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Publication numberUS20050144245 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/063,562
Publication dateJun 30, 2005
Filing dateFeb 24, 2005
Priority dateSep 3, 2003
Also published asUS7890585, US8131813, US20050050145, US20110106903, WO2005024578A2, WO2005024578A3
Publication number063562, 11063562, US 2005/0144245 A1, US 2005/144245 A1, US 20050144245 A1, US 20050144245A1, US 2005144245 A1, US 2005144245A1, US-A1-20050144245, US-A1-2005144245, US2005/0144245A1, US2005/144245A1, US20050144245 A1, US20050144245A1, US2005144245 A1, US2005144245A1
InventorsJohn Lowe
Original AssigneeLowe John C.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Email classifier
US 20050144245 A1
Abstract
An email classifier gives users the ability to efficiently and easily assign category information to email messages. The email classifier may present a graphical window to a user interacting with an email message. Through the graphical window, the user enters information describing at least one category to which the email relates. The email and its associated category information may be archived for later access.
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Claims(24)
1. A method for facilitating electronic mail (“email”) classification, the method comprising:
presenting a graphical object to a user interacting with an email message, the graphical object configured to receive information from the user describing at least one category to which the email relates; and
storing the email message and the at least one category associated with the email message.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the user is a sender of the email message.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the graphical object is presented to the user when the email message is sent.
4. The method of claim 2, wherein the graphical object is integrated with a window through which the user composes the email message.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the information from the user describing the at least one category includes multiple categories input by the user.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the information from the user describing the at least one category includes a sub-category of the at least one category.
7. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
automatically identifying a likely category to which the email relates; and
displaying a visual indication of the likely category in the graphical object as a default category.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein storing the email message includes:
storing the email message and the at least one category associated with the email message in a database that stores email messages and associated categories from multiple users.
9. An electronic mail (“email”) classifier comprising:
a graphical window presented to an email user when the email user attempts to send an email message to an addressee, the graphical window being configured to
present information to the email user describing a plurality of possible categories that may be assigned to the email message, and
receive information from the user selecting one of the categories; and
a database to store the email message and the selected category.
10. The email classifier of claim 9, wherein the graphical window is presented to the user when the email message is sent.
11. The email classifier of claim 10, wherein the graphical window includes controls for composing the email message.
12. The email classifier of claim 9, wherein the graphical window receives information from the user selecting multiple categories that relate to the email message.
13. The email classifier of claim 9, wherein the information from the user includes a sub-category of the category.
14. The email classifier of claim 9, further comprising:
automatically identifying a likely category to which the email message relates; and
displaying a visual indication of the likely category in the graphical window as a default category.
15. A method comprising:
presenting a list of categories that are potentially related to an email message to a user;
receiving a selection of one or more of the categories from the user;
associating the selected one or more of the categories with the email message; and
archiving the email message with the selected one or more categories associated with the email message.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein the user is a sender of the email message.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein the list of categories is presented to the user in response to the email message being sent.
18. The method of claim 15, wherein the selection of the one or more categories includes multiple categories selected by the user.
19. The method of claim 15, wherein the selection of the one or more categories includes sub-category information.
20. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
automatically identifying a likely category to which the email message relates; and
presenting the list of categories to the user with the likely category presented as a default category.
21. The method of claim 15, wherein archiving the email message includes:
archiving the email message and the selected one or more categories associated with the email message in a database that stores email messages and associated categories from multiple users.
22. The method of claim 15, wherein the list of categories is configurable.
23. A computing device comprising:
means for presenting a list of categories that are potentially related to an email message to a user;
means for receiving a selection of one or more of the categories from the user for the email message; and
means for archiving the email message with the categories for the email message.
24. A computer-readable medium comprising:
instructions for presenting a graphical window to a user interacting with an email message, the graphical window configured to receive information from the user describing at least one category to which the email relates; and
storing the email message and the at least one category associated with the email message.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority from and is a continuation-in-part (CIP) of U.S. patent application, Ser. No. 10/653,259, filed Sep. 3, 2003, and entitled “SECOND PERSON REVIEW OF EMAIL,” the disclosure which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to electronic communications, and more particularly, to communications via electronic mail.

B. Description of Related Art

Electronic mail (email) has become a relatively common communication medium. Email messages generally arrive quickly (i.e., minutes or less), unobtrusively, and are cheap. For these reasons, email is used extensively in the modern world.

Although email is often thought of as an “informal” communication medium, email is increasingly being used to transmit more formal information. For example, legal and other professional services are increasingly using email to transmit legal and financial documents that would traditionally be sent via postal mail or courier. Some courts, for instance, no longer accept paper filings and instead require electronic filings. One consequence of this juxtaposition of formal documents in a traditionally informal communication medium is that formal documents that would normally be reviewed by one or more persons for content and grammatical accuracy are sent via email without the same level of review.

Additionally, past email communications are often used as evidence in litigations. In civil litigations, for instance, the parties involved in the litigation may be required to produce a large number of emails relating to a particular topic or set of topics to the opposing side. The process of reviewing and categorizing all of the emails that may potentially need to be produced can be a time consuming and expensive process.

Accordingly, it would be desirable to be able to archive and organize emails such that they can be effectively retrieved (e.g., produced for a litigation) when needed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One aspect of the invention is a method for facilitating electronic mail (“email”) classification. The method includes presenting a graphical object to a user interacting with an email message, where the graphical object is configured to receive information from the user describing at least one category to which the email relates. The method further includes storing the email message and the at least one category associated with the email message.

Another aspect of the invention is an email classifier that includes a graphical window presented to an email user when the email user attempts to send an email message to an addressee. The graphical window is configured to present information to the email user describing possible categories that may be assigned to the email message and receive information from the user selecting one of the categories. The email classifier further includes a database to store the email message and the selected category.

Yet another aspect of the invention is a method that includes presenting a list of categories that are potentially related to an email message to a user and receiving a selection of one or more of the categories from the user. The method further includes associating the selected one or more of the categories with the email message and archiving the email message with the categories associated with the email message.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate an embodiment of the invention and, together with the description, explain the invention. In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is an exemplary diagram of a system in which systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention may be implemented;

FIG. 2 is an exemplary diagram of a client or server entity according to an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a diagram conceptually illustrating a computer-readable medium in one of the client entities shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a flow chart illustrating operation of an email review tool consistent with an aspect of the invention;

FIG. 5 is diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface of an email program through which a user may compose an email message;

FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface for a second person review pop-up window that may be presented to a user;

FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface of an “in-box” of an email program;

FIG. 8 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface presented to a reviewer that is editing an email;

FIG. 9 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface of an email program consistent with an alternate aspect of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface of an email program consistent with yet another alternate aspect of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a diagram conceptually illustrating a computer-readable medium containing an email classifier consistent with aspects of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface for a pop-up window that may be presented by the email classifier shown in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface of an email program including an email classifier; and

FIG. 14 is an exemplary diagram of a system illustrating email classification consistent with the principles of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The following detailed description of the invention refers to the accompanying drawings. The detailed description does not limit the invention. Instead, the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims and equivalents.

An email classification tool facilitates the categorization of email messages. Users may conveniently assign categories to email messages. The assigned categories can later be used when retrieving or otherwise manipulating groups of stored email messages.

Exemplary System Configuration

FIG. 1 is an exemplary diagram of a system 100 in which systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention may be implemented. System 100 may include a network 140 (or other communication link) that connects multiple computing entities, such as clients 110, a server 120, and proprietary sub-networks (such as a corporate network) 130. Network 140 may be the Internet, although more generally network 140 may include a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), a telephone network, such as the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), an intranet, or a combination of networks. Two clients 110, a server 120, and a proprietary sub-network 130 are illustrated in FIG. 3 for simplicity. In practice, there may be more or fewer clients 110, servers 120, and sub-networks 130.

Clients 110 may include client entities. An entity may be may defined as a computing device, such as a wireless telephone, a personal computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a lap top, another type of computation or communication device, a thread or process running on one of these devices, and/or an object executable by one of these device. Server 120 may include a server entity that performs network functions, such as email services. Clients 110 and server 120 may connect to network 140 via wired, wireless, or optical connections.

Sub-network 130 may be a network such as a corporate network. A gateway 132 may restrict access to sub-network 130 to authorized users. Gateways are generally known in the art and may act as a node in system 100 that serves as an entrance to sub-network 130. Gateway 132 may additionally act as a proxy server and/or a firewall server to restrict access to and protect sub-network 130. Sub-network 130 may additionally include a number of clients 134, which may be similar to clients 110. In one implementation, clients 134 may be personal computers that are operated by users (e.g., employees) in sub-network 130. Clients 134 may be grouped together as a LAN.

Clients 134 may exchange email with one another and with other devices in system 100, such as clients 110 and server 120. Reading, managing, and composing email messages may be performed at clients 134 using client email software. Clients 110 may include similar (or compatible) email software. There are a number of well known and commercially available client email software packages.

Sub-network 130 may additionally include an email server, such as email server 137. Email server 137 may facilitate the sending and receiving of email messages among clients 134 or between clients 134 and other devices in system 100, such as clients 110. Email server 137 may, for instance, collect email sent from clients 134. The collected email may then be forwarded toward its final destination using a messaging protocol, such as the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). SMTP is a well known protocol for sending and receiving email. External email destined to one or more of clients 134 may be first received at email server 137 and then forwarded to the destination client(s) 134.

Clients 110 may also send/receive email. Server 120 may, for example, be configured to act as an email server that clients 110 access when sending mail or when checking whether mail has been received at server 120. In situations in which client 110 is associated with sub-network 130, such as an employee that is traveling or working from home, client 110 may send/receive email by accessing email server 137 through gateway 132.

Exemplary Client/Server Architecture

FIG. 2 is an exemplary diagram of one of clients 110/134 or servers 120/137, labeled as computing device 200. Computing device 200 may include a bus 210, a processor 220, a main memory 230, a read only memory (ROM) 240, a storage device 250, one or more input devices 260, one or more output devices 270, and a communication interface 280. Bus 210 may include one or more conductors (or other data transmission links) that permit communication among the components of computing device 200.

Processor 220 may include any type of conventional processor or microprocessor that interprets and executes instructions. Main memory 230 may include a random access memory (RAM) or another type of dynamic storage device that stores information and instructions for execution by processor 220. ROM 240 may include a conventional ROM device or another type of static storage device that stores static information and instructions for use by processor 220. Storage device 250 may include a magnetic and/or optical recording medium and its corresponding drive.

Input device(s) 260 may include one or more conventional mechanisms that permit a user to input information to computing device 200, such as a keyboard, a mouse, a pen, voice recognition and/or biometric mechanisms, etc. Output device(s) 270 may include one or more conventional mechanisms that output information to the user, including, but not limited to, a display, a printer, or a speaker. Communication interface 280 may include any transceiver-like mechanism that enables computing device 200 to communicate with other devices and/or systems.

As will be described in detail below, clients 110 and 134, consistent with the principles of the invention, perform certain email-related operations. Clients 110 may perform these operations in response to processor 220 executing software instructions contained in a computer-readable medium, such as memory 230. Computer-readable media may include, but are not limited to, one or more physical or logical memory devices and/or carrier waves.

FIG. 3 is a diagram conceptually illustrating a portion of a computer-readable medium, such as memory 230, in one of clients 110/134. Memory 230 may include an email program 335 and an email review tool 336. Email program 335 may include conventional email software that is used to send and receive email. Email review tool 336 may assist users of clients 110/134 in using email program 335 in a manner consistent with aspects of the invention for facilitating second person review of email. Email review tool 336 may be implemented as an “add-in” module to email program 335, it may be integrated with email program 335, or it may be implemented as a separate program that monitors the operation of email program 335 and intercepts input/output information flows from email program 335.

The software instructions that define email program 335 and email review tool 336 may be read into memory 230 from another computer-readable medium, such as data storage device 250, or from another device via communication interface 280. Alternatively, custom circuitry may be used in place of or in combination with software instructions to implement processes consistent with the present invention. Thus, implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are not limited to any specific combination of circuitry and software.

Operation of Email Review Tool

Email review tool 336, as described below, provides users with a simple, quick, and safe method for implementing second person review before sending an email to an outsider, such as a client.

FIG. 4 is a flow chart illustrating operation of email review tool 336 consistent with an aspect of the invention. To begin, a user at one of clients 110/134 may compose an email message in the normal manner using email program 335 (act 401).

FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface 500 of email program 335 through which a user may compose an email message. Email interface 500 may include a composition section 505, a “send” command option (e.g., an icon) 510, a “To” address field 515, a “CC” address field 520, a “Subject” field 525, and an attachment section 530. Email interface 500 may also include a menu bar 540 through which various other email-related operations may be performed. For clarity, email interface 500 is shown in a simplified form. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that a typical email interface may include numerous other commands or options.

In composition section 505, the user may type or otherwise enter text, graphics, audio, or video that are to be included in the email. In the example shown, the user has also included another file in the email, shown as attachment 532 (“attachmentl.doc”) in attachment section 530. Attachment 532 may be, for example, any type of text or word processing file, a video file, or an audio file. Attachment 532 may be considered part of the email. In the “To” address field 515, the user may enter the intended recipient(s) of the email. In many email programs, the recipients may be typed in manually or selected from a contact list. Additional recipient(s) may be added in “CC” field 520. In subject field 525, the user may enter a subject for the email.

After composing the email, the user may instruct email program 335 to send the email (act 402). In many email programs, the send command may be initiated by selecting send option 510. Send option 510 may be implemented in the form of an icon or software button.

Email review tool 336 may determine when an email is sent (act 403). If email review tool 336 is integrated directly into email program 335 or as an add-in module, this determination can be made through direct communication with email program 335. In this situation, although send option 510 may have been selected by the user, email program 335 may not actually send the email to email server 120/137. If email review tool 336 is implemented as a separate program that monitors the operation of email program 335, this determination may be made by monitoring an output of email program 335 and intercepting attempts to send an email.

In some implementations, email review tool 336 may next analyze the email to determine if a second person review window should be presented to the user before actually transmitting the email to email server 120 or 137 (acts 404 and 405). Whether or not the second person review window is presented may be based on a user or network administrator configurable set of rules. For example, email review tool 336 may be configured to examine the To field 515 and skip the review window when all the recipients of the email have addresses within sub-network 130. In this way, when sending internal emails, which can often afford to be less formal than external emails, the user is not presented with a second person review window. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other rules could be applied by email review tool 336. For example, the user may be able to specify certain email addresses or domains for which the second person review window may not be shown.

For emails for which a second person review window applies, email review tool 336 may present a “pop-up” window (or other indication) to the user that asks the user to enter information relating to review of the email (act 406). For emails in which a pop-up window is not presented to the user, email program 335 may send the email as normal using email server 120 or 137.

FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface for a second person review pop-up window 600 that may be presented to the user in act 406. Through window 600, the user may enter information used to facilitate the second person review. Window 600 may include an author name field 602 and an author email field 604, which may display the name and email address of the author, respectively. Review tool 336 may, by default, insert the name and email address of the user of email program 335 into name field 602 and email field 604, respectively. In other words, review tool 336 may assume that the person currently logged into client 110/134 is the author. If this is not the case, the user may edit fields 602 and 604, by entering the correct information or selecting the information, via a drop down window that provides additional names and/or email addresses.

In reviewer name field 606 and reviewer email field 608, the user may enter the name and email address of the intended reviewer(s). In some implementations, the user may only need to fill in one of fields 606 and 608. Based on the information in the filled-in field, email review tool 336 may automatically populate the other field. In other implementations, the “reviewer” may actually be an automated review device, such as a network computer dedicated to checking emails for certain format conventions.

The user may optionally enter a descriptive priority of the email in priority field 610. Priority field 610 may be editable through a drop-down window in which the user may choose from priority levels such as “routine” (default level), “urgent,” and “low.”

A comment field 609 may also be included in pop-up window 600. In comment field 609, a short message may be entered for the reviewer.

Pop-up window 600 may additionally include a number of additional command options, such as “skip review option 612, “return to draft email” option 614, and “send for review” option 616. Skip review option 612 may allow the user to, skip the second person review and have the email instead sent as a normal email to the destination address(es) (i.e., the email addressees specified in To field 515 and CC field 520). Return to draft email option 614 may cause email review tool 336 to exit and return the user to email interface 500, where the user can continue to compose the email. Send for review option 616 may cause email review tool 336 to send the email to the reviewer(s) entered in fields 606 and 608.

In some implementations, pop-up window 600 may include other options relating to second person review of email. For example, there may be an option to enable the reviewer to send the reviewed email directly to its final addressees if the reviewer does not have any changes. Also, there may be an option to allow the user to input a filing location for a hard copy of the email. Also, there may be an option to allow the user to input a date when the email can be deleted as part of a document retention program. Also, there may be an option to enable the reviewer to send the reviewed email directly to its final addressees, incorporating any changes the reviewer made to the document. Also, there may be an option to enter an identification number, such as a client number, that is associated with the email. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that options relating to second person review, other than those discussed above, may be included and configured through pop-up window 600.

Returning to FIG. 4, assuming that the user transmits the email to the reviewer, such as by selecting send for review icon 616, the email may then be sent to the reviewer (act 408). The email may be transmitted to the reviewer as a normal email via email server 120/137. In one implementation, email review tool 336 may modify subject field 525 to reflect the fact that a second person review of the email is being requested.

FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface 700 of an “in-box” of email program 335. As shown, a number of email messages 701-703 may be present and ready to be read. Email message 702, in particular, may be a second person review email. Email review tool 336 may use a standard text identifier, such as “Request for Second Person Review,” to identify the email 702 as a second person review request.

The reviewer (e.g., the user of in-box 700) may select email 702 to review and potentially make changes to email 702 and/or its attachments. In one implementation, the reviewer may select an “edit draft” icon 710 to initiate viewing and editing of email 702.

FIG. 8 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface presented to a reviewer that is editing an email (e.g., email 702). Body 801 of email 702 is displayed to the reviewer in a text editable format. The reviewer may make desired changes to the text in body 801. Any comments entered in field 609 (FIG. 6) may also be displayed to the reviewer, as shown in field 815. Additionally, the reviewer may select attachments, such as attachment 802. In response, the email review tool may run an editing program appropriate for the attachment. For example, if the attachment is a word processing document, clicking on the attachment may cause email review tool 336 to run the corresponding word processing program.

When the reviewer has finished the review, the reviewer may select review complete option 810 to send the email, including any changes to body 801 or attachment 802, back to the author. Optionally, email review tool 336 may include fields in which the reviewer can identify additional people to whom the reviewer would like to send the reviewed email.

Email review tool 336, in response to selection of review complete icon 810, may send email 702 back to the author. The reviewed email may be viewable by the author as a normal email. The reviewed email may include distinctive text in the subject line, such as “Completed Second Person Review” that identifies the email as being a returned second person review request.

The author may select the reviewed email to again initiate email interface 500, where the author may view and edit the contents of the email, including any changes made by the reviewer. In one implementation, email review tool 336 may present the changes using a distinctive font, such as red text to indicate additions and red strikethough text to indicate deletions. The author may further edit the reviewed email. When the author is done editing, or if the author is satisfied with the changes, the author may accept the changes and then forward the edited email to its intended addressees (i.e., the addressees in fields 515 and 520). For example, the author may select send icon 510 and skip review icon 612 to forward the email to the intended addressees.

FIG. 9 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface 900 of email program 335 consistent with an alternate aspect of the invention. Graphical interface 900 is similar to graphical interface 500, except that graphical interface 900 additionally includes a “send for review” option 910. By placing option 910 in the main email composition interface, the user has the opportunity to affirmatively choose to send the email for review at an earlier stage in the email process. Selecting send for review option 910 may present the user with a second person review window such as window 600. In this implementation, selecting send option 510 may skip the second person review window 600 and immediately send the email to the addressees in fields 515 and 520.

FIG. 10 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface 1000 of email program 335 consistent with yet another aspect of the invention. Graphical interface 1000 is similar to graphical interface 900, except that graphical interface 1000 includes additional information relating to the second person review. For example, a reviewer name field 1006 and comment field 1009, which function similarly to fields 606 and 609 (FIG. 6), may also be included in graphical interface 1000. In this manner, the email sender can fill in basic email information as well as the second person review information in a single graphical interface. In this implementation, selecting send for review option 1010 may send the email directly to the reviewer without the need for another window.

Email Classifier

In addition to providing functionality to assist in reviewing emails, such as email review tool 336, concepts consistent with aspects of the invention may assist users or organizations in archiving and organizing emails.

FIG. 11 is a diagram illustrating a computer-readable medium containing an exemplary email classifier 1110. Computer-readable memory 230 may include email program 335 and, optionally, email review tool 336, as previously discussed. Additionally, computer-readable memory may contain email classifier 1110. Email classifier 1110 may assist in archiving and organizing email messages. More particularly, as described in more detail below, email classifier 1110 may assist in associating email messages with categories. For example, each time an email is created, the email may be associated with one or more categories, such as categories relating to social topics, finance, legal advice, administrative, certain technologies, business categories, etc. Email classifier 1110 may assist in associating the appropriate categories with each created email.

Email classifier 1110 may be implemented as an “add-on” module to email program 335, it may be integrated with email program 335, or it may be implemented as a separate program that monitors the operation of email program 335 and intercepts input/output information flows from email program 335. The software instructions that define email classifier 1110 may be read into memory 230 from another computer-readable medium, such as data storage device 250, or from another device via communication interface 280. Alternatively, custom circuitry may be used in place of or in combination with software instructions to implement processes consistent with the invention. Thus, implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are not limited to any specific combination of circuitry and software.

In one implementation, email classifier 1110 may present a “pop-up” window that asks the user to enter information relating to the appropriate classification for the email. The pop-up window may be presented to the user when the user attempts to send the email. More generally, the pop-up window may be presented to the user whenever a user is interacting with (e.g., reading, sending, or composing) an email message.

FIG. 12 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary interface for a pop-up window 1200 that may be presented by email classifier 1100. Through pop-up window 1200, a user may enter appropriate classification categories for the email message. Window 1200 may include a classification drop down menu 1210 and a sub-classification drop down menu 1220. Via drop down menu 1210, the user may select the category most appropriate to their email. For example, drop down menu 1210 may include a main field 1212 that includes the currently selected category (“finance”) and a list 1214 of other possible categories. The actual categories from which a user may select may be customizable by the user or an administrator. The currently selected category may be changed by the user by, for example, selecting another category from list 1214. The newly selected category may then be placed in field 1212.

In some implementations, the selection of a particular category may enable the user to further define the category by entering a sub-classification category of the main category. As shown in FIG. 12, a sub-classification menu 1220 allows users to select sub-categories relating to a category. The currently selected sub-classification category may be listed in field 1222. The list of available sub-categories may be dynamically generated based on the category selected in field 1212. For instance, as shown in FIG. 12, the category “finance” is the selected category. The finance category may include a number of possible sub-categories, such as the sub-categories “invoices,” “client billing issues,” “company spending,” and “company investments.” These sub-categories may be placed in sub-classification menu 1220 when the user selects the finance category in the classification menu 1210.

When the user has selected the appropriate category, the user may select “done” graphical command button 1230. The classification categories selected by the user may then be associated with the email message and the email message may be further processed (e.g., transmitted to its destination addresses) as normal. The email and its associated categories may be saved or otherwise archived. For example, in the context of a corporate email server, such as email server 137, the email server may handle the archiving of emails and their selected categories.

In some implementations, multiple categories/sub-categories may be associated with a single email. Graphical command button 1240 may be selected by the user when the user wishes to enter another category. Email classifier 110 may respond to this button by storing the currently selected categories and then allowing the user to enter another category.

In some implementations, email classifier 1110 may attempt to intelligently determine the likely category that the user will select based on either the content of the email, the destination addresses of the email, an attachment added to the email, and/or the user's past category selections. Email classifier 1110 may then place these selections as the default category in classification menu 1210. This may save the user time when email classifier 1110 is able to correctly identify the category that is to be associated with the email. In these situations, if the user agrees with the automatically selected category, the user may simply select “done” command button 1230. If the user does not agree, he may first select the correct category before pressing done button 1230.

Email classifier 1110 may use a variety of techniques to intelligently determine the likely category that the user will select. For example, if a certain number of past email messages to a particular address were all classified in one category, email classifier 1110 may initially assume that a new email destined to that address is likely to also be classified in that category. As another example, email classifier 1110 may examine the contents of the unclassified email. If the email contains words or phrases that are usually associated with a particular category, email classifier 1110 may assume that the email is likely to also be classified in that category. As yet another example, email classifier 1110 may compare the contents of a new email to previously classified emails. If the new email is similar to one or more previously sent emails, email classifier 1110 may assume that the new email is likely to be classified in the same category as the previously sent emails. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other techniques could be used to intelligently determine the likely category that the user will select.

FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary graphical interface 1300 of email program 335 consistent with yet another aspect of the invention. Graphical interface 1300 is similar to graphical interface 1000, except that the functionality of email classifier 1110 is also integrated into the email interface for composing an email message. As shown, interface 1300 includes graphical elements that allow the user to compose an email message and enter second-person review information. Additionally, interface 1300 includes a classification menu 1310 and a sub-classification menu 1320. Menus 1310 and 1320 may be used to enter email categories in the manner used with classification menu 1210 and sub-classification menu 1220.

FIG. 14 is an exemplary diagram of a system 1400 illustrating email classification consistent with the principles of the invention. System 1400 may include a number of client computing devices 1401, which may be similar to clients 134 (FIG. 1). Clients 1401 may exchange emails with one another and with other external clients (not shown), such as external clients connected to a wide area network, such as the Internet. Reading, managing, and composing email messages may be performed at clients 1401 using client email software 1405. Client email software 1405 may include conventional email client functionality as well as the previously discussed functionality of email classifier 1110.

System 1400 may additionally include email server 1410 that facilitates the sending and receiving of email messages among clients 1401 or between clients 1401 and other external clients. Email server 1410 may, for instance, collect an email message sent from or received by clients 1401, including the email category information. The collected email may then be forwarded toward its final destination using an email messaging protocol.

Email that is sent or received via email server 1410 may be archived in email archive database 1420. Archive database 1420 may store the email messages along with the categories assigned to the emails. Additional information, such as the sender and receivers of each of the emails may also be stored in database 1420. In the event that a group of emails needs to be retrieved, such as a group of emails that is required to be produced in a litigation, the categories associated with the emails may be used to assist in the retrieval of the emails. For example, when there is a large number of emails stored in database 1420, the categories associated with the emails can be used to quickly eliminate many of the emails from the set of possible emails that may need to be produced.

Conclusion

The email classifier described above assists in categorizing emails. Email message categories may be saved with the emails and can then be used to later help in producing or otherwise organizing a large number of email messages.

It will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that aspects of the invention, as described above, may be implemented in many different forms of software, firmware, and hardware in the implementations illustrated in the figures. The actual software code or specialized control hardware used to implement aspects consistent with the invention is not limiting of the invention. Thus, the operation and behavior of the aspects were described without reference to the specific software code—it being understood that a person of ordinary skill in the art would be able to design software and control hardware to implement the aspects based on the description herein.

The foregoing description of preferred embodiments of the invention provides illustration and description, but is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teachings or may be acquired from practice of the invention. For example, although email review tool 336 and email classifier 1110 was described as being implemented on client computing devices, the programming logic that defines email review tool 336 and email classifier 1110 may instead be implemented at the email server or at a combination of the email server and client. Additionally, although a number of exemplary graphical user interfaces were illustrated, one of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that these interfaces are exemplary only, and that other interfaces could be used that perform similar or the same functions.

No element, act, or instruction used in the description of the present application should be construed as critical or essential to the invention unless explicitly described as such. Also, as used herein, the article “a” is intended to include one or more items. Where only one item is intended, the term “one” or similar language is used.

The scope of the invention is defined by the claims and their equivalents.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification709/206
International ClassificationH04L12/58, H04L29/06, H04L29/08
Cooperative ClassificationH04L67/36, H04L69/329, H04L12/5855, H04L12/5885, H04L51/14, H04L29/06
European ClassificationH04L12/58G, H04L29/08N35, H04L29/06