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Publication numberUS20050164141 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/042,805
Publication dateJul 28, 2005
Filing dateJan 24, 2005
Priority dateJan 22, 2004
Also published asWO2005072339A2, WO2005072339A3
Publication number042805, 11042805, US 2005/0164141 A1, US 2005/164141 A1, US 20050164141 A1, US 20050164141A1, US 2005164141 A1, US 2005164141A1, US-A1-20050164141, US-A1-2005164141, US2005/0164141A1, US2005/164141A1, US20050164141 A1, US20050164141A1, US2005164141 A1, US2005164141A1
InventorsRobert Paasch, Andrew Barros
Original AssigneePaasch Robert W., Andrew Barros
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scented candle wick
US 20050164141 A1
Abstract
A scented wick including a wick and an aromatic substance is provided. The aromatic substances can be any material including a chemical or fire retardant. A scent enhancer may be used with the aromatic substance. The scented wick may be sealed with a thin layer of wax to prevent scent loss and prepare the scented wick for individual sale. When used, the scented wick will produce more effective scent production than conventional scented candles. Also the scented wick will extinguish with less smoldering and smoking than a conventional wick. Methods for producing the scented wick are also disclosed herein.
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Claims(19)
1. A scented wick comprising:
a wick; and
an aromatic substance embedded in or applied on the wick.
2. The scented wick of claim 1 including a scent enhancer embedded in or applied on the wick.
3. The scented wick of claim 1, wherein the aromatic substance is a chemical.
4. The scented wick of claim 1, wherein the aromatic substance is crushed powered incense.
5. The scented wick of claim 1 further comprising a first thin wax layer applied around the wick for sealing in the aromatic substance, the first thin wax layer separate from a second wax layer applied over the first wax layer for forming a candle.
6. The scented wick of claim 1 including a scented wax surrounding most of the wick to form a scented candle.
8. The scented wick of claim 1 including a non-scented wax surrounding most of the wick to form a scented candle.
9. The scented wick of claim 1 wherein the aromatic substance, or a smolder reducing material incorporated into the aromatic substance, reduces an amount of smoldering after a flame on the wick is extinguished.
10. The scented wick of claim 9 wherein the aromatic substance or the smolder reducing material is a fire retardant.
11. The scented wick of claim 1 wherein the aromatic substance, or a smolder reducing material incorporated with the aromatic substance, reduces unburnt carbons produced by a flame on the wick after being extinguished.
12. The scented wick of claim 1 wherein the aromatic substance, or a smolder reducing material incorporated with the aromatic substance, reduces an amount of smoke created by the wick after a flame on the wick is extinguished.
13. A method of forming a scented wick comprising:
impregnating or disposing an aromatic substance into or onto a wick separately from any wax applied around the wick to form a candle.
14. The method of claim 13 impregnating or disposing an aromatic substance into or onto the wick by soaking the wick in the aromatic substance.
15. The method of claim 13 wherein the aromatic substance comprises an oil-based liquid scent, non oil-based liquid scent, crushed powdered incense, or water and scent enhancers.
16. The method of claim 13 including mixing a fire retardant in with the aromatic substance.
17. The method of claim 13 including sealing the wick in wax to seal in the aromatic substance.
18. A method according to claim 13 including applying wax around the wick to form a scented candle.
19. The method of claim 18 including using an unscented wax to form the candle.
20. The method of claim 18 including using a scented wax to form the candle.
Description

This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Ser. No. 60/538,725, filed Jan. 22, 2004 and U.S. Provisional Ser. No. 60/608,720, filed Sep. 10, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is related to the field of candles, and more specifically to an improved candle wick.

2. Description of the Related Art

Candles have become popular for decorative and aromatic purposes. The candles may be manufactured from a wax, such as paraffin, vegetable or beeswax.

Scented wax candles have been widely used for producing a scent. Such candles are conventionally made by blending an aromatic substance into melted wax. The resulting aromatic mixture is poured into a candle mold with a fiber wick disposed therein. The wick is generally made from an absorbent twine such as cotton. The wax then cools, forming a solid candle.

When the wick of the candle is lit, the heat gradually melts the wax adjacent the wick. This melted wax forms a melt pool. When the wick burns, the wick must have a strong capillary action to absorb liquid wax pooled at the top of the candle and draw it up the wick. The wax provides fuel for the flame so that the wax burns instead of the wick. As the wax becomes vaporized by the flame, aromatic substances are dispersed.

Changes to the material used for the wick, the thickness of the wick, the core material of the wick, and the braid of the wick all affect how much capillary action the wick provides. The greater the capillary action, the greater amount of wax provided to the flame. The more wax that is provided to the flame, the more aromatic substances can be dispersed. However, if too much wax is provided to the flame, the flame will not receive enough oxygen to burn all of the wax effectively and smoking will result.

As the scented wax burns, the aromatic substance in the wax is released into the air. The released scent disperses into the air, lending a pleasant scent to the surrounding area.

Scented wax candles are generally inefficient for scent generation for multiple reasons. First, during use, most of the heat of the candle flame travels upward and away from the scented wax. Accordingly, much of the aromatic substances remain in the melted wax. Wicks are also often designed to be thinner to avoid releasing a lot of soot and bad smell after being extinguished. Thinner wicks are also used to minimize the amount of time a wick smolders after the candle flame is extinguished. A smoldering wick also presents a safety hazard. As a result of thinner wicks, candles do not burn as much wax, thus limiting the amount of aromatic substances released into the air. It would be desirable to increase scent generation without having to increase wick size. Alternatively, it would be desirable to increase wick size without the negative smoking side effects.

It is often desirable to use thicker wicks because they have greater capillary action (necessary for larger candles with a larger wax melt pool) and thus produce a larger more beautiful flame and release more aromatic substances while burning. Unfortunately, despite the benefits of thicker wicks they are often avoided due to their added soot and smoking when extinguished. Thus it would be desirable to have the option of using a thicker wick while minimizing increases in the soot and smoky smell released during extinguishing, and while minimizing smoldering during extinguishing.

For the foregoing reasons, there is a need for an improved scent dispenser for use with candles that permits the user to easily change the type, rate or strength of scent for dispensing. It would be a significant advance in the art of scent dispensing to develop a scent dispenser for use with candles, which efficiently provides pleasant scents in a safe manner, while being inexpensive and easy to use.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present disclosure overcomes these problems and limitations of the prior art.

Generally, the present disclosure provides for placing aromatic substances and other materials in a wick to produce a scented wick. The scented wick releases scent while being burned. The scented wick also releases less smoke and smolders less after being extinguished. The scented wick can be used to produce a scented candle, with or without scented wax.

These and other features and advantages of the present disclosure will become more readily apparent from the following Detailed Description, which proceeds with references to the drawings, in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1A-C are diagrams showing how to produce a scented wick.

FIG. 2 is a diagram showing another way to produce a scented wick.

FIG. 3A is a graph comparing smoke produced by a conventional wick with smoke produced by a scented wick.

FIG. 3B is a diagram comparing the effects of a conventional wick with the effects of a scented wick.

FIGS. 4A-B are diagrams comparing different characteristics of conventional wicks with characteristics of scented wicks.

FIGS. 5-8 are diagrams comparing characteristics of a conventional scented candle with characteristics of a scented candle produced by using a scented wick.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)

The present invention relates to a candle wick having an aromatic substance embedded therein, and methods for making the scented wick and a candle using the scented wick. The resultant scented wick can be employed in conjunction with scented wax to produce a scented candle. The scent in the wax and the scent in the wick could be different, producing a new aromatic effect during burning. Also, the resultant scented wick can be employed in conjunction with unadulterated (unscented) wax (i.e., a wax base lacking an aromatic substance) to produce a scented candle.

The aromatic substances are impregnated into the wick that then releases a scent that masks, neutralizes, or counteracts the normal smell typically released by a wick when extinguished. The result is an odorless or seemingly odorless extinguishing. In one embodiment, the scent is released after the flame is extinguished while the wick is still smoldering. By creating an odorless extinguishing process, the remaining wax melt pool can continue to release a scent (in the case of scented wax) for a short time after extinguishing.

By selecting the proper aromatic substances, or by mixing the proper materials with the aromatic substances, the wick can have a shorter smoldering time and reduced smoke when extinguished. For example, using fire retardant aromatic substances in the wick, or mixing fire retardant materials with the aromatic substances, the wick has a reduced smoldering time and in turn creates less smoke.

Even when the wick does smolder, scent continues to be released from the wick reducing offensive odors. The resultant wick releases fewer un-burnt carbons than conventional wicks after being extinguished.

Wicks used for candles generally are constructed of a variety of wick types, including without limitation cored wicks, flat-braid wicks, square-braid wicks, and HTP wicks. Such wicks are known in the art and are capable of being impregnated and/or coated with conventional scented compounds.

Conventional aromatic substances suitable for use in candles include liquid scent compounds, which can be either organic (oil-based) scent compounds or aqueous (non-oil-based) liquid scent substances. Chemicals also may be used. As well, crushed powdered incense can be employed. Scent enhancers are compounds that stabilize the aromatic substances, chemically interact with such substances, and/or facilitate scent release when the scented wax or wick is burned. Aromatic substances and scent enhancers are known in the candle fragrance art. Other substances may also be used.

The wick may also be oxygenated. An oxygenated wick is able to burn more wax from a wax pool without producing smoke. One conventional limitation to increasing the capillary action of a wick was that wax will not be burned due to lack of adequate oxygen and will thus produce smoke. Oxygenating the scented wick may allow for greater capillary characteristics in the wick without the negative downsides of smoking during burning.

A scented wick may be produced as described in FIGS. 1 and 2. According to FIG. 1A, a wick 10 of any size or length is soaked to saturation in a mix 12 including, for example, oil-based liquid scent, non oil-based liquid scent, crushed powdered incense, water, scent enhancers, and other ingredients as desired. These scents are known to those skilled in the art and therefore are not described in further detail. According to FIGS. 1B and 1C, other techniques besides soaking may be used to impregnate, implant, or cover the wick with aromatic substances 11.

Optionally a fire retardant 13 may also be added to the mix to further reduce smoke and smoldering produced by the resulting scented wick. For example, a fire retardant material similar to that used in clothing may be used. The fire retardant may be part of the aromatic substance 11 of another material 13. The fire retardant material can be any commercially available chemical used for producing a fire retardant effect when applied to a material. For example, any of the fire retardant materials produced by Flame Stop, Inc., Fort Worth, Tex. The fire retardant can be chemicals, putty, liquids, additives, etc.

According to FIG. 2, after soaking in the substance 11, the soaked wick 10 a is dried by any method (e.g. air dried, heat dried, freeze dried, pressure vacuum dried, etc.) to lock the scent 11 in the wick 10. If another method besides soaking is used, drying may be unnecessary. The wick 10 is then optionally wax-sealed with a thin layer of wax 20 to further lock in the scent 11. Wax sealing 20 endows the wicks with a longer shelf life. If a fire retardant is added, wax sealing 20 may take place without drying to prevent the fire retardant from evaporating.

A scented wick may be used in the manufacture of a candle in conventional and known manners. For manufacture of a candle having a scented wick as described herein, the wick need not be wax-sealed prior to candle manufacture. Alternatively, a scented wick may be produced for individual sale. Such individual scented wicks might preferably be wax-sealed 20 to better fix the scent 11 within the wick 10.

A wick 10 having an aromatic substance 11 embedded therein is beneficial in many ways over a traditional scented candle with a standard candle wick. For example, the scented wick 10 might continue to release scent for a short time after the flame is extinguished. The released scent masks the sooty, burnt smell commonly associated with extinguishing a wick. The wick 10 of the present disclosure therefore reduces the disagreeable odors produced when a candle is extinguished. The wick 10 may also counteract or retard the disagreeable smoke odors producing a seemingly odorless extinguishing.

The scented wicks described herein are also believed to be non-allergenic, in that they release fewer unburnt carbons and soot filled bacteria into the air compared to conventional candle wicks. According to FIGS. 3A and 3B, the addition of the proper aromatic substances 11, or by mixing the proper materials with the aromatic substances, the wick 10 will extinguish faster than conventional wick 30, thus reducing smoldering and smoke. Reducing wick smoldering time also makes the wick safer. The addition of the proper aromatic substances to the wick 10 results in a substantially no smoke after a flame is extinguished.

Another benefit is that a thicker wick can be used without the conventional increases in smoldering and smoking. For example, according to FIG. 4A, a candle may be limited to using a conventional 30 ply wick 40 to prevent the amount of smoldering and smoking 32 typically produced by a conventional 36 ply wick 41. By applying a scent, a 36 ply scented wick 43 produces less smoldering and smoke than the 30 ply convention wick 40. Or a 30 ply scented wick 42 can be used that produces even less smoke 32.

Furthermore, the scented wicks 42 or 43 retain the benefits of greater capillary action resulting in more wax being burned while the candle is lit. The greater wax burn produces more scent and a brighter flame. Accordingly, the scented wicks 42 and 43 can be thicker without increased smoldering and soot thereby providing more candle design options.

The present scented wicks 42 and 43 may have more illuminating flames, enhancing the beauty of the flame and the aesthetic appeal of a candle having such wick. Selecting different aromatic substances, or by mixing the different materials with the aromatic substances, can change any property of the flame including the color and/or brightness.

The present scented wick can be used in conjunction with unadulterated wax. From an aesthetic standpoint, some aromatic substances can discolor or adversely affect the structure or appearance of wax compositions. This is shown in FIG. 5. The conventional scented candle 50 with a conventional wick 52 is embedded with an aromatic substance 11. The aromatic substance 11 can be seen in the wax 58. In contrast, the present scented wick 10 can produce a scented candle 53 void of aromatic substances 11 in the wax 58 thus producing a more aesthetically pleasing scented candle 53.

In conventional scented candle 50, the embedded aromatic substance 11 may interact with the wax 58. Such undesirable chemical interaction and interference can diminish scent dispensing efficiency. Placement of the aromatic substance 11 in the wick 10 eliminates the chance of an adverse reaction between the aromatic substance 11 and the wax 58 in the candle 53.

The scented wick 10 according to the present disclosure can also increase the scent “volume” per burn time as shown in FIG. 6. According to FIG. 6, the conventional scented candle 50 does not release a high volume of scent 54 while burning. A scented candle 53 using the present scented wick 10 concentrates the aromatic substance 11 in the candle wick 10 rather than distributing the scent throughout the wax body 58. Thus, a greater amount of scent 55 is released by combustion of the wick 10, or the combination of scent 11 in wax 58 and scent in wick 10 increases overall scent 55 for candle 53. The chemical for the scent used in the wick 10 can be the same as the chemical and scent 11 used in the wax 58. Alternatively, different scents can be used for the wick 10 and in the wax 58. The chemicals that produce the scents can also be different in both the wick 10 and wax 58.

Conventional scented candles also possess a limited shelf life, owing to the porosity of wax. As shown in FIG. 7, a large amount of scent 57 escapes from the scented conventional candle 50 while the candle is not being used. By depositing the aromatic substance 11 in the candle wick 10, rather than the wax 58, the present invention reduces scent loss over time. Sealing the wick 10 with wax as shown in FIG. 2 also further prevents scent loss from wick 10.

Another problem exists where conventional scented wax candles spread their scent while unlit and on display. According to FIG. 8, scented conventional candle 50 provides a large porous surface area of scented wax 58 that releases a scent 60 even when the candle is not burning. Users sometimes want the scent to be released only when the candle is burning. By depositing the aromatic substance 11 in the candle wick 10, rather than in the wax 58, this problem is reduced and the scented candle 53 does not release scent while unlit and on display. Wax sealing the wick 10 as described in FIG. 2 above can further prevent scent loss. Alternatively, wax 58 can use less scent 11 and still provide an equal aromatic experience as candle 50.

Another shortcoming of conventional scented candles is the possible unfavorable interaction between the wax and the aromatic substance. Some wax compositions may negatively alter the aromatic substance's physical and chemical properties, potentially suppressing scent generation or producing undesirable odors. For example, a burning candle typically produces a “burning wax” smell that an embedded scent is intended to cover-up. A negative interaction can reduce the efficiency of the embedded scent, making the waxy odor 60 more prominent. The scented wick 10 precludes the need for an aromatic substance 11 in the wax 58 and facilitates a stronger scent release compared to the burning wax odor 60.

Also, with regard to using the present scented wick 10 in conjunction with unadulterated wax, the scented wick 10 according to the present disclosure also allows easier candle manufacturing. For example, traditionally non-scented candles and scented candles of varying scents would require different wax mixtures. The manufacturer would be required to keep non-scented wax mixes separate from each of the different scented wax mixes. A scented wick precludes the need for keeping all the different wax mixtures separate because a single wax mixture can be used to make both non-scented candles and scented candles of varying scent. One of skill in the art would recognize that the present invention could of course also be used with scented wax too.

A person skilled in the art will be able to practice the present invention in view of the description present in this document, which is to be taken as a whole. Numerous details have been set forth in order to provide a more thorough understanding of the invention. In other instances, well-known features have not been described in detail in order not to obscure unnecessarily the invention.

While the invention has been disclosed in its preferred form, the specific embodiments thereof as disclosed and illustrated herein are not to be considered in a limiting sense. Indeed, it should be readily apparent to those skilled in the art in view of the present description that the invention can be modified in numerous ways. The inventor regards the subject matter of the invention to include all combinations and sub-combinations of the various elements, features, functions and/or properties disclosed herein.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7922482Sep 28, 2006Apr 12, 2011S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Candle and wick holder therefor
US8206150 *Mar 22, 2010Jun 26, 2012Travis Aaron WadeMethod for extinguishing a candle at timed intervals using a combustible material
US20100173254 *Mar 22, 2010Jul 8, 2010Travis Aaron WadeMethod for extinguishing a candle at timed intervals using a combustible material
US20110045424 *Mar 13, 2009Feb 24, 2011Colin Litten-BrownCandle
WO2010050941A1 *Oct 29, 2008May 6, 2010Philip BraginskyCandles containing a human pheromone component
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/325
International ClassificationF23D3/18
Cooperative ClassificationF23D3/18
European ClassificationF23D3/18
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 11, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: PAASCH S SCENTED WICKS AND CANDLES, INC., OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PAASCH, ROBERT W.;BARROS, ANDREW;REEL/FRAME:016093/0408
Effective date: 20050226