Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050133166 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/782,300
Publication dateJun 23, 2005
Filing dateFeb 18, 2004
Priority dateDec 19, 2003
Also published asWO2005064670A1
Publication number10782300, 782300, US 2005/0133166 A1, US 2005/133166 A1, US 20050133166 A1, US 20050133166A1, US 2005133166 A1, US 2005133166A1, US-A1-20050133166, US-A1-2005133166, US2005/0133166A1, US2005/133166A1, US20050133166 A1, US20050133166A1, US2005133166 A1, US2005133166A1
InventorsPeter Satitpunwaycha, Khiem Nguyen, Alfred Mak, Kenneth Collins, Turgut Sahin
Original AssigneeApplied Materials, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tuned potential pedestal for mask etch processing apparatus
US 20050133166 A1
Abstract
The present invention generally provides an improved pedestal for supporting a substrate. The pedestal has greatest application during a plasma etching process, such as for a quartz photomask, or “reticle.” The pedestal defines a body, and a substrate support base along an upper surface of the body. The substrate support base has an outer edge, and an intermediate substrate support ridge for receiving and supporting the substrate. At least a portion of the substrate support base outside of the intermediate substrate support ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material. The purpose is to couple greater RF power through the reticle in order to enhance the plasma etching process.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(19)
1. A pedestal for supporting a substrate in a plasma etching chamber, comprising:
a body, the body being configured to receive an RF power; and
a substrate support base along an upper surface of the body, the substrate support base having an outer edge, and an intermediate substrate support ridge for receiving and supporting the substrate;
and wherein at least a portion of the substrate support base outside of the intermediate substrate support ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material.
2. The pedestal of claim 1, wherein the portion of the substrate support base within the substrate support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material.
3. The pedestal of claim 2, wherein the portion of the substrate support base fabricated from a dielectric material is formed by placing a layer of dielectric material along a top surface of the substrate support base outside of the substrate support ridge in order to form a dielectric ring.
4. The pedestal of claim 3, wherein the substrate support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material.
5. The pedestal of claim 3, wherein the dielectric material is fabricated from materials selected from the group consisting of a polymeric material, a ceramic material, and combinations thereof.
6. The pedestal of claim 2, wherein the portion of the substrate support base fabricated from a dielectric material defines substantially the entire thickness of the substrate support base outside of the substrate support ridge.
7. The pedestal of claim 6, wherein the substrate support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material.
8. The pedestal of claim 6, wherein the dielectric material is fabricated from materials selected from the group consisting of a polymeric material, a ceramic material, and combinations thereof.
9. The pedestal of claim 1, further comprising a cover configured to be received on the substrate support base.
10. A pedestal for supporting a reticle in a plasma etching chamber, comprising:
a body, the body being configured to receive an RF power;
a reticle support base along an upper surface of the body, the reticle support base having an outer edge, and an intermediate reticle support ridge for receiving and supporting the reticle;
and wherein at least a portion of the reticle support base outside of the intermediate substrate support ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material.
11. The pedestal of claim 10, wherein:
the portion of the reticle support base within the reticle support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material;
the reticle support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material; and
12. The pedestal of claim 10, wherein the dielectric material is fabricated from at least one of a polymeric material and a ceramic material.
13. The pedestal of claim 12, wherein the portion of the reticle support base fabricated from a dielectric material is formed by placing a layer of dielectric material along a top surface of the reticle support base outside of the reticle support ridge in order to form a dielectric ring.
14. The pedestal of claim 12, wherein the portion of the reticle support base fabricated from a dielectric material defines substantially the entire thickness of the reticle support base outside of the reticle support ridge
15. A plasma etching chamber having a pedestal therein for supporting a reticle, comprising:
a chamber body defining a base wall, a side wall and a dome;
a gate along the side wall for permitting a reticle to be moved into the plasma etching chamber; and
a reticle support member for supporting a reticle within the plasma etching chamber during processing, the reticle support member comprising:
a body, the body being configured to receive an RF power;
a reticle support base along an upper surface of the body, the reticle support base having an outer edge, and an intermediate reticle support ridge for receiving and supporting the reticle;
and wherein at least a portion of the reticle support base outside of the intermediate substrate support ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material.
16. The chamber of claim 15, wherein:
the portion of the reticle support base within the reticle support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material;
the reticle support ridge is fabricated from a metallic material; and
17. The chamber of claim 16, wherein the dielectric material is fabricated from at least one of a polymeric material and a ceramic material.
18. The chamber of claim 17, wherein the portion of the reticle support base fabricated from a dielectric material is formed by placing a layer of dielectric material along a top surface of the reticle support base outside of the reticle support ridge in order to form a dielectric ring.
19. The chamber of claim 17, wherein the portion of the reticle support base fabricated from a dielectric material defines substantially the entire thickness of the reticle support base outside of the reticle support ridge
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application claims priority to previously filed provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/531,062, filed Dec. 19, 2003, entitled “Tuned Potential Pedestal for Mask Etch Processing Apparatus.” The provisional application is incorporated herein by referenced in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention generally relates to the fabrication of integrated circuits. More specifically, the invention relates to an apparatus for manufacturing a photomask, or “reticle,” useful in manufacturing semiconductors.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0005]
    Integrated circuits (IC) are manufactured by forming discrete semiconductor devices on a surface of a semiconductor substrate. An example of such a substrate is a silicon (Si) or silicon dioxide (SiO2) wafer. To interconnect the devices on the substrate, a multi-level network of interconnect structures is formed. Material is deposited on the substrate in layers and selectively removed in a series of controlled steps.
  • [0006]
    Increasing circuit densities have placed additional demands on processes used to fabricate semiconductor devices. For example, as circuit densities increase, the widths of vias, contacts and other features, as well as the dielectric materials between them, decrease to sub-micron dimensions. However, the thickness of the dielectric layers remains substantially constant, with the result that the aspect ratios for the features, i.e., their height divided by width, increases. Reliable formation of high aspect ratio features is important to the success of sub-micron technology and to the continued effort to increase circuit density and the quality of individual substrates and die.
  • [0007]
    Reliable formation of high aspect ratio features with desired critical dimensions requires precise patterning and subsequent etching of the substrate. A technique commonly used to form precise patterns on substrates is photolithography. The technique generally involves the direction of light energy through a lens, or “reticle” and onto the substrate. In conventional photolithographic processes, a photoresist material is first applied on a substrate layer to be etched. In the context of optical resists, the resist material is sensitive to light energy, such as ultraviolet or laser sources. The resist material defines a polymer that is tuned to respond to the specific wavelength of light used, and to different exposing sources.
  • [0008]
    After the resist is deposited onto the substrate, the light source is actuated to emit ultraviolet (UV) light or low X-ray light, for example, directed at the resist-covered substrate. The selected light source chemically alters the composition of the photoresist material. However, the photoresist layer is only selectively exposed. In this respect, a photomask, or “reticle,” is positioned between the light source and the substrate being processed. The photomask is patterned to contain the desired configuration of features for the substrate. The patterned photomask causes the light energy to strike the resist material in accordance with the pattern.
  • [0009]
    Photolithographic reticles are fabricated from an optically transparent material, such as quartz (i.e., silicon dioxide, SiO2). The reticle includes a pattern of opaque material that inhibits the light from exposing portions of the substrate in accordance with the desired pattern. A thin opaque layer of metal, typically chromium, is disposed on the surface of the reticle. This light-shielding layer is patterned to correspond to the features to be transferred to the substrate, such as transistors or polygates. The metallic material is patterned using conventional laser or electron beam patterning equipment to define the critical dimensions to be transferred to the metal layer. The metal layer is then etched to remove the metal material not protected by the patterned resist, thereby exposing the underlying quartz material and forming a patterned photomask layer. Photomask layers thus allow light to pass therethrough in a precise pattern onto the substrate surface.
  • [0010]
    In photolithography, the exposed material may either be a positive resist or a negative resist. In a positive resist, the exposed resist material on the substrate is removed, while in a negative resist, the unexposed portions are removed. Removal is typically by a chemical process to expose an underlying substrate material. The exposed underlying substrate material may then be etched to form patterned features in the substrate surface while the retained resist material remains as a protective coating for the unexposed underlying substrate material. In this manner, contacts, vias, or interconnects may be formed by exposing the resist to a pattern of light through a photolithographic reticle having a photomask layer disposed thereon.
  • [0011]
    In an iterative convergence, the method for fabricating a patterned reticle itself involves a deposition and subsequent etching process. In this respect, a metal layer is first deposited on a top surface of a glass reticle. Thereafter, selected portions of the metal layer are removed through etching. Various types of etching processes are used for etching the metal layer from a reticle. One such etching method is known as plasma etching. In order to perform plasma etching, a glass reticle is first placed within a process chamber. More specifically, the glass reticle is placed on a pedestal. In a plasma etching process, the pedestal serves as a cathode. To this end, the metallic pedestal is given RF power. Power applied to the pedestal creates a substrate bias in the form of a negative voltage on the upper surface of the reticle. This negative voltage is used to attract ions from a plasma formed above the reticle in the chamber. The plasma is formed by the application of power to one or more inductive coils at the top of the chamber. The inductive coils generate and sustain the plasma above the pedestal and reticle. Thus, a voltage drop is induced across the pedestal that draws ions to the upper surface of the reticle, thereby etching a metallic layer.
  • [0012]
    Because the reticle is formed from a material having a low dielectric constant, e.g., glass or quartz, the amount of RF power that is coupled through the reticle is low. This inhibits the gas plasma in reacting with the reticle surface. This limitation is compounded by a gap typically existing between the reticle and the supporting pedestal therebelow. In addition, when the surface area of the pedestal is large compared to the reticle area, the RF power may preferentially couple to other regions of the pedestal, producing a loss of RF power. Further, it has been observed that the use of a pedestal cover, e.g., cover ring and capture ring, fabricated from a dielectric material is inadequate to lessen the power coupled through the region of the pedestal that is not immediately below the reticle.
  • [0013]
    Therefore, there is a need for a plasma etching apparatus that aids in the chemical reaction between a gas plasma and a reticle. In addition, there is a need for a pedestal fabricated from a material that does not contribute to the power loss across the reticle during a plasma etching procedure.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    The present invention generally provides an improved pedestal for supporting a substrate and related substrate support hardware. The pedestal has greatest application during a plasma etching process, such as for a quartz photomask, or “reticle.”
  • [0015]
    The pedestal defines a body, and a base along on an upper surface of the body. The body receives an RF power during substrate processing. The substrate support base has an outer edge, and an intermediate substrate support ridge for receiving and supporting the substrate. At least a portion of the substrate support base outside of the intermediate substrate support ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material, or material having a lower dielectric constant than the remaining support base. An example is quartz. Quartz has a lower dielectric constant than the materials typically used for fabricating the pedestal body or cover, e.g., alumina. The placement of quartz allows greater RF power to be coupled through the reticle, thereby enhancing the plasma etching process. It also provides greater control over the relative amount of RF power coupled through the reticle.
  • [0016]
    In one aspect, a layer of dielectric material is placed along the top of the support base of the pedestal body. In another embodiment, the entire cross-sectional thickness of the support base that encompasses the supporting ridge is fabricated from a dielectric material. In one embodiment, a separate substrate support assembly is disposed on the base to facilitate the transfer of the substrate onto and off of the pedestal, with the substrate support assembly being fabricated from a dielectric material.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0017]
    So that the manner in which the above recited features of the present invention can be understood in detail, a more particular description of the invention, briefly summarized above, may be had by reference to the appended drawings. It is to be noted, however, that the appended drawings illustrate only typical embodiments of this invention and are, therefore, not to be considered limiting of its scope.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a plasma etching chamber as might contain the pedestal of the present invention. The chamber shown in FIG. 1 is exemplary.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 2 presents an exploded perspective view of the substrate support member of FIG. 1.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 3 shows a perspective cutaway view of one embodiment of a pedestal of the present invention.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 4 provides a cross-sectional schematic view of a pedestal of the present invention. A portion fabricated from a dielectric material is shown.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 5 presents a cross-sectional schematic view of a pedestal of the present invention, in an alternate embodiment. A portion fabricated from a dielectric material is again shown.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0023]
    Aspects of the invention will be described below in reference to an inductively coupled plasma etch chamber. Suitable inductively coupled plasma etch chambers include the Decoupled Plasma Source (DPS™) chamber available from Applied Materials, Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., or the ETEC Tetra™ photomask etch chamber available from ETEC of Hayward, Calif. A two-coil chamber, such as the Tetra II™ decoupled plasma source chamber available from Applied Materials, Inc. may also be employed. Other process chambers may be used including, for example, capacitively coupled parallel plate chambers and magnetically enhanced ion etch chambers, as well as inductively coupled plasma etch chambers of different designs. Although the processes are advantageously performed with the DPS™ processing chamber, the description in conjunction with the DPS™ processing chamber is illustrative and should not be construed or interpreted to limit the scope of aspects of the invention.
  • [0024]
    In order to perform plasma etching, a substrate, e.g., a glass reticle, is placed within a processing chamber. An example of such a chamber is schematically shown in FIG. 1. The process chamber 100 of FIG. 1 has a substrate support member 200 disposed therein, and a substrate handler blade 300 positioned adjacent thereto. Substrates 222 are shown positioned on both the substrate support member 200 and the handler blade 300.
  • [0025]
    The processing chamber 100 is configured to receive a substrate 222, such as a glass reticle to be processed through plasma etching. The substrate 222 enters and exits the chamber 100 through a gate 161. The gate 161 serves as a port, and also isolates the chamber 100 environment during reticle processing. The substrate 222 is transported via a substrate cassette, using the substrate handling blade 300. The substrate handling blade 300 transfers the substrate 222 between a separate transfer chamber (not shown) and various processing chambers. In this respect, it is understood that the reticle fabrication process involves multiple steps, and that different steps are typically conducted in different chambers that mechanically cooperate with the substrate handling blade 300. An example of such a processing system is a Centura™ processing system available from Applied Materials, Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif.
  • [0026]
    The process chamber 100 generally includes a cylindrical side wall 162. The side wall 162 helps define the chamber body, and also supports the gate 161. The chamber 100 is also defined by a chamber bottom 167, and an energy transparent ceiling or lid 163. An inductive coil 176 is disposed around at least a portion of the lid 163. The chamber body 162 and chamber bottom 167 of the chamber 100 can be made from a metal, such as anodized aluminum. The lid 163 is fabricated from an energy transparent material such as a ceramic or other dielectric material.
  • [0027]
    As mentioned above, the chamber 100 holds a substrate support member 200. The support member 200 supports the substrate 222 during processing. A plasma zone 164 is defined by the process chamber 100 above an upper surface of the substrate support member 200. During processing, process gases are introduced into the plasma etch chamber 100 through a gas distributor 172. The gas distributor 172 is peripherally disposed about the substrate support member 200. The gas distributor 172 is shown illustratively, and may be disposed in other configurations, such as disposed at the top of lid 163. Process gases and etchant byproducts may be exhausted from the process chamber 100 through an exhaust system (not shown). An optional cooling line 184 is provided in the pedestal 200. for controlling the pressure in the plasma etch chamber 100. An endpoint measurement device may optionally be included to determine the endpoint of a process performed in the chamber 100.
  • [0028]
    With respect to the substrate support member 200 itself, the support member 200 defines a pedestal for the substrate 222 during processing. The support member 200 first comprises a body 206. The body 206 has an upper surface that defines a substrate support base 210 (seen in FIG. 2). In one arrangement, the substrate support base 210 is a separate piece mounted on an upper surface of the body 206. An optional substrate supporting assembly 215 is preferably provided over the base 210 to aid in transporting the substrate 222 into and out of the chamber 100. The substrate supporting assembly 215 is shown in detail in FIG. 2. Only the capture ring 216 of the supporting assembly 215 is seen in FIG. 1.
  • [0029]
    Referring back to FIG. 1, the body 206 of the substrate support member 200 is mounted on a bulk head assembly, or shaft, 102. In the embodiment shown, the body 206 is stationary in the chamber 100; however, in an alternative embodiment, the body 206 (or a portion of the body 206) may be moveable within the chamber 100. In one arrangement, the body 206 of the substrate support member 200 is mounted on a stainless steel base 104. The base 104 is typically disposed on the bottom of the processing chamber (not shown in FIG. 2), with the bulk head assembly 102 mounted through the bottom of the processing chamber 100 and coupled to the body 206. The substrate support member 200 is adapted to maintain vacuum isolation between the interior of the chamber 100 and the outside environment. Power, electrical controls, and backpressure gases may be provided to the substrate support member 200 via the shaft 102.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 2 presents an exploded perspective view of one embodiment of a substrate support member 200. From FIG. 2, the body 206 and support base 210 are more clearly seen. It can also be seen that a cathode 112 is disposed in the support base 210. The cathode 112 may optionally vertically extend above the surface of the body 206. The cathode 112 is electrically coupled to an electrode power supply 178 to generate a capacitive electric field in the plasma etch chamber 100. Typically an RF voltage is applied to the cathode 112 while the chamber body 162 is electrically grounded. Power applied to the pedestal 200 creates a substrate bias in the form of a negative voltage on the upper surface of the substrate 222. This negative voltage is used to attract ions from the plasma formed in the chamber 100 to the upper surface of the substrate 222. The capacitive electric field forms a bias which accelerates inductively formed plasma species toward the substrate 222 to provide a more vertically oriented anisotropic etching of the substrate 222.
  • [0031]
    Channels 211 (three are shown) are also disposed through the body 206, and house internally movable lift pins 214 therein. As will be discussed further below, the lift pins 214 engage the lower surface of a capture ring 220 to move the capture ring 220 vertically within the chamber 100 relative to the cover ring 216. The body 206 may comprise a temperature controlled base adapted to regulate the temperature of the substrate support assembly 215, and thus, a substrate 222 disposed thereon. The body 206 can be made of a material inert to the process formed in the processing chamber including, for example, aluminum oxide, or aluminum, and substrate support assembly 215 components can be made of aluminum or aluminum oxide. The body 206 may include fluid channels, heating elements, e.g., resistive heating elements or other temperature control members.
  • [0032]
    In the support member arrangement of FIG. 2, the substrate support member 200 includes a separate substrate supporting assembly 215. The substrate supporting assembly 215 generally includes a cover ring 216 and a capture ring 220.
  • [0033]
    Referring first to the cover ring 216, the cover ring 216 is preferably a circular ring having an upper surface 219 and support shoulders 218. The substrate supports 218 define shoulders for receiving a substrate (not shown). In one arrangement, the substrate supports 218 define opposing raised surfaces 221, 223 that each includes an inner sloped surface for receiving a substrate. A central opening 225 is formed in the upper surface 219 of the cover ring 216. The two raised surfaces 221, 223 are generally disposed on opposing sides of the central opening 225. The first raised surface 221 defines an essentially linear raised surface extending along the length of one side of the central opening 225. The second raised surface 223 defines an arcuate raised surface 221 having an outer diameter 224 and an inner diameter 226. The outer diameter 224 generally matches the radius of the cover ring 216, while the inner diameter 226 conforms to the geometry of the central bore 225 along one or more sides of the bore 225. The upper surface 219 and the raised surfaces 221, 223 may be monolithic or may be made of separate components connected together.
  • [0034]
    The capture ring 220 defines an arcuate base plate having an inner diameter 207 and an outer diameter 202. A central bore 206 is formed within the inner diameter 207 of the capture ring 220. The diameters 207, 202 of the capture ring 220 are not continuous, but retain an opening that serves as part of the bore 206. As with the cover ring 216, the capture ring 220 includes substrate supports 204, 205. The substrate supports 204, 205 generally follow the inner diameter 207 of the capture ring 220. In the arrangement of FIG. 2, the supports 204, 205 define shoulders disposed along the inner perimeter 207. The substrate supports 204, 205 and the base plate 202 form a substrate receiving area. The shoulders 204, 205 and the base plate 202 are adapted to mate with the substrate supports 218 on the cover ring 216. When the capture ring 220 is rested upon the cover ring 216, the substrate supports 205 for the capture ring 220 are co-planar with the substrate supports 218 for the cover ring. The capture ring 220 is dimensioned to rest on the cover ring 216 without covering the two raised surfaces 221, 222 on the cover ring 216. Together, the substrate supports 205, 218 may then seamlessly receive a substrate (not shown).
  • [0035]
    The capture ring 220 moves vertically above the cover ring 216. In operation, the lift pins 214 move the capture ring 220 vertically above the cover ring 216 during substrate transfer, and then lower the capture ring 220 onto the cover ring 216 for substrate processing. The use of lift pins in the semiconductor fabrication business is known, and those of ordinary skill in the art will understand from this disclosure how the lift pins may be fabricated.
  • [0036]
    Channels 217 are formed through the cover ring 216 to enable the lift pins 214 disposed through the body 206 to move therethrough and lift the capture ring 220 vertically. The vertical movement imparted by the lift pins 214 is used to lift the capture ring 220 to effectuate substrate transfer between the substrate handler blade 300 and the capture ring 220. The lift pins 214 move the capture ring 220 vertically above the cover ring 216 during substrate transfer, and then lower the capture ring 220 onto the cover ring 216 for substrate processing.
  • [0037]
    To begin processing, the reticle 222 (or other substrate) is positioned on the surface of the pedestal 200. Etch gases are then introduced into the chamber 100. To this end, a process gas source supplies gas, such as an oxygen based gas, through a gas input line 172. In the arrangement of FIG. 1, the input line 172 feeds gas into the side of the lid 163. However, gas may also be introduced through nozzles (not shown) in the top of the lid 163. Chamber pressure is controlled by a closed-loop pressure control system (not shown).
  • [0038]
    As gas is injected into the chamber 100, a gas plasma is created. Plasma is formed by the application of power to one or more inductive coils 176 at the top of the lid 163. In the chamber 100 of FIG. 1, two RF coils 176 are used, with one being an outer coil and one being an inner coil. A power supply 177 and matching network is used to apply power to the inductive coils 176. The inductive coils 176 generate and sustain the plasma above the pedestal 200 and substrate 222. In one arrangement, approximately 125 Watts is applied to the coils 176 at a frequency of about 13.56 MHz, to produce and maintain an oxygen-comprising plasma over the surface of the reticle 222. In one arrangement for a dual coil system, approximately 400 Watts is applied to the coils 176 at a frequency of about 13.56 MHz, to produce and maintain a chlo7rine-and-oxygen-comprising plasma over the surface of the reticle 222. For a single coil system, the coils may provide a DC bias of about 340 to 410 Volts on the reticle surface.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 3 shows a perspective cutaway view of one embodiment of a pedestal 300 of the present invention. The pedestal 300 is configured to receive and support a substrate in a plasma etching chamber. Preferably, the substrate is a photolithographic reticle, and the chamber is a plasma etching chamber, such as the chamber shown in FIG. 1, and discussed above.
  • [0040]
    The pedestal first comprises a body 306. In the arrangement of FIG. 3, the body 306 is a generally cylindrical object, though other shapes may be employed. The body 306 includes an upper surface 310 that serves as a substrate support base. In the arrangement shown in FIG. 3, the support base 310 has a radial outer diameter 324. The base 310 also has an intermediate shoulder 326 that forms a four-sided support ridge 325. The support ridge 325 serves to support the reticle above the pedestal 300 during processing. The support ridge 325 is preferably fabricated from a metallic material. The term “support ridge” means any raised surface feature of any height or shape along the support base 310 that contacts and supports a substrate 222 during processing.
  • [0041]
    The support base 310 is typically configured to receive a cover (not shown) to further support a reticle during processing. The cover may be configured to operate as the substrate support assembly 215 described above.
  • [0042]
    In the novel pedestal 300 of the present invention, at least a portion of the body 306 is fabricated from a dielectric material. In the cutaway view of FIG. 3, the dielectric material portion of the body 306 is shown at 318. Dielectric material 318 is selectively used in the upper surface 310 so as to define a dielectric ring generally about the perimeter of the body 306. The dielectric material 318 is placed outside of the contact point, e.g., support ridge 326, for the reticle 222 on the pedestal 300. The dielectric material portion 318 of the body 306 may comprise two or more separate components (not shown) joined together to form the dielectric portion 318 of the body 306. The two or more dielectric members may be fabricated from materials having different dielectric properties. The benefit of using material of different dielectric properties is to control the relative amount of RF power coupled through the reticle, as the thickness and dielectric property of the reticle substrate, e.g., quartz, is fixed.
  • [0043]
    The dielectric material portion 318 of the body 306 may be of different thicknesses. This is demonstrated in the schematic embodiments shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. FIG. 4 provides a cross-sectional view of a pedestal 300′ of the present invention. The pedestal 300′ is shown schematically. Likewise, FIG. 5 presents a cross-sectional view of a pedestal 300′ of the present invention, in an alternate embodiment. The pedestal 300″ is again shown schematically. In each view, a reticle 222 is shown being supported on the respective pedestal 300′, 300″. Further, in each view a cover 315 is provided. The cover 315 may be configured in accordance with the cover 215 shown in the exploded view of FIG. 2. The cover 315 is preferably fabricated from a dielectric material. The use of different dielectric material thickness is to adjust or control the relative RF power coupled to the reticle. One benefit of using a dielectric material is it enables the use of two control knobs, that is knobs for dielectric constant and thickness. This, in turn, enables the operator to change the relative amounts of RF that goes into the reticle versus the RF power that goes to the pedestal area surrounding the reticle. The dielectric thickness and type may be such that the relative amount is the same for uniform power distribution, or different if needed for compensating for the etch process.
  • [0044]
    Dielectric material is shown at 318 in both FIG. 4 and in FIG. 5. In FIG. 4, the dielectric material 318 resides along the top of the upper support base 306. In FIG. 5, the dielectric material 318 defines substantially the entire thickness of the upper support base 306. In either instance, the dielectric material 318 is preferably placed outside of the contact point for the reticle 222 on the pedestal 300.
  • [0045]
    As can be seen, the pedestals 300, 300′, 300″ place dielectric material along a periphery of the upper substrate support body 306. The dielectric material 318 may be polymeric or ceramic. An example of a polymeric material is Ardel™ polyarylate material manufactured by Amoco polymers. Another example is Vespel™ polyimide from DuPont. Still another example is a plastic material sold under the trade name Ultem™. Yet another example is a synthetic rubber material. An example of a suitable ceramic material is aluminum oxide. Another example of an acceptable dielectric material is quartz. The selected use of dielectric material 318 has the effect of changing the amount of RF power coupling into the reticle during a plasma etching procedure. In this respect, during a plasma etching procedure, the body 306 receives power, such as an RF power. By using dielectric material on the periphery of the body, the potential drop across the pedestal is changed to have a value less than the region where the reticle rests, i.e., inside of the substrate support ridge 326. The portion of the pedestal 300 within the substrate support ridge 326 remains metallic in order to efficiently conduct waste heat away from the reticle 222.
  • [0046]
    While the foregoing is directed to embodiments of the present invention, other and further embodiments of the invention may be devised without departing from the basic scope thereof, and the scope thereof is determined by the claims that follow.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4586743 *Sep 24, 1984May 6, 1986Intelledex IncorporatedRobotic gripper for disk-shaped objects
US4676193 *Jul 15, 1985Jun 30, 1987Applied Magnetics CorporationStabilized mask assembly for direct deposition of a thin film pattern onto a substrate
US4705951 *Apr 17, 1986Nov 10, 1987Varian Associates, Inc.Wafer processing system
US4813732 *Apr 9, 1987Mar 21, 1989Epsilon Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for automated wafer handling
US4842683 *Apr 25, 1988Jun 27, 1989Applied Materials, Inc.Magnetic field-enhanced plasma etch reactor
US4869801 *Mar 21, 1988Sep 26, 1989Leybold AktiengesellschaftApparatus for mounting workpieces
US5022695 *Oct 24, 1989Jun 11, 1991Texas Instruments IncorporatedSemiconductor slice holder
US5133635 *May 21, 1990Jul 28, 1992Tet Techno Investment Trust SettlementMethod and apparatus for holding and conveying platelike substrates
US5180276 *Apr 18, 1991Jan 19, 1993Brooks Automation, Inc.Articulated arm transfer device
US5280983 *Oct 19, 1992Jan 25, 1994Applied Materials, Inc.Semiconductor processing system with robotic autoloader and load lock
US5292399 *Jan 8, 1992Mar 8, 1994Applied Materials, Inc.Plasma etching apparatus with conductive means for inhibiting arcing
US5324155 *Jan 9, 1992Jun 28, 1994Advanced Semiconductor Materials America, Inc.Wafer handling system with bernoulli pick-up
US5374147 *Sep 10, 1992Dec 20, 1994Tokyo Electron LimitedTransfer device for transferring a substrate
US5469035 *Aug 30, 1994Nov 21, 1995Applied Materials, Inc.Two-axis magnetically coupled robot
US5580388 *May 30, 1995Dec 3, 1996Moore Epitaxial, Inc.Multi-layer susceptor for rapid thermal process reactors
US5611865 *Feb 14, 1996Mar 18, 1997Applied Materials, Inc.Alignment of a shadow frame and large flat substrates on a heated support
US5643366 *Jan 31, 1994Jul 1, 1997Applied Materials, Inc.Wafer handling within a vacuum chamber using vacuum
US5647626 *Dec 4, 1995Jul 15, 1997Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd.Wafer pickup system
US5669644 *Nov 13, 1995Sep 23, 1997Kokusai Electric Co., Ltd.Wafer transfer plate
US5688358 *Mar 8, 1995Nov 18, 1997Applied Materials, Inc.R.F. plasma reactor with larger-than-wafer pedestal conductor
US5702228 *Jul 17, 1996Dec 30, 1997Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.Robotic arm supporting an object by interactive mechanism
US5720590 *May 3, 1995Feb 24, 1998Brooks Automation, Inc.Articulated arm transfer device
US5733096 *Sep 13, 1995Mar 31, 1998Silicon Valley Group, Inc.Multi-stage telescoping structure
US5791895 *Feb 15, 1995Aug 11, 1998Novellus Systems, Inc.Apparatus for thermal treatment of thin film wafer
US5820685 *Feb 28, 1997Oct 13, 1998Applied Materials, Inc.Wafer support device
US6203617 *Mar 19, 1999Mar 20, 2001Tokyo Electron LimitedConveying unit and substrate processing unit
US6217663 *Jun 20, 1997Apr 17, 2001Kokusai Electric Co., Ltd.Substrate processing apparatus and substrate processing method
US6284093 *Sep 20, 2000Sep 4, 2001Applied Materials, Inc.Shield or ring surrounding semiconductor workpiece in plasma chamber
US6726804 *Jan 22, 2001Apr 27, 2004Liang-Guo WangRF power delivery for plasma processing using modulated power signal
US6921457 *Jul 6, 2001Jul 26, 2005Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd.Semiconductor manufacturing apparatus, and positioning jig used for same
US20020162630 *Oct 17, 2001Nov 7, 2002Kiyoshi SatohSemiconductor substrate-supporting apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7879151 *Sep 11, 2006Feb 1, 2011Applied Materials, Inc.Mask etch processing apparatus
US8206552Jun 25, 2008Jun 26, 2012Applied Materials, Inc.RF power delivery system in a semiconductor apparatus
US20060292727 *May 26, 2006Dec 28, 2006Takeharu MotokawaPhotomask plasma etching apparatus, etching method, and photomask forming method
US20070007660 *Sep 11, 2006Jan 11, 2007Khiem NguyenMask etch processing apparatus
US20070217119 *Mar 5, 2007Sep 20, 2007David JohnsonApparatus and Method for Carrying Substrates
US20070293311 *Jun 7, 2006Dec 20, 2007Walker Jay SProblem gambling detection in tabletop games
US20090321019 *Jun 25, 2008Dec 31, 2009Zhigang ChenRf power delivery system in a semiconductor apparatus
US20100279765 *Nov 4, 2010Walker Jay SProblem gambling detection in tabletop games
US20110236806 *Oct 8, 2010Sep 29, 2011Applied Materials, Inc.Dc voltage charging of cathode for plasma striking
US20140150246 *Feb 4, 2014Jun 5, 2014Plasma-Therm LlcApparatus and Method for Carrying Substrates
WO2011119471A2 *Mar 21, 2011Sep 29, 2011Applied Materials, Inc.Dc voltage charging of cathode for plasma striking
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/345.51
International ClassificationH01L21/00, C23C16/458, H01L21/687
Cooperative ClassificationH01J2237/2001, H01J37/321, H01L21/67069, H01L21/68735, H01L21/68785
European ClassificationH01J37/32M8D, H01L21/67S2D8D, H01L21/687S20, H01L21/687S6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 18, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: APPLIED MATERIALS, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SATITPUNWAYCHA, PETER;NGUYEN, KHIEM;MAK, ALFRED W.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015032/0007;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040124 TO 20040211