment features. When a force is applied to the outer skirt of the closure, the child-resistant features will disengage from one another and rotation is permitted. When the force is removed the skirt will automatically reposition itself, thus, re-engaging the child resist features of both the closure and container.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description, may be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of the specification. The drawings serve to explain the principles of the invention and illustrate embodiments of the present invention that are preferred at the time the application was filed. It should be understood however that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional side view of the child-resistant apparatus assembly, including closure (flex cap) and container;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional side view of the child-resistant closure (flex cap) shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective cross sectional side view of the child-resistant closure (flex cap), shown in FIG. 2, in the downward flexed position;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the container shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective side view of an alternative shape container shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a perspective side view of another alternative embodiment of the child-resistant closure (flex cap), and container shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 represents an alternative embodiment of a closure with the flexible, movable, bendable membrane technology adapted;

FIG. 8 represents an alternative embodiment of a closure with the flexible, movable, bendable membrane technology adapted. This particular membrane has a bellows shape extending upwards from the top section; and

FIG. 9 represents an alternative embodiment of a closure with two separate flexible, movable, bendable membranes; a straighter membrane at the top surface of the closure and a bellows shaped membrane built into the outer skirt extending downward.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

A single-piece closure for a container having an inner cap substantially concentrically located with a larger diameter outer cap, and a relatively thin flexible membrane sandwiched between the caps so that the outer cap can move relative to the inner cap.

The container has an opening with threads located closest to the opening and a ring with a sawblade-like periphery located proximate the thread. The inner cap has a skirt with mating threads on the interior surface of the skirt.

The threads on the inner cap's skirt mate with the threads on the container so that the cap can seal the opening of the container.

The outer cap also has a skirt. The outer skirt is slightly longer than the length of the skirt on the inner cap. A plurality of engagement means on the inner surface of the outer cap's skirt are designed to operate with the sawblade ring on the container to prevent the closure from accidentally opening.

The closure is applied to the container by twisting it onto the container so that the threads of the inner cap mate with the threads of the container. When the closure is completely screwed onto the container, the engagement means slide over and eventually lock into position about the sawblade-shaped ring. The closure can be released by depressing the outer cap (which moves axially with respect to the inner cap thereby moving the engagement means below the saw-shaped ring and unlocking the closure with respect to the container) while simultaneously twisting the closure. In other words, the flexible membrane forces the inner cap to rotate with the outer cap but allows the outer cap to move axially independent of the inner cap.

The closure cap of the present invention incorporates a flexible, movable membrane that is built into the closure cap. The introduction of a movable, flexible membrane provides the means to manipulate (in a vertical plane) the closure's features with respect to a container's features.

The movable, flexible, malleable bendable membrane may be designed to incorporate numerous geometries. Such as: Membrane may be curved upwards, downwards, or a combination of angles including perforations or other unique geometries (bellow shaped) in-order to control the movement of one of the closure's skirts with respect to the other. The wall thickness may be adjusted to control how the membrane flexes and or to control the bending qualities of said membrane. There could be more than one membrane or a series of membranes to control motion and range of the closure with respect to a container of child-resistant features. (Note: A flexible membrane could be adapted to the side wall of a closure as well, providing a movable membrane in the horizontal direction. This particular membrane could be adapted to control the closure's locking means to a particular container).

The flexible membrane built directly into a skirt side wall may also be adapted to provide a range of motion. (For example a bellows shaped skirt.)

A unique and great advantage of this invention is the incorporation of a flexible and movable membrane feature. This membrane technology provides the means to manufacture a single-piece closure, (unlike all of the other caps) that take advantage of the well proven, two-step (push-and-turn) screw-thread child-resistant closures that have been successful in preventing young children access to the contents of a container. The prior art requires a two-piece cap (a cap inside of a cap) in-order to utilized the push-and-turn concurrent motions. Said membrane may be a adapted to a multiple piece closure as well.

Both the outer and inner skirts are connected by a flexible, movable membrane that is built into the closure cap surface (top-mainly flat). The flexible membrane forms a bridge between the inner skirt that is attached to the container's screw neck and extends outward towards the outer skirt. The flexible membrane may be tapered and angled slightly upward. (Note: the angle may be upward, downward or straight, depending on the desired direction and range of motion required to communicate with a specific container).

The membrane is designed to bend and or flex when a downward (or upward) force is applied to the outer skirt. The outer skirt will move relative to the inner skirt.

(Note: Depending on which skirt is fixed the other will move relative to it when a force is applied. In the preferred embodiment, at this time the outer skirt will move relative to the fixed inner skirt. Although, it could be desired to fix the outer skirt to a container and flex the inner diameter of a cap for example a pump, valve gate or plug, etc.) A closure may also be designed to incorporate more than one flexible membrane and/or a membrane that operates in the x, y and z planes. Note: In the case of a non-threaded container finish the flexible membrane may still be utilized and the abutment features on both the closure and container may be designed so that they lock when pushed and turned in one direction and unlock when pushed and turned in the opposite direction. The key feature is the flexible membrane, thus the container's finish and the type of abutment feature may be changed to fit many different bottle configurations (for example, a non-screw-neck prescription vial).

Referring now to FIG. 1, a cross-sectional side view of a child-resistant apparatus 5 in accordance with the present invention is shown. Child-resistant apparatus 5 includes a closure (flex cap) 20 and container 10. Container 10 has child-resistant features 13 and a threaded screw neck finish 11. Closure (flex cap) 20 consists of an inner skirt 21 and an outer skirt 23. Inner skirt 21 includes a threaded screw neck finish 29 that communicates with threaded finish 11 of container 10. Top section 27 of closure (flex cap) 20 is closed off thus, forming a seal when closure (flex cap) 20 is attached to container 10. Extending outward from top section 27 is a flexible, movable, bendable membrane 25. At the outer end of membrane 25, outer skirt 23 extends downward.

Both the outer skirt 23 and inner skirt 21 are connected by flexible, movable membrane 25. The flexible membrane 25 forms a bridge between the inner skirt 21 and outer skirt 23. At the lower end of the outer skirt 23, are specially designed abutment features 30 that are circumferentially positioned around the interior of outer skirt 23 inner diameter. Abutments 30 have features that are designed to communicate with the child-resistant features 13 on container 10.

Now referring to FIG. 2, a cross sectional side view of the child-resistant closure 20 (flex cap) is illustrated. Inner skirt 21 of closure 20 has threaded finish 29 thus, providing means to screw closure 20 onto container 10.

Referring to FIG. 4 (a detailed top view of the child-resistant features 13 of container 10 is illustrated. When closure 20 is rotated in the clockwise direction onto container 10, abutments 30, leading edges 34 and 36 will slide freely over the child-resistant features 13, surfaces 17 and 19 of container 10. Top cover 27 of closure 20, will seal contents of container 10 when closure 20 is securely attached and abutments 30 of closure 20 will be aligned in the vertical plane with child-resistant feature 13 of container 20.

In this position, trailing edges 38 of abutments 30 of closure 20, will engage the flat surfaces 17 (sawblade-teeth design) of the child-resistant feature 13 of container 10. The closure (flex cap) abutments 30, trailing back edges 38 form an engagement-lock with the flat surface 17 (sawblade-teeth design) of the child-resistant feature 13 of container 20 that cannot slip. Closure 20 is therefore, unable to unscrew in the counterclockwise direction thus, creating a child-resistant package.

In the static position the child-resistant features 13 of the container 20 will be aligned with the closures abutment features 30 and the closure 20 cannot be screwed off from the container. When a force is applied (i.e., a downward or axial force) to the outer skirt of closure 20, the child-resistant features between both the closure and container will disengage from one another and counter-clockwise rotation is permitted. When the force is removed, the skirt will automatically reposition itself, thus, re-engaging the child resist features of both the closure and container.

In order to unscrew the closure, the outer skirt of the closure, must be pushed downward (or pulled upward) thus, flexing and/or bending the flexible, movable membrane between the inner and outer skirts, which will also, simultaneously move the abutment features of the closure with respect to the fixed container's child-resistant features (i.e., the sawblade ring).

Referring now to FIG. 2 and FIG. 3, to remove closure 20 from container 10, abutments 30 must be disengaged from the child-resistant surfaces 17 and simultaneously the closure must then be un-screwed in the counterclockwise direction. (Note: The flexing action could be adjusted by controlling the wall thickness and specific geometry of the flexible membrane and stress points 33 of membrane 25.)

A downward force applied onto outer skirt 23 of closure 20, will flex/bend the flexible, movable membrane 25 of closure 20. Membrane 25 will simulate a living hinge between the inner and outer skirts of closure 20. (Note: The introduction of a movable, flexible membrane 25 provides the means to manipulate (in a vertical plane) the closures abutments 30, features with respect to the container's child-resistant features 13.)

Simultaneously, as the outer skirt 23 is manipulated in the downward direction, abutments 30 will also move downward, thus mis-aligning the abutments 30 with respect to the child-resistant features 13 of container 20. In this position, the closure (flex cap) is permitted to rotate in the counter clockwise direction. As closure 20 is unscrewed, the leading edge 32 of abutments 30 has a sufficient taper that will slide freely (vertically) over the container's child-resistant feature 13, edges 17 and 19. Eventually the closure abutments 30 will be positioned above the container's child-resistant feature 13 (in the static position) and the cap may freely be removed.

FIG. 5 illustrates another embodiment of the closure assembly utilizing a flexible membrane in accordance with the present invention. Container 50 has child-resistant features 13 and a threaded screw neck 11. The entry/exit port of container 50 may be designed to accept a dropper tip plug.

(Note: The container's child-resistant features may also be modified to work with a modified neck finish such as a non-threaded bottle neck. In such a case, the closure (flex cap) would still include a flexible membrane although, the cap would be pushed onto the container and rotated a partial turn until the closures abutments (modified) were to lock onto the container's modified child-resistant features. When removed, the closures outer skirt would be pushed and reversed rotation a partial turn, thus unlocking to closure).

In FIG. 6 container 50, has adapted a dropper tip plug to entry/exit port 15. A modified alternative embodiment of closure 60 has inner skirt 21 and outer skirt 23 as previously described in FIG. 2. Closure 60 incorporates flexible membrane 25, container child-resistant features 13 and closure abutment features 30.

FIG. 7 represents an alternative embodiment of a closure with the flexible, movable, bendable membrane technology adapted. In this particular embodiment, flexible membrane 25 provides means for the center portion of closure 70 to be moved in the vertical direction. Outer skirt 23 has a threaded inner diameter 29 that communicates with a container threaded screw finish. Outer skirt 23 is fixed in this particular embodiment. When a downward force is applied on the center of the outer top portion of closure 70 the top portion will move downward. Child-resistant feature 30 of closure 70 communicates with container's child-resistant features and or a seal plug 77 (pump-valve, etc). To remove child-resistant feature 30 from engaging with child-resistant features of a container, a finger slot 79 is adapted to the top portion of closure 70. An upward force will disengage closure mechanism and free rotation is permitted.

FIG. 8 illustrates an alternative embodiment of a closure with the flexible, movable, bendable membrane technology in accordance with the present invention. This particular closure 80 incorporates membrane 81 (bellows shape) that extends upwards from the top section 83 of closure 80. When a downward force is applied onto the outer skirt 82 the abutment features 84 (detail not shown) will disengage from container child-resistant features and counter-clockwise rotation will be permitted. In this embodiment, inner skirt 81 has a threaded screw neck finish that attaches to a container. The bellows shaped membrane is exaggerated for descriptive purposes. In order to mold this type of membrane the bellows shaped membrane may be a threaded design to remove from the mold. It may also be mold with a straight wall with a controlled wall thickness, thus causing it to bend when compressed.

FIG. 9 represents an alternative embodiment of closure 90 incorporating two separate flexible, movable, bendable membranes. A relatively straight membrane 95 at the top surface of closure 90 and a bellows shaped membrane 94 built into outer skirt 92 extending downward. This particular embodiment has an inner skirt 93 that attaches to a container and an outer skirt 92 that is designed to engage or bottom out on a container's neck finish bead when a downward force is applied onto outer skirt 92. As a downward force is applied onto the outer skirt 92, both, flexible membrane 95 moves along with bellows shaped membrane 94. As membrane 94 compresses, child-resistant features 91 located on the inner diameter of outer skirt will communicate with the container's child-resistant features, thus disengaging and allowing rotation.

Although this invention has been described and illustrated by reference to specific embodiments, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made which clearly fall within the scope of this invention. The present invention is intended to be protected broadly within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7815063Jan 19, 2007Oct 19, 2010Rexam Prescription Products Inc.Closure and package with user-selectable child-resistant and non-child-resistant modes of operation
WO2008088715A1 *Jan 10, 2008Jul 24, 2008Rexam Prescription Products InClosure and package with user-selectable child-resistant and non-child-resistant modes of operation
WO2008154575A1 *Jun 11, 2008Dec 18, 2008Paul D GoebelChild resistant cap and container assembly
WO2010136198A1 *May 27, 2010Dec 2, 2010G.S. Anderson GmbhDiaphragm valve drive
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/329, 215/330
International ClassificationB65D50/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D50/067, B65D50/063
European ClassificationB65D50/06C, B65D50/06H