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Publication numberUS20050141431 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/910,899
Publication dateJun 30, 2005
Filing dateAug 3, 2004
Priority dateAug 6, 2003
Also published asCN1849775A, CN1849775B, EP1661307A1, EP1661307B1, US8325770, US20080113560, WO2005018150A1
Publication number10910899, 910899, US 2005/0141431 A1, US 2005/141431 A1, US 20050141431 A1, US 20050141431A1, US 2005141431 A1, US 2005141431A1, US-A1-20050141431, US-A1-2005141431, US2005/0141431A1, US2005/141431A1, US20050141431 A1, US20050141431A1, US2005141431 A1, US2005141431A1
InventorsJack Caveney, Ronald Nordin, Michael Doorhy, Kenneth Kozicki, Richard Conneely, Masud Bolouri-Saransar, Steven Jacks, Jack Tison, Brian Leshin, Elizabeth Farrimond, Alan Farrimond
Original AssigneeCaveney Jack E., Nordin Ronald A., Doorhy Michael V., Kozicki Kenneth C., Conneely Richard J., Masud Bolouri-Saransar, Jacks Steven A., Tison Jack D., Leshin Brian D., Elizabeth Farrimond, Alan Farrimond
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Network managed device installation and provisioning technique
US 20050141431 A1
Abstract
A system for managing and documenting a local area communications network is provided which deploys power sourcing equipment and powered devices by the use of active electronic modules, having an Ethernet controller and Power over Ethernet forwarding capabilities, as integral, managed components within the cable plant, to enhance management, documentation, security and emergency 911 aspects of the network as well as extending the physical reach of the network.
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Claims(7)
1. An installation data device for use in installing active jacks in a communications system comprising:
a display for providing installation instructions;
one or more user input controls for accepting inputs from an installer;
a power supply; and
a connector for connection to an active jack;
said installation data device being adapted to accept installation information and to provide said installation information to an active jack during active jack installation.
2. The installation data device of claim 1 wherein said installation instructions comprise a graphical installation map.
3. The installation data device of claim 1 further comprising a GPS receiver for providing location information via said display.
4. The installation data device of claim 1 wherein said power supply and said connector are adapted to provide power to an active jack according to the IEEE 802.3af standard.
5. The installation data device of claim 1 further comprising a printer for printing jack labels during jack installation.
6. The installation data device of claim 1 wherein said device is adapted to execute software facilitating the installation of active jacks.
7. The installation data device of claim 1 wherein said device is adapted to execute software facilitating the testing of connections following the installation of active jacks.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/492,822, filed Aug. 6, 2003 and entitled “Network Managed Device Installation and Provisioning Technique.”

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/492,822 filed Aug. 6, 2003 and entitled “Network Managed Device Installation and Provisioning Technique,” application Ser. No. 10/353,640, filed Jan. 29, 2003 and entitled “Systems and Methods for Documenting Networks With Electronic Modules,” U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/352,826, filed Jan. 30, 2002, application Ser. No. 10/366,093, filed Feb. 13, 2003 and entitled “VOIP Telephone Location System,” and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/357,017, filed Feb. 14, 2002 are hereby incorporated by reference into the present application in their entireties.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is directed generally to communications components and more specifically is directed to systems and methods for managing communications networks using active jacks.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The use of a local area network (LAN) to serve a wide range of communication needs has continued to escalate, with networks growing larger and denser. Issues with documenting and managing LANs have likewise increased the need for timely response when connectivity problems arise. This is even more important with the advent of voice over internet protocol (VOIP) replacing the function of the traditional phone network, but now operating over the same LAN as data services. Local area networks are subsuming more and more of the responsibility for carrying the total electronic communication capability of a business or home.

A system which provides documentation, management and trouble shooting capabilities should do so while keeping the need for human involvement at access points or patch panels to a minimum. Traditionally, telephone networks and data networks have been maintained as two separate networks with their own wiring requirements and peculiarities. This has largely been due to the regulatory requirements on telephone service to supply life line capability and electrical issues such as a relatively high DC ring-tone voltage.

In many respects, LAN wiring schemes have followed telephone schemes involving wall jack panels leading back to patch panels. However, the cable types and characteristics have remained distinct. This is true for large offices, residential and Small Office-Home Office (SOHO) and Multi-Dwelling Units (MDU) installations.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one embodiment of the present invention, a system is provided which uses an active electronic jack. According to some embodiments of the present invention, the active jack can be located at the wall in an enterprise office, in a patch panel within the cable distribution plant, in a user device or in two or more of these areas. According to some embodiments of the invention, the active jack includes at least two 10/100 Mb/s Ethernet ports and is a network element (NE) on the local area network (LAN). One Ethernet port of the active jack is the network port and connects to the horizontal wiring of the LAN system. At least one other port is the user port into which Ethernet capable devices, such as a personal computer (PC) or a Voice over IP (VOIP) telephone, plugs into in order to gain access to the LAN. The active jack may act as a two port Ethernet switch routing data between the two ports.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, physical location information (i.e., room, floor, etc.) is associated with the MAC address of the active jack. Since the active jack has a MAC address it responds to Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) requests from the network and transmits ARP messages when powered up or queried to indicate presence on the network. The ARP message and the associated physical location information of the active jack can be used to provide information regarding the connectivity of the structured cable system, i.e., the LAN cable plant.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the active jack is an electronic element that requires a source of DC power which can be obtained from Power Supplying Equipment (PSE) such as an IEEE 802.3AF compliant source. Such sources are deployed in networks as the source of DC power for an attached powered device (PD) such as a VOIP telephone that receives power according to a power-over-network scheme. According to some embodiments of the present invention, the power consumption of the active jack is minimal, with the remaining power forwarded to a powered device (PD) if one is connected.

There are several methods of supplying the active jacks with DC power. According to one embodiment of the present invention, PSE equipment such as an Ethernet switch or IP router is used. According to another embodiment a patch panel or mid-span patch panel can be used. When a patch panel is equipped with active jacks, a managed structure cable PSE system is obtained. The scope of management that a patch panel has can be enhanced if an active jack is used between the patch panel and the end device.

Current methods of cable plant management and security rely on having the state of the horizontal cable system and/or patch panels remain fairly constant. Further, if changes occur it is required that they are well documented and manually entered in the security/management system database. According to one embodiment of the present invention, use of active jacks facilitates monitoring the state of the patch cords and the horizontal cable system to provide a managed, structured cable system. If there is a removal or movement of a particular cable, the active jacks connected by the cable will lose upstream network connection. An active jack in a patch panel can detect the change periodically, for example, via once-per-second “heart beat” IP transmissions to the upstream switch. Because the PSE and PD communicate, the PSE can instantaneously report opens in the patch cord. Optionally, an active jack can send a message to a neighboring active jack to report communication problems. When the connection is re-attached, the active jack may send out an ARP message to indicate that it is back on line with any other devices connected to it. As the connection is re-established the switch port to the patch panel port is thus identified, an important aspect to managing the patch cord connectivity. Since the physical location information can be associated with active jacks, even momentary changes to the cable plant may be recognized and logged.

Since the active wall jack is a managed network element, remote visibility is gained by the management and operations components of a communications network. The active jack provides for remote monitoring, obviating or reducing the need to send out a technician to determine the state of the equipment. Service, can be remotely suspended or re-instated. Furthermore, end point devices which connect to a network using active jacks can be inventoried and controlled as well.

According to some embodiments of the present invention, these management and security aspects are utilized when customers use Soft IP phones or VOIP external hardware phones. The active wall jacks can offer power over Ethernet (to power the phone) and/or provide a physical location address to support E911 service.

To support lifeline VOIP, PSE switches may be used to ensure that all the enterprise switches have enough DC power to survive an AC outage. The internal switches will continue to direct and manage VOIP calls to the outside world but deny other IP data transactions. According to one embodiment of the present invention, an advantage of the power patch panel with the active jack is that it can allow the upstream switches to power down during an AC power outage. The traffic can then be directed to a “lifeline” VOIP gateway from the patch panel, with the lifeline VOIP gateway supporting voice traffic and/or a reduced volume of data traffic.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 a is an isometric view of an active wall jack;

FIG. 1 b is a side view of an active wall jack;

FIG. 2 a is a schematic diagram of an active wall jack;

FIG. 2 b is a schematic block diagram of an alternative embodiment of an active wall jack;

FIGS. 3 a, 3 b, and 3 c illustrate different configurations of active and standard wall jacks in outlet panels;

FIG. 4 a, 4 b, 4 c, and 4 d are side views of alternative embodiments of active wall jacks according to the present invention;

FIG. 5 a is a block diagram illustrating the entry of location data into an active wall jack;

FIG. 5 b is a block diagram showing the use of an installation data device for the installation and recording of data related to installation of an active jack;

FIG. 5 c is a side view of an installation data device according to one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 d is a side view of an installation data device according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 e is a side view of an installation data device according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 f is a top view of an installation data device showing the installation of an active jack;

FIG. 5 g is a flowchart showing the steps for installing an active jack using an installation data device;

FIG. 5 h is a schematic diagram showing the use of an installation data device;

FIG. 5 i is a top view of an installation device showing connectivity testing;

FIG. 5 j is a flowchart showing the steps for testing connectivity using an installation data device;

FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating power distribution and cable management schemes using for active wall jacks;

FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating a communications network using active jacks according to one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating an emergency powering system incorporating patch panels with active jacks;

FIG. 9 is a schematic view of a patch panel with active jacks and shared circuitry;

FIG. 10 is a schematic view of an active jack according to one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 11 is a block diagram of a patch panel implementation according to one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of a patch panel implementation according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a block diagram of a patch panel implementation according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a block diagram of a patch panel implementation according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 15 is a block diagram of a multiple-dwelling unit network according to one embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of a network according to one embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings, and initially to FIG. 1 a, an isometric construction view of an active jack 10 is shown. The active jack 10 comprises two housings 12 a and 12 b which can form plug receiving openings 14 as shown in the drawing for the housing 12 b. According to an alternative embodiment of the present invention, one connector of the active jack 10 is a pug and the other connector is an insulation displacement connector (IDC). The housings 12 a and 12 b may be of a type used for communication connectors as described more fully in U.S. Pat. No. 6,371,793, “Low Crosstalk Modular Communication Connector,” by Doorhy et al., issued Apr. 16, 2002 which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference. Mounted within the plug receiving opening are a plurality of conductors 16 which form a resilient contact with a communications plug when the plug is connected to the active jack 10. The conductors 16 are led through the housing of the active jack 10 to make contact with the printed circuit board (PCB) 18. According to one embodiment of the invention, the PCB 18 has an x dimension of approximately {fraction (5/8)} inches and a y dimension of approximately 2 inches and is of a multi-layer construction with a maximum copper area fill for heat dissipation, and is capable of supporting electronic components 20. The housing is shown in an exploded view away from the circuit board 18 to expose thermal contacts 22 which in one embodiment aid in conducting heat from the circuit board 18 and components 20 to the housing components such as component 12 b. The active jack 10 is shown in FIG. 1 b in relation to a mountable faceplate 24 of the type typically used as communication ports in wall locations.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the thermal design of the active jack 10 supports the environment within the enclosure of a data outlet. Since according to some embodiments there is virtually no airflow in this enclosure, heat dissipation is not effective. The active jack design may incorporate a low thermal resistance contact to the outside of the enclosure through the connector housing 12 b, as shown in FIG. 1 b. In another embodiment of the current invention the housing is constructed of a high thermal conductivity material, such as metal-impregnated material, to aid in the dissipation of generated heat. In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, the electronic components 20 on the printed circuit board 18 are provided within one or both of the housings 12 a and 12 b of the active jack 10.

Turning now to FIG. 2 a, a schematic drawing of an active wall jack 10 according to one embodiment of the present invention is shown. The components of the active jack unit 10 according to one embodiment of the present invention are mounted on the PCB 18. The components shown in FIG. 2 a are shown as functional units which may be realized in various forms of integration. The components include an at least dual port Ethernet physical device (PHY) 26 comprising receivers 28 a and b and transmitters 30 a and 30 b. While a dual port Ethernet device is shown in FIG. 2, it is to be understood that the principles of the present invention can be applied to active jacks having more than two ports, as further discussed below.

The receivers 28 and transmitters 30 are electrically connected to respective receive transformers 32 a and b and transmit transformers 34 a and b. The receive transformers 32 a and b and the transmit transformers 34 a and b are further electrically connected to a plurality of conductors (ref 16 in FIG. 1) of the respective housings 12 a and b. The conductors may take the form of a network-side connection 37 and a user-side connection 39. The PHY 26 is connected to an Ethernet Media Access Controller (MAC) processor 36 which functionally forms a two-port Ethernet switch.

According to some embodiments of the present invention, power for the circuit of the active jack 10 is obtained from an IEEE 802.3AF compliant PSE source which according to one embodiment supplies negative common-mode voltage which is extracted from the center tap of the receive transformer 32 a to a negative rail 38 and a positive common-mode voltage which is extracted from the transmit transformer 34 a to a positive rail 40. The IEEE 802.3AF standard also allows for the negative and positive lines to be switched. A DC-to-DC converter 42 is connected to the negative rail 38 and positive rail 40 and supplies the circuitry of the active jack 10 with power. A resistor 44 is placed across the voltage rails 38 and 40 with sufficient resistance to signal to the PSE the presence of a Power Requiring Device (PD). According to one embodiment of the present invention, the resistor 44 has a resistance of 26 kΩ, though greater or lesser resistances may be used in particular embodiments of the invention. In a power supplying throughput mode, the voltage rails 38 and 40 are electrically connected through an optional switch 46 to the center taps of the transmit transformer 34 b and receive transformer 32 b to allow other PDs downstream to obtain power from the PSE. The IEEE 802.3AF draft standard does not cover multiple PDs on a given circuit so the power requirements of intermediate PDs such as the active jack 10 must be very small, typically less than a watt. The optional switch 46 may be controlled by the local MAC processor to provide power control over downstream PDs for management and/or security purposes and is discussed further below.

Also shown in FIG. 2 a is the MAC processor 36 which controls a light emitting diode (LED) 48. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the MAC processor 36 serves as a network port identification component, storing and providing identification information when requested. There may be two or more such LEDs 48 controlled by the MAC processor 36 in communication links: at least one indicates link status, and at least one other indicates transmit/receive activity. According to one embodiment the LED(s) 48 are mounted on the PC board 18 and light is conducted by a light pipe 50 to the exterior jack housing 12 b. In alternative embodiments the LEDs may be mounted on the housing 12 and electrically connected to the PCB 18. According to alternative embodiments, one or more LEDs may be associated with each active jack 10 and with each jack housing 12. According to some embodiments of the present invention, additional LED ports, or different colors of LED light, can be made available to support control or monitoring of endpoint devices. For example, different colored lights or additional lights may be employed to indicate that an installation is or is not complete and to aid in the monitoring and maintenance of cable connections. Such embodiments may provide installation or maintenance personnel with information needed to locate a break in cable connectivity and thereby pinpoint the connection that requires attention.

Turning now to FIG. 2 b, an alternative active jack according to one embodiment of the present invention is shown. In the embodiment of FIG. 2 b, a logic chip 51 carries out the functions of the active jack, including such functions as the forwarding of communications through the active jack, regeneration of signals by the active jack, monitoring and reporting of data throughput, memory storage for installation instructions and user instructions, logical identification of the active jack, and switching of the active jack to enable or disable communications through the active jack. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the logic chip 51 includes a memory component for storing a template of instructions for an installer to follow and/or one or more data fields for an installer to fill during installation of the active jack. The logic chip 51 is connected to a network-side connection 53 and a user-side connection 55.

Active jacks according to some embodiments of the present invention may be deployed in power-over-Ethernet environments. In these environments, the active jacks may consume the power needed for their operation while falling below the level of power consumption that would identify the active jacks as powered devices in the power-over-Ethernet environment. Active jacks in such an environment forward power for provisioning to powered devices.

Referring now to FIG. 3 a, a face plate 24 a according to one embodiment of the invention is shown with one active jack 10. Another embodiment is face plate 24 b, shown in FIG. 3 b, with two active jacks 10 a-b. Another embodiment is face plate 24 c, shown in FIG. 3 c, with two active jacks 10 a-b and a passive jack 52. It is to be understood that several alternative embodiments employing multiple active and passive jacks may be implemented in specific installations. Also shown in FIGS. 3 a, 3 b, and 3 c are LED indicators 49 for facilitating installation and maintenance of active jacks.

Referring now to FIG. 4 a, according to one embodiment of the present invention the active jack unit 10 is incorporated into a wall panel mounted in a wall 54 behind a face plate 24 so that the user-side jack housing 12 b is accessible within the user area 56 as shown. The active jack unit 10 is connected to a horizontal cable 58 by means of a terminating plug 60, which facilitates testing and repair of either the active jack unit 10 or the horizontal cable 58. Alternatively, the active jack unit 10 can be connected to a horizontal cable via an insulation displacement connector.

Active jacks according to the present invention also support the use of multiple user-side connections and/or multiple network-side connections within one active jack unit. Such embodiments may be useful in implementations in which one user device is connected to more than one network on the network side. Further, more than one user device, or user devices belonging to more than one account owner on a network, may be connected to a single active-jack and access one or multiple networks on the network side of the active jack. Constructions of active jacks having multiple network-side connections also support dual-homing operation for active jacks. In this operation, an active jack can monitor more than one network-side connection for operability. If a primary network connection becomes inoperable or suffers other communications problems, active jacks according to the present invention may automatically switch to a secondary network connection. This provision for redundancy of network connections can significantly enhance the reliability of network access at an active jack employing such a dual-homing system.

Embodiments of active jacks according to the present invention using multiple user-side and/or network-side connections are shown in FIGS. 4 b, 4 c, and 4 d. The active jacks of FIGS. 4 b, 4 c, and 4 d are incorporated into wall panels, but it is to be understood that they could alternatively be incorporated into other network components as desired. FIG. 4 b shows an active jack having two network-side connector housings 12 a and 12 c for connection to two network-side terminating plugs 60 a and 60 b which in turn are connected to one or more networks via two horizontal cables 58 a and 58 b. The active jack of FIG. 4 b allows for one connection in a user area 56 to have access to more than one network connection. While two network connections have been shown, it is to be understood that more than two network connections may be employed on the network side in this and other embodiments.

Turning now to FIG. 4 c, an active jack having two user-side connector housings 12 b and 12 d for connection to two user devices. One network-side connector housing 12 a is shown for connection to a network-side terminating plug 60, which in turn is connected to a network via a horizontal cable 58. This embodiment allows two user devices to be connected to the active jack assembly. Further, because each of the user-side connector housings 12 b and 12 d can support the functionality of a separate active jack, the embodiment of FIG. 4 c enables all active jack functions to be equally applied to more than one user-side device via a direct wall connection. While two user-side connections have been shown, it is to be understood that more than two user-side connections may be employed in this and other embodiments.

FIG. 4 d shows an active jack embodiment in which two network-side connector housings 12 a and 12 c and two user-side connector housings 12 b and 12 d are employed. In this embodiment, more than one user device, such as a VOIP phone or other user device, may be connected to more than one network-side connection. The embodiment of FIG. 4 d allows for a dual-homing application for an active jack wall assembly having multiple user-side active jacks. Thus, multiple users or multiple user devices on the user side 56 of the jack may be provided with network redundancy in the event of failure of a primary network or other communications problems.

In a communication network it is desirable to be able to identify the physical location of each user. This is especially important in supporting an electronic emergency 911 database for VOIP, in which the location information can greatly facilitate the ability of personnel to respond to an emergency. Location information can also support a managed, structured cable plant. Referring now to FIG. 5 a, an active jack 10 mounted in the wall 54 of an area 62 connected via a horizontal cable 58 to a patch panel 64 and through a patch cord 66 to an IP router 68 is shown. According to one embodiment of the present invention a specific active jack 10 is associated with its physical location information in a database. To associate the active jack 10 with its physical location, the physical location of the area 62 may be associated with information regarding the active jack—e.g., its MAC address—in a database 70, which according to some embodiments is an E911 database or a database recognized by an E911 program.

Further, devices within the area 62 and connected to the active jack 10 may be identified according to item type or item model, thereby enabling an inventory of items connected to active jacks 10 and the real-time monitoring of equipment connected to networks via active jacks 10. For example, in a school network active jacks distributed in classrooms allow for centralized monitoring of equipment connected to the school network via active jacks. Thus, if a particular computer or optical projector were needed, the physical location of that computer or optical projector—in addition to the logical location of the device in the computer network—can easily be determined as long as the equipment is connected to the network. According to one embodiment of the present invention, inventory information corresponding to the physical location of devices connected to the network may be associated with a graphical map of a network's physical locations to provide a real-time depiction of device locations within a network.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, personnel engaged in the installation of an active jack may associate the active jack and the active jack's physical location by entering the location information using an application running on a PC 72 which communicates with the connected local active jack 10 which in turn, as stated above, has its own MAC address. The association of the MAC address of the local active jack 10 with the location data can be recorded on the PC 72 and later transferred to a management database 70 after a work period of active jack installations. In an alternative embodiment, the associated information is input directly into the database 70 over the connected network. In another method, personnel use a test instrument 74, which provides a simpler interface to achieve the same results. The test instrument 74 can also perform a variety of network tests to ensure proper network installation and connectivity. In yet another embodiment a networked computer 76 is used to update the location database based on work order entry information. The database 70 as depicted in FIG. 5 a may reside as part of a network manager system, as part of the IP router 68 or as part of a voice gateway for VOIP systems.

For the proper operation of some systems, such as E911 service in a VOIP system, physical location information (e.g., building one, floor #12, room #32, jack outlet #3) for an active jack must be associated with other identification information of the active jack, such as the active jack's MAC address. It is preferred to associate physical location information with identification information at the installation of the active jack. In an E911 implementation, physical location may be passed on to emergency responding personnel who need the information to quickly respond to an emergency. Location information for an active jack may be stored in an E911 application database, in a network-accessible database, or within an active jack. According to some embodiments, it is preferred to store the physical location data into the jack at the time of installation to avoid any possible errors in the association between a MAC address or other identifying information and the jack's physical location. Physical location data and other data regarding the active jack installation may be manually recorded and entered into a management system following installation of several active jacks. A PC 72, a test instrument 74, or another networked computer 76 may be used to record and enter physical location data and identification data, such as a MAC address.

FIG. 5 b shows an installation of an active jack 10 facilitated by an installation data device 75 design to facilitate installation of active jacks 10 and further designed to enable easy recording and entry of physical location information and other identification information regarding active jacks 10. While the discussion of identification information for active jacks 10 focuses on MAC addresses as the key identification data, it is to be understood that other identification numbers, such as customized identification numbers for use within a specific network, may be utilized instead of or in addition to MAC addresses when recording and monitoring active jack installations.

The installation data device 75 may be a dedicated installation device customized to facilitate and record data related to the installation of communication components. The installation data device 75 may take the form of a modified personal digital assistant (PDA) with a graphical user interface (GUI) designed to aid in the installation of active jacks 10. For the installation of active jacks 10 in a power-over-Ethernet environment—for example, using the IEEE 802.3af standard—the installation data device 75 may include battery-powered power supply equipment (PSE) and jack connectivity cords. In FIG. 5 b, the installation data device 75 is shown attached to a cradle 77, which may be used for connection of the installation data device 75 to a network or computer for downloading of data from the installation data device 75 or uploading data to the installation data device 75.

As described in further detail below, an installation data device 75 may be provided with a facility map showing installation points of active jacks 10, including office location numbers and jack location within specific rooms. The physical location data can be uploaded into an active jack 10 at the time of installation by the installation data device. It is preferable to provide an installation data device 75 with PDA-style software to enable a user-friendly interface for linking office map information with proper user information entry fields. Further, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) functionality may be provided within an installation data device 75 to provide location information to an installer. Map information may be provided in a variety of formats, such as the AutoCAD format for use with AutoCAD™ software by Autodesk, Inc. Once a number of jacks are installed, data from the installation data device 75 may be uploaded to an Element Manager System (EMS) or Network Manager System (NMS) database. In addition, installation data devices 75 may be used to test installations or detect problems by enabling and performing connection tests. For such testing, an installation data device 75 may be connected to a patch panel to send messages to active jacks 10. Information on the lengths of connections may be obtained by using the time delay of ping messages or by time domain reflectometer (TDR) techniques.

Turning now to FIG. 5 c, an installation data device 75 is shown with a main device module 202 connected to a battery and interface pack 204. The battery and interface pack 204 includes a battery to allow the installation data device 75 to serve as power supplying equipment in a power-over-Ethernet environment for the installation of active jacks. The battery and interface pack 205 is connected via a connection cable 205 to a wire cap 206. The wire cap 206 enables connection of the installation data device 75 to the network side of an active jack via an active jack's insulation displacement connection (IDC). Such a connection enables the supply of power to an active jack from the network side of the active jack and further enables the uploading of physical location data to the active jack—or “commissioning” of the active jack—during installation.

Turning now to FIG. 5 d, an installation data device 75 is shown with a main device module 202 again connected to a battery and interface pack 204, with the battery and interface pack 204 connected via a connection cable 205 to a connector plug 207 such as an RJ45 plug. Such a connection allows the testing of an active jack from the user side of the active jack toward the network side of the active jack. This configuration can also be used to commission or test active jack installation from a patch panel, as discussed in greater detail below.

FIG. 5 e shows an installation data device 75 having a main device module 202 connected to a battery and interface pack 204, which is in turn connected to a printer device 208. The printer device 208 may be used to print labels 210 to be affixed to active jacks during the installation procedure. The installation data device 75 of FIG. 5 e is shown with a connection cable 205 attached to a wire cap 206 for connection to the network side of an active jack.

Installation data devices according to the present invention are preferably provided with a graphical user interface to facilitate the installation of communications jacks. Turning now to FIG. 5 f, an installation data device 75 is shown with a display 212 having a building map display to enable informed and orderly installation of active jacks. The building map display includes a display of a number of rooms 214, showing room orientation, room number, and the locations 216 at which active jacks are to be installed within a room. Installation locations 216 may be marked with solid locators to show completed installations and open locators to show installations yet to be completed. An installation-in-progress indicator 218 may be used to show an installer which jack is currently being installed or which jack is to be installed next.

A data display and entry field 220 allows for the display of information regarding an active jack being installed as well as the input of information into the installation data device 75 by an installer or other user. Information may be input using input controls 222 or via a touch- or write-screen. Fields of information shown within the data display and entry field include: the MAC ID number of the active jack being installed; the company whose building is being provided with active jacks; a building identifier; jack physical location information including floor, aisle, room number, and jack number; names of users expected to use the active jack; the authorization level of users of the active jack; and miscellaneous and optional fields as may be useful for identification and tracking of active jack installation.

Installation steps for installing an active jack using an installation data device 75 are shown in the flowchart of FIG. 5 g. The flowchart of FIG. 5 g refers to an installation in which the installation data device 75 is a modified PDA. The installation data device 75 executes application code designed to facilitate jack installation and downloads maps of the enterprise into which active jacks are to be installed, such as maps in the AutoCAD™ format, as shown at block 226. A GPS system may optionally be used to determine the correct starting point for installation as well as the correct orientation, as shown at block 228. The installer is shown which room a jack is to be installed in by highlighting on a display, as described at block 230. The exact location within the room for the jack to be installed may also be provided, as described at block 234. Next, the installer plugs the jack into a wire cap connector provided on the installation data device, as shown at block 234, and records any additional office data regarding the installation into the installation data device as shown at block 236. Office data is recorded into jack memory as shown at block 238, and the jack is disconnected from the installation data device as described at block 240. Next, the jack is physically installed into the designated outlet and into the structured cable. If an additional jack is to be installed, another room is highlighted as shown at block 230, with blocks 230 through 242 being repeated for each jack to be installed. Following installation of all active jacks, data from the installation data device may be uploaded to an Element Manager System (EMS) or Network Manager System (NMS) as shown at block 244. After completion of installation, the installation process is ended as shown at stop block 246.

Installation data devices 75 may also be used for testing of installations and testing of network connections following installation. This testing may be accomplished by connection of an installation data device 75 to a patch panel, as shown in FIGS. 5 h-5 j. FIG. 5 h shows an installation data device 75, again in the form of a modified PDA, via a connection cable 75 to a patch panel 248. The patch panel is connected via horizontal cabling 250 to an active jack 10 provided in a wall 54. FIG. 5 i shows an installation data device 75 whose display 212 is displaying information on a connection test being performed from a patch panel. A patch panel display 252 shows the patch panel and may show an installer or tester which connection on a patch panel is to be tested. A patch panel data testing display 254 shows information related to the test, such as the frame, panel, and jack being tested, whether the connection passes or fails a connectivity test, and the cable length of the tested connection. Optional information such as the switch number, port number, or name of the connection being tested may also be provided. The data display and entry field 220 shows additional information on the connection being tested, including information on the jack being tested. The data display and entry field may allow for entry of additional information on the test by the tester or installer, via input controls 222.

A process for testing a connection using an installation data device is shown in the flowchart of FIG. 5 j. Again, the process is outlined using a modified PDA as an installation data device. Application code for jack testing is executed at the installation data device and additional information such as maps, spreadsheets, or databases of the enterprise at issue, along with information on connectivity equipment, is uploaded to the installation data device as shown at block 256. Next, as shown at block 258, GPS information may optionally be used to determine the starting point of the testing and the orientation of the tester. The panel and jack to be tested are next highlighted on the display of the installation data device, as shown at block 260. Next, as shown at block 262, the installation data device is plugged into a patch panel and additional patch panel data is recorded into the installation data device as shown at block 264. Information on the patch panel to which a jack is connected may next be recorded into the jack, as shown at block 266. Next, the installation data device is disconnected from the panel under test as shown at block 268, and if additional panels and/or jacks are to be tested, the panel and jack to be tested are highlighted as shown at block 260. Blocks 260 through 268 are repeated until all required testing is complete. Finally, after completion of panel tests, testing data is uploaded from the installation data device to an Enterprise Manager System or Network Manager system, as shown at block 270. Following entry of data, the process is stopped as shown at stop block 272.

Turning now to FIG. 6 three connection paths are shown to illustrate methods of managing a structured interconnection cable network 78 using active jacks 10. The structured network used for this example is a PSE IP switch/router 80 connected by patch cords 82 to a first patch panel 84 having passive jacks as ports and by a patch cord 86 to a second patch panel 88 which has active jacks 10 c as ports. In the first connection path 90 of FIG. 6, a user device 92 a, such as a VOIP phone, is connected via a passive jack 52 to the network 78. User devices for use with this and other embodiments of the present invention may be phones such as VOIP phones, computers, and the like and may be powered devices that draw power from network connections. In the first connection path 90 if there is an open connection anywhere in the cable system or if the device 92 a is a powered device and is disconnected from the wall jack 52, the device 92 a will power down. This can be detected by the PSE IP switch/router 80 but the reason—e.g., cable plant issue, an office connection or device powering down—cannot be determined. If a patch cord 82 or the connecting horizontal cable 94 a were moved the movement would only be detected as the powering down of the device 92 a. A patch panel containing active jacks as ports may be considered a managed interconnect patch panel because it enables the monitoring and control of connections similarly to a cross-connect patch panel system while requiring only one patch panel.

In a second connection path 96 of FIG. 6, a user device 92 b is connected to the network 78 by means of an active wall jack 10 a. In this scenario a cable movement or an open circuit in either the patch cord 82 or the horizontal cable 94 b causes the user device 92 b (if the user device is a powered device) and the active jack 10 a to power down. At this time the PSE IP switch/router 80 may note in a database that the user device 92 b and the active jack 10 a are no longer present, i.e., drawing power. When the power is restored (via a cable change or repair in the case of an open circuit) the PSE IP switch/router 80 notes that a powered device is connected due to the sensing of a power request at the PSE IP switch/router 80. Furthermore, the active jack 10 a and the device 92 b send Ethernet ARP messages on powerup indicating presence on the network. If only the device 92 b is disconnected then its loss will be detected by the PSE IP switch/router 80 and the active jack 10 a can still be reached and queried by management software. Further, when only the user device 92 b is disconnected and later reconnected, on power restoration only the re-powered device 92 b will respond with the Ethernet ARP message. The active jack 10 a and thereby the user device 92 b can be associated with a given physical location, assisting management with notification of disrupted service.

When active jacks are deployed in a patch panel 88, as shown in a third connection path 98, the active jacks in the wall facilitate the maintenance of a structured and managed cable plant. However, there is some additional functionality that can be derived by having active jack technology at the patch panel and the client destination point. In the third connection path 98, a user device 92 c is connected to the network 78 by means of an active wall jack 10 b and a horizontal cable 94 c to a patch panel 88 which contains active jacks 10 c. The patch panel 88 is, in turn, connected via patch cords 86 to the PSE IP switch/router 80. In this scenario open circuit breaks, cable movements, and/or movement of the user device 92 c can be isolated and separately identified as the connecting network is segmented by active devices 92 c, 10 b and 10 c. Each of the active devices mentioned respond to Ethernet ARP requests and produce Ethernet ARP messages on power up situations. For example, if there is a movement of the patch cord 86, the user device 92 c, the active jack 10 b and the patch panel jack 10 c will all power down. At this point the PSE notes that the user device changed state in the amount of power requested and can thus distinguish between only a user device 92 c removal and horizontal or patch cord open circuits and/or movements. When power is restored all previously powered down devices send Ethernet ARP requests on the network indicating presence. Furthermore, if the interconnection between a port of the PSE device 80 and an active port on the patch panel 88 or between the patch panel 88 and the active jack 10 b has been changed then the location of the change can be determined and managed.

Referring now to FIG. 7, the use of the active jack 10 to control network access to a LAN 100 is illustrated. In this embodiment, user devices 102 a-n, such as VOIP phones, are attached to the network through respective active jacks 10 a-n in respective locations 104 a-n. While only four user devices are shown in four locations, it is to be understood that systems and methods according to the presentation may be used with a number of devices in a number of locations. The active jacks 10 a-n are connected to a patch panel 106 by a horizontal cable plant 108. The patch panel 106 is connected to a PSE IP router device 110 which is connected to an uninterrupted power source (UPS) 112 and supplies power via the IEEE 802.3AF draft standard to downstream power requiring devices, e.g. 102 a-n and 10 a-n. The PSE device 110 is connected to an IP router 114 which also serves as a VOIP gateway and is connected to or contains a database 116. A network manager 118 is also connected to the LAN 100 and in one embodiment of the present invention is capable of monitoring and controlling the various network elements such as the routers 110 and 114 and the active jacks 10 a-n via Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) messages. According to some embodiments of the present invention, network managers execute network management programs for implementing network management tasks.

As shown in FIG. 2, the active jack 10 has a DC power switch 46 which is controlled by the local processor 36. The active jack 10 contains the switch 46 and thus both the data connectivity and the power to any downstream device can be controlled, for example by the local processor 36, enabling enhanced security features such as endpoint isolation, device inventory, and authorization. The network manager 118 can control the network elements to disable network access to any endpoint either at periodic intervals or in response to an external stimulus such as an unauthorized request for service. This may be accomplished by the network manager 118 sending signals to processors 36 located at active jacks 10 to open the switches 46 at specific locations, thereby preventing data flow at those locations. There are applications whereby during certain times of the day, access to a managed network can be restricted. Use of the active jack 10 in networks also permits usage monitoring. For example, it may be useful to restrict access from some office to sensitive or restricted internet or intranet sites or locations. If an unauthorized access is initiated, then the network manager 118, aware of the intrusion, can have the option of shutting the active jack 10 off as well as logging the location of the active jack that the requesting device is using.

Referring now to FIG. 8, a system according to one embodiment of the present invention of providing emergency power via a patch panel as well as managing the structured cable system using active jacks at the patch panel is illustrated. User VOIP phones 120 a-n in user areas 121 a-n are connected through active wall jacks 10 a-n via a horizontal cable plant 108 to a powered patch panel 122. The powered patch panel 122 is connected to an upstream IP switch 124, which during normal operation is the routing device for the VOIP phones 120 a-n. The powered patch panel 122 is also connected to a local emergency power supply 126, such as an emergency battery, and an emergency voice gateway 128, which is also connected to the local emergency power supply 126. In an electrical outage, the upstream switch 124 may power down and the power patch panel 122 may divert voice traffic to the local gateway 128. According to some embodiments, data services may be curtailed in a power outage but voice services are maintained for emergency situations.

According to one embodiment of the present invention active jacks are provided within the patch panel 122 as three-ported devices. In this embodiment, one port is used for the user connectivity, one port for network connectivity and the third port for connectivity to the emergency voice gateway 128. According to another embodiment of the present invention the connectivity to the emergency gateway 128 from the patch panel 122 is via a shared Ethernet connection. According to yet another embodiment of the present invention, the patch panel uses a network-side switching element to connect the network ports of the patch panel active jacks to a shared Ethernet bus 130.

Referring now to FIG. 9 a block diagram of one embodiment of a powered patch panel 122 is illustrated. In this embodiment active jack units 10 a-x of a 24-port patch panel 122 are mounted on a common printed circuit board 132. A processor 134 is electrically connected to and controls the activity of the active jacks 10 a-x via a bus 136. A DC-to-DC power converter 138 converts an incoming power supply to a power supply as required by local circuitry. For example, the power converter 138 may convert an incoming 48 volt power supply to 3.3 volts required by the local circuitry. The power for the local circuitry is distributed along a power connection 140 to the active jacks 10 a-x in order to forward the power to downstream powered devices. According to one embodiment, the active jack 10 x is assigned to extract 48 volts from an upstream PSE and distribute the 48 volts via an incoming power connection 142 to the DC-to-DC converter 138. Optionally, alternative active jacks such as the active jack 10 w may also be used for power extraction, as for example when drawing power from a redundant upstream PSE. The DC-to-DC power converter 138 may determine from which source (e.g., 10 w or 10 x) power will be used. In an alternative embodiment an additional jack or jacks may be employed for the sole purpose of power extraction.

Turning now to FIG. 10, an alternative construction for an active jack 144 according to one embodiment of the present invention is shown. The active jack 144 may, for example, be used in the embodiment of FIG. 9, in which a common processor 134 and a common DC-to-DC power converter 138 is used and the individual jacks need not extract power from an upstream PSE. The active jack 144 of FIG. 10 comprises upstream transformers 146 and 148 connected to upstream drivers 150 and 152 respectively, and downstream transformers 154 and 156 connected to downstream drivers 158 and 160, respectively. A switch 162 is operatively connected to the power connection 140 and under processor control via the bus 136 can control the power distributed via downstream power connectors 164 and 166 to the downstream transformers 154 and 156 in order to forward power to downstream powered devices. Thus, only the downstream transformers 154 and 156 need to be center-tapped for the purpose of forwarding power. According to yet another embodiment of the present invention, the switch 162 may also be operatively connected to the receive (Rx) and transmit (Tx) signals for the purpose of interrupting the data connection.

According to one embodiment of a patch panel 122 of FIG. 9, the active jacks 10 have integrated LEDs that aid the installer in either cross-connect or interconnect systems. FIG. 11 illustrates an interconnect system in which LEDs 168 associated with active jacks 10 on a patch panel 122 can be illuminated or flash patterns to aid the installer. For example, LEDs may indicate where patch cords 86 or horizontal cables 108 are to be connected to the patch panel 122. In the embodiment of FIG. 11, the patch panel 122 is disposed along a communication pathway between a PSE IP switch/router 170 and horizontal cables 108. According to one embodiment, illumination of the active jack LEDs is achieved through SNMP messages from a management entity. In addition to the facilitation of installation provided by LED functionality, LEDs also allow for improved cable management following installation by providing maintenance personnel with visual indications of where inoperable cables are located as well as by providing visible instructions for reorganizing cables in a communications network. While only one LED has been shown associated with each of the active jacks 144, it is to be understood that multiple LEDs may be associated with each active jack in some embodiments of the current invention.

Another embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIG. 12, in which patch panels 122 a and 122 b are deployed in a cascaded master-slave configuration. Patch panels deployed in the cascaded manner shown in FIG. 12 enable cross-connect systems with LEDs 168 on each panel indicating to an installer where patch cords are to be removed or installed.

According to one embodiment of the powered patch panel 122 shown in FIG. 13 an electrical supply, such as a 48 volt DC electrical supply, can be obtained from a local power source 172 which may be an AC line PSE or an emergency DC battery pack making the powered patch panel 122 a PSE device. According to another embodiment, a power supply, such as a 48 volt DC electrical supply, can be obtained by means of one of the local jacks 10 x, as shown in FIG. 9, from an upstream PSE.

In yet another embodiment, shown in FIG. 14, a power supply, such as a 48 volt DC electrical supply to the patch panel 122, can be obtained from two independent sources, PSEs 174 a and 174 b, by means of patch cords 176 a and 176 b using active jacks, such as jacks 10 k and 10 l, within the patch panel 122, thus providing redundant DC power sources.

Referring now to FIG. 15, a multiple-dwelling unit (MDU) according to one embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. Using active jacks allows service activation at individual dwelling units. In addition, security and management of communications for residential and small office/home office (SOHO) applications can be facilitated. A broadband router 178 is connected to a wide area network 180 for external connectivity and to a distribution system within the MDU via patch cords 86 to a patch panel 182, which may be a powered patch panel with powered active jacks. The patch panel 182 may optionally include one or more active jacks 10 for management purposes. From the patch panel 182 a horizontal cable plant connects individual locations 184 a-n, which may be individual dwellings. Each location 184 a-n includes a wall mounted active jack 10 a-n and a user device 186 a-n. Each active jack 10 a-n has a MAC address and physical location information associated with the active jack. Power for the active jacks 10 and the user devices 186 a-n may be obtained from a UPS source connected to the broadband router 178 or the patch panel 182. Integrating active jacks into user areas and/or into the broadband router 178 allows for remote management and diagnosis of cabling infrastructure issues, increased security of the cabling infrastructure, service activation (i.e., turning service on and off) and monitoring, power over Ethernet applications, and indication of devices' physical locations. Performance monitoring is also enhanced because the exact physical and logical network location of a problem connection can be identified centrally by a service provider, without the need for more extensive investigation of basic location issues.

Multiple dwelling unit applications of the present invention, including the benefits of embodiments of active jacks as described herein, may be extended to residential, office, and hotel networks. The distribution of active jacks throughout these networks enables a variety of useful features. One use for active jacks 10 a-n distributed throughout a network is the implementation of toll-for-service systems. Such a system may be implemented, for example, in a hotel in which each of the locations 184 a-n is a hotel room or a conference room. The active jacks 10 a-n enable the monitoring of data throughput and the reporting of data throughput to a network manager. Thus, the network manager may charge a set fee for the amount of data requested or sent by the devices 186 a-n. Further, because each of the active jacks 10 a-n may be switched on or off by a network manager, the ability to use the active jacks 10 a-n in the locations 184 a-n may be centrally controlled to allow use of individual active jacks only for those who have paid for use of the active jacks, including the ability to halt data flow through the active jacks 10 a-n once a paid-for time period has expired. Payment schemes of payment per data packet or other data unit and time-based payment may be implemented, allowing for the efficient allocation of network bandwidth to those who pay for it. Active jacks may be distributed in a network tree architecture, such that network access by several users of separate active jacks, for example within a conference room, may be easily managed by a network manager without the need to address each active jack within an access-enabled area. Active jacks according to the present invention may be connected to other active jacks provided within a network, and active jacks provided within walls may be connected to other active jacks provided in walls or to active jacks provided in patch panels. Further, in some network architectures according to the present invention, active jacks provided within patch panels may be connected to other network jacks provided in patch panels.

The use of active jacks in a multiple-dwelling unit as shown in FIG. 15 also enhances cable management for a service provider by allowing the identification of communication problems at individual spans of cable. Centralized control and monitoring of active jacks also allows a network manager to determine if unauthorized network access—or network “pirating”—is attempted and further provides the network manager with information necessary to determine the physical location of attempted unauthorized access.

Because active jacks integrated into patch panels or wall jacks can send connection information upstream to a remote network management system, the need to send technicians to remote sites to determine equipment conditions or to service equipment can be reduced or, in many cases, eliminated. As with other multiple-user embodiments described herein, only a few users have been shown, but it is to be understood that the present invention may be used to facilitate implementations with many more users.

Active jacks according to the present invention can be used to extend the physical range of Ethernet systems. By regenerating signals received, active jacks positioned along a communication pathway serve to increase the effective range of signals, resulting in a sturdier communication pathway. Also, since each active jack in some embodiments of the invention regenerates an Ethernet signal it is not necessary to co-locate IP switches and routers with a patch panel. Further, because active jacks can be disposed within patch panels or at wall jacks, communications pathways can be designed to take the greatest advantage of active jack placement while keeping costs low. Active jacks may also be used in combination with wireless network elements, such as wireless access points (“WAPs”) to provide the features of active jacks in wireless networks.

FIG. 16 shows a block diagram of a communications network employing active jacks to extend the network range. In the network of FIG. 16, a network element 188, such as a switch, has a first radius “R1” within which the network element may conduct network signals via wired connections. Thus, the network element 188 has an operable area 190 denoted by a first dotted circle “C1.” Providing a wired connection 192 to an active jack 10 positioned near the perimeter of the operable area 190 of the network element 188 will increase the effective area of the system because the active jack 10 can regenerate communication signals. A second circle “C2” having a second radius “R2” shows the extended effective area 194 achieved when the active jack 10 is employed. Further extension can be achieved by employing multiple active jacks 10 or by providing an additional wired connection 196 from the active jack 10 to a wireless access point 198. It is to be understood that active jacks used for the extension of range as shown in FIG. 16 may be provided as wall jacks or as active jacks within patch panels. Further, it is to be understood that wireless access points 198 and active jacks 10 may be deployed in a variety of configurations as desired in particular networking applications, and that active jacks may be provided within areas served by wireless access points to regenerate signals from the wireless access point along an additional cabled line. Additionally, while R1 and R2 have been shown approximately equivalent to each other in FIG. 16, it is to be appreciated some embodiments of the present invention may employ two different radii. Wireless access points and dual-homing active jacks (described above with reference to FIG. 4 b) may be employed to switch device access from a primary wireless access point to a secondary wireless access point when networking problems develop with the primary wireless access point.

While particular embodiments and applications of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise construction and compositions disclosed herein and that various modifications, changes, and variations may be apparent from the foregoing descriptions without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification370/241
International ClassificationH04L12/24, H04L12/26
Cooperative ClassificationH04L41/22, H04L43/0817, H04L43/50, H04L12/2697, H04L12/24, H04L41/00
European ClassificationH04L12/24, H04L12/26T, H04L43/08D, H04L41/00, H04L43/50
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 4, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: PANDUIT CORP., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CAVENEY, JACK E.;NORDIN, RONALD A.;DOORHY, MICHAEL V.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015832/0668;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050111 TO 20050225