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Publication numberUS20050133576 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/738,672
Publication dateJun 23, 2005
Filing dateDec 17, 2003
Priority dateDec 17, 2003
Publication number10738672, 738672, US 2005/0133576 A1, US 2005/133576 A1, US 20050133576 A1, US 20050133576A1, US 2005133576 A1, US 2005133576A1, US-A1-20050133576, US-A1-2005133576, US2005/0133576A1, US2005/133576A1, US20050133576 A1, US20050133576A1, US2005133576 A1, US2005133576A1
InventorsMichael Maier, William Russell
Original AssigneeMaier Michael C., Russell William R.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Imprintable laminate to create pokets for presentation folders and method of preparing such folders
US 20050133576 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to a laminate that is imprintable, such as through non-impact printing means, for use in creating personalized pockets on demand for use with presentation folders, document containment devices and other items for which an auxiliary pocket may be useful. The pocket of the present invention is formed from a first sheet having patterns coated thereon, including patterns of adhesive and release which is then attached to a second or release sheet to protect the adhesive coated portions of the substrate. The patterns of release and adhesive enable the application of the pocket portion to a blank suitable for use in forming a presentation folder or other structure or item for which a pocket may be useful or beneficial.
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Claims(29)
1. A laminate for use in creating a pocket for a presentation folder, comprising;
a first sheet having a first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, one of said first and second faces capable of receiving printing, another of said first and second faces receiving at least one pattern of adhesive;
a second sheet having a second dimension substantially equal to said first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, said second sheet having a coating of release material in at least an area covered by said pattern of adhesive, and said second sheet releasably connected to said first sheet;
said pattern of adhesive having first and second areas of adhesive disposed substantially adjacent each of said first and second longitudinally extending side edges and each of said first and second areas of adhesive extending inwardly of said side edges, said pattern of adhesive further having a strip of adhesive that extends substantially perpendicularly to said first and second areas of adhesive, said strip having first and second ends and first and second segments of adhesive extending substantially perpendicularly from each of said ends; and
said first sheet having a first set of die cuts with said first die cuts being adjacent each of said first and second areas of adhesive and at least a second die cut disposed perpendicularly to said first set of die cuts such that said die cuts and said pattern of adhesive define at least first and second pocket areas.
2. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said strip of adhesive is disposed within an area created by said strip of adhesive.
3. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said first and second segments extend in opposite directions from one another.
4. A laminate as recited in claim 4, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on one end of said strip of adhesive.
5. A laminate as recited in claim 4, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on opposite ends of said strip of adhesive.
6. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said first and second segments are disposed substantially adjacent said first and second areas of adhesive.
7. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said first and second areas of adhesive form detachable label segments.
8. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein at least one of the first and second faces is provided with personalized printing.
9. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said each of said pocket areas are sized and configured to receive a standard sheet of paper in a portrait arrangement.
10. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein said first and second areas are removable label sections.
11. A laminate as recited in claim 1, wherein at least one of said first and second pocket areas is provided with slits, cuts or openings to hold supplemental items.
12. A laminate as recited in claim 11, wherein said supplemental items are selected from a group including business cards, discs, diskettes, tags, labels and combinations thereof.
13. A presentation folder and pocket combination, comprising;
a blank sized and configured to create a presentation folder;
a pocket prepared from a laminate, said laminate comprising;
a first sheet having a first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, one of said first and second faces capable of receiving printing, another of said first and second faces receiving at least one pattern of adhesive;
a second sheet having a second dimension substantially equal to said first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, said second sheet having a coating of release material in at least an area covered by said pattern of adhesive, and said second sheet releasably connected to said first sheet;
said pattern of adhesive having first and second areas of adhesive disposed substantially adjacent each of said first and second longitudinally extending side edges and each of said first and second areas of adhesive extending inwardly of said side edges, said pattern of adhesive further having a strip of adhesive that extends substantially perpendicularly to said first and second areas of adhesive, said strip having first and second ends and first and second segments of adhesive extending substantially perpendicularly from each of said ends;
said first sheet having a first set of die cuts with said first die cuts being adjacent each of said first and second areas of adhesive and at least a second die cut disposed perpendicularly to said first set of die cuts such that said die cuts and said pattern of adhesive define at least first and second pocket areas; and
wherein at least one of said first and second pocket areas are applied to said blank to form a presentation folder with a pocket.
14. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 13, wherein said laminate and said blank are provided with printing.
15. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 14, wherein said printing on said blank and said laminate are complimentary to one another.
16. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 13, wherein said each of said pocket areas are sized and configured to receive a standard sheet of paper in a portrait arrangement.
17. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 13, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on one end of said strip of adhesive and said first and second segments extend in opposite directions from one another.
18. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 13, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on opposite ends of said strip of adhesive and said first and second segments extend in opposite directions from one another.
19. A presentation folder and pocket combination as recited in claim 13, wherein said first and second areas form removable label portions.
20. A laminate as recited in claim 19, wherein at least one of said first and second pocket areas is provided with slits, cuts or openings to hold supplemental items.
21. A laminate as recited in claim 20, wherein said supplemental items are selected from a group including business cards, discs, diskettes, tags, labels and combinations thereof.
22. A method of making a presentation folder, comprising the steps of:
providing a blank of material having a first size and configuration;
supplying a laminate having a series of die cuts and patterns of adhesive and release, said laminate having one or more removable pocket areas;
removing one or more of said pocket areas; and
applying one or more of said pocket areas to said blank to create pockets on said blank so as to form a presentation folder.
23. A method as recited in claim 22, wherein a further step of printing the blank of material is conducted after the step of providing the blank of material.
24. A method as recited in claim 22, including a further step of printing the laminate after the step of supplying the laminate.
25. A method as recited in claim 22, wherein said each of said pocket areas are sized and configured to receive a standard sheet of paper in a portrait arrangement.
26. An auxiliary pocket for a document retention device, comprising;
a first sheet having a first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, one of said first and second faces capable of receiving printing, another of said first and second faces receiving at least one pattern of adhesive;
a second sheet having a second dimension substantially equal to said first dimension and having first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges, said second sheet having a coating of release material in at least an area covered by said pattern of adhesive, and said second sheet releasably connected to said first sheet;
said pattern of adhesive having first and second areas of adhesive disposed substantially adjacent each of said first and second longitudinally extending side edges and each of said first and second areas of adhesive extending inwardly of said side edges, said pattern of adhesive further having a strip of adhesive that extends substantially perpendicularly to said first and second areas of adhesive, said strip having first and second ends and first and second segments of adhesive extending substantially perpendicularly from each of said ends; and
said first sheet having a first set of die cuts with said first die cuts being adjacent each of said first and second areas of adhesive and at least a second die cut disposed perpendicularly to said first set of die cuts such that said die cuts and said pattern of adhesive define at least first and second pocket areas that can be applied to a document retention device.
27. An auxiliary pocket as recited in claim 26, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on one end of said strip of adhesive and said first and second segments extend in opposite directions from one another.
28. An auxiliary pocket as recited in claim 26, wherein said first and second segments of adhesive are disposed on opposite ends of said strip of adhesive and said first and second segments extend in opposite directions from one another.
29. An auxiliary pocket as recited in claim 26, wherein said document retention device is selected from a group including portfolios, notebooks, binders, clipboards, sleeves, folders, envelopes, accordion folders and combinations thereof.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    None.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to a laminate that is imprintable, such as through non-impact printing means, for use in creating personalized pockets on demand for use with presentation folders, document containment devices and other items for which an auxiliary pocket may be useful. The pocket of the present invention is formed from a first sheet having patterns coated thereon, including patterns of adhesive and release which is then attached to a second or release sheet to protect the adhesive coated portions of the substrate. The patterns of release and adhesive enable the application of the pocket portion to a blank suitable for use in forming a presentation folder or other structure or item for which a pocket may be useful or beneficial.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Stock folders are generally well known today and are provided in a variety of colors and typically in several standard formats. Such stock products are created from a blank of material to which at least one and usually two pockets are provided on the inner face of the blank. The pockets are generally formed from the same sheet or blank and are then folded over onto the blank and sealed to the blank to create the pockets. The blank is then folded, usually centrally, to form two relatively equal sides.
  • [0004]
    Such folders are used in a number of applications ranging from academic, such as in a elementary, middle school, high school or collegiate environment to education purposes including seminars and technical symposiums. In addition, folders have also been used in the past to hand out information on products and services in the hopes of inducing purchases or sales of such products or services.
  • [0005]
    These prior art folders are provided in a broad spectrum of colors and can even have different finishes such as glossy or a metallic appearance in order to supplement the product of topic offering. In addition, such prior art products may also be provided with textural or tactile features so as to resemble grains in leather or wood, again all in an effort to produce or tailor the communication vehicle to the audience or presenter to garner more attention for the products or services being offered.
  • [0006]
    Examples of such prior art folders include U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,870,223, 4,109,850, 4,301,962, 4,731,142, 4,989,777 and 5,836,507. Each of these prior art constructions are constructed from a single blank of material. That is, the portion making up the folder which comprises the pocket, are part of the same blank. The portion which becomes the pocket is then folded onto the folder portion to create the pocket portion. Such constructions normally require the manufacturer to purchase expensive and complicated folding equipment in order to process and fold the pocket portion, see for example U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,439,436 and 6,063,226.
  • [0007]
    One of the difficulties with such stock folder products is that the user of such products must order the folders in large lots, or must select from a generic stock inventory that may only have a pre-determined number of colors or finish options. If a presenter or distributor would prefer to have at least limited information printed on the folder, such as the name of the company or presenter or to have certain colors or finishes that represent the company, such as to emphasize the trade dress, then the user is stuck with the unfortunate option of having to order such products in large quantities typically greater than 50 and more often in the hundreds as the set up for the production folders is complex and orders in the hundreds of units is normally required by the manufacturer due to the complexity associated with such set up of equipment. This dilemma has thwarted the growth of the folder industry and prevented the use of this tool from expanding its communication potential to users of the product.
  • [0008]
    Attempts at personalization or individualization have sometimes been elaborate, such as that illustrated by U.S. Pat. No. 5,882,038 in which a personalized sheet is printed and then inserted so that the personalized information is then visible through die cut windows in the blank. As one might imagine, this limits the amount of personalization that can be provided and also requires that the information be aligned with the windows in the folder assembly so that it is visible. In addition, to the steps of folding the blank and the equipment required therefore, in order to manufacture such a product one needs to add additional die cutting stations and then is faced with the challenge of inserting the personalized sheet of information. In preparing for a meeting, even a small meeting, having to insert 10 sheets into 10 different folders can be time consuming, particularly if one is rushed in trying to get to the meeting.
  • [0009]
    The foregoing prior art products also suffer from the fact that they are provided only in a few relatively standard configurations, choices of only one or two products having only one or two pockets. This may require the presenter to over stuff the pockets provided with the folder or alternatively to have to distribute multiple folders in order to achieve the communication that is intended, that is in order to discuss multiple products or services multiple folders need to be provided to the attendees of the meeting. In addition, attendees may also wish to include materials collected at the event such as notes, brochures or other collateral material and are faced with stuffing the material into already tight spaces or simply dropping them internally from the folder which can lead to the materials being lost as they are not secured by a pocket. The ability to add additional pockets or the ability to position pockets in different areas of the folder is simply not an option or if it is it may be an expensive option requiring the manufacturer to purchase additional equipment, rework existing equipment or obtain further tooling in order to produce what may only be a single order.
  • [0010]
    Another problem faced by users of such stock folders is that they have virtually no personalized or individualized information. For example, in a typical introductory business meeting between two entities, the attendees may include an executive, members of sales and marketing and production personnel. Distributing the exact same information to each attendee may result in the information simply being deposited into the attendee's files, instead of the presenter's intent of delivering a specific message to each participant. Any personalized or individualized information is then limited to the sheets that are included inside the folders and those specific to a particular attendee may be buried deep within myriad of pages of information provided to the attendees.
  • [0011]
    Publications, patents and patent applications are referred to throughout this disclosure. All references cited herein are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • [0012]
    What is needed therefore is a product that can be produced in a convenient manner that overcomes the foregoing drawbacks. In addition, what is needed is a product that can be customized and tailored to the individual needs of a customer or presenter and one which enables the customer or presenter to convey personalized or individualized messages so as to increase the impact of the delivered materials. Moreover, the ability to provide any number of individual pockets would assist in the direct marketing effort to each of the attendees.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0013]
    The embodiments of the present invention described below are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed in the following detailed description. Rather, the embodiments are chosen and described so that others skilled in the art may appreciate and understand the principles and practices of the present invention.
  • [0014]
    The present invention is directed to an imprintable sheet having pre-determined pocket configurations. The sheet can be processed through a laser or other non-impact printer to produce pockets “on-demand.” More particularly, the present invention pertains to a laminated sheet configuration having a cooperating arrangement of adhesive and release patterns to form one or more pockets that can be imprinted with variable or personalized information and then removed for attachment to a presentation folder, either one which comes from a pre-existing configuration, so that the user now has an extra pocket that can be applied to a blank of material which can be used as a presentation folder. In other embodiments, the pocket configuration of the present invention can be applied to a pre-existing document retention device so as to provide additional, supplemental or auxiliary pockets for the device.
  • [0015]
    In one embodiment of the present invention a laminate for use in creating a pocket for a presentation folder is described and includes a first sheet that has a first dimension with first and second faces. The sheet of material has first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges with one of the first and second faces being capable of receiving printing, and the other of the first and second faces receiving at least one pattern of adhesive.
  • [0016]
    In this embodiment, a second sheet is provided and has a second dimension that is substantially equal to the first dimension. The second sheet also has first and second faces and first and second transversely extending side edges and first and second longitudinally extending end edges. The second sheet is provided with a coating of release material in at least an area covered by the pattern of adhesive that is applied to the first sheet so that the second sheet is releasably connected to the first sheet.
  • [0017]
    In the presently described embodiment, the pattern of adhesive has first and second areas of adhesive disposed substantially adjacent each of the first and second longitudinally extending side edges. Each of the first and second areas of adhesive extends inwardly of the side edges. The pattern of adhesive used in the present invention also includes a strip of adhesive that extends substantially perpendicularly to the first and second areas of adhesive that is forming something similar to a capital letter “H” or in alternate embodiments a capital letter “L”.
  • [0018]
    The strip of the first sheet has first and second ends and first and second segments of adhesive that extend substantially perpendicularly from each of the ends. The first sheet also has a first set of die cuts with the first die cuts being adjacent each of the first and second areas of adhesive and at least a second die cut that is disposed perpendicularly to the first set of die cuts such that the die cuts along with the pattern of adhesive define at least first and second pocket areas that are used in the formation of a presentation folder.
  • [0019]
    In a still further embodiment of the present invention, a combination presentation folder and pocket arrangement is provided and includes, a blank of material that is suitable for use in creating a presentation folder as well as a laminate that is prepared from the construction discussed in the previous embodiment. The pocket areas that are created from the laminate, are then applied to the blank of material so as to create a presentation folders having one or more pockets for receiving information relating to a topic, subject matter or goods and services that are being promoted.
  • [0020]
    In a yet still further embodiment of the present invention, a method for making a presentation folder is described and includes the steps of, initially providing a blank of material having a first size and configuration. Next, a laminate is supplied with the laminate having a series of die cuts and patterns of adhesive and release. The laminate has one or more predetermined removable pocket areas. One or more of the pocket areas is then removed and applied to the blank to create pockets on the blank so as to form a presentation folder.
  • [0021]
    In a still further embodiment of the present invention, the laminate may be used in the formation of an auxiliary pocket that can be attached to a document retention device. In addition, the laminate of the present invention can be used to create either left and right hand oriented pockets or the laminate can create pockets having only one orientation, either both left or right.
  • [0022]
    Other steps that may be utilized in connection with the foregoing method embodiment include the step of printing on the blank and/or laminate prior to the steps of assembling the blank with the pocket areas to create the presentation folder.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0023]
    These, as well as other objects and advantages of this invention, will be more completely understood and appreciated by referring to the following more detailed description of the presently preferred exemplary embodiments of the invention in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, of which:
  • [0024]
    FIG. 1 depicts a front perspective of the first sheet, rear face of the present invention showing the patterns of adhesive and die cuts used in making the pocket areas of the laminated construction;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 1A provides a front perspective of the first sheet, rear face of the present invention showing an alternative pattern of adhesive and die cuts used in making the pocket areas of the laminated constructions;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the front face of the first sheet of the laminate and shows the portions used in creating the pocket areas and removable label areas;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 3 shows a partial cutaway of the laminate of the present invention illustrating the sheets used in making the construction as well as the areas of adhesive and showing one area being wider than the other due to the additional segment of adhesive that extends perpendicularly from the strip;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 4 provides a front perspective of the pockets created from the laminate of the present invention being applied to a blank so as to form a presentation folder;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 5 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the present invention in which the pockets created from the laminate are applied to a document retention device, here a notebook and thus provide the user with auxiliary or supplemental pockets in which to hold other items; and
  • [0030]
    FIG. 6 is a block diagram showing the method of using and assembling a presentation folder using the pockets created from the laminate of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0031]
    The present invention is now illustrated in greater detail by way of the following detailed description, but it should be understood that the present invention is not to be construed as being limited thereto.
  • [0032]
    Unexpectedly, it has been found that there is not a simple, efficient manner in which to create personalized presentation folders which can be produced in either small quantities, such as by a manufacturer of printed products or by a small office or home office (“SOHO”) for presenting products or services or an independent user, such as a student in preparation for a report for school.
  • [0033]
    As used herein, the term “adhesive” includes, but is not limited to strips, patterns, segments, shapes, spots, continuous arrangements, discontinuous arrangements and combinations thereof. The type of adhesive that may be used includes but is not limited to repositionable, removable, permanent, remoistentable, hot melt, pressure seal (cohesive), cold glues and combinations and mixtures thereof. The present invention may also include adhesive strips that are provided in the form of transfer tapes, pressure sensitive tapes and the like which usually will have a removable release liner, which when removed will expose and/or activate the adhesive that can be used to form a sealing arrangement.
  • [0034]
    The term “document containment device” as used herein includes portfolios, notebooks, binders, clipboards, sleeves, folders, envelopes, accordion folders and the like.
  • [0035]
    The printing or imaging can be provided on one or both faces of the sheet or laminate. The information to be provided is generally personalized or individualized so that each attendee of a business meeting can receive a specially tailored message. For example, a normal introductory business meeting, the attendees from the target company (company that is being targeted for the sale of goods or services) may have an executive present, members of the sales and marketing team as well as production personnel in attendance to consider the information being provided. The presenter ideally wants to deliver a unique message to each person or group in the audience and is only offered a short period of time to accomplish this task, and usually devotes most of the period to “walking through” a visual presentation. However, through the use of the present invention, the presenter can deliver personalized or individualized information to each group while still focusing on delivering the information to the group. For example, information for sales and marketing may relate to increased sales and commissions or sales strategies for selling the product. Production personnel may receive information relating to efficient manufacturing techniques and other products for which the services may be used with as well as contact numbers for support and other technical data. The executive may only receive summary or overview information and financial numbers relating to the impact of the divisional bottom line. Thus each person is provided with a unique package of information that is tailored to his or her specific talents thereby potentially increasing the chances of success of the presentation. It should be understood that in addition to personalized or individualized information, the sheet or laminate of the present invention may also include static, fixed or regularly repeating information (such as information printed on each folder to be presented).
  • [0036]
    Each panel of the presentation folder or folder page will in one exemplary embodiment have a width of approximately 9 inches and a length of about 12 inches. Together, two panels are generally required to create a presentation folder with the overall dimensions running about twelve inches by eighteen inches. The pockets formed from the present invention will have a height of around 4″ to 4″ and a width of up to 9 inches.
  • [0037]
    The foregoing dimensions are used when preparing a standard configuration presentation folder. That is, each panel of the blank runs about 12″ high and about 9″ wide with the pocket having a length of about 9″ and a height of around 4″. Obviously, other dimensions are possible and would simply require the repositioning of the adhesive areas, lines of weakness, etc. on the sheet or the use of different sized sheets of material. The pocket of the presently described embodiment is sized and configured so that it can receive and retain a standard size sheet of paper in a portrait arrangement (8″ side placed in the pocket which has a width of approximately 9″).
  • [0038]
    Turning now to FIG. 1, the first sheet 10 of the laminate of the present invention is shown. The sheet for the presently described embodiment has dimensions of roughly a standard sheet of paper, or 8{fraction (1/2)}″ by 11″. The sheet 10 may be of any suitable material that will be sufficient for processing through a laser or non-impact printer and will withstand the insertion of at least one sheet or other material after the sheet is formed into a pocket and attached for use as a presentation folder. Thus, the sheet can range from twenty pound (20#) bond paper to one hundred pound (100#) tag stock. Other materials may also be suitable for the present invention including synthetic films, metalized foils, and the like.
  • [0039]
    The first sheet 10 has a first face 12 and a second face 12* (shown in FIG. 2). The first sheet 10 has first and second transversely extending end edges 111 and 13, respectively, and first and second longitudinally extending side edges 15 and 17, respectively. Coated on the first face (or rear face) 12 of the sheet 10, are first and second areas of adhesive 14 and 16, respectively. The first and second areas of adhesive 14 and 16 are disposed substantially adjacent to the first and second longitudinally extending side edges 15 and 17. The first and second areas of adhesive extend inwardly from the side edges 15 and 17 a distance of approximately one inch. The first and second areas of adhesive 15 and 17 will serve as removable labels that can be used to personalize, decorate, etc. the presentation folder, document retention device or other purpose to which labels are generally known and used for.
  • [0040]
    The pattern of adhesive that is applied to the first face 12 of the first sheet 10 also includes a strip of adhesive 18 which runs substantially perpendicularly to the first and second areas of adhesive 14 and 16. That is, the strip of adhesive 18 forms generally the shape of a capital “H” with the first and second areas of adhesive 14 and 16 and is approximately {fraction (1/2)}″ wide. The strip of adhesive 18 has first and second ends 20 and 22 from which adhesive segments 26 and 28 run perpendicularly to the strip 18 of adhesive. The strip of adhesive 18 will serve as the base portion of a pocket and will secure the pocket to the blank or other substrate or material.
  • [0041]
    The adhesive segments 26 and 28 are disposed on a single end 20 and extend in opposite directions. That is, segment 26 is adjacent adhesive area 16 and runs from adhesive strip 18 toward transversely extending end edge 13. Whereas segment 28 is adjacent adhesive area 16 and extends from strip 18 toward transversely extending end edge 11. The adhesive segments 26 and 28 will form the side, sealed walls of the pockets when the pockets are applied to a substrate. The orientation of the strips is different so that left and right hand pockets A and B can be created. It should be understood however, that it is within the scope of this invention that the segments 26 and 28 could be on opposite ends of strip 18, so that pockets having a single orientation, either right or left open sides could be formed.
  • [0042]
    The sheet 10 is also provided with a first set of die cuts 30 and 30* which will extend completely through the first sheet 10 but will not penetrate the second sheet which will make up the laminate as is readily understood by those with skill in the art. The die cuts 30 and 30* define the end edge of the adhesive areas 14 and 16. The adhesive areas 14 and 16 are thus defined by the longitudinally extending side edges 15 and 17 and die cuts 30 and 30*.
  • [0043]
    The sheet 10 is also provided with a second die cut 32 that runs substantially perpendicularly to die cuts 30 and 30*. Die cut 32 separates the areas that become the pockets into first and second pocket areas. Die cut 32 is desirably centrally disposed within the area defined by strip 18. Thus, separating the pocket sections A and B from the sheet 10 will provide a strip of adhesive of about ″ along the bottom edge of the material that will form the pocket as will be described later.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 1A shows an alternate configuration of the present invention in which segment 26 is on an opposite end edge 20 from that of segment 28 which runs perpendicularly from end edge 22. In this embodiment, pockets A and B will have identical open end edges so that a plurality of pockets can be created having the same orientation as provided in FIG. 5 discussed herein.
  • [0045]
    In addition, FIG. 1A also provides for a preformed arrangements of slits 25 and 27 which are used to hold auxiliary items such as discs, diskettes, business cards, labels, tags, coupons, passes and the like.
  • [0046]
    Reference is now directed to FIG. 2, where the second face (front face) 12* of sheet 10. The face 12* is capable of receiving imaging, printing, graphics and the like, that is the face 12* is receptive to toner or ink such as provided from a laser printer or ink jet printer. Alternatively, if needed, the surface of face 12* can be treated so as to increase receptivity or anchorage of the toner or ink.
  • [0047]
    The face 12* shows the first and second pocket portions A and B as well as the removable label portions C and D (also designated by reference numerals 14 and 16) that can be used in labeling, identification or any other use suitable for labels. FIG. 2 also provides a further outline of the areas of the pocket portions A and B and the portions of the adhesive strip 18 and segments 26 and 28 that will serve to secure the pocket portions A and B to a substrate. It should be understood, that only one pocket may be removed and used and the other can be saved for use at a later time or may not be used at all.
  • [0048]
    As indicated above, FIG. 3 is a partial cut away taken along line X shown in FIG. 2. FIG. 3 shows first sheet 10 removably adhered to second sheet 10* through use of the adhesive patterns and a release coating 14* applied to the second sheet 10*. The release coating 14* may be silicone or other material that will impart sufficient release properties so that the adhesive coated first sheet 10 can easily be peeled away. The release coating may be applied in a pattern corresponding to the areas of the adhesive pattern on the first sheet 10 or alternatively, the entire sheet may be release coated. The partial cut away is depicted to show the first and second areas of adhesive 14 and 16 as well as the segment 28 of adhesive that will form the sealed end edge of the pocket portion when the pocket portion is secured to a substrate.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 4 highlights the use of the invention in creating a presentation folder. The presentation folder is generally referred to by reference to numeral 100 and is typically constructed from a blank of material having dimensions of twelve inches by 18 inches with each panel having dimensions of roughly nine inches wide by twelve inches high. As is provided in FIG. 4, pocket portions A and B have been applied to the blank of material. Each of the pocket portions A and B are held to the blank though a portion of the adhesive strip 18, roughly equal portions of about ″ and by adhesive segments 28 and 26, respectively and shown in phantom by the FIGURE. The side edges 28* and 26* opposite that of the adhesive segments 28 and 26 is open. Thus, the open pocket area of each of the pockets is roughly 8″ wide by about 4 inches high, which is sufficiently large enough to accommodate a sheet of paper in a portrait arrangement when inserted into the pocket of the presentation folder.
  • [0050]
    FIG. 4 also illustrates the use of the removable label portions C and D as shown in FIG. 2. Here removable label portion 110 has been provided on the interior of the blank that forms the presentation folder. Obviously, the labels may be positioned anywhere on the blank or even on the pockets. In addition, the present invention may include additional die cuts in the label areas so that different sized labels can be created for labeling the substrate or material containing the pocket portion.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 4 also provides areas where a presenter can place additional collateral materials such as through the use of slits or cuts 25 and 27 which can hold business cards, discs, diskettes, coupons, passes, tags, labels, etc.
  • [0052]
    Printing, imaging or graphics can also be provided on the blank and shown by reference to numerals 120 and 130. Printing can also be provided on the pocket portions A and B and is referenced by numerals 125 and 135. The printing on the pockets and blanks can correspond to one another so as to be complimentary in conveying a personalized message, or the printing may be static or fixed or may be a combination of static and personalized information.
  • [0053]
    Attention is now directed to FIG. 5 of the present specification in which the pocket portions A and B, this time created from a laminate in which the orientations of the pockets are the same (both pocket portions have a left or a right open end) as provided in FIG. 1A. The pocket portions in this embodiment are simply created by moving one of segment 26 or 28 to the opposite end edge 20 or 22 of strip 18 so that the segments 26 or 28 still extend in opposite directions and then at opposite end edges as can be readily understood by reference to FIGS. 1, 1A and 2 of the instant specification.
  • [0054]
    In this FIG. 5, a document retention device 200, as defined above, is provided with pocket portions A and B to create auxiliary storage for the document retention device 200, for example a three ring binder. Pocket B could hold diskettes, folded notes and other items other than a full size sheet of paper. Pocket A could be used to hold full sized sheets of paper. The pockets A and B are again held in position through the use of adhesive 18 and 28 and 26 respectively. Additional pockets can of course be added, such as at pocket AA. The sheet to which the pocket may be applied can be provided with slits or cuts to hold supplemental items for the presentation.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 6 provides a block diagram of an exemplary method of using the present invention and making presentation folders. Initially, a blank is supplied from a source at step 300. Then the blank may be imaged or printed at step 310. The information used in rendering the printing or imaging may be collected from a remote source and transmitted over a global communications network or over a local area network or other suitable means. Alternatively, the information to be printed can be provided on site, such as in a small office environment.
  • [0056]
    Next, a laminate constructed in accordance with the present invention is supplied at step 320. The laminate may or may not be printed at step 330. The printing of the laminate as well as the blank may be accomplished with personalized information, static or fixed data or a combination of the two. Alternatively, one may carry personalized information and the other may carry static information. Printing is accomplished through the use of non-impact printers such as ink jet, laser printers and the like.
  • [0057]
    The pocket areas of the laminate are removed at step 340 and positioned on the blank or other substrate at step 350. Depending on the configuration of the laminate, the blank may receive both left and right oriented pockets or pockets having the same orientation (both opening to the left or to the right).
  • [0058]
    One of the most important things with respect to new product innovations is the need to effectively market and communicate the new product to potential customers and end users of the product. Such marketing typically includes the creation of marketing collateral associated with the features of the present method and system and its benefits and uses. These unique products produced by the system and in accordance with the method of the present invention are sold in connection with that marketing collateral and then distributing the end product to potential end users and customers or transferring the technology to others for incorporation in their respective products. Customers can include distributors of such products as well as office supply stores, retail and warehouse outlets, manufacturers of such presentation folders which themselves may not be end users, but may repackage and resell the products to end users or third parties.
  • [0059]
    Marketing collateral as used herein includes the use of scripted or prepared material that are distributed through audio and visual communication mediums, over a global communication network, through printed mediums such as newspapers, trade publications, magazines, fliers, handouts and the like.
  • [0060]
    It will thus be seen according to the present invention a highly advantageous laminate for creating presentation pocket folders and a method of using same has been provided. While the invention has been described in connection with what is presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that the invention is not to be limited to the disclosed embodiment, that many modifications and equivalent arrangements may be made thereof within the scope of the invention, which scope is to be accorded the broadest interpretation of the appended claims so as to encompass all equivalent structures and products.
  • [0061]
    The inventors hereby state their intent to rely on the Doctrine of Equivalents to determine and assess the reasonably fair scope of their invention as it pertains to any apparatus, system, method or article not materially departing from but outside the literal scope of the invention as set out in the following claims.
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Referenced by
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US7810267Apr 21, 2005Oct 12, 2010Avery Dennison CorporationPatient identification products
US20060202002 *Oct 4, 2005Sep 14, 2006Interform CorporationPresentation folder and method of making same
US20060236578 *Apr 21, 2005Oct 26, 2006Avery Dennison CorporationPatent identification products
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/67.1, 229/72
International ClassificationB65D27/00, B42C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42P2241/22, B42C7/002
European ClassificationB42C7/00C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 19, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: WARD KRAFT, KANSAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MAIER, MICHAEL C.;RUSSEL, WILLIAM R.;REEL/FRAME:015579/0142
Effective date: 20031217