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Publication numberUS20050137459 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/737,980
Publication dateJun 23, 2005
Filing dateDec 17, 2003
Priority dateDec 17, 2003
Also published asUS20090012367, WO2005058149A1
Publication number10737980, 737980, US 2005/0137459 A1, US 2005/137459 A1, US 20050137459 A1, US 20050137459A1, US 2005137459 A1, US 2005137459A1, US-A1-20050137459, US-A1-2005137459, US2005/0137459A1, US2005/137459A1, US20050137459 A1, US20050137459A1, US2005137459 A1, US2005137459A1
InventorsYem Chin, Louis Barbato
Original AssigneeScimed Life Systems, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical device with OLED illumination light source
US 20050137459 A1
Abstract
A medical device such as a catheter or endoscope device includes an illumination light source having one or more organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The OLEDs are energized to produce illumination light that is received by an image sensor or camera to produce images of tissue within a patient's body. A heat conductive polymer conducts heat away from the illumination light source.
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Claims(18)
1. A medical device for illuminating a body cavity of a patient, comprising:
an elongate member having a proximal end that remains outside the body cavity and a distal end that is insertable into the body cavity;
an illumination source including one or more organic light-emitting diodes that produce light within the body cavity of the patient when energized; and
two or more conductive leads that deliver electrical energy to the one or more organic light-emitting diodes.
2. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the illumination source includes a single organic light-emitting diode.
3. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the illumination source includes two or more organic light-emitting diodes, each of which produces illumination light of a different wavelength.
4. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising one or more lumens extending therethrough.
5. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising an image sensor at or adjacent the distal end of the elongate member for capturing images of tissue in the body cavity.
6. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising an imaging light guide within the elongate member that transmits reflected or scattered illumination light to an image sensor or camera.
7. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the elongate member includes a heat conductive polymer that dissipates heat produced by the one or more organic light-emitting diodes.
8. The medical device of claim 7, wherein the elongate member is at least partially formed of the heat conductive polymer and wherein the elongate member is thermally coupled to the one or more organic light-emitting diodes.
9. The medical device of claim 7, wherein the elongate member includes a length of the heat conductive polymer that is thermally coupled to the one or more organic light-emitting diodes.
10. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the elongate member includes a torqueable wire that is secured at or adjacent the distal end to bend and/or rotate the distal end of the elongate member.
11. A medical device, including:
an elongate member having a proximal end and a distal end;
one or more lumens extending through the elongate member;
one or more strips of an organic light-emitting diode material disposed along a length of the elongate member; and
conductive leads that supply electrical energy to the one or more strips of organic light-emitting diode material to cause the one or more strips to emit light.
12. The medical device of claim 7, wherein the one or more strips of organic light-emitting material are marked with length indications.
13. A medical device for illuminating a body cavity of a patient, comprising:
an elongate member having a proximal end that remains outside the body cavity and a distal end that is insertable into the body cavity;
one or more LEDs that illuminate the body cavity; and
a heat conductive polymer that is thermally coupled to the one or more LEDs to dissipate heat from the one or more LEDs.
14. The medical device of claim 13, wherein the elongate member is at least partially formed of the heat conductive polymer.
15. The medical device of claim 13, wherein the elongate member includes a length of the heat conductive polymer in thermal contact with the one or more LEDs.
16. The medical device of claim 13, wherein the one or more LEDs are organic LEDs.
17. The medical device of claim 16, wherein the one or more organic LEDs produce light of the same wavelengths.
18. The medical device of claim 16, wherein the one or more organic LEDs produce light of different wavelengths.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to medical devices in general, and illuminated catheters and endoscopes in particular.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Many modem in-vivo medical devices such as catheters or endoscopes are equipped with imaging equipment that includes a light source and an image sensor. A light source delivers an illumination light onto an area of interest while the image sensor obtains an image from the reflected or scattered illumination light. The images obtained are used by a physician to diagnose internal body tissue or to perform surgical procedures in the body.

The most common type of light sources used on catheters and endoscopes are lasers or high powered white light sources. Light from these external light sources is delivered to the distal end of the scope by a fiber-optic illumination channel. Alternatively, some devices have solid state light sources such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are located at or adjacent the distal tip of the device. Both approaches have limitations. First, the optical fibers used to form an illumination channel are relatively fragile and limit the bending ability of the device. On the other hand, LEDs are often encapsulated in a plastic or other transparent material that is relatively large in comparison to the size of the light-emitting element. Therefore, the amount of light that can be delivered at the distal end of the device is limited by the diameter of the device. Therefore, there is a need for a light-emitting device that can be incorporated into a medical device such as an endoscope that avoids these limitations.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

To overcome the above-referenced limitations, the present invention is a flexible in-vivo medical imaging device such as a catheter or endoscope, having a light source made of one or more organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). An organic light-emitting diode is formed on the substrate between two or more semi-transparent electrodes. The organic light-emitting diode material produces illumination light when electrical energy is applied to the electrodes. The light source may comprise an OLED of a single color. Alternatively, the light source may be a stack or other configuration of OLEDs each having a different illumination wavelength such that one or more OLEDs can be energized at the same time to produce a desired illumination light. In another embodiment of the invention, the OLEDs are selected to produce excitation light in the ultraviolet wavelength band for fluorescence or drug-induced imaging. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the OLEDs produce light in the infrared range for tissue heating.

In one embodiment of the invention, the light source is sufficiently bright to allow external imaging devices to track the position of the light source as it is moved in the patient's body.

In another embodiment of the invention, the OLEDs are formed as strips that extend along the length of the device. The strips have distance markings thereon to gauge how far the device has been inserted into the patient.

In yet another embodiment of the invention, a catheter includes a heat conducting polymer to conduct heat away from the OLEDs and the patient.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing aspects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will become more readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 shows a medical device such as an endoscope having a single OLED light source at or adjacent its distal end in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a medical device having a light source comprising a number of OLEDs;

FIG. 3 shows components of an in-vivo medical imaging system, including an OLED light source in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 4 shows a medical device including a strip of OLED material that can be used to gauge depth of insertion into a patient in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As indicated above, the present invention is an in-vivo medical device that uses organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) as a light source to provide illumination light within a patient's body cavity. FIG. 1 shows the distal end of an in-vivo medical device 10 such as a catheter, endoscope, bronchoscope, trocar, guidewire or other device that is inserted into a patient's body cavity. At or adjacent the distal end of the device is the light source 12 having one or more organic light-emitting diodes that produce illumination light when energized.

The light source 12 has a substrate 14 on which is formed an electrode 16. A semi-transparent electrode 18 is formed on top of the organic light-emitting diode material such that the diode material is sandwiched between the electrodes 16 and 18. Electrode wires, conductive leads, or other current carrying devices 28 connect the electrodes 16 and 18 to a power supply 30, which is typically external. However, the medical device could have built-in batteries to power the light source. The application of electrical energy to the electrodes 16 and 18 cause the organic light-emitting diode material to produce illumination light. The composition and method of constructing an OLED light source 12 suitable for use with the medical device of the present invention are known to those of ordinary skill in the art of light-emitting diodes. See, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,627,333; 6,124,046; 6,127,693; and 6,495,198, which are herein incorporated by reference.

In the embodiment shown, the light source 12 is generally cylindrical or tubular in shape such that the medical device 10 can include one or more parallel or coaxial lumens 22 extending through the light source 12. In addition, the medical device 10 may include an image sensor 24 at or adjacent its distal end for capturing images of a patient. Alternatively, the medical device 10 may include an imaging light guide and one or more lenses that direct reflected and back scattered illumination light to an external image sensor or camera.

The illumination light provided by the light source 12 may be in the visible, ultraviolet or infrared spectrum depending upon the desired use of the medical device 10.

FIG. 2 illustrates another embodiment of a medical device 50 having an OLED light source 52 at or adjacent its distal end. The light source 52 includes a substrate 54 and a number of spaced, semi-transparent electrodes 56, 58, 60, 62. Between the electrodes are segments of organic light-emitting diode material of different colors or wavelengths in order to form a stacked organic light-emitting diode (SOLED). The color or illumination wavelength of the light induced by the light source 52 can be adjusted by applying a voltage to selected electrodes 56, 58, 60 or 62. The SOLED can be manufactured with known lithographic or semiconductor fabrication techniques such as those described in patent application No. PCT/US98/01412, which is herein incorporated by reference.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the light source 52 has an ovoidal shape with an atraumatic distal tip to reduce the likelihood of damaging tissue in the body. The medical device 50 also has one or more lumens 70 exiting the distal end of the device and an imaging sensor 72 for producing images of the patient.

FIG. 3 shows an in-vivo medical imaging system including a medical device 100 having a light source 102 formed of one or more OLEDs that provide illumination light to a point of interest in a patient's body. At the proximal end of the medical device 100 are the proximal openings of one or more lumens within the medical device 100, through which a physician can insert an instrument into the patient. In addition, the proximal end of the medical device includes a connector 109 that connects the light source 102 to a supply of electrical power 110. A connector 108 allows signals from an imaging sensor (not shown) at the distal end of the device to be connected to a video or other display 112.

In operation, the physician can adjust the supply of electrical power 110 to the one or more OLEDs at the distal end of the medical device 100 in order to adjust the intensity or illumination wavelength of the light produced. In some instances, the power supply 110 may be automatically controlled to illuminate the tissue with a number of different wavelengths such that images can be obtained with illumination light of each wavelength in order to view tissue under a variety of illumination conditions. Alternatively, the light source may be strobed to obtain images of moving tissue such as heart valves, etc.

Depending on the wavelength of the illumination light, different imaging techniques may be used to view or diagnose tissue in the body. These imaging techniques include: drug induced or native fluorescence imaging and white light or colored light imaging. In addition, light from the light source can be used to activate photosensitive drugs, or infrared heat can be supplied to tissue in the body.

FIG. 4 illustrates an embodiment of the invention whereby a medical device 120 has one or more strips of OLED material 122 positioned along its length. The strips 122 are preferably ruled or otherwise marked with distance indications. The one or more strips 122 can therefore be used to gauge how far the device 120 is inserted into a patient. The strip 122 may be integrally formed on the medical device 120 or may be separately formed by a semiconductor or lithographic process and secured to the device 120 with an adhesive or the like.

In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1-4, it may be desirable to encapsulate the OLED light source with a transparent cover or shield to prevent bodily fluids from contacting the light source.

As will be appreciated, the OLEDs generate more light in a smaller area and with less heat than that produced by conventional LEDs. The light produced may be sufficient to externally view the position of the illuminated medical device inside the body with the naked eye or with external imaging equipment.

In some instances, it may be desirable to provide a mechanism for removing heat from the one or more OLEDs and transferring the heat to a point away from the patient's body. In one embodiment of the invention, the medical device includes a heat conducting polymer such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,620,497 assigned to Cool Options, Inc. of Warwick, R.I., and which is herein incorporated by reference. A head conductive polymer as described in the '497 patent can be used to form the tubular walls of the medical device or a cover of the medical device. Alternatively, the medical device can include a strip of such a heat conductive polymer material having one end thermally coupled to the OLEDs and another end positioned away from the OLEDs. The strip therefore conducts the heat produced by the OLEDs away from the patient. The heat can be transferred outside of the patient's body or over a large enough area such that no point of the medical device that is within the patient becomes hot enough to cause discomfort or burn the patient.

Furthermore, the OLED endoscope may include a torqueable pull wire such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,642,736, which is herein incorporated by reference, in order to provide the ability of an operator to bend the distal tip and to rotate it by torquing the wire or rotating it about its longitudinal axis.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, although the invention has been illustrated with endoscopes, it will be appreciated that other medical devices such as guide catheters, guidewires, ablation devices, balloon catheters or other devices could be equipped with such a light source. It is therefore intended that the scope of the invention be determined from the following claims and equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7413543 *Mar 29, 2004Aug 19, 2008Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Endoscope with actively cooled illumination sources
US7585275 *Jan 17, 2006Sep 8, 2009Hoya CorporationCapsule endoscope
US8043211 *Apr 23, 2007Oct 25, 2011Olympus CorporationEndoscope device with a heat removal portion
US8152718Jan 3, 2007Apr 10, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical device light source
US20100056869 *Aug 25, 2009Mar 4, 2010Olympus CorporationEndoscope
US20110230739 *Aug 20, 2009Sep 22, 2011Norbert GretzTranscutaneous organ function measurement
DE102006032115A1 *Jul 8, 2006Jan 10, 2008Fachhochschule SüdwestfalenEndoscope and optical element for producing light, optimal coupling and light direction, has one or more light emitting diode as illuminants that are firmly attached with light adjusting device and light of light emitting diodes is coupled
EP1988967A2 *Feb 27, 2007Nov 12, 2008Thomas PerezMethod and apparatus for application of light to tissue
EP2101215A1 *Mar 9, 2009Sep 16, 2009Vision & Control GmbHCoaxial reflected light illumination
EP2248482A1 *May 5, 2010Nov 10, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LPMethod for determining a position of an instrument within a body cavity
WO2007092108A2 *Jan 3, 2007Aug 16, 2007Boston Scient Scimed IncMedical device light source
WO2010092518A1 *Feb 8, 2010Aug 19, 2010Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Interventional instrument with illumination means
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/179, 600/101, 600/178
International ClassificationA61B5/06, A61B17/00, H01L51/50, A61B19/00, A61B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B1/00165, A61B2019/462, A61B1/0676, A61B5/06, A61B1/00096, A61B1/128, A61B19/5202, A61B19/5212, A61B1/0684, A61B5/064
European ClassificationA61B1/12G, A61B1/00E4H7, A61B1/00S2, A61B1/06R4, A61B1/06R6, A61B5/06C3, A61B5/06
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