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Publication numberUS20050129228 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/733,527
Publication dateJun 16, 2005
Filing dateDec 12, 2003
Priority dateDec 12, 2003
Publication number10733527, 733527, US 2005/0129228 A1, US 2005/129228 A1, US 20050129228 A1, US 20050129228A1, US 2005129228 A1, US 2005129228A1, US-A1-20050129228, US-A1-2005129228, US2005/0129228A1, US2005/129228A1, US20050129228 A1, US20050129228A1, US2005129228 A1, US2005129228A1
InventorsVictor LaGarde
Original AssigneeLagarde Victor J.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular computerized encryption scheme
US 20050129228 A1
Abstract
This paper introduces a design of a series of six modular computerized ciphers which can be performed sequentially and in a number of rounds, to form an encryption scheme greater than the sum of its parts.
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Claims(2)
1. A modular computerized encryption scheme can be formed from the performance of a sequential series of computerized modules. Each module is a computerized encryption in its own right, said to be modular in that the output of one encryption can be fed into the input of another. The sequential performance of multiple modules, and permutations of modules, substantially increase the complexity and security of the overall encryption, leading to an encryption greater than the sum of its parts. This modularity constitutes claim one.
2. Each module has key operating parameters which are externalized to the computer program, and may be easily changed. Once these parameters are changed, the module may be used repeatedly, with completely different results each time, in effect a new module is created by altering data files external to the computer program. This permutability constitutes claim two.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention pertains to the field of cryptography/other (Classification 380/59). Over the years and centuries, numerous classical cryptography methods have proven to be vulnerable to attack, by frequency analysis or other methods. With the advent and popularization of the personal computer and computerized spreadsheet in the early to mid 1980's, it became possible to design and implement computerized ciphers and encryptions. Furthermore, these computer programs can be designed to be modular, in that the output of one can be fed into the input of another, further increasing the complexity of the encryption. This modularization is the primary claim of this patent. A search of patents with the words “modular” and “encryption” in the title was made, back to 1976 (before the advent of personal computer hardware and software utilized in the creation of this invention). No similar claims were found.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The encryption scheme is modular in that the output of one computerized encryption may be fed into the input of another, and a sequential series of encryptions formed. To facilitate this modularization, each module has an input and output of identical size, an 100 row by 80 column block of text (approximately two single-spaced pages of text).

Additionally, the same module could be used repeatedly, but with its working parameters modified each time. Provisions for this are made by externalizing key parameters in data files accessible to the user. This concept was utilized for Modules 2 thru 6 and could be applied to the design of Module 1 as well.

A brief Description of Each Module Follows:

  • Module 1: A modified Vigenere cipher, of 10 randomized alphabets, with a 18 digit key which determines which substitution alphabets are used. An alphabet of 36 characters, 26 lower case letters and 10 numer, was used.
  • Module 2: A Hill cipher, using a 10×10 matrix multiplied upon a 10×1 vector (a 10 character sub-block).
  • Module 3: A “shifting” cipher to shift and intermix rows and columns of the input text block (100 row by 80 columns). Module 3 can be described as a block function operating on a relatively large (100×80) block of text (a “super block”).
  • Module 4: A poly-alphabetic substitution cipher similar to Module 1 except there are 80 substitution alphabets, one for each column of text to be encrypted. Each alphabet is not randomized as in Module 1 but is determined by a linear equation ax+b where “a” is a four digit number prime with regard to 36, the length of the alphabet. The “prime” stipulation helps eliminate degenerate alphabets.
  • Module 5: A poly-alphabetic substitution cipher, where there are 36 randomized alphabets and a key text equal in size to the input text, the key text determining which substitution alphabets are used, and in what order.
  • Module 6: “Noise” is added modulo 36 to the input text, as an encryption, then removed as a decryption.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

Not Applicable

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A Detailed Description of Each Module is Given Below:

Module 1:

The input text is contained in a file “input.daf”, being a text file 100 rows by 80 columns. An alphabet of 26 lower case letters and 10 numerals (total of 36 characters) is used within (inside) this module as well as the others. Here, in this module alone, there are no limitations on characters used in the input file, but for ease of construct, the capital letters are later reduced to lower case letters, and punctuation, blanks and other symbols are allowed to pass through the program unencrypted.

A work-around, or kluge, for Microsoft Fortan only, perhaps: Let the computer read “input dat” one line at a time in a format “A80”, then write to an internal memory (buffer) as format “A80” but then retrieve from the buffer (read from it) in a format “80A1”. This can convert a single line of “input.dat” into a row of an array, with 80 elements. Useful.

A spreadsheet table is made of some number (10 here) of scrambled or randomized alphabets, for reference. This look-up table is implemented within the computer program's code by a series of callable Fortran subroutines, each one implementing one substitution alphabet by means of a series of 36 Fortran “if . . . then” statements. One example of such a statement might be similar to: if (letter.eq.‘a’) then letter=‘z’. The output text is contained in a file “output.dat”.

A companion computer program is made to decrypt “output.dat” into a new output file “dcrypt.dat”. This program simply has the characters in the “if . . . then” statements reversed.

A user-input 18 digit key, also using the same 36-character alphabet, is used to specify which substitution alphabets are used, and in what order. For example, a key “ac” might be interpreted as “use alphabet 1 (a=1) to look up a substitution for the first character to be encrypted, alphabet 3 (c=3) for the second character, etc. An 18 digit key was selected as a maximum length easily memorized. If this key were an easily memorized phrase, composed of four smaller words (of length four or five characters), there are approximately 16×10{circumflex over ( )}12 possibilities (there being, in round numbers, 2000 common four-letter words and 2000 common five-letter words). One example of this type of 18 digit key is “looselipssinkships”. Of course, the introduction of numerals and words not in the dictionary (proper names, place names, foreign words, etc.) increases the number of possible keys, e.g. “ubereigen2506henri”, “babar9802sanssouci”, “eulergammaquidvici”, etc. In this module, two randomly chosen alphabets are added to the 18 character key as padding, since the resulting effective total key length 20 divides evenly into 80, the number of columns of text to be enciphered (the key is used four times per row of input text).

This module could be improved by adding more substitution alphabets or a longer key. Another improvement would be to not embed the substitution alphabets in Fortran “if . . . then” statements, but to arrange them in a data file which the computer program could read into a data array of 36 rows, each column being one substitution alphabet. This would give the user access to the data file, with the ability to modify the operations of the module externally.

Module 2:

The input text is of the same size and name as in Module 1, but there is a restriction that all characters must be lower case letters or numerals (no blanks or punctuation are permitted due to ensuing operations). Padding characters may be used to fill the input text block. Initially each character of the input text is converted to a numerical value 0 thru 35, in a one-to-one correspondence, through a single scrambled or randomized substitution alphabet implemented by “if . . . then” blocks. These values are then taken ten at a time and transformed by an enciphering matrix (10×10) into new values, using matrix multiplication, then later converted back to the familiar 36-character alphabet and released as output. The deciphering process is identical but uses a companion matrix, a deciphering matrix which is the inverse of the enciphering matrix. Both the enciphering and deciphering matrices are supplied to the computer program as data files (changeable should the need arise).

A spreadsheet is used to calculate the 10×10 inverse matrix, the matrix which undoes the encryption. (A spreadsheet solving for the inverse of a 5×5 matrix was performed as an intermediate exercise.) Further spreadsheets are used to calculate the determinate of a 10×10 matrix and a 9×9 matrix (necessary for computing the inverse of the 10×10 matrix). The spreadsheets solving for the inverse matrix incorporate modulo 36 arithmetic not found in ordinary matrix calculators found on the internet. A spreadsheet modeling the computation of an inverse of a 3×3 matrix is the first step.

Module 3:

The same input and output files are used. The input text is inducted into an array. A data file contains instructions for shifting and intermixing the columns of this array. An example of this file might be 0380 which would be interpreted as move column 3 to column 1, move column 80 to column 2, etc. This file is also inducted into a separate array, which can be simply manipulated internal to the program to produce a decoding array. A similar arrangement is made for shifting and intermixing the rows of the input text

Provisions are made for the user to select an encryption or decryption mode of the program, which results in “input.dat” being encrypted to “output.dat”, or “output.dat” being decrypted to “dcrypt.dat”, respectively. Both row and column enciphering arrays are supplied to the computer program as data files (readily changeable if necessary).

Module 4:

Using a spreadsheet, a column of integers 0 thru 35 is formed. In the next column a linear equation y=(ax+b) mod 36 transforms the first column, where “a” is a four digit integer prime with respect to 36, “b” a small prime such as 5 or 7, and “x” the integer in the first column to be transformed. Using an internet factorization applet and this spreadsheet, eighty suitable integers are discovered and evaluated for forming substitution alphabets, one for each column of text to be encoded. (Integers forming degenerate alphabets, without a one-to-one correspondence (or mapping) from x to y are discarded).

These suitable integers are then placed in a file for access by the program (where they are easily changeable should it be desired). The computer program accepts these 80 integers, uses the equation to generate a substitution alphabet for each integer, and stores the alphabets in a 36 row by 80 column array, each column being an alphabet. This array is used as a substitution table for the text to be encrypted. Again, a simple manipulation of the 36×80 encrypting array results in a decrypting array, and the user is given an option to either encrypt or decrypt, using the same program.

Module 5:

An alphabetic substitution table is imported into the program as a 36 row×36 column array, each column being one alphabet of 26 alpha and 10 numer characters. An input text, “input.dat”, comprised of a message embedded within an 100 row by 80 column padded text, is formed as usual. A “key text”, ideally of random, evenly distributed characters, of identical size to “input.dat”, is chosen (here the key text was selected from excerpts of the classical texts of Vegetius, Beowulf, and Cicero). All three texts (alphabets, input, and key) are modifiable by the user, external to the computer program, for maximum flexibility. The encryption uses the alphabet table to find the substitution for the inputs of a given key (selects the column of the alphabet table) and a given plaintext character (selects the row of the alphabet table). The decryption first locates the cipher letter in the table, then looks up the input coordinates using the key, to arrive at the original plain text character.

Module 6:

A “noise” text is added modulo 36 to the input text. The noise text is the same as the “key text” of Module 5, and is modifiable by the user. The decryption is the opposite, the subtraction of the noise (key) from the encrypted text. In this module, conversion of the characters “a” thru “z” and “0” thru “9” into the integers “0” thru “35” is required, through a Fortran “if . . . then” sequence, as performed elsewhere.

Appendix—Examples of Input and Output Data Files.

An example of the data file ‘input.dat’ follows. This block has a background (filling or padding) composed from excerpts from the classical texts, Caesar's “Commentaries” and Sun Tzu's “The Art of War”. A short “secret” message is embedded at row 23, but any message up to a size 100 rows by 80 columns can be enciphered here.

allgaulisdividedintothreepartsoneofwhichthebelgaeinhabittheaquitanianotherxthose
whointheirownlanguagearecalledceltsinourgaulsthethirdallthesedifferfromeachother
inlanguagecustomsandlawstherivergaronneseparatesthegaulsfromtheaquitanithemarnea
ndtheseineseparatethemfromthebelgaeofallthesethebelgaearethebravestbecausetheyar
efurthestfromthecivilizationandrefinementofourprovinceandmerchantsleastfrequentl
yresorttothemandimportthosethingswhichtendtoeffeminatethemindandtheyaretheneares
ttothegermanswhodwellbeyondtherhinewithwhomtheyarecontinuallywagingwarforwhichre
asonthehelvetiialsosurpasstherestofthegaulsinvalorastheycontendwiththegermarisina
lmostdailybattleswhentheyeitherrepelthemfromtheirownterritoriesorthemselveswagew
arontheirfrontiersonepartofthesewhichithasbeensaidthatthegaulsoccupytakesitsbegi
nningattheriverrhoneitisboundedbytherivergaronnetheoceanandtheterritoriesofthebe
lgaeitborderstooonthesideofthesequaniandthehelvetiiupontheriverrhineandstretches
towardthenorththebelgaerisesfromtheextremefrontierofgaulextendtothelowerpartofth
eriverrhineandlooktowardthenorthandtherisingsunaquitaniaextendsfromtherivergaron
netothepyrenaearmiountainsandtothatpartoftheoceanwhichisnearspainitlooksbetweenth
esettingofthesunandthenorthstarchapter2axnongthehelvetiiorgetorixwasbyfarthemostd
istinguishedandwealthyxhewhenmarcusmessalaandmarcuspisowereconsulsincitedbylusto
fsovereigntyformedaconspiracyamongthenobilityandpersuadedthepeopletogoforthfromt
heirterritorieswithalltheirpossessionssayirigthatitwouldbeveryeasysincetheyexcell
edallinvalortoacquirethesupremacyofthewholeofgaultothishethemoreeasilypersuadedt
hembecausethehelvetiiareconfinedoneverysidebythenatureoftheirsituationononesideb
ytherhineaverybroadanddeepriverwhichseparatesthehelvetianterritoryfromthegermans
hellothisiszimmermanjoinusandyoucanhavearizonanewmexicoandtexasoveronasecondside
bythejuraaveryhigbmountainwhichissituatedbetweenthesequaniandthehelvetiionathird
bythelakeofgenevaandbytheriverrhonewhichseparatesourprovincefromthehelvetiifromt
hesecircumstancesitresultedthattheycouldrangelesswidelyandcouldlesseasilymakewar
upontheirneighborsforwhichreasorunenfondofwarastheywerewereaffectedwithgreatregre
ttheythoughtthatconsideringtheextentoftheirpopulationandtheirrenownforwarfareand
braverytheyhadbutnarrowlimitsalthoughtheyextendedinlength240andinbreadth180roman
mileschapter3inducedbytheseconsiderationsandinfluencedbytheauthorityoforgetorixt
heydeterminedtoprovidesuchthingsaswerenecessaryfortheirexpeditiontobuyupasgreata
numberaspossibleofbeastsofburdenandwagonstomaketheirsowingsaslargeaspossiblesoth
atontheirmarchplentyofcornmightbeinstoreandtoestablishpeaceandfriendshipwiththen
eighboringstatestheyreckonedthatatermoftwoyearswouldbesufficientforthemtoexecute
theirdesignstheyfixbydecreetheirdepartureforthethirdyearorgetorixischosentocompl
etethesearrangementshetookuponhimselftheofficeofambassadortothestatesonthisjourn
eyhepersuadescasticusthesonofcatamantaledesoneofthesequaniwhosefatherhadpossesse
dthesovereigntyamongthepeopleforxnanyyearsandhadbeenstyledfriendbythesenateofther
omanpeopletoseizeuponthesovereigntyinhisownstatewhicbhisfatherhadheldbeforehiman
dhelikewisepersuadesduinnorixanaeduanthebrotherofdivitiacuswhoatthattimepossessed
thechiefauthorityinthestateandwasexceedinglybelovedbythepeopletoattemptthesamean
dgiveshimhisdaughterinmarriageheprovestothemthattoaccomplishtheirattexnptswasathi
ngveryeasytobedonebecausehehimselfwouldobtainthegovernmentofhisownstatethatthere
wasnodoubtthatthehelvetiiwerethemostpowerfulofthewholeofgaulheassuresthemthathew
illwithhisownforcesandhisownarmyacquirethesovereigntyforthemincitedbythisspeecht
heygiveapledgeandoathtooneanotherandhopethatwhentheyhaveseizedthesovereigntythey
willbymeansofthethreemostpowerfulandvaliantnationsbeenabledtoobtainpossessionoft
hewholeofgaulchapter4whenthisschemewasdisclosedtothehelvetiibyinformerstheyaccor
dingtotheircustomcompelledorgetorixtopleadhiscauseinchainsitwasthelawthatthepena
ltyofbeingburnedbyfireshouldawaithimifcondemnedonthedayappointedforthepleadingof
hiscauseorgetorixdrewtogetherfromallquarterstothecourtallhisvassalstothenumberof
tenthousandpersonsandledtogethertothesameplaceallhisdependentsanddebtorbondsmeno
fwhomhehadagreatnumberbymeansofthoseherescuedhimselffromthenecessityofpleadinghi
scausewhilethestateincensedatthisactwasendeavoringtoassertitsrightbyarmsandthema
gistratesweremusteringalargebodyofmenfromthecountryorgetorixdiedandthereisnotwan
tingasuspicionasthehelvetiithinkofhishavingcommittedsuicidechapter5afterhisdeath
thehelvetiineverthelessattempttodothatwhichtheyhadresolvedonnamelytogoforthfromt
heirterritorieswhentheythoughtthattheywereatlengthpreparedforthisundertakingthey
setfiretoalltheirtownsinnumberabouttwelvetotheirvillagesaboutfourhundredandtothe
privatedwellingsthatremainedtheyburnupallthecornexceptwhattheyintendtocarrywitht
hemthatafterdestroyingthehopeofareturnhometheymightbethemorereadyforundergoingal
ldangerstheyordereveryonetocarryforthfromhomeforhimselfprovisionsforthreemonthsr
eadygroundtheypersuadetherauraciandthetulingiandthelatobrigitheirneighborstoadop
tthesaxneplanandafterburningdowntheirtownsandvillagestosetoutwiththemandtheyadmit
totheirpartyandunitetothemselvesasconfederatestheboiiwhohaddweltontheothersideof
therhineandhadcrossedoverintothenoricanterritoryandassauitednoreiachapter6therew
ereinall tworoutesbywhichtheycouldgoforthfromtheircountryonethroughthesequaninarr
owanddifficultbetweenmountjuraandtheriverrhonebywhichscarcelyonewagonatatimecoul
dbeledtherewasmoreoveraveryhighmountainoverhangingsóthataveryfewmighteasilyinter
ceptthemtheotherthroughourprovincemucheasierandfréerfromobstaclesbecausetherhone
flowsbetweentheboundariesofthehelvetiiandthoseoftheallobrogeswhohadlatelybeensub
duedandisinsomeplacescrossedbyafordthefurthesttownoftheallobrogesandthenearestto
theterritoriesofthehelvetiiisgenevafromthistownabridgeextendstothehelvetiitheyth
oughtthattheyshouldeitherpersuadetheallobrogesbecausetheydidnotseemasyetwellaffe
ctedtowardtheromanpeopleorcompelthembyforcetoallowthemtopassthroughtheirterritor
ieshavingprovidedeverythingfortheexpeditiontheyappointadayonwhichtheyshouldallme
etonthebankoftherhonethisdaywasthefifthbeforethekalendsofaprilthe28thofmarchinth
econsuishipofluciuspisoandaulusgabiniusbc5echapter7whenitwasreportedtocaesarthat
theywereattemptingtomaketheirroutethroughourprovincehehastenstosetoutfromthecity
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eprovincetofurnishasgreatanumberofsoldiersaspossibleastherewasinallonlyonelegion
infurthergaulheordersthebridgeatgenevatobebrokendownwhenthehelvetiiareapprizedof
hisarrivaltheysendtohimasambassadorsthemostillustriousmenoftheirstateinwhichemba
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ughtheprovincewithoutdoinganyharmbecausetheyhadaccordingtotheirownrepresentation
snootherroutethattheyrequestedtheymightbeallowedtodosowithhisconsentcaesarinasmu
chashekeptinremembrancethatluciuscassiustheconsulhadbeenslainandhisarmyroutedand
madetopassundertheyokebythehelvetiididnotthinkthattheirrequestoughttobegrantedno
rwasheofopinionthatmenofhostiledispositionifanopportunityofmarchingthroughthepro
vinceweregiventhemwouldabstainfromoutrageandntischiefyetinorderthataperiodmightin
terveneuntilthesoldierswhomhehadorderedtobefurnishedshouldassembleherepliedtothe
ambassadorsthathewouldtaketimetodeliberateiftheywantedanythingtheymightreturnont
hedaybeforetheidesofaprilallwarfareisbasedondeceptionhenceawisegeneralmakesapoin
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ntwomethodsofattackthedirectandtheindirectyetthesetwoincombinationgiverisetoanen
dlessseriesofmaneuversletyourplansbedarkandimpenetrableasnightandwhenyoumovefall
likeathunderboltponderanddeliberatebeforeyoumakeamovethisiscalledabilitytoaccomp
lishathingbysheercunningwhenthesefivekindsofspyareallatworknonecandiscoverthesec
retsystemthisiscalleddivinemanipulationofthethreadsitisthesovereignsmostprecious
facultyhenceitisonlytheenlightenedrulerandwisegeneralwhowillusethehighestintelli

After transformation by the sequence [module 2+module 3+module 4], the resulting encrypted data file ‘output.dat’ is shown below (it is fully recoverable by applying the decryption sequence [module 4+module 3+module 2]).

pbjo5gb4pthy6zksnj8l6l5ghkwfen06tii0251phg1uozwfn3o2cglee6so218081dyglitrm4icrjl
ru5hc8dkr868iqxs1t1nf2hzglpzjli1avuj4p8jjmn3qudgpiv3y056oqc9ogosdiu4x0qmvmyjxljw
qikchri7hrdxhmjjz2kw1forywo9uoyqniw80qo9rk56z9kcxjfaow9om4f4d6cunfj6gzyw5myblb7z
0i29x3b21pjz37ppjq4w2ejjg5fgholgy7qngore1hz7bqe6c5tnvo2cn3imf16jj2rgmtrx3z2w5sjb
aoolo706041dnjprvxpzby13wv1terbfuccbvx8t2yrd0rbs0buthc1zrmao11hqz53zzqjilk7w2qrj
44jhzapap5schr2dee54gpxs3vwvcs61s1w6w5yggf3dgm6dkvwx2mcpgatnora9nwdsoppc1n41inp9
4gyvu0keq51keojdho7uli7eyv75esgleyaaff72cy3366pselv0asukqedotda4b3lan5x10f1j2vdx
be3b84rmdjrpj3394r1u0mjk9rff10czmqwtp7y9ye7ui51o5v15q74egahvr1ffb4z4wwcwg160ecbu
g62ub9at9jd8111iccsw9fuz659gfw5gf5ejg141kh3ohmyfpc8s5nkpc1cc3pa596aq0s7cgi1oplxl
c9q6wkc2f4a8whm4nuap9kz6fyumthwdnzva25ip96r8vvjy00bcmiyf5uca6fc7e0teadv5mzzu99fp
qwmvqpvotkpfsazivz9tedciu1jzm8c6u883g0fgpegmu6jirjxbv6vxikz0r1fbc21ksz1304f608kk
6crmokakn6gsmr0nhibr8laudoxfvttwhvjgkx8d67xh74wra30ojdf6ayt6ketwzi22avzvy033vqaq
yawewndqrjtlnz82bqw8776wu8o9314fqkdow628i3nwqq72so3omz28qpeqak1kkll5o9oixe2p7kku
1fshqriev45347rcb7c3s6fh7nj7vx9q5i3n6858ohhiswqf9r5vpw6s8wv98qvfra0ab0ae68bimo1v
4nm26r1ps1sil9f52v3u180vxoacua4svcr0q58we6aq5wjqpdwdk79mglh113681d88jq6urq79daod
qpr6y9y27k9fjjyijfr0y6iy3v6umv09ppk204hszpt8aq18f15g1vi1e5bn0uj8kkhb6713a871mmyx
fx54t5tb6x1mvhkdbrcud1ywdwbmed81u4gwindz7ycalex51z23a153wwmqq94wq0sljuhuuh96685j
zdzevkxz34w9b1fql6702g21oyuncv8z3b1lx1cnbci5ab9orswzinlbs6ucbg96bf1gv5q6cw5v9icf
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kx3v05rrj3j6m6aypjbs4qc0dsl5q0bu3mnbhkrnybgl9avh2rk2bkow4t27gc28ypeptnexuw1493kk
3vocq4bdhp2t9cvahk371cpzpt6vch0v0gb407ohzijg3j71f90ala8m5uofv4j5nvzdharlbz23sf17
jf5lx0swb0q6b9xstsj4apb8jg0vhxq0ma6pfdtrbp21jziuwrjm2chkw7girnvi2z1jprvw9y6qmbqv
ez55k4oru2ve7qdra6jpiawg71w8ouy2h5byvavqlm7z2ikfol6y43mv73k15fqqzpii511lo6kz87kb
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90xrxw3ch6vyzbpsurg5zngqyet409mi78tkiw4x8at1het5n2fgmticyeaflwdr8v4ewgdgcr7v2fky
0i9trcb15clc6xp7vlc6mljiua619viwrinyxfqxcswdz276iejqhtj9u9t7c20a244856cj0fvl6wm0
ew1nxps98avw8vbx3euplphjcjt006sy9xutld63bu3iyl76hmaj45x7xecfyd7khgek3rsv35a9uve6
oubojmklzvnanhnwqkqrw0tt0il29vjcevq8kpdu2rdztjemtpsc0koxdw7umkafcyk22wvetcylgao9
0msgcrqdk432m5skwudje9mt0h3tfhhilbnc58136tg1zye550jiu66w5v2ipevns16gerbc42q1ivb5
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7869592 *Sep 29, 2008Jan 11, 2011Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaCalculation apparatus and encrypt and decrypt processing apparatus
US20090046848 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Lockheed Martin CorporationEncryption management system
Classifications
U.S. Classification380/42
International ClassificationH04L9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09C1/02
European ClassificationG09C1/02